46 replies
I've been speed reading since junior high school, and it's the best thing I ever learned to do, bar none. It helps improve your retention a lot, too.

There are actually a number of different types of 'speed reading'. Wiki has a good article about them, when and how each is best used and such ;

Speed reading - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The one I took was similar to Evelyn Wood's Reading Dynamics. It is my usual way of reading (unless it's something purely for pleasure), but I use quite a few of the other methods, as well.

For anyone who has never done it, I would highly recommend learning. You just can't imagine how much time you will save and how much better you will actually learn.

So is anyone else here a speed reader?

I would imagine at least some of the methods are utilized by many people here, a skill acquired through having to pore through many words of info to get to what you actually need in the last 4 or 5 pages.
#readers #speed
  • Profile picture of the author Ross Kenny
    Interesting article.

    I'm not a speed reader but try to read fast.
    The faster I read the less I seem to understand what I've read

    Any tips and tricks???
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    • Profile picture of the author DeborahDera
      My fiance told me that when he was in school his class was part of a speed reading experiment. They had index cards with a hole cut out so that they could only see the sentence they were on, and they'd move it down the page. He's an incredibly fast reader to this day and has great retention.

      Originally Posted by Ross Kenny View Post

      Interesting article.

      I'm not a speed reader but try to read fast.
      The faster I read the less I seem to understand what I've read

      Any tips and tricks???
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    • Profile picture of the author Ross Kenny
      Originally Posted by myob View Post

      Ifyoutrytoreadtoofastallthewordsruntogether.
      I know, ha ha
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      • Profile picture of the author Tina Golden
        I read 750 wpm average naturally and always have, so I've never had any incentive to try a speed reading program. My retention is good, too.

        Some of the methods I've seen make me think that my retention would go down if I tried to get even faster.
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        • Originally Posted by Tina Golden View Post

          I read 750 wpm average naturally and always have, so I've never had any incentive to try a speed reading program. My retention is good, too.

          Some of the methods I've seen make me think that my retention would go down if I tried to get even faster.
          750 wpm is super awesome for someone that has never 'learned' to speed read from a class. I think an average reader is like 200 wpm. When I was tested in high school I had around 1200 wpm, but I doubt I come anywhere near close to that anymore. For many years now most of my reading isn't so much word-for-word; it's much more scanning and then pin-pointing what I need to know.

          And you most definitely have to adjust your speed depending on what you are reading. There is definitely a 'break even' point between speed and comprehension.
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        • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
          Originally Posted by Tina Golden View Post

          I read 750 wpm average naturally...
          I knew there was something special about you, Tina.


          Bradley,

          I bought The Reader's Edge around 03/04 and used that for several months. It
          is based on recognizing words and eliminating sub-vocalizing. Perhaps all of them
          are like that.

          After about a month I tested myself, with their built-in tests, and was able to
          read about 1200 wpm with around 90% retention/comprehension. I thought that
          was pretty cool.

          But after that, I just stopped using it or trying to make more progress. I have no
          idea where I am now with reading rate, but after going through that it settled at
          something higher than where I was before.

          I guess it's not terribly important, for me, and I'm good with it. I read fairly fast
          and it's cool.

          My ultimate goal is to be able to put a book under my pillow and wake up with all
          the info in my head. Osmosis, ya know?


          Ken
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        • Profile picture of the author Henry White
          Originally Posted by Tina Golden View Post

          I read 750 wpm average naturally and always have, so I've never had any incentive to try a speed reading program. My retention is good, too.

          Some of the methods I've seen make me think that my retention would go down if I tried to get even faster.
          My dad gave me a copy of Mortimer Adler's How to Read a Book when I was in third grade. That's about techniques, primarily questions and "dialog" with the author and the topic, rather than reading speed, but all I've ever needed and certainly saved my sanity in grad school!

          And like you, Tina, I've always been reluctant to fix what obviously ain't broke!
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          • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
            Originally Posted by hwhite View Post

            My dad gave me a copy of Mortimer Adler's How to Read a Book when I was in third grade.

            Wow... I read that book back in the 70s. It's a great book. I think
            it should be required reading by everyone early on in school.


            Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author DatingGoldJason
    I was actually trying to get into that but never had the chance. I have a friend who's done it and it really works great for him.
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  • Profile picture of the author GailTrahd
    I'd like do to the osmosis thing the best I've never taken a speed reading course - really want a speed typing and writing course! Mike Koenigs just released a free speed reading course - video and pdf I think. I'm so slow I haven't clicked the link yet! I think if you get on his list now he'll be sending it out again in a week or so.
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  • Profile picture of the author GailTrahd
    @MYOB - I hang my head - got through the sales copy - just didn't take the time yet to click the link I got distracted!
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  • Profile picture of the author KenB
    I don't want to read the article,

    Is there a video for this?

    :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author Claire Sharp
    I've never took speed reading before and i don't think i need it. It is still best to read manually because you can understand what you are reading for.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    I know how to speed read. Unfortunately, I had a LOT of coursework in linguistics and literary analysis so I always end up going through editing and analyzing everything. It slows me down, sometimes to a crawl. LMAO.
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Schenk
    When I was a teenager attending X high here in Cincy, they taught the Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics course as a regular class. They had me reading at 3200 wpm, but that was 45 years ago. While I still read fast, I'm at a less than a third of that today.

    I guess it wouldn't be too difficult to build up the speed again.

    :-Don
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  • Profile picture of the author jjbalagosa
    I took a speed reading course in college that got me up to about 1200 wpm, with roughly 80% retention.

    Found Paul Scheele's Photoreading Course a little while later. Got me through the rest of college without sacrificing my social life, along with a full time job. I was able to read through textbooks within the first week of a semester.

    I usually can get through a 400 page book in about an hour.
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  • Profile picture of the author Derek Soto
    Originally Posted by Bradley J Anderson View Post

    I've been speed reading since junior high school, and it's the best thing I ever learned to do, bar none. It helps improve your retention a lot, too.

    There are actually a number of different types of 'speed reading'. Wiki has a good article about them, when and how each is best used and such ;

    Speed reading - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The one I took was similar to Evelyn Wood's Reading Dynamics. It is my usual way of reading (unless it's something purely for pleasure), but I use quite a few of the other methods, as well.

    For anyone who has never done it, I would highly recommend learning. You just can't imagine how much time you will save and how much better you will actually learn.

    So is anyone else here a speed reader?

    I would imagine at least some of the methods are utilized by many people here, a skill acquired through having to pore through many words of info to get to what you actually need in the last 4 or 5 pages.
    Where did you buy your speed reading course from? This is actually something I've been thinking of doing. If you don't mind sharing, what are some of the other methods you use for speed reading?
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    • Originally Posted by Derek Soto View Post

      Where did you buy your speed reading course from? This is actually something I've been thinking of doing. If you don't mind sharing, what are some of the other methods you use for speed reading?
      It was first offered to me in high school because I was so bored all the time I was getting into trouble. A teacher got ahold of some heavy, black machine and let me start using it. It had a plate dated from the 1940's, so by that time in the late 70s, it was already very dated, but I could tell a huge improvement just after the first week.

      When I first got into college, I wanted to try to improve my speed even more, so I took a class at a local trade school that lasted like 3 or 4 weeks, I think.

      There is software now that will train you, though, and it's probably much more efficient. I've never used any of them, but I'm assuming they would help your reading speed as far as wpm, but not teach much of the other techniques.

      As far as actual techniques I use, most of what I do now is skimming and taking in blocks of text, rather than individual words. Most people who are on the web much learn to do it very quickly. I read basically the first paragraph of a sentence, if it's something I need or is important I skim the rest of the paragraph, otherwise on to the next one.

      I also look for keywords that give me an idea of what the surrounding text is about.

      Basically, what I'm doing is creating an outline in my head, and occasionally creating peg words to help me remember very important things. Memory enhancement is another excellent skill to acquire. Can't go wrong with it. 'The Memory Book' by Harry Lorayne and Jerry Lucas.

      As far as reading word for word at 1200 wpm, there's really not much call for that. And as far as pleasurable reading, where you actually want to read every word, I don't know of anyone who speed reads through that sort of thing. An average book contains 250 words per page, and is 350 pages long, so I could speed read through that in say half an hour, but then I wouldn't get the same pleasure from it. I could still tell you what it was about, who the characters were, etc., but I wouldn't be taking the time to be doing the same in-depth analysis as I usually would.

      I enjoy reading, I just hate wasting my time with the unimportant stuff.

      I have read about a method called Photo Reading that allows a person to take in the whole page at a time. Supposedly, some of the graduate can read at speeds up to 25,000 words a minute, but I've never been able to find a study to prove that. It is an interesting theory, though.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kurt
        Originally Posted by Bradley J Anderson View Post


        As far as actual techniques I use, most of what I do now is skimming and taking in blocks of text, rather than individual words. Most people who are on the web much learn to do it very quickly. I read basically the first paragraph of a sentence, if it's something I need or is important I skim the rest of the paragraph, otherwise on to the next one.
        That is impressive!
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        • Profile picture of the author Kai Pei
          Thanks Bradley for posting this thread!

          There is life on other planets and there are other speed readers out there - SO we're not all alone in the universe and I'm not a speed reading freak (he he).

          I've timed myself and clocked in at over 2,500 words per minute (wpm). And NO, I'm not boasting. In fact, I think this is something anyone can do given sufficient time and the proper tools.

          I started my speed reading adventures years ago when I purchased a piece of software called Eye Q from a company called Infinite Mind. It cost me $250 when I first picked it up - In fact, I just checked the site, and it's still the same price - SUPER EXPENSIVE.

          But GOOD NEWS WARRIORS. I have a solution for you if you're looking to turbo-boost your speed reading skills. (Without spending $250 like me OUCH!)

          But first, why would you want to speed read?

          I defer to Bradley by saying it's a HUGE time saver. If you're active in this forum, then you're obviously interested in making money online. Even more so, you're interested in the shortest route to go from 'broke' to 'rich' (or 'rich' to 'richer').

          And last time I checked, "making money" is a HUGE subcategory of entrepreneurship. And drinking Redbulls, growing wings, and becoming a BAD A** entrepreneur involve investing time into yourself.

          Imagine what you could do with the knowledge you absorb from reading a book a day or every two days? (I read mostly business and marketing books - and Warrior Forum threads, of course )

          Yes, with consistent practice, you can develop some serious Matt Damon, Good Will Hunting, GENIUS level reading SKILLZ.

          So how does one go about learning the art of whiplash speed reading?

          I can't speak for everyone, but here's how I clocked in at 2,500+ wpm and growing.

          I bought a book called Breakthrough Rapid Reading by Peter Kump (Former Director of Education for Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics).

          In case you've never heard of Evelyn Wood, she coined the phrase "speed reading" and many people consider her the matriarch of speed reading systems.

          Anyhow, you can order Breakthrough Rapid Reading from Amazon for $17. And HOLY S**T, is it packed with value.

          It's a 6 week course. It's flexible and fun. And it'll keep you on your toes. You just have to commit to it and GO!

          Let me do a quick comparison between this $17 dollar book and Eye Q's $250 hose-down software. (And why I think the $17 book DESTROYS Eye Q - or ANY other software program for that matter.)

          Aside from the obvious price difference, here are some other key points to consider when comparing Eye Q with Breakthrough Rapid Reading (which I'll abbreviate as BRR for the remainder of the thread):

          Eye Q requires only 7 minutes every other day. You put in a CD and watch fancy schmancy eye exercises on your computer screen (which are actually pretty basic to tell you the truth). Although the time investment is minimal (Yes this is SEXY), the problem is that your speed reading gains will be short-lived.

          BRR on the other hand is flexible. You can invest between 30 minutes to 2 hours per day. It's up to you. While the time demand is greater than Eye Q, the gains you'll make are concrete and won't vanish. ** Remember, this is a lifestyle investment. Imagine investing 6 weeks of your life to develop skills that can positively impact you for the REST of your life. (Not a bad trade off if you ask me.)

          Eye Q has built in reading material (which CANNOT be edited). In other words, you're forced to practice and develop your reading skills with content and reading material that comes on the CD. (Which includes books like Huckleberry Finn and The Wizard of Oz - WHOOPEE!! - Not to DISS the classics, but I'd rather be reading books about making LOADS OF DOUGH... In fact, I think I'll write a book call Loads of Dough... followed up by the sequel Lords of Dough - Sorry 'bout the rant... back to the thread...)

          BRR in contrast allows you to select your own material for speed reading practice. GROOVY!

          Before you begin the 6 week BRR program, you're asked to choose 10 books which you'll use to practice speed reading exercises. If you go really fast, you may even need more.

          In case you have a shortage of books, FEAR NOT; I have the perfect solution.

          It's called the Public Library. Seriously, the library ROCKS. I go to the library weekly... It's the only way I can feed my speed reading habit. Yes, I'm addicted to reading.

          Let's see, should I buy 100 books on amazon and spend an average of $15 to $20 bucks a pop - which would cost me $1,500 to $2,000 dollars?

          OR, should I check out the reviews of books I like on Amazon (you can save them to your Amazon Wishlist with the click of a button) and then check them out at the library for FREE?

          Hmmm... I'm not sure about you, but I'm going with FREE.

          When you read a book a day (or every two days), speed reading can get expensive without a library card. :rolleyes:

          The only benefits of Eye Q, are the fact that they have a nice looking website and the 7 minutes/every other day schedule (which is the equivalent of 7 minute abs - and I've never met anyone with a killer six pack using THAT program).

          For long lasting benefits, BRR kicks some serious butt. You simply can't go wrong.

          The SECRET is simple. With software programs like Eye Q, you get specific eye exercises and training. You ONLY use your eyes. But with BRR, you practice special hand-eye coordination techniques that physically anchor you to the material your reading.

          This means, when you pick up a book, you have all the tools you need: Your eyes and your hands.

          There are a vast assortment of hand-eye coordination skills, tactics, and strategies you'll learn from going through the BRR program.

          Oh and one last thing, with BRR, you do need to create some timing devices. I call them countdown timers. You can use a stopwatch, but that's way too distracting - the last thing you want to do is look back and forth at a stupid stopwatch when you're eyes are ripping through books like greased lightening.

          Instead, you can follow the simple instructions included in BRR and record your own voice as a timing device. Don't worry, it's super simple. I won't go into the full-blown details here.

          Hopefully you have software to do some simple voice recording. If not, you can download Audacity for free: Audacity - Free software downloads and software reviews - CNET Download.com

          Okay. So that's my 2 cents worth for the day.

          I hope this input offers some insight into the glamorous world of speed reading.

          In closing, let me just share a statistic with you:

          The average adult reads 1 book a year. (Scary but true.)

          And the average adult that reads 1 book a year rarely if ever finishes the book. In other words, if you've read a book from cover to cover in the last 12 months, pat yourself on the back for being ahead of the curve.

          In comparison, statistics show that successful entrepreneurs and CEO's read on average at least one book per month (with top tier readers averaging a book or more per week).

          The moral of the story: There is a direct correlation between knowledge and income.

          The more you know, the more you earn.

          Take care Warriors, and happy speed reading!

          Thanks again to Bradley for starting this thread.
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      • Profile picture of the author Nate Simms
        Originally Posted by Bradley J Anderson View Post

        As far as actual techniques I use, most of what I do now is skimming and taking in blocks of text, rather than individual words. Most people who are on the web much learn to do it very quickly. I read basically the first paragraph of a sentence, if it's something I need or is important I skim the rest of the paragraph, otherwise on to the next one.
        The whole "reading the first sentence of the paragraph" idea is probably the most important thing I've learned so far to survive PhD school.

        ...I really have no other option when my advisor tells me to get through five books and 10-15 rather 'heavy' journal articles in only a week's time.

        The retention rate is still surprisingly good using this method.
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  • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
    Derek,

    In my post, I mentioned using The Readers Edge speed reading s/w. You
    can buy and download it. I used it about 7 years ago. So I imagine it has
    been updated, you would think.

    If you visit their site, they offer some good information about the principles
    involved and other topics.

    I found it to be very effective and useful. You have to practice with it, and
    you'll get out of it what you put into it just like everything else.


    Ken
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    • Profile picture of the author Derek Soto
      Originally Posted by KenThompson View Post

      Derek,

      In my post, I mentioned using The Readers Edge speed reading s/w. You
      can buy and download it. I used it about 7 years ago. So I imagine it has
      been updated, you would think.

      If you visit their site, they offer some good information about the principles
      involved and other topics.

      I found it to be very effective and useful. You have to practice with it, and
      you'll get out of it what you put into it just like everything else.


      Ken
      Ken if you have an affiliate link, go ahead and PM it to me. You didn't have to take the time to tell me about this, it's actually something I really want to do.
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  • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
    Thanks for the offer Derek, but I'm not an affiliate, etc.

    Here's a non-affiliate link to them. Please keep in mind there may be
    better programs out there. I don't know. But I liked this one and had
    excellent results with it.

    Top-Rated Speed Reading Software - The Reader's Edge - The Literacy CompanyThe Literacy Company


    Ken
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    • Profile picture of the author Derek Soto
      Originally Posted by Bradley J Anderson View Post

      It was first offered to me in high school because I was so bored all the time I was getting into trouble. A teacher got ahold of some heavy, black machine and let me start using it. It had a plate dated from the 1940's, so by that time in the late 70s, it was already very dated, but I could tell a huge improvement just after the first week.

      When I first got into college, I wanted to try to improve my speed even more, so I took a class at a local trade school that lasted like 3 or 4 weeks, I think.

      There is software now that will train you, though, and it's probably much more efficient. I've never used any of them, but I'm assuming they would help your reading speed as far as wpm, but not teach much of the other techniques.

      As far as actual techniques I use, most of what I do now is skimming and taking in blocks of text, rather than individual words. Most people who are on the web much learn to do it very quickly. I read basically the first paragraph of a sentence, if it's something I need or is important I skim the rest of the paragraph, otherwise on to the next one.

      I also look for keywords that give me an idea of what the surrounding text is about.

      Basically, what I'm doing is creating an outline in my head, and occasionally creating peg words to help me remember very important things. Memory enhancement is another excellent skill to acquire. Can't go wrong with it. 'The Memory Book' by Harry Lorayne and Jerry Lucas.

      As far as reading word for word at 1200 wpm, there's really not much call for that. And as far as pleasurable reading, where you actually want to read every word, I don't know of anyone who speed reads through that sort of thing. An average book contains 250 words per page, and is 350 pages long, so I could speed read through that in say half an hour, but then I wouldn't get the same pleasure from it. I could still tell you what it was about, who the characters were, etc., but I wouldn't be taking the time to be doing the same in-depth analysis as I usually would.

      I enjoy reading, I just hate wasting my time with the unimportant stuff.

      I have read about a method called Photo Reading that allows a person to take in the whole page at a time. Supposedly, some of the graduate can read at speeds up to 25,000 words a minute, but I've never been able to find a study to prove that. It is an interesting theory, though.
      Bradley, I read well but I share the same frustration as most where I want to "extract" the information from say, a marketing book, but I may not have the time. I imagine that speed reading allows you to attain information faster and allows you to grow faster. In your experience, how has speed reading made life easier? Anyway, I'm going to check out some of this stuff for sure.

      Originally Posted by KenThompson View Post

      Thanks for the offer Derek, but I'm not an affiliate, etc.

      Here's a non-affiliate link to them. Please keep in mind there may be
      better programs out there. I don't know. But I liked this one and had
      excellent results with it.

      Top-Rated Speed Reading Software - The Reader's Edge - The Literacy CompanyThe Literacy Company


      Ken
      thanks, Ken, I'm going to check it out, this could be interesting.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dean Jackson
    This is definitely a skill that every IM'er should work on developing!

    Thanks Ken, the Readers Edge program looks like a great investment. Just picked up my copy. I did some research and another program but the website looked pretty crummy

    Let you's know how it goes.

    Dean
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Barboza
    Do you recommend Reading Dynamics?

    Originally Posted by Bradley J Anderson View Post

    I've been speed reading since junior high school, and it's the best thing I ever learned to do, bar none. It helps improve your retention a lot, too.

    There are actually a number of different types of 'speed reading'. Wiki has a good article about them, when and how each is best used and such ;

    Speed reading - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The one I took was similar to Evelyn Wood's Reading Dynamics. It is my usual way of reading (unless it's something purely for pleasure), but I use quite a few of the other methods, as well.

    For anyone who has never done it, I would highly recommend learning. You just can't imagine how much time you will save and how much better you will actually learn.

    So is anyone else here a speed reader?

    I would imagine at least some of the methods are utilized by many people here, a skill acquired through having to pore through many words of info to get to what you actually need in the last 4 or 5 pages.
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  • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
    Have you ever tried speed reading after smoking a joint? Just curious. It seems like they would cancel each other out.
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    • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
      Originally Posted by E. Brian Rose View Post

      Have you ever tried speed reading after smoking a joint? Just curious. It seems like they would cancel each other out.

      Brian,

      I've only read about that stuff in magazines...

      But no, they don't cancel each other out. The only problem is retention
      drops to single digit percentages.

      Oh well...


      Ken
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      • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
        Originally Posted by KenThompson View Post

        Brian,

        I've only read about that stuff in magazines...
        Said Ken, as he rolled his third J of the day.
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  • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
    I too took speed reading - in high school - and it was the best thing I ever did study habit wise. It helps a ton with research.

    They just had something on the local news here about it too: Speed Reading Makes a Comeback | NBC Dallas-Fort Worth

    What I thought was cool was that the courses now don't just teach textbooks but also speed reading for today's technology - on an iPad, for instance, PDF files, etc.

    Very cool!
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  • Profile picture of the author Dean Jackson
    One of the best threads I've read on WF, hands down.

    Thanks everyone for the suggestions. Even though I'd heard of "speed reading" before, it didn't occur to me that I should have learned this years ago. Just imagine how much time you'll save in the long run!

    Dean
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    • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
      Originally Posted by Dean Jackson View Post

      One of the best threads I've read on WF, hands down.
      Was it my suggestion to smoke pot first that led you to this opinion? I'm sure that it was.
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  • Profile picture of the author xoomprince
    tips on speed reading

    1. try to see more number of words at a time. as your eyes work less so you will not get tired.

    2. reduce the time you spend on each word

    3. avoid pronouncing the words while reading. if after some time you revert back to pronouncing the words then slowly say eeeeeeeeeeeeee----------- while reading.

    4. your reading speed has to be varied as per the type of material being read like light novel, fiction or technical material.

    5. after a while if you feel that you are not understanding anything then it means that you have passed a word whose meaning you dont understand. look up that word in a dictionary.

    and finally practice and practice....

    happy reading
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    I just read this whole thread using speed reading. Here's my take.
    70 wpm smoke pot can't remember a thing about life on other planets but I like skimming and taking in blocks of text to feed my addiction to speed reading at the library and ya'll comeback to Dallas Fort Worth So that's my 2 cents worth for the day
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    • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

      I just read this whole thread using speed reading. Here's my take.
      70 wpm smoke pot can't remember a thing about life on other planets but I like skimming and taking in blocks of text to feed my addiction to speed reading at the library and ya'll comeback to Dallas Fort Worth So that's my 2 cents worth for the day
      LOL... outstanding Suzanne!

      The big takeaway from what you wrote ... Cliff Notes, sort of... is
      to smoke 70 joints a day with Brian on your way to the party in
      Dallas and not to worry because you won't remember a thing!


      Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author revjoe
    Good stuff thanks!
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    Keep the faith and never give up!

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  • Profile picture of the author bobsstuff
    Thanks Kai, on Breakthrough Rapid Reading, I think I look into that -- at the library LOL
    Now,if they would only come up with a way to "speed view" all of the ever so popular IM videos.
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    Bob Hale
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    • Profile picture of the author tylerzito
      Originally Posted by bobsstuff View Post

      Thanks Kai, on Breakthrough Rapid Reading, I think I look into that -- at the library LOL
      Now,if they would only come up with a way to "speed view" all of the ever so popular IM videos.
      You could always try the fast froward button
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  • Profile picture of the author chrisfdc
    Originally Posted by Bradley J Anderson View Post

    There is definitely a 'break even' point between speed and comprehension.
    I think if you don't apply any effective techniques or training then simply trying to read faster will result in you taking in less and consequently remembering less!
    However, it's worth noting that the well-run programs focus on all 3 'pillars' of fast learning:
    • Speed
    • Comprehension
    • Retention
    So it doesn't have to be a case of 'Speed vs Comprehension'. If you do it right and practice the correct principles, you can improve all 3 simultaneously. For those requesting further info, here's a good example of a modern (2014) online course in Speed Reading & Superlearning etc:
    Reviews & Udemy Coupon: Become a SuperLearner: Learn Speed Reading & Advanced Memory
    I hope this helps!
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