How important is your reputation to you?

51 replies
In effect this is an appeal to those marketers out there, some of whom do not seem to understand the vital importance of ones personal and business reputation (particularly as they grow older).

It appears to me that there are far too many young people out there (at age 60 anybody who is 40 and under seems young to me) who are so desperate or greedy that they are scamming left right and center. A few of them do not even realize that they are guilty of this fact and most of them would be utterly horrified if you had to tell them that they are scammers.

As time goes by, the many "gullible" and not so gullible buyers get to know the names of those people who are not providing good quality product. They also get to know the names of those affiliates who persist in recommending products that they know nothing about and which are invariably total rubbish.

Once your name is known or believed to be that of a scammer or huckster you can count on sales slowing down and eventually drying up altogether. It might take time but it will happen. People will begin to turn away from you because they do not want to be tarnished with the same brush.

Yes, the internet being what it is, you can start trading under an assumed name, but is that what you really want? You will of course be found out eventually and your alias will be linked to your real name. Is your own good name and reputation not important to you?

Do you want to slink into your old age and eventual death with people saying of you "good ridance he/she was nothing but a snake-oil salesman".

Or, do you want to stand upright and know that your family and friends look to you with proud respect.

I recall that shortly after entering the internet marketing arena, I was scammed big time. That young man landed up in prison for internet fraud. I have no idea what caused him to do what he did, but his reputation was ruined.

These days, I very rarely buy anything without first looking for independent and honest reviews (thank heaven for the Warrior Forum),but I am utterly stymied as to why the owners and/or sellers of these products do not religiously follow up and comment on those reviews themselves (a few do of course).

Yesterday (Tue, April, 25, 2011) I purchased a product that looked interesting. The WF review was a bit wishy-washy but not particularly bad.

The following day that same marketer sent me a "recommendation". I checked the review for that product as well - it was really bad. This in turn made me question the integrity of the person who recommended it and from whom I had purchased the previous day.

I have now sent an email to the marketer in question, requesting that to save his reputation (and confirm his integrity) he publicly withdraw from from the contamination of a product that is considered to be a scam.

Will he respond? I don't know, I guess it all depends on whether he is happy for his parents and/or spouse and/or children to know precisely what he is doing and how he is earning his money.

Are you a man or woman of integrity?
Is your personal and business reputation important to you?
Have you investigated yourself and your business to find out what others think of you and your product?
If you have found something bad with regard to your reputation or product have you considered what you are going to do about it?

Do you give a damn?



Sandy DuPlessis
#important #reputation
  • Profile picture of the author globalpro
    Sandy,

    Great post.

    At the end of the day, your reputation is all you have. Maintain the integrity of it and it will take you a long way. Abuse it and you will crash and burn in no time.

    The thing people don't understand is as big as the Internet may seem, if you rip people off, it won't take long to catch up with you. For ones that don't believe this to be true, just follow along here on the forum. There's always the sharp ones that will catch the scammers and call them out.

    Thanks for the words of wisdom.

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author ladywriter
    I don't think Mark Twain, Ralph Lauren, Sting, and Lady Gaga are suffering a loss of business or harm to their reputations because they don't use their real names for their business lol. I agree with much of what you say but I am not sure why you included 'assumed names' in the post.

    I suppose it depends on what your business goals are. Sometimes you need to see the person behind the curtain, but I have no idea who owns Target and I still shop there. Whole Foods doesn't introduce their entire executive team complete with home addresses and personal phone numbers every week when I need groceries, etc. etc. etc.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by rosegrower76 View Post

      I don't think Mark Twain, Ralph Lauren, Sting, and Lady Gaga are suffering a loss of business or harm to their reputations because they don't use their real names for their business lol. I agree with much of what you say but I am not sure why you included 'assumed names' in the post.

      I suppose it depends on what your business goals are. Sometimes you need to see the person behind the curtain, but I have no idea who owns Target and I still shop there. Whole Foods doesn't introduce their entire executive team complete with home addresses and personal phone numbers every week when I need groceries, etc. etc. etc.
      Rosegrower, I don't think she was talking about using an assumed name for business/privacy concerns. She was talking about having to adopt a new identity because the current one was 'ruined'.

      There's a big difference between using a pen name or stage name, where the actual name of the individual can be discerned if required, and the kind of reverse witness protection scheme Sandy was describing.

      As for Target/Whole Foods, those are corporate entities, not people. And if you want to know who the executive teams are, complete with legitimate mailing addresses and phone numbers, all it takes is a little digging in public records.

      Again, not the same as having to invent a new identity because people associate the first one with being a crook.
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      • Profile picture of the author ladywriter
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        There's a big difference between using a pen name or stage name, where the actual name of the individual can be discerned if required, and the kind of reverse witness protection scheme Sandy was describing.
        ...
        Again, not the same as having to invent a new identity because people associate the first one with being a crook.
        I didn't get impression the first time I read it, but you fleshed it out a bit more to me. Appreciate that.
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        • Profile picture of the author cliftoncarden
          Reputation IS EVERYTHING!!

          At the End of the Day, people Still do business with And Always Will do business with people that they Know, Like and TRUST! PEOPLE WILL NOT BUY FROM YOU IF THEY DO NOT TRUST YOU (PERIOD)

          Yes. There are multitudes of Young, unseasoned, Inexperienced and Desperate Marketer Online (and Off) Who Don't Understand that a Quick Dollar is not Worth Selling One's integrity.

          You may Lie, Con, Manipulate and Scam for a little while and maybe even make a few dollars, but in the end, You will not sustain a long-term business.

          (Not to mention that cheating folks puts you on the bad side of Karma)

          People love to Buy online because it is easy to see who you do business with before you hit the "buy now" button.
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  • Profile picture of the author JustinDupre
    Great post indeed! Reputation is important to me. It's like a trust and integrity you have out there from your business to the world. I agree that the new younger generation is doing too much scamming left and right no good.
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  • Profile picture of the author J R Salem
    Great post!!

    Sadly, I think in the world of Internet Marketing more people are unscrupulous than in most occupations.

    This is due to the somewhat anonymous aspect of things.

    I truly think as we evolve, and the economy picks up, those with the good reputations will prevail. Times will not always be desperate where any scam will work.
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  • With so many products and marketers out there, you have to give yourself an edge.

    That edge to me is making myself into a sort of... well... brand.

    I attempt to create a personal brand with my visitors, that builds a relationship and a sense of trust.

    Part of this is the sense of integrety that my visitors and individuals in my list can sense coming from me.

    What I am trying to say is, to survive in the field, you NEED the reputation and a brand name.

    I think all IMers should read this thread and keep it in mind. I think this is particularly true for the scammers, else all they'd do is continue to give our field a bad name!
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    • Profile picture of the author SandyDuPlessis
      What I am trying to say is, to survive in the field, you NEED the reputation and a brand name.
      Daniel,

      You are so correct! The NEED of a good reputation and integrity along with a brand name is incredibly important.
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      • Profile picture of the author SandyDuPlessis
        One day my grand kids will read my interactions to the world and I want it to be something they can point to and be damn proud of. A scammers grand kids are going to do the same research. Instead of being proud they will duck their head in shame. To me that is wholly unacceptable to my mission here on this planet.
        Like you, I too want my children and grandchildren to be proud enough of me to want to follow in my behavioral footsteps. The fact that I might not succeed in all my endeavors is not nearly as important as the riches I will accumulate by being accepted as a role model to them.
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      • Profile picture of the author techservice
        Great Post!
        I’ve bought many of the hyped up scammy type products in the IM Niche and have to say that although they have not made me a gizzlion dollars yet J– each and everyone did teach me a little more about Internet Marketing so I don’t feel scammed because I want to learn about IM and the truth is 95% don’t take any action anyway after they go through the courses or software’s.
        So to answers your point – we all know the people with the good reps – stick with them and ignores the rest.
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  • Profile picture of the author mattlaclear
    Most people in IM are not making any money yet. That is certainly no great secret. But many of them lose sight of the big picture in exchange for quick profits. I mean you really cannot dream the dream until you have some sort of money coming in from your efforts, right? I was a lot like that when I started this IM thing a decade and a half ago. All I cared about was being able to generate enough money to allow me to quit my day job. As I grew older and older I soon started looking at the big picture. One day my grand kids will read my interactions to the world and I want it to be something they can point to and be damn proud of. A scammers grand kids are going to do the same research. Instead of being proud they will duck their head in shame. To me that is wholly unacceptable to my mission here on this planet.
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  • Profile picture of the author donhx
    Originally Posted by SandyDuPlessis View Post

    This in turn made me question the integrity of the person who recommended it and from whom I had purchased the previous day.....

    Do you give a damn?



    Sandy DuPlessis

    This is a trick question. You seem to want to set the standard for "integrity," and I question that.

    For example, a product that got bad reviews made you question the "integrity" of the person, rather than possible other options--like the fact some may like the offer more than you did, or, at worst, the person you mention does not know the difference between a good and bad offer or was misled himself.

    To me, the problem is with the person who goes around questioning the integrity of others, especially when they don't have the full facts. After all, you only sent an email to the person, you did not receive one back, according to your post, so your comments about integrity are problematic.

    Maybe the feelings you have are not connected to the integrity of the person. Maybe it is just buyer's remorse.

    There are people who have little integrity by nature, those who are learning integrity, and those who may have occasional lapses of integrity. Few are pure. That's why I think it is not helpful to judge the integrity of others--it is almost always a tainted judgment. Better that people judge themselves when it comes to integrity, not others.
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    • Profile picture of the author SandyDuPlessis
      Originally Posted by donhx View Post

      This is a trick question. You seem to want to set the standard for "integrity," and I question that.

      For example, a product that got bad reviews made you question the "integrity" of the person, rather than possible other options--like the fact some may like the offer more than you did, or, at worst, the person you mention does not know the difference between a good and bad offer or was misled himself.

      To me, the problem is with the person who goes around questioning the integrity of others, especially when they don't have the full facts. After all, you only sent an email to the person, you did not receive one back, according to your post, so your comments about integrity are problematic.

      Maybe the feelings you have are not connected to the integrity of the person. Maybe it is just buyer's remorse.

      There are people have little integrity by nature, those who are learning integrity, and those who may have occasional lapses in in integrity. Few are pure. That's why I think it is not helpful to judge the integrity of others--it is almost always a tainted judgment. Better that people judge themselves when it comes to integrity, not others.
      No, I do not want to set the standard for integrity at all. That standard has already been set. See Answers.com - What is the definition of integrity.

      Re the facts, you are quite right, I do not have them fully which is precisely why I commented that I had not yet had a reply.

      As to buyers remorse, no I do not have any because I have not requested a refund with regard to the product I purchased from the original seller and do not plan to. I found his product interesting even though in his case the review was neither good nor bad.

      But yes, I did question his integrity when he promptly turned around and highly recommended a product which had appalling reviews. I am most definitely concerned that anything else he might recommend may be just as bad. Can I trust his judgement in the future. After all, it is not he who is bearing the financial burden of paying for the product.

      If I had wanted other to judge him then I would have named him, but then again, I do not believe in judging specific people without incontrovertible proof of wrongdoing which is precisely why I sent him an email. In his probable youthful excitement or zest he may well not even realize the damage one small mistake can cause.

      My point is to encourage people to question themselves and their own behavior and hopefully prevent errors of judgment which may affect their futures.
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      • Profile picture of the author mattlaclear
        Originally Posted by SandyDuPlessis View Post

        No, I do not want to set the standard for integrity at all. That standard has already been set. See Answers.com - What is the definition of integrity.

        Re the facts, you are quite right, I do not have them fully which is precisely why I commented that I had not yet had a reply.

        As to buyers remorse, no I do not have any because I have not requested a refund with regard to the product I purchased from the original seller and do not plan to. I found his product interesting even though in his case the review was neither good nor bad.

        But yes, I did question his integrity when he promptly turned around and highly recommended a product which had appalling reviews. I am most definitely concerned that anything else he might recommend may be just as bad. Can I trust his judgement in the future. After all, it is not he who is bearing the financial burden of paying for the product.

        If I had wanted other to judge him then I would have named him, but then again, I do not believe in judging specific people without incontrovertible proof of wrongdoing which is precisely why I sent him an email. In his probable youthful excitement or zest he may well not even realize the damage one small mistake can cause.

        My point is to encourage people to question themselves and their own behavior and hopefully prevent errors of judgment which may affect their futures.
        But does that mean they need to check in with you to see if a product is worthy of promoting before actually promoting it? Are the folks giving the negative reviews even purchasers of the product? Did you do your due diligence in checking the reviews? Or did you just read the top couple of ones and then formulated your opinion on them at that point? Were there any positive reviews written? If so how many? There are a lot of variables you are skipping over.
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

          That sounds dirty but fun.
          It is, if you do it right...

          :p
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        • Profile picture of the author SandyDuPlessis
          Originally Posted by mattlaclear View Post

          But does that mean they need to check in with you to see if a product is worthy of promoting before actually promoting it? Are the folks giving the negative reviews even purchasers of the product? Did you do your due diligence in checking the reviews? Or did you just read the top couple of ones and then formulated your opinion on them at that point? Were there any positive reviews written? If so how many? There are a lot of variables you are skipping over.
          Why on earth would they need to check in with me? If it is an affiliate product that they are promoting, then they should by rights be doing their own due diligence to ensure that they are promoting an article that is worthy.

          As to the reviews. I read every single one of them and sadly there was not one single positive review.

          This thread however has nothing to do with my specific experience. That was merely an example. It did however prompt me to consider the importance of personal reputation.
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          • Profile picture of the author mattlaclear
            Originally Posted by SandyDuPlessis View Post

            Why on earth would they need to check in with me? If it is an affiliate product that they are promoting, then they should by rights be doing their own due diligence to ensure that they are promoting an article that is worthy.

            As to the reviews. I read every single one of them and sadly there was not one single positive review.

            This thread however has nothing to do with my specific experience. That was merely an example. It did however prompt me to consider the importance of personal reputation.
            I get totally where you are coming from. But it's important to note that reputation is a very fickle thing. There are people who bad mouth products all the time without ever having purchased it. Why they do it I have no idea. I'm sure they have their reasons. But if someone judges anther person according to their statements then the merchant in question gets totally railroaded.
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      • Profile picture of the author donhx
        Originally Posted by SandyDuPlessis View Post


        But yes, I did question his integrity when he promptly turned around and highly recommended a product which had appalling reviews. I am most definitely concerned that anything else he might recommend may be just as bad. Can I trust his judgement in the future. After all, it is not he who is bearing the financial burden of paying for the product.

        If I had wanted other to judge him then I would have named him...
        Not to put too fine of a point on it, but your explanation is as worrisome as your OP. You questioned him for quickly sending out an email for a products some reviewers disliked, and made a jump to questioning his "judgment" --to making an even greater leap to questioning his "integrity." Is that fair?

        By the way, if you would have named him on this forum, you are likely to be banned and your own integrity diminished. "Naming people" (bad mouthing them) is not allowed here.

        At least we agree about the need for each person to examine their own integrity. I'll examine mine and you can examine yours.
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  • Profile picture of the author SearchBlogger
    On the same topic I wrote a blog post today about the importance of Googling yourself on a regular basis. With so many online platforms now for people to share their opinions, I think online reputation is something nobody can afford to ignore.
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    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
      Banned
      Originally Posted by SearchBlogger View Post

      On the same topic I wrote a blog post today about the importance of Googling yourself on a regular basis.
      That sounds dirty but fun.
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    To me, reputation is everything. Not because if you get a bad reputation, your business will dry up, but because cheating people out of money is a bad thing to do and would make me feel really scummy.

    If I have to choose between reputation and a big fat wad of money, I'll choose reputation.
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  • Profile picture of the author ginak59
    Wonderful post
    It's nice to know there's lots of people out there who understand that running a business ethiclly is important. It's also so much better for productivity. When I'm doing something which follows my moral compass in the right direction I'm happy about my work. This was one of the reasons I desired to work for myself in the first place, to be able to feel good about what I do as opposed to working for a company which has a negative impact on the world.
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  • Profile picture of the author mattlaclear
    But reputation can easily be manufactured by someone who understands seo and backlinking.
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  • In all aspects of life your reputation is very important. If you have a buisness it's 100 times more important.



    Kristof
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  • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
    Hi Sandy,

    Interesting post.

    Things are simpler for me since I'm the last of the Mohicans
    in my family. I try to do the right thing and cause no harm to
    anyone. So with that fairly straightforward approach, the rest
    takes care of itself.

    But your overall question and point are interesting to me, and
    perhaps only from a historical perspective.

    There are quite a few very wealthy families whose names (and
    wealth) derived from less than respectable endeavors. I'm being
    as generous as possible, here.

    That's why I think much has to do with scale and what is at stake.

    The children of those families at least do not seem to be bothered
    with ill-gotten gains or other (normally) unacceptable behaviors.
    Maybe they wisely do not wish to throw stones lest they are cut-off
    from one day having their 'fair' share.

    Obviously this is all a personal decision, even though some may not
    be thinking far enough into the future to realize they may have regrets
    about what they're doing today.

    Salvaging tarnished reputations, in my loose opinion, is similar to
    wars of attrition.

    It's sustained damage control, truth by repetition which is merely a
    persuasive tactic and simply not caring what others think. Of course that's
    a very general approach, but it has happened a hundred times (if not more)
    on the national and international stage with individuals and larger entities.


    Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author Linda_C
    Yesterday, Seth Godin posted about alignment. Theory being that when a business's goals are in alignment with the customer's goals, that's the root of long term success. When goals are out of alignment, the business is eventually going to fail. Worth reading;
    Seth's Blog: Alignment

    With IM, I think it's easy to get seduced by the influx of cash after a mailing and justify that the buyers should do their own due diligence, etc., etc. I see that as short term thinking.

    I grew up on a farm - ie; knowing we can only harvest what we planted. Reap what we sow and all that. Our decisions eventually catch up with us. Some people know that going into an endeavor. Some people learn it after the fact. C'est la vie. Such is life.

    And I don't think integrity has anything to do with age.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Johns
    It seems to me that there are too many marketers who are willing to pretty much promote anything that will make them some money.

    How many emails do you get that say

    "Check out this product now" and a link ... no explanation or anything?

    How many emails do you get that set unrealistic expectations in their subject lines, promising you untold riches for no work?

    Basically, affiliate marketers need to stop being lazy and start checking out the products that they are promoting and making sure they are decent quality. Any idiot can put together a product to sell on the Internet, it's not hard to do, but it takes talent to create something that is of a good quality and really helps people.

    If more marketers checked the quality of the products they were promoting then it would start to weed out all the rubbish. I can remember recent product launches with refund rates of 75% and higher yet the guru's and the like were scrambling over each other to promote it. Go search the product review thread here and you'll see product after product with bad reviews and they aren't by people out to sabotage the point.

    My word of advice to everyone here is to start hitting the unsubscribe button. don't be worried about missing the latest greatest thing because you're not likely to do so. start voting with the unsubscribe button and these people will start to pay more attention to what they send out.

    I used to be on 100+ marketers lists and realised that out of ALL of those marketers there were 2 (yes, just 2!) marketers who actually sent me content other than promotional emails. Of the 100+, probably 60-70% of them only ever sent canned, pre-written emails and about 30-40% sent one liners telling me to go visit a site as if they were my friend!

    The Internet Marketing arena is unfortunately soured by a huge amount of poor quality products being promoted by marketers who seem to be literally desperate for commissions.

    Start voting with your feet and unsubscribe and then they'll have to listen!
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    • Profile picture of the author SandyDuPlessis
      Originally Posted by Jason Johns View Post

      It seems to me that there are too many marketers who are willing to pretty much promote anything that will make them some money.

      How many emails do you get that say

      "Check out this product now" and a link ... no explanation or anything?

      How many emails do you get that set unrealistic expectations in their subject lines, promising you untold riches for no work?

      Basically, affiliate marketers need to stop being lazy and start checking out the products that they are promoting and making sure they are decent quality. Any idiot can put together a product to sell on the Internet, it's not hard to do, but it takes talent to create something that is of a good quality and really helps people.

      If more marketers checked the quality of the products they were promoting then it would start to weed out all the rubbish. I can remember recent product launches with refund rates of 75% and higher yet the guru's and the like were scrambling over each other to promote it. Go search the product review thread here and you'll see product after product with bad reviews and they aren't by people out to sabotage the point.

      My word of advice to everyone here is to start hitting the unsubscribe button. don't be worried about missing the latest greatest thing because you're not likely to do so. start voting with the unsubscribe button and these people will start to pay more attention to what they send out.

      I used to be on 100+ marketers lists and realised that out of ALL of those marketers there were 2 (yes, just 2!) marketers who actually sent me content other than promotional emails. Of the 100+, probably 60-70% of them only ever sent canned, pre-written emails and about 30-40% sent one liners telling me to go visit a site as if they were my friend!

      The Internet Marketing arena is unfortunately soured by a huge amount of poor quality products being promoted by marketers who seem to be literally desperate for commissions.

      Start voting with your feet and unsubscribe and then they'll have to listen!
      Oh my,

      That really hit home. I have been hitting the unsubscribe button for ages now, but I keep getting more and more mails. I am blowed if I know where they are all coming from. I know for a fact that I have not subscribed to many of them.

      I have now taken to writing down the details of each of the mails that I unsubscribe from and the dates that I unsubscribe (and how many times I have to unsubscribe from the same people).

      If I have to unsubscribe from the same email list more than once (not necessarily the same marketer - since various marketers have more than one list) then I hit the spam button.
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  • Profile picture of the author mohamed.hammad
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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  • Profile picture of the author JamesGw
    Reputation is important, which is why I tend to focus on creating authority sites moreso than sites dedicated to only selling products. You want people to like your content and keep coming back.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pedro Borges
    Hello Sandy,

    First of all, let me say that i really enjoyed reading your post and i do give a damn.

    Reputation and integrity are vital if you wanna build a long term successful business and even i, younger than most of the people here, realize that without them we're just walking into failure.

    People forget about the Client/Seller relationship and only have one goal in mind: "Quick Money". It's sad but nowadays, this is our reality.

    (Sorry about any grammar mistakes)
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  • Profile picture of the author masterjani
    Hi sandy,
    Nice post,Actually reputation is very important if we want to be in this business for long.This IM we are doing will not stop after we get some 1k,2k it will keep on growing.So if we want to continue keep doing postive things is very very important.

    Thanks for the brilliant post again.
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  • Profile picture of the author digesource
    Thank you Sandy!

    This is a very good piece for consideration. However, there are Pros and Cons to the regard of one's own reputation.

    A couple Pros are:

    1) Geometric Networking Effectiveness. This is basically where your networking efforts become more effective because previous connections you have built spike in strength due to collateral reputation building. Additional connections become more frequent as your reputation grows from the previous connections, and a dynamo affect takes place in your network. This is a lot like search engines and the spidering they do. This could also be thought of as "going viral." To keep it simple here, dropping unnecessary boundaries and making friends is IMPORTANT! I stress "unnecessary boundaries" because some boundaries you keep legitimately in place in order to maintain a professional approach, where appropriate, and to avoid the pitfalls of association with those who have OBVIOUSLY NOT CHOSEN to self-correct OBVIOUS HARMFUL BEHAVIORAL patterns. Application of awareness, forgiveness, self-correction, and redemption are keys to keeping this moving forward.

    2) Value Adding. Adding value to your life and the lives of those in your inner circle (family, friends, close business associates, etc...) Your reputation affects the reputation of others, and this, adds or subtracts, value, to or from, their lives. Remember, people are thinking about them also, who they are connected with, and YOU are one of those connections. We are truly a network, in and of, ourselves together socially. It may be complex in size and quality, but it's operation is really simple.

    3) Trust Building. This includes the opening of doors that once were closed, and the realization of opportunities that were not before understood or seen. Trust, or the lack thereof, has complex roots, yet a simple understanding. It boils down to what, you and others, believe about, you and others, concerning the probability of, yours or their, actions or the end results of efforts made.


    A couple Cons are:

    1) Selfish Consideration. "what others think about you" is not always healthy, and can become a mental health trap. While it is true that your reputation geometrically effects your networking effectiveness, it can become a two edge sword whereby you become absorbed into internal considering which becomes a common psychological trap known as identification. In other words, stuck and/or paranoid in the thought of what others think about you can lead to serious mental health issues such as split or dualistic personality disorder. The way to handle this is to neutralize YOUR critical inner consideration of "what others think" while simultaneously objectively looking at their viewpoint, and holding to the essential value that your contributions to the world are best served by doing what is honorable, right, and making amends where necessary.

    2) Clique Formation. This becomes an exclusionary body that tends to operate with conceit and arrogance whereby the adherents forgets their roots that, they to, were beginners at one time. None of us were born with the perfect book of life operating in our consciousness. The result becomes damaging to their reputation collectively as a group as they gradually take on the beliefs that "once an enemy, always an enemy", and "your enemy is my enemy". These are destructive networking thought patterns to have, and reassessment should always play a role here. Redemption becomes an unthinkable concept to most cliques, and extremist considerations of the outside world develops. This is commonly seen in cults. I've seen this in other IM forums, and I have to wonder how successful they really are when statistically compared to places like the Warrior Forum. In most groups where cliques exist, new members to the group find the learning curve to be extremely high, and for some impossible. This in turn denies them, and the group, the benefits of learning the values of the groups ultimate mission, which is probably some form of improvement for everybody. With this kind of clique development ultimately everyone in the world would be excluded except for the few in the group. People DO make mistakes. Of course, the more that are excluded, the less profiting that can take place as well, so it becomes a self-defeating dynamo in opposition to the desired result of networking and reputation. The way to handle this is to have a set of redemption rules, that are not impossible to achieve, but do become progressively harder to achieve with each offense thereafter the initial banning from the group. Perhaps a doubling of membership fee to rejoin the group. Of course this can have the pitfall of banning-for-profit, but it wouldn't last long because it would cause reputation damage and eventual collapse of the group. Making this a, do-not-do, moderation rule would solve that problem.


    There is nothing wrong with seeking to fulfill your needs and desires. The questions you have to ask yourself are: At what cost will this have in doing so? and, How can I adjust my approach to keep it ethical, helpful, and focused?

    A product, a service, a belief, a thought, an idea, is ethical to the degree that it is valuable to the people it most closely affects. (Harry Palmer)

    Helpful, is where you are adding additional value via advice, tips, relevant knowledge and/or correcting obvious errors to the topic at hand.

    Focused is where you discipline your attention to remain on topic and task, of whatever you are doing. Some goal setting helps a great deal with this.


    Understanding these Pros and Cons lays the foundation for an ever widening growth that will benefit all, and diminish the pitfalls of newbie ignorance. After all, greater profits are realized with greater integration and unity.


    All-In-All, I still believe and support the concept of building and sustaining a good reputation. This post is definitely worthy of consideration because it helps us all build a value we all know we should build, especially in business. I will always give a fast and courteous refund to anyone who asks for it, regardless of whether I have included a money back guarantee, or not, in my sales pitch. I am 100% committed to customer satisfaction!


    Well.., that's all my energy on this topic, for now.

    May you be happy and well,

    Darin
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  • Profile picture of the author sdbagley
    This was an amazing post! This is something I had actually been discussing recently with my husband. When I started my own business, he asked me if I was planning on using an alias name to "protect" myself from potential internet stalkers, and I told him no, I planned to use my real name and on my "about me" page, I planned to even tell the buyer a little bit about who I am.
    I want for people to know who they are buying from right away.
    My reputation is extremely important to me, and maintaining a standard of being honest and reliable means more to me than just about anything.
    I do agree though with digesource about the "selfish consideration" part, where you can actually care way to much what people think about you.. I have a habit of falling into that trap and taking it really personal if someone seems to not like me.
    I think I'm getting more sensitive with age, I used to not care one bit what anyone thought about me!
    Now I just have to find the right balance to keep me at least partially sane
    Again, kudos for the post!
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  • Profile picture of the author clever7
    The main reason why I’m afraid of JVs and ad swaps is exactly the fact that I don’t trust other people’s products. I can’t promote them to my list. I’d have to analyze them very well, and this practice is too time consuming…

    I don’t know if I would make more money if I would be less cautious, but I prefer to preserve my reputation than taking risks.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brad789
    Sandy

    I completely agree. What we are seeing - right before our eyes is the growth of a brand new market. Main Street on steroids. Just like our home town, once a business has a bad reputation - it is tough to get rid of it. Montgomery Ward used to have quality stuff. Then I recall my folks calling it "Monkey Wards".

    The got a real bad deal on a "house brand" washer there. Seems like it wasn't but five or so years later the store closed up in town. A few years later the whole chain just folded.

    Quality, giving before receiving and service that is the hallmark of a reputable business.

    I completely agree with you and believe your email to the seller was an act of kindness. Hope s/he understands they may be getting a second chance - and I hope they don't waste it.

    I spent a lot of time searching the internet for quality people to teach me the business. I stumbled across Chris Farrell, Yaro Starak and Jeff Johnson. I circled them for several weeks. They each seemed to have a similar business model. "Over deliver", "serve", never take your list for granted.

    Well in a few weeks of research and study I found them each to be absolutely true to their mantra. The free videos, guides and materials they have produced and supply free to nubies is fantastic.

    Most importantly to me, each of their systems are reproduceable. No not just selling how to make money - they teach the basic skills that are used to market - really market on the internet.

    It is their example that has proven to me that 1) your post is right on and 2) there are ethical, principled marketers on the net willing to help, guide and train.

    I have confidence that the quality of our work and desire to serve our customers will win out over the scammers - just wait and see.

    Great points and perfect sentiment - my congratulations to you.
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  • Profile picture of the author IntegMark
    Originally Posted by SandyDuPlessis View Post


    Are you a man or woman of integrity?
    Is your personal and business reputation important to you?
    Have you investigated yourself and your business to find out what others think of you and your product?
    If you have found something bad with regard to your reputation or product have you considered what you are going to do about it?

    Do you give a damn?



    Sandy DuPlessis
    Sandy, it's like you've been reading my mind over the past few weeks. Ever since I came across a video entitled "I'm Sorry I Lied" I've thought more and more about this subject -- and I've done some research into it as well. I can't answer any of these questions, only each individual person has that ability - but I do follow this topic closely and I do feel that MOST Internet Marketers do give a damn - there simply hasn't been a system in place to weed out the one's that do, from the one's that don't.
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    IntegrityMarketer.com - Integrity Marketer allows you to start making easy, long term residual income simply by showing others how to do the same - it really is that simple.

    ~~~
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    • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
      Originally Posted by IntegMark View Post

      Sandy, it's like you've been reading my mind over the past few weeks. Ever since I came across a video entitled "I'm Sorry I Lied" I've thought more and more about this subject -- and I've done some research into it as well. I can't answer any of these questions, only each individual person has that ability - but I do follow this topic closely and I do feel that MOST Internet Marketers do give a damn - there simply hasn't been a system in place to weed out the one's that do, from the one's that don't.
      This was a video put out by an internet marketer? (I have an 'idea' of what you may be talking about, but I don't want to jump to conclusions)

      Do you feel that the internet needs to be more strongly regulated, IntegMark?
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    • Profile picture of the author SandyDuPlessis
      Originally Posted by IntegMark View Post

      Sandy, it's like you've been reading my mind over the past few weeks. Ever since I came across a video entitled "I'm Sorry I Lied" I've thought more and more about this subject -- and I've done some research into it as well. I can't answer any of these questions, only each individual person has that ability - but I do follow this topic closely and I do feel that MOST Internet Marketers do give a damn - there simply hasn't been a system in place to weed out the one's that do, from the one's that don't.
      When all is said and done as long as people care about themselves enough to question and and try to change anything that they perceive to be wrong with regard to themselves that is a really positive action.

      Having had to deal with REALLY bad people in the past (gangsters not IMers ) I have found that there is much that is good in everybody - they just have to learn to like and have respect for themselves. That is when things really begin to change.
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  • Profile picture of the author celente
    if you are offering a product or service taht is good, do you really have to worry about your reputation.

    no...plain and simple.
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    • Profile picture of the author digesource
      Originally Posted by celente View Post

      if you are offering a product or service taht is good, do you really have to worry about your reputation.

      no...plain and simple.
      True, we should NOT worry about our reputation. We should BUILD it! We build it just like you said, by offering good products and services. Period!
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    • Profile picture of the author SandyDuPlessis
      Originally Posted by celente View Post

      if you are offering a product or service taht is good, do you really have to worry about your reputation.

      no...plain and simple.
      Unfortunately, I cannot agree with you.

      First of all, no matter how good a product may be, I for one avoid purchasing that product if I know that the person selling it has a dodgy reputation. In fact, chances are that I will never even get to know about the product because I will have unsubscribed from his or her mails.

      Everything thing we do has a ripple effect on some other part of our lives. If your reputation with regard to business is not the best, it is likely to spill over into your personal life an vice versa. In addition it can affect your business and personal relationships as well.

      Have you ever considered why there are more than 12M sites using the term "name and shame them"
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  • Profile picture of the author shuvo
    As like food.My reputation help to get some more income from business and building a printable relationship with my targeted customers and get more sales and more new customers on a regular basis.
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  • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
    Have a product? Try what this guy is doing
    Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author Geoff1
    Sandy,

    I think your post is really valuable. I feel very similar. Some people will do and say anything to make a sell. I will hand them money once but never again. Sadly these sorts of people often times go out of business because after people get burned, they won't do business with them again.

    A few thoughts that I rely on to run my businesses that are relevant to your post:

    * Repeat business is the only way to have a secure business.

    * Satisfying products are mandatory for maximum success.

    * Whenever I'm faced with a long term or a short term decision I always take the long term.

    * My job is to give far more in return to my clients vs what they invest.

    * If for every $1.00 someone invests with me I can give them $10.00 or $100.00 back I will always have a secure, flourishing business.

    Geoff
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    • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
      Those are great tenets and principles Geoff. They are simple in verbage, but a bit more complex in execution. Even still, they provide a fundamental guideline that would serve us all well to try to emulate fully.

      Originally Posted by Geoff1 View Post

      Sandy,

      I think your post is really valuable. I feel very similar. Some people will do and say anything to make a sell. I will hand them money once but never again. Sadly these sorts of people often times go out of business because after people get burned, they won't do business with them again.

      A few thoughts that I rely on to run my businesses that are relevant to your post:

      * Repeat business is the only way to have a secure business.

      * Satisfying products are mandatory for maximum success.

      * Whenever I'm faced with a long term or a short term decision I always take the long term.

      * My job is to give far more in return to my clients vs what they invest.

      * If for every $1.00 someone invests with me I can give them $10.00 or $100.00 back I will always have a secure, flourishing business.

      Geoff
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  • Reputation is very important to me. It is hard to have new and repeat customers if your reputation and reviews are negative.
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