Fewer emails to your list makes better sense!

69 replies
I subscribed to a fellow Warrior's list the other week, I dunno, wanted to get the freebie, thought their insights might be useful, all the usual reasons we sign up. They'd used an odd number (very slick marketing: $5,347 in 21 days!) (NOT.) and that probably appealed to old gullible me.

Today, after three weeks of being barraged with daily emails promoting the latest shiny new object, I unsubscribed. Now when I think of this Warrior, his name leaves a bad taste in my mouth as I feel he got greedy and trashed up my inbox with offer after offer, "Wanna buy this? How about this? Wanna spend money here? How about here? This looks good! You gotta have this!"

For crying out loud, common sense will tell you this is LOUSY MARKETING! Woo me for a while, don't climb into bed with me right from the get-go!

I am so tired of it. And it makes me angry.

I see seemingly smart people undermine their marketing efforts by OVERKILL. This happens all too often.

Start slo-w-w-w-w-w-ly. I don't want to hear from you every day, never did! Why would you think I do?

AAAARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHH.

Thanks for letting me vent. I just had to unload.

Marilyn
#emails #fewer #list #makes #sense
  • haha this is a good reminder to build a relationship with your email subscribers before you pitch them something.
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  • Profile picture of the author omk
    Yeah, fewer emails is best. I personally keep mine to about 6 per month.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
      Originally Posted by omk View Post

      Yeah, fewer emails is best. I personally keep mine to about 6 per month.
      Not necessarily. Granted there is a point of diminishing returns if you send out too many, but sending out "less" isn't necessarily better. In all our testing across over 38 niches we have found our profits increase when we increase the number of our e-mails, not lower them. However, we keep a balance between giving valuable content and making pitches. It's not a barrage of pitches.

      Though the OP makes a good point, virtually nobody wants to receive a pitch every single day and not receive any good content. Many marketers will send out a lot of pitches and see their short-term profits increase, thus they fall into the trap of thinking this a good thing for their business, when instead they are not building any kind of relationship with their list and they are actually hurting their long-term profits.

      Across the board, I have found that 2 to 3 e-mails per week works really well, when you are giving away valuable content. Dr. Mercola is a master at this and makes for a great real-life case study to look at if you want one model on how to do this.

      Granted, this is something you should test yourself since there are many factors that come into play such as the niche, price point, where the traffic is coming from (how targeted it is), etc.

      RoD
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      • Profile picture of the author Marilynj55
        Even 2-3 emails per week if you are giving away valuable content I think is too much, simply because of my time constraints and my inability to absorb all you are sending.

        At first I may want to devour all the freebies you are sending me, but then, at the rate of 2-3 a week, it just becomes too much of an imposition on my time and I feel, instead of uplifted when I see something from you in my inbox, pressured and harassed and as if you just added another unwelcome "to do" to my list of things.
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        • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
          Originally Posted by Marilynj55 View Post

          Even 2-3 emails per week if you are giving away valuable content I think is too much, simply because of my time constraints and my inability to absorb all you are sending.

          At first I may want to devour all the freebies you are sending me, but then, at the rate of 2-3 a week, it just becomes too much of an imposition on my time and I feel, instead of uplifted when I see something from you in my inbox, pressured and harassed and as if you just added another unwelcome "to do" to my list of things.
          Understood, but you're one person and not everyone feels that way. My testing has shown 2 to 3 per week has worked extremely well for us and we've sent out billions of e-mails over the course of a decade in a wide variety of markets. Sometimes it's better to send out 2 a week for about 3 months and then lower it to once a week or bi-weekly, but it all depends on the testing results and that is what we go by.

          "Pressured" and "harassed" if someone is giving away valuable content? I just don't see it and the sheer numbers do not agree with you. One can always read the e-mail later or delete it. I would agree if all they are doing are sending you product pitches, in that context I wouldn't blame you for unsubscribing. Then again, if anyone does not want to be on any of our lists then I want them to unsubscribe because they are probably not our target audience.

          The overwhelming majority of our target audience asks us for more content, not less, and that is who we cater to. And that has been consistent no matter if it's the dating, wedding planning, weight loss, fitness, etc. niches.

          RoD
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          • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
            I have some markets where I send an email everyday. And the people signed up knowing this.

            With some of those lists (not all of them) I get 20 - 30 percent CTR consistently. Granted these are soft sell kinds of things, but I have been doing this consistently for over 4 years.

            If someone feels pressured and harassed because emails are in their inbox, it is definitely time for you to unsubscribe from those things. That is the way you feel, you have to take care of that, but as far as making a blanket rule for everyone else based on the way you feel, that is probably not going to work out so well for everybody else. It might work out, I guess, for folks who feel the way you do, but for a lot of folks it is not going to work out for what they need.

            There are plenty of great marketers who sell excellent products. And sometimes those products don't show up in the email until 20 or 30 emails down the road.

            People want and need good products that will help them in whatever it is they want to do. It is OK for them to read emails about those products.
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            • Profile picture of the author Marilynj55
              Caveat: Of course this is just my opinion. I am the one who feels harassed and pressured and I understand not everyone's life is like that.

              I wish I DID have the luxury of pouring over valuable content for even a half hour every day.

              My IM career would have probably gone a whole lot more smoothly if I had taken the time to absorb the valuable content that has been made available to me, particularly from the likes of Chris Farrell and other very caring marketers who target beginners.
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              • Profile picture of the author Bryan99
                Marketers seem to forget that if their inbox was filled with daily junk emails, they would unsubscribe in a jiffy!

                People don't like to be pushed to buy things. If your subscribers don't buy your product the first day, what makes you think they will buy it the other day? You will just lose subscribers, and your name will be frowned upon in the future.

                So think wisely, don't do to others what you wouldn't like to be done to yourself!
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                • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
                  Originally Posted by Bryan99 View Post

                  Marketers seem to forget that if their inbox was filled with daily junk emails, they would unsubscribe in a jiffy!

                  People don't like to be pushed to buy things. If your subscribers don't buy your product the first day, what makes you think they will buy it the other day? You will just lose subscribers, and your name will be frowned upon in the future.

                  So think wisely, don't do to others what you wouldn't like to be done to yourself!
                  If every marketer whose list you subscribe to irritates you, then perhaps you should unsubscribe from those lists. If it is not every marketer, then just unsubscribe from the folks whose emails you don't like.

                  There may be some autoresponder services which come without unsubscribe links, but I am not sure I have ever heard of one. And if they do, you could just make a filter and send the emails to the trash when they come so you never have to see them.

                  I find that sometimes I have to use the filter idea, but not too often, usually I can just unsubscribe with no problem.
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              • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
                Originally Posted by Marilynj55 View Post

                Caveat: Of course this is just my opinion. I am the one who feels harassed and pressured and I understand not everyone's life is like that.

                I wish I DID have the luxury of pouring over valuable content for even a half hour every day.

                My IM career would have probably gone a whole lot more smoothly if I had taken the time to absorb the valuable content that has been made available to me, particularly from the likes of Chris Farrell and other very caring marketers who target beginners.
                Marilynj55,

                I think in the context that you provided your example in the OP brings up a very valid point though. Marketers that make nothing but pitches and slam you with you no value are simply focusing on making the sale and then getting out does not build any kind of relationship. And I think that point should definitely not be forgotten.

                One thing that I've noticed among marketers in any niche is that we all run our lists differently. There's definitely an art and a science to it. Some test their open rates and responses, while others don't. Some segment their lists and others don't.

                I read very few e-mails from marketers these days, but there's one that I always open and read: our very own Paul Myers. His free stuff is better than a lot of paid stuff out there. I think I've been on his list longer than any other marketer since I also find myself unsubscribing from quite a few. When there's no value being given, I don't stick around. In his case, there's value in every e-mail he sends out.

                RoD
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            • It is a huge mistake to dismiss Marilyn as "just one person."

              I read these responses and get exasperated; have you people never heard of *segmenting* your list into: wants email every day, wants email once a week, wants email twice a month, wants email once a month? Seems terribly myopic to me to insist that each and every one of your recipients must be pantingly eager for your daily update or they're not worthy of belonging to your list.

              Whenever I come into contact with a hotshot marketer working a system, I'm invariably slammed into an autoresponder chain. And there's nothing I hate more than that, because it's impersonal, because it comes whether I want it or not, because I feel *used*.

              fLufF
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              • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
                Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post

                It is a huge mistake to dismiss Marilyn as "just one person."

                I read these responses and get exasperated; have you people never heard of *segmenting* your list into: wants email every day, wants email once a week, wants email twice a month, wants email once a month? Seems terribly myopic to me to insist that each and every one of your recipients must be pantingly eager for your daily update or they're not worthy of belonging to your list.

                Whenever I come into contact with a hotshot marketer working a system, I'm invariably slammed into an autoresponder chain. And there's nothing I hate more than that, because it's impersonal, because it comes whether I want it or not, because I feel *used*.

                fLufF
                --
                Marilyn is one person and has an opinion that she has expressed. Truthfully, if she is not getting benefit from the emails she is receiving, and feels bad even getting them, then it is probably to her benefit to unsubscribe.

                If you don't like getting emails in an autoresponder sequence, then perhaps it is to your highest good to unsubscribe from those. Perhaps doing that would help you focus on something you feel better about.
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              • Profile picture of the author Coby
                Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post

                It is a huge mistake to dismiss Marilyn as "just one person."

                I read these responses and get exasperated; have you people never heard of *segmenting* your list into: wants email every day, wants email once a week, wants email twice a month, wants email once a month? Seems terribly myopic to me to insist that each and every one of your recipients must be pantingly eager for your daily update or they're not worthy of belonging to your list.

                Whenever I come into contact with a hotshot marketer working a system, I'm invariably slammed into an autoresponder chain. And there's nothing I hate more than that, because it's impersonal, because it comes whether I want it or not, because I feel *used*.

                fLufF
                --
                Once your list gets above 10K you really only want the folks on your list that want the emails you like to give them... (b/c once you get a list this big it gets expensive to keep everyone on board so to make them happy)

                Super segmenting do to "wants email once a month" is simply not worth the time to me when I can simply replace that person with someone who wants to read emails at the frequency I send...

                Why should I change my business to satisfy less than 10% of my readers?

                It's just like Wal-mart - if you don't like they way they operate their store you simply shop everywhere else... Some people love Wal-mart and others hate it with a passion and will not go near it...

                You have to work you business and satisfy a "particular market"! If we spent all our time trying to "please everyone" in our market then no money would get me..

                I have my list segmented into about 20 plus separate lists based on interest and products purchased... Why segment it further to please a few extra people?

                Of course it's easy to see this from a consumer's point of view, but I make my living from my list, so I'm doing it everyday... So I know what's working for me...

                If you get too many emails, just unsub...

                Good luck
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        • Profile picture of the author Coby
          Originally Posted by Marilynj55 View Post

          Even 2-3 emails per week if you are giving away valuable content I think is too much, simply because of my time constraints and my inability to absorb all you are sending.

          At first I may want to devour all the freebies you are sending me, but then, at the rate of 2-3 a week, it just becomes too much of an imposition on my time and I feel, instead of uplifted when I see something from you in my inbox, pressured and harassed and as if you just added another unwelcome "to do" to my list of things.
          I would say you weren't the marketer's target audience, which is great that you unsubscribed rather than just deleting them...

          Granted not everyone wants to be pitched a product everyday, some marketers make a very good income doing this (I'm not one of those). While others are making good amounts with less pitches but the same frequency...

          I think that if you think getting 3 helpful emails (w/o pitches) are too much then unsub... Your not the target audience... Simply find another list that suits your tastes better, they are out there...

          Don't get bent out of shape for getting too many emails, especially helpful ones, just unsub and go about your business...

          If they are spamming everyone, eventually their list will burn out and they will either go away forever or they will evaluate the situation and learn from it...

          Some lists expect daily emails... while others don't...

          As a marketer you have to find the best fit for your list and niche...

          As a consumer you have to find the marketers that market to you the way you prefer...

          Just my 2 cents
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    • Profile picture of the author drmani
      The worst marketing mistake you can make is to assume
      (without testing) that your audience feels exactly the same
      way as you do about things!

      Just saying

      All success
      Dr.Mani
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        I've noticed the barrage of emails is much great when I either download something or make a purchase through the WF.

        I think it's because these are "marketers" and because they are competing with other marketers here for your attention.

        In niche mailing lists I see the old time list seduction of sending good info, interesting insights and the occasional link to an affiliate product. In emails I end up on (often without formally signing up) through the WF, I'm usually bombarded with with "my friend just launched" and "try this" and "buy that".

        My rule for WF lists is you get 3-5 emails - if you are promoting 3-5 different things with those, I unsubscribe.

        Set your own personal limits and stick to them. No sense wasting emotion on a mailing list snafu.

        kay
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      • Profile picture of the author lstoops
        Originally Posted by drmani View Post

        The worst marketing mistake you can make is to assume
        (without testing) that your audience feels exactly the same
        way as you do about things!

        Just saying

        All success
        Dr.Mani
        Ain't that the truth!!
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    • Profile picture of the author anthony2
      Originally Posted by omk View Post

      Yeah, fewer emails is best. I personally keep mine to about 6 per month.
      It depends...you will have to test
      but fewer emails like just 6 per month
      can hurt someone business.

      Like i mentioned before it all depends on
      (Niche, Emails (content or sending lots of offers) etc)

      My mentor he send 2 to 3 emails per day to his email
      list...Yes 2 to 3 per day.

      2 of those emails are content based and the 3 rd is a offer
      to his product.

      Most people will be afraid of sending 1 email per day because
      fear of unsubscribes. But he has a lead abundance mindset.

      He knows if couple of people unsubscribe he will get hundreds
      more to subscribe. Also because of the daily emails his income
      has sky rocketed.
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  • 99% of my new students tell me they hate how other do the marketing and tell me what is refreshing and what attracted them to me is the content. I would recomend when you mail put yourself in their shoos and ask yourself is this a value to them (not you). I think that is what most marketers don't do (it's sad!)
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    soon people... Relax...
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  • Profile picture of the author Adam Sussman
    I was on a marketers list, and he used to send emails maybe once a week or so, ocasionaly twice a week. A good mix of content, decent freebies and sales links. I always looked at his emails and I bought a lot of his WSO's and other products.

    Then he changed. Instead of seeing me as a person as he had done for a long time he started to see me as his personal ATM. What caused the change? The WSO affiliate system.

    He stopped sending his mix of content and sales and started sending me daily affiliate links to WSO's. After a while he started sending me two emails daily with affiliate links to WSO's. When he started sending three emails a day....that was it. He lost a regular paying customer.

    Sure, I may buy one of his WSO's in the future, but where before I would buy without even thinking, now the trust has gone. His last few WSO's have come and gone without a purchase. If I buy again, he gets a throw away email address.

    I believe in relationship marketing. I believe in showing your customer/prospect respect. I've been on some lists since 2005. I buy from these marketers. I seriously consider their affiliate recommendations. The reason why? They know the value of building relationships.

    I am not a number...I am a free man!
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
      Originally Posted by Adam Sussman View Post

      I was on a marketers list, and he used to send emails maybe once a week or so, ocasionaly twice a week. A good mix of content, decent freebies and sales links. I always looked at his emails and I bought a lot of his WSO's and other products.

      Then he changed. Instead of seeing me as a person as he had done for a long time he started to see me as his personal ATM. What caused the change? The WSO affiliate system.

      He stopped sending his mix of content and sales and started sending me daily affiliate links to WSO's. After a while he started sending me two emails daily with affiliate links to WSO's. When he started sending three emails a day....that was it. He lost a regular paying customer.

      Sure, I may buy one of his WSO's in the future, but where before I would buy without even thinking, now the trust has gone. His last few WSO's have come and gone without a purchase. If I buy again, he gets a throw away email address.

      I believe in relationship marketing. I believe in showing your customer/prospect respect. I've been on some lists since 2005. I buy from these marketers. I seriously consider their affiliate recommendations. The reason why? They know the value of building relationships.

      I am not a number...I am a free man!

      When the relationship changes so that it is not comfortable anymore, I unsubscribe. Relationships have to work both ways to the mutual benefit of both parties, otherwise, those are not relationships I want to be in.

      I am on a few lists of marketers now, fewer than in the past, but i am also willing to sign up to the lists of new people or people I have not been in contact with before, because those things may be to my benefit.

      The world is big with lots of opportunities. I think that is excellent.
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    • Profile picture of the author Marilynj55
      That is exactly what happened to me and a couple of my favorite Warriors from whom I used to buy WSOs without blinking an eye, if I had the spare dough to do it.

      Then they started promoting daily WSOs as affiliates, and that gets old FAST, so I unsubscribed, perhaps throwing out the baby with the bathwater, but, hey, it's a busy world and I don't want to be seen as their personal ATM, as you so aptly put it, Adam.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      I've noticed the barrage of emails is much great when I either download something or make a purchase through the WF.

      I think it's because these are "marketers" and because they are competing with other marketers here for your attention.

      In niche mailing lists I see the old time list seduction of sending good info, interesting insights and the occasional link to an affiliate product. In emails I end up on (often without formally signing up) through the WF, I'm usually bombarded with with "my friend just launched" and "try this" and "buy that".

      My rule for WF lists is you get 3-5 emails - if you are promoting 3-5 different things with those, I unsubscribe.

      Set your own personal limits and stick to them. No sense wasting emotion on a mailing list snafu.

      kay
      Interesting...

      it's this *competitiveness* that makes not for better
      marketers, but sometimes *clinginess*.

      Email marketing is like dating...

      if you're *attached* to an outcome (please click my
      link and by through ME, not the other guy/gal!)...

      people run the opposite way.

      If you're good, you won't have to *compete* for any
      attention. You'll EARN it without all the screaming.

      ...learned that one the hard way. Wish I'd seen your
      post earlier, KayKing.



      Originally Posted by Rod Cortez View Post

      Marilynj55,

      I think in the context that you provided your example in the OP brings up a very valid point though. Marketers that make nothing but pitches and slam you with you no value are simply focusing on making the sale and then getting out does not build any kind of relationship. And I think that point should definitely not be forgotten.

      One thing that I've noticed among marketers in any niche is that we all run our lists differently. There's definitely an art and a science to it. Some test their open rates and responses, while others don't. Some segment their lists and others don't.

      I read very few e-mails from marketers these days, but there's one that I always open and read: our very own Paul Myers. His free stuff is better than a lot of paid stuff out there. I think I've been on his list longer than any other marketer since I also find myself unsubscribing from quite a few. When there's no value being given, I don't stick around. In his case, there's value in every e-mail he sends out.

      RoD
      It's not easy to find that balance. Hell, it wasn't
      easy for me. But, the moment I got out of my
      OWN head and focused on the other person... it
      all started to come together nicely.


      Originally Posted by Adam Sussman View Post

      I was on a marketers list, and he used to send emails maybe once a week or so, ocasionaly twice a week. A good mix of content, decent freebies and sales links. I always looked at his emails and I bought a lot of his WSO's and other products.

      Then he changed. Instead of seeing me as a person as he had done for a long time he started to see me as his personal ATM. What caused the change? The WSO affiliate system.

      He stopped sending his mix of content and sales and started sending me daily affiliate links to WSO's. After a while he started sending me two emails daily with affiliate links to WSO's. When he started sending three emails a day....that was it. He lost a regular paying customer.

      Sure, I may buy one of his WSO's in the future, but where before I would buy without even thinking, now the trust has gone. His last few WSO's have come and gone without a purchase. If I buy again, he gets a throw away email address.

      I believe in relationship marketing. I believe in showing your customer/prospect respect. I've been on some lists since 2005. I buy from these marketers. I seriously consider their affiliate recommendations. The reason why? They know the value of building relationships.

      I am not a number...I am a free man!
      Money has a funny way of doing that to people.

      For some, it's for a serious need (medical emergency)
      for others it's purely greed. They just want more...at
      the expense of alienating their list, burning them out.

      I think MOST marketers do it at least once before it
      finally clicks. Atleast, I know I've made that mistake
      twice before.
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      • Profile picture of the author drmani
        As a list owner:

        It boils down to knowing TWO things - and doing ONE!

        Know:

        * who your prospect is and what they want
        * what are YOUR goals/targets for your list

        and then do this one thing:

        TEST everything!


        As a subscriber:

        It boils down to ONE thing -

        * Are YOU getting value (however YOU define it) from being on this list?

        If yes, continue - until the answer is 'No'.

        If no, hit the unsubscribe button/link


        When you cut through the clutter, email marketing
        is simple - both as a marketer and as a subscriber

        All success
        Dr.Mani
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  • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
    All of you have valid points to your arguments here.

    If your subscribers don't buy your product the first day, what makes you think they will buy it the other day?
    The same could be said for radio and TV advertisements, but studies show that repeating the same message produces results.

    I am the one who feels harassed and pressured and I understand not everyone's life is like that.
    Life is short. If you feel harassed by a marketer, no matter who it is, then hit the unsubscribe button.

    I have some markets where I send an email everyday. And the people signed up knowing this.
    Many people want daily emails. They want to know what's out there and they don't want to have to do the research to find those golden nuggets themselves.

    The worst marketing mistake you can make is to assume
    (without testing) that your audience feels exactly the same
    way as you do about things!
    Absolutely! As a marketer, all you can do is test out different methods and go with what works best.

    Remember one thing... you can never please all of the people all of the time. Do what feels right for you and is most profitable for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author gskesavan
    If you're building a list it is just like followers on twitter. If you provide useful information they won't dump you. Else, you are gonna be sad.

    Marketing is secondary to building a smooth relationship with your visitors / subscribers. You shouldn't ask them to buy a product. You should Wholeheartedly recommend it as a solution to their problem.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jake Gray
    I'm picky about which lists I enter.

    Some to name that I absolutely love is Bill Platt, Frank Kern,
    Gary Bencivenga and many others to name.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rose Anderson
    Does anyone offer a "check here if you'd prefer to see only a weekly recap" type option?

    I know there are people who want to receive emails every day and there are others who might prefer to see a condensed weekly summary.

    I say this because there are a few people I enjoyed getting emails from until it became a daily sales pitch and I had to unsubscribe to keep from wasting too much time.

    Rose
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve L
    Originally Posted by Marilynj55 View Post

    I subscribed to a fellow Warrior's list the other week, I dunno, wanted to get the freebie, thought their insights might be useful, all the usual reasons we sign up. They'd used an odd number (very slick marketing: $5,347 in 21 days!) (NOT.) and that probably appealed to old gullible me.

    Today, after three weeks of being barraged with daily emails promoting the latest shiny new object, I unsubscribed. Now when I think of this Warrior, his name leaves a bad taste in my mouth as I feel he got greedy and trashed up my inbox with offer after offer, "Wanna buy this? How about this? Wanna spend money here? How about here? This looks good! You gotta have this!"

    For crying out loud, common sense will tell you this is LOUSY MARKETING! Woo me for a while, don't climb into bed with me right from the get-go!

    I am so tired of it. And it makes me angry.

    I see seemingly smart people undermine their marketing efforts by OVERKILL. This happens all too often.

    Start slo-w-w-w-w-w-ly. I don't want to hear from you every day, never did! Why would you think I do?

    AAAARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHH.

    Thanks for letting me vent. I just had to unload.

    Marilyn
    I couldn't agree more Marilyn. Nobody likes advertisements. Most of us go out of our way to avoid them, which is why you should be selective in which offers you send to your list, and how frequently you send them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brad Gosse
    I think your list grows accustomed to your own flavor of email consistency.

    I have been mailing my list more often with little to no unsubscribes. I only send them products I created or reviewed and never push things I can't get behind.

    Some people will always complain and leave. They are not my market. The people who don't like seeing offers are not the kind of marketers I cater to.
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  • Profile picture of the author AskJesusLeon
    The whole problem is not too many or too few email, it's when you send GARBAGE to your list. That's the problem.

    I WAS on a marketers' list here on the warrior forum and all he did was send me pitches everyday, sometime two times a day even. IMHO, you have to build that relationship if you want long term love from your list.
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  • Profile picture of the author mookinman
    When I started out here on the forum I must have signed up to 20+ mailing lists! And every day, every one of these so called "gurus" would email telling me I need to buy something. Drove me crazy. I still get emails to one of my old accounts every single day, god knows how he manages to keep coming up with stuff every day. He's probably outsourcing the writing & sending of the emails, otherwise he'd be extremely bored, and no way he's making any money from anything other than the aff links in his emails.

    It's a shame that only a small fraction are actually offering something useful for free before even attempting to build trust.
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  • Profile picture of the author wvcopywriter
    I personally think 1 email a week is good. My mentor suggest sending emails out every 3 to 4 days for those who do email marketing.
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
      There are lots of ideas about how often to email and what to send.

      As far as I have been able to tell the only "rule" that I have seen have consistent results is to test and see what brings you the results you are hoping for.

      When you are subscribing to someone's list, you are running a test to see if you are getting the results you are expecting. if you do not get the results you are hoping for, then those are the results you got and you have to decide what to do next with that data.

      The person whose list you are on is running a test also. And they have to decide what to do with the results they get from doing that test.

      Maybe from your results, you will decide that you do not want to be subscribed anymore. That is your decision, and if it is what is best for you, then that is a good thing to do.

      The person who is sending you emails also gets to decide what is best for them. That's fair.

      Maybe for the person sending out emails, it works the best for them to send out emails once a week, maybe twice a day.

      Maybe the recipient wants to know which WSO's are hot right now and they welcome those emails. There are plenty of lists I have been on where the sender changed directions in their business and we were not such a good fit anymore. Those things happen.

      Just because that person decided to change something about what they did, does not mean there is something wrong with them because I would have made different choices.

      For all I know, their spouse just got in a dreadful car accident and needed 20,000 dollars worth of medicine every week just to get through each day of horrific pain. I have no idea what is behind the change in their marketing.

      What I do know is that I am not willing to decide based on a series of emails that someone is using me as their personal ATM. But that is my own opinion, others may think differently.
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      • Profile picture of the author mrelosa
        Fewer emails is always better. If you send too many emails, the subscribers get irritated and it will all end the subscriber unsubscribing. Too much is always bad.
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        • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
          Originally Posted by mrelosa View Post

          Fewer emails is always better. If you send too many emails, the subscribers get irritated and it will all end the subscriber unsubscribing. Too much is always bad.
          Fewer is not the same kind of comparison as too many. If you are the sender, the only way to know if you are sending too many is if a significant amount of people tell you.

          You can't even draw the conclusion that because somebody unsubscribed it was because you sent too may emails. People unsubscribe for all kinds of reasons. They unsubscribe because they already got three emails about a product launch. They unsubscribe because they wanted to buy something from you but you didn't send your email quick enough. They unsubscribe because they had a fight with their spouse or because it's Wednesday or because they have a headache.

          Or they unsubscribe because they don't have the money for something offered in the email and they feel bad. So to feel better they unsubscribe so they don't have to worry about not having the money. Ther are a lot of different reasons.

          The person sending the emails out is a person same as the recipient. They might have different thoughts about things, but they are still a person. With the same kind of issues that the email reader has (not exactly the same for sure) but similar no doubt.
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  • Profile picture of the author Textech
    Originally Posted by Marilynj55 View Post

    I subscribed to a fellow Warrior's list the other week, I dunno, wanted to get the freebie, thought their insights might be useful, all the usual reasons we sign up. They'd used an odd number (very slick marketing: $5,347 in 21 days!) (NOT.) and that probably appealed to old gullible me.

    Today, after three weeks of being barraged with daily emails promoting the latest shiny new object, I unsubscribed. Now when I think of this Warrior, his name leaves a bad taste in my mouth as I feel he got greedy and trashed up my inbox with offer after offer, "Wanna buy this? How about this? Wanna spend money here? How about here? This looks good! You gotta have this!"

    For crying out loud, common sense will tell you this is LOUSY MARKETING! Woo me for a while, don't climb into bed with me right from the get-go!

    I am so tired of it. And it makes me angry.

    I see seemingly smart people undermine their marketing efforts by OVERKILL. This happens all too often.

    Start slo-w-w-w-w-w-ly. I don't want to hear from you every day, never did! Why would you think I do?

    AAAARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHH.

    Thanks for letting me vent. I just had to unload.

    Marilyn
    One can't know where the good stuff lies hidden. If the chaff is more than the wheat, simply unsubscribe. That option is always open.

    Textech
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  • Profile picture of the author Cee
    I've been on lists that send email after email always with very short emails that say something like 'you've gotta see this click here'. They don't tell me what the product is. No value whatsoever in the emails. So I always unsubscibe.

    There are however some marketers that I trust and whose list I have been on for a long time. They send 2-3 emails a week with good quality info and more detailed explanation about the product they are promoting. If I'm interested I will click on the link but never will I click on a link that just say's 'hey check this out' with no clue what is being promoted. I suppose it works for some. But everyone is different. Finding the happy mix in between that appeals to most people without turning too many of them off.
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  • Profile picture of the author shaynjordan
    I know I am learning and when I did a study of moms with kids the same age as me (they are my target market on my network marketing website) they said 1 - 2 times a week with helpful information and not to sell every week. I am in the process of setting up my email list and I am thinking 2 times a week and offering something to sell once a week or once every other week.

    I want to keep readers once I get them and if that's what my market wants, that is what they will get
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
      Originally Posted by shaynjordan View Post

      I know I am learning and when I did a study of moms with kids the same age as me (they are my target market on my network marketing website) they said 1 - 2 times a week with helpful information and not to sell every week. I am in the process of setting up my email list and I am thinking 2 times a week and offering something to sell once a week or once every other week.

      I want to keep readers once I get them and if that's what my market wants, that is what they will get
      In general, this is a pretty good idea to ask the people on your list. It is possible that every person on your list responded and each of them said the same thing. The bigger your list is, however, the more variation in your sampling.

      It is your decision (or any list owner's) about what to do with your list. If every one of then had told you they did not want any emails ever with anything in them to sell, would you still email them.

      In most groups there are deviations from the norm - the popular opinion -and each of those people is an individual as well and deserves their opinion.

      There might be people on your list who want you to email the mintue you hear of something that will help them and wouild be angry if they knew you withheld something from them just because somebody else did not want emails more than twice a week.

      Mot to say anything except, it is your decision, no matter what. You have taken the time to develop the list of people and you do owe them something. And that something is your best. And you get to decide what your best is.

      If you do that in good conscience in a spirit of trying to help the people who have trusted you with their email addresses, you have nothing to apologize for even if you send out emails three times a day.

      The place to make decisions from as a marketer is as a marketer, not as a consumer. There is a place somewhere in the middle of all the opinions that will work for most of the people. For you and for them. It might take some trials to find that out.
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  • Profile picture of the author luzern
    Originally Posted by Marilynj55 View Post

    I subscribed to a fellow Warrior's list the other week, I dunno, wanted to get the freebie, thought their insights might be useful, all the usual reasons we sign up. They'd used an odd number (very slick marketing: $5,347 in 21 days!) (NOT.) and that probably appealed to old gullible me.

    Today, after three weeks of being barraged with daily emails promoting the latest shiny new object, I unsubscribed. Now when I think of this Warrior, his name leaves a bad taste in my mouth as I feel he got greedy and trashed up my inbox with offer after offer, "Wanna buy this? How about this? Wanna spend money here? How about here? This looks good! You gotta have this!"

    For crying out loud, common sense will tell you this is LOUSY MARKETING! Woo me for a while, don't climb into bed with me right from the get-go!

    I am so tired of it. And it makes me angry.

    I see seemingly smart people undermine their marketing efforts by OVERKILL. This happens all too often.

    Start slo-w-w-w-w-w-ly. I don't want to hear from you every day, never did! Why would you think I do?

    AAAARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHH.

    Thanks for letting me vent. I just had to unload.

    Marilyn
    You should show this thread to that Warrior
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  • I think that is it ok to email everyday as long as it is in a make money online niche. This is probably the only niche that would allow such aggressive marketing. Maybe cuz people want to make money yesterday. I think that another mistake marketers make is that they just send emails that are trying to sell. That is not effective marketing. You need a mix of emails that inform, sell, and inform and sell at the same time. I don't blame you for unsubscribing. That marketer is probably selling crap and thats why he just wants to sell sell sell because they don't know how to build a relationship and real value.

    Peace and Love

    Anthony Spencer
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
      Originally Posted by ajspencersolutions View Post

      I think that is it ok to email everyday as long as it is in a make money online niche. This is probably the only niche that would allow such aggressive marketing. Maybe cuz people want to make money yesterday. I think that another mistake marketers make is that they just send emails that are trying to sell. That is not effective marketing. You need a mix of emails that inform, sell, and inform and sell at the same time. I don't blame you for unsubscribing. That marketer is probably selling crap and thats why he just wants to sell sell sell because they don't know how to build a relationship and real value.

      Peace and Love

      Anthony Spencer
      I email every day in niches outside of IM. Well, not on Sunday usually, but otherwise everyday. With a special edition on Saturday that is not a recap.
      Every email is not a sales message though.
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      • Profile picture of the author Daniel Brock
        Well... as you said, it's your opinion only.

        I've been mailing a lot - I get the same number of unsubscribes when I give away free stuff vs. when I promote something.

        Frankly, I'd much rather lose 10% of my subscribers for emailing too frequently then emailing less frequently just to please that 10% of my list.

        Also, you're not taking into account that marketers have to support other marketers if they want their help in the future. You have to promote your partners or you end up dying out - absolutely no ifs, ands, or buts.

        If you haven't noticed, a lot of the guys who were relevant 2 years ago are starting to lose their market share. It's because a lot of those guys abandoned their affiliate base who are the lifeblood of your business.

        So if my options are to let my business die out for not supporting my affiliates to keep 100% of my subscribers happy vs. pissing off 10% of my subscribers to keep my affiliates 100% happy... we'll obviously I'll go with my affiliates.

        Because I can always get new subscribers - once you piss off an affiliate you not only lose his support in the future but possibly many of his friends in his circles of influence.

        Ya'll can hate on me all you want for saying that, but this is how it is in the market you are referring to.
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        • Profile picture of the author ExRat
          Hi,

          This is one of those perennial conversations that appears regularly.

          I'll try and keep my overview as short, concise and devoid of emotional preferences as I can.

          There are always a mix of contributors to these conversations - some people only send emails and barely receive any - except for the purpose of researching how to send more effective emails/swiping. At the other end of the spectrum are those who may not even have an autoresponder, but receive many marketing emails. Then you have all of those somewhere in between. This obviously muddies the waters a little.

          Out of those who are actively email marketing, you could again broadly put those people into two extremes and the rest somewhere in between.

          To understand the difference between the two extremes it's helpful to consider the term 'relationship marketing', as the interpretation of this is key to the difference.

          Type A) these marketers believe in treating people how they would like to be treated themselves. They don't see subscribers as a number, but as a real person. They tend to try and build a two-way relationship where there is a genuine exchange of value.

          Type B) these marketers have a very different approach (the opposite.) They keenly try to give the impression of a two-way relationship, but in fact it is a totally one-way relationship. They encourage the subscriber to feel a kind of bond/kinship with the marketer - they try to position themselves somewhere close to the subscriber, but slightly ahead in the learning curve - like a kindly guide. The reality is that they are hardcore marketers. The subscriber is simply a number which needs to be sacrificed once they stop being useful (buying). It's the marketing equivalent of real politik.

          Realpolitik is a theory of politics that focuses on considerations of power, not ideals, morals, or principles.
          Conclusions - we see a lot of semi-experienced marketers converting from A to B, because while competing with other marketers using the B approach, the price they pay for maintaining their high principles is too high and leads to failure.

          Many marketers spend a lot of energy creating the impression of being an A while covertly being a hardcore B. The reasons for this deception should be obvious.

          A lot of those who are somewhere in between A and B appear to be confused and struggling with these concepts. It appears that they would actually do better if they made a choice and worked at it.

          Many successful B type marketers tend to see A type marketers as 'not understanding business'.

          This attitude has some validity but it is a complex issue, which can be understood further by examining how well psychopaths do in higher levels of business and decision-making. There are actually mathematical formulas that appear to prove that overall, the psychopath is mathematically at an advantage over their business competitors (whether in terms of two competing businesses or two competing employees of the same company) due to the fact that emotional/guilt considerations do not take up any of their resources.

          A reason for mentioning this is because as a non-psychopath myself (honest ) with high levels of empathy, it has been very helpful in my business education to study this subject - not least because my biggest challenges involve direct competition with the opposite type.

          In other words, I believe we can all progress more quickly by facing these issues unemotionally and examining the differences between type A and B and considering our own approach to business - are we in business for personal satisfaction through providing value, or purely to win at all costs, or a complex combination of the two?

          Understanding aspects of these things (in my opinion) is the prerequisite step to becoming a consistent, aware and successful email marketer.

          Hi Coby,

          As a consumer you have to find the marketers that market to you the way you prefer...
          Or alternatively (in the context of this forum), as a consumer you have to convert as quickly as possible from being someone who only consumes (and doesn't sell) via their already taxed income, to either someone who consumes as a business expense paid for by their marketing activities, or preferably someone who abandons consuming entirely (except for research) and uses their experiences as a consumer as a springboard for their marketing.
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          • Profile picture of the author Ralf Skirr
            I don't mind getting a daily email from a marketer as long as he has something interesting to say.

            If ALL I get from someone is pitches, I'll unsubscribe, or send him to junk.

            It seems the IMers have forgotten that emails can be used to send interesting content, articles, stories to connect, etc.

            Instead they got lazy and just blast out promotions.

            It might work for getting immediate sales, but it certainly not works for building relationships and reputation.

            Ralf
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          • Profile picture of the author drmani
            Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

            Type A) these marketers believe in treating people how they would like to be treated themselves.
            Isn't that narcissism, more than 'relating', Roger?

            If you're seeking to provide 'real value', then it begins
            from denominating what your audience WANTS (or needs) more
            than projecting your own wants/needs/preferences upon them.

            The reality is that they are hardcore marketers. The subscriber is simply a number which needs to be sacrificed once they stop being useful (buying). It's the marketing equivalent of real politik.
            Which becomes a different argument/discussion than that of
            providing value - because when we begin from a standpoint
            of a marketer delivering ONLY valuable stuff to subscribers,
            then it stands to reason that the technique(s) that get
            the highest percentage of them to actually consume that
            content and enjoy that benefit are what must be adopted.

            (Even if they are what some may disparagingly refer to
            as 'marketing realpolitik') ;-)

            And whenever a discerning subscriber self-selects to
            remain ONLY on those lists that provide him/her with
            value, this becomes a mutually fulfilling relationship
            that benefits both marketer and consumer.

            No?



            All success
            Dr.Mani
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            • I have a mailing list of around 7,000 double opt-in addresses for another business that sells physical products. I love getting feedback from any of these folks, wish more would write me. If one tells me I'm mailing too often, I stop what I'm doing and see if she might be right or if she's trying to tell me something else.

              What I don't say is "You can always unsubscribe."

              fLufF
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        • Profile picture of the author Marian Berghes
          Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post

          Well... as you said, it's your opinion only.

          I've been mailing a lot - I get the same number of unsubscribes when I give away free stuff vs. when I promote something.

          Frankly, I'd much rather lose 10% of my subscribers for emailing too frequently then emailing less frequently just to please that 10% of my list.

          Also, you're not taking into account that marketers have to support other marketers if they want their help in the future. You have to promote your partners or you end up dying out - absolutely no ifs, ands, or buts.

          If you haven't noticed, a lot of the guys who were relevant 2 years ago are starting to lose their market share. It's because a lot of those guys abandoned their affiliate base who are the lifeblood of your business.

          So if my options are to let my business die out for not supporting my affiliates to keep 100% of my subscribers happy vs. pissing off 10% of my subscribers to keep my affiliates 100% happy... we'll obviously I'll go with my affiliates.

          Because I can always get new subscribers - once you piss off an affiliate you not only lose his support in the future but possibly many of his friends in his circles of influence.

          Ya'll can hate on me all you want for saying that, but this is how it is in the market you are referring to.
          And who says that you can only grow your business with the help of those people?

          I'm not saying that there's something wrong with that...I just think its weird.

          I like you and your products but I think you should think outside the box a little...your business shouldn't depend as much on you promoting them and they promoting you, or doing launches for every new product.
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          • Profile picture of the author ExRat
            Hi Marian,

            And who says that you can only grow your business with the help of those people?
            He does.

            I understand his point, but I don't think he would appreciate me spelling it out.
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  • Profile picture of the author 4Frankie
    Hi I find that I send 2 or 3 emails with tips and hints and then send a linked email. Seems to be working not getting a lot of unsubscribes. Thanks for interesting comments.
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  • Profile picture of the author TryBPO
    Personally, I hate getting more than 2 emails a week...I prefer 2-4 per month. When I sign up for something, I sign up directly and the emails go to the email box I check on a regular basis. I get a ton of "important" emails and the list emails end up being clutter and just irritating me.

    For me, I'd prefer an email with some serious, substantiated value. Go ahead and include some affiliate links or a link or two to one of your own products, but the email had better be of use.

    A good rule of thumb is think about when you're busy...then REALLY decide whether or not that email is one you would consider valuable/useful. Would you save it? Would you return to it later? If not, just don't send...

    Another train of thought though (Devil's Advocate) is maybe the original sender didn't WANT people like the OP on his list. He only wanted people who will drink up his emails and buy products...if they don't like the barrage he figures they'll unsubscribe, but maybe he'll be left with a buyer's list? I don't know...think he's more likely to be left with a bunch of non-readers, personally.
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
      I have come across a number of marketers who seem to treat their list members with a a buy or die philosophy. An idea that is similar to squeeze pages. You, as a subscriber have a single choice to make with a limited number of options. Can't say as I care for that particularly myself, but sometimes I get to find out about excellent ideas and products from those people.

      Similar to what Dr. Mani has written about self-selection, I think that process is an important thing to do. A subscriber will stay on a list as long as they perceive value from the exchange. And when they don't, they unsubscribe.

      It is hard to say sometimes what things people find value in and it is very difficult to create emails which every single person who reads them finds value with. There are just so many things that various people want in their lives.

      Some people sign up to email lists with bizarre email addresses or have a special "sign up email" address so they won't be bothered with needing to read emails from anyone. Often, I would imagine this is because they want whatever is being offered as an incentive for signing up. I am not sure on this, I am just guessing here.

      I suspect that this kind of defensive idea does not lead to much conversion to sales. Again I am just postulating.

      Staying on an email list or not is a personal choice. It certainly is one I do not want to give up, I like knowing I can make choices for myself. But that is all it is, a personal choice. Like what flavor of ice cream you like, or if you like ice cream at all.
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    • Profile picture of the author FamilyAffairs
      Let's just face it, to some people we are only thought of as an ATM machine for quick cash - not as a customer! Then they wonder why it is that they're selling things on the front end and yet their list never gets bigger.

      News flash we're people not cash machines, give me some value not a bunch of sales pitches.

      The unsubscribe option is a wonderful thing isn't it?
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  • Profile picture of the author Rough Outline
    I honestly don't mind getting an email a day from a marketer, just as long as every single one of them isn't a "buy this" email. If they link to useful articles they written or case studies they've devised, then I'm happy to take a look.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Theres some great responses here.

    Id be very interested in hearing what Alexa's take on this is, and how often she emails her list. As well as "how long"
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

      Theres some great responses here.
      There are.

      Especially - as ever - Roger's, on the previous page (#45).

      Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

      Id be very interested in hearing what Alexa's take on this is, and how often she emails her list. As well as "how long"
      I'm not sure how relevant what I do is to others, though ... I think it depends on the niche, how you've attracted the opt-in in the first place, what they expect from you, and particularly their demographics.

      I'm trying to reach demographics other marketers aren't reaching, perhaps partly because there's a general perception that they're "smaller markets" or "too much work" (in my view, they're neither).

      I have 8 lists in entirely unrelated niches, but I know I'm attracting broadly the same customer demographics in all of them, in more or less the same way. I've tested only half of them but applied my "findings" (such as they are) to all of them and will probably continue to do so with further new niches. I'm not in any "IM-advice" or "MMO" niches (in which I suspect perhaps a little more email's expected?).

      I send email on days 1, 3, 6, 10 and 15 and thereafter at 5-day intervals for ever.

      I often send longer emails than many people do (judging by what I receive), but "my people" expect that, and have originally been attracted by long articles and content-rich, slightly wordy websites.

      I generally put "clear promotion" in one email in three - occasionally one email in two - but the "promotion" isn't the entire email.

      I know there are people who send daily email, having tested and found that they derive more income from them, that way (perhaps especially to buyers' lists). From the limited testing I've done, if I sent email every day, I'd confidently expect both unsubscriptions and significantly reduced income from those remaining.

      Originally Posted by HelpingYouBeAnExpert View Post

      I would recomend when you mail put yourself in their shoos
      Not for me: my own shoes are second-to-none. :p

      But especially, before you criticise anyone, "walk a mile in their shoes", because that way, by the time they find out you've been bad-mouthing them, you're a mile away from them and you have their shoes ...
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      • Profile picture of the author ExRat
        Hi Dr. Mani,

        Thanks for the reply.

        Originally Posted by ExRat
        Type A) these marketers believe in treating people how they would like to be treated themselves.
        Isn't that narcissism, more than 'relating', Roger?

        If you're seeking to provide 'real value', then it begins
        from denominating what your audience WANTS (or needs) more
        than projecting your own wants/needs/preferences upon them.
        Yes. I would say that you are offering more value by giving them what they want rather than what you want, but what I am saying is in the context of how you treat them, rather than what you give them. So for example, in terms of respect.

        The reality is that they are hardcore marketers. The subscriber is simply a number which needs to be sacrificed once they stop being useful (buying). It's the marketing equivalent of real politik.
        Which becomes a different argument/discussion than that of
        providing value - because when we begin from a standpoint
        of a marketer delivering ONLY valuable stuff to subscribers,
        then it stands to reason that the technique(s) that get
        the highest percentage of them to actually consume that
        content and enjoy that benefit are what must be adopted.
        I don't disagree with your point. But my original point is not based around an argument related to 'providing value.' That was just one aspect that came up within my points.

        To try and explain what the core point revolved around I figure that this quote is relevant -

        Out of those who are actively email marketing, you could again broadly put those people into two extremes and the rest somewhere in between.

        To understand the difference between the two extremes it's helpful to consider the term 'relationship marketing', as the interpretation of this is key to the difference.
        What I am suggesting is that the B type is not so concerned about whether they provide value or not (they prefer to offer value, but it's not imperative), they are more concerned with making sales along with avoiding refunds.

        Then I am also suggesting that type A is particularly concerned with providing value, because it is central to one of their main goals - satisfaction of a job well done.

        It's important to clarify here that those two examples (type A & B) were extremes, not examples of typical/regular types. I chose extremes for a reason and also implied that many lie somewhere between the two extremes.

        If we assume for the purposes of this point that both are providing value, then it's simply a difference in techniques. Type A focusses on relationship building, while type B focusses on testing, analysing metrics and tweaking.

        My reason for bringing the two extremes into it in the first place was to help others understand why there often seems to be no overriding conclusion to the threads, or a clash of opinions. It's because the different approaches are diametrically opposed, therefore within the discussion some posters will totally disagree while both will still be 'right'.

        (Even if they are what some may disparagingly refer to
        as 'marketing realpolitik') ;-)
        I see the smiley, but I hope that you noted that I presented this in a 'devoid of emotional preferences' manner.

        I felt that the term I used was the best way of describing that particular extreme, in particular the quote I used -

        considerations of power, not ideals, morals, or principles.
        As I said previously, it's complex :-) I think your point is interesting and important but I think if we look at what people are complaining about in the thread (and other threads like it,) then I think there are definitely times when it's questionable whether the emailers are delivering any value at all. See this thread for an example.

        Finally -

        And whenever a discerning subscriber self-selects to
        remain ONLY on those lists that provide him/her with
        value, this becomes a mutually fulfilling relationship
        that benefits both marketer and consumer.

        No?
        Yes, I agree.
        Signature


        Roger Davis

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        • Profile picture of the author Black Hat Cat
          Banned
          Originally Posted by Marilynj55 View Post
          Even 2-3 emails per week if you are giving away valuable content I think is too much, simply because of my time constraints and my inability to absorb all you are sending.
          Yeah, I'm calling BS on that one. No one is too busy to read two emails a week that can improve their bottom line. And if you are, you're doing something very, very wrong.
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      • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
        Part of the problem here is that marketers treat their list all
        the same.

        Regardless of the frequency, treating your list all the same is
        nuts.

        Newsflash: Your subscribers are not all the same!

        Some want to hear from you daily. Some want to hear from
        you weekly - and others much less often.

        I like Perry Marshall's approach to e-mail marketing where you
        set-up your e-mail system to respond to how ACTIVE your
        subscribers are.

        So, people who click on more links, buy more products or join
        more sublists get more e-mails - because they've demonstrated
        - by their behavior - that they are MORE insterested in what
        you have to say and offer them.

        The sad fact is that most of your list are ignoring you anyways,
        regardless of how often you e-mail them.

        In your relationships - there are people you are happy to hear
        from every day and others you can stand to hear from even
        once a month!

        And yeah - for some list builders - it is a relationship.

        For any relationship to last long-term - all parties need to win
        now and into the future too.

        And who pays the list owners bills and the affiliate/JV partners
        bills? Oh, yeah - that'd be the buyers on the list.

        So, find out what the buyers want and how they want it and
        give it to them that way.

        Dedicated to mutual success,

        Shaun
        Signature

        .

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  • Profile picture of the author petelta
    At one time, I was a twice a week emailer at most. This worked well. Very low unsubscribes and some happy readers. Then, I started working with some WF members that are making big pay checks. I noticed they emailed every day or at least every other day...mostly only offers too.

    I used to talk down about emailing too much too until I started seeing the benefit. Once I started emailing 4-7 times a week like them, my income doubled. I was able to promote nearly twice as much in a month. I offer free/awesome content at a 3:1 ratio compared to promotions of my products or reviewed products. So, the subscribers are still happy and the unsubscribes are pretty low.

    My daily subscriber numbers are much higher these days too though. This is a number I factored in as well. If I were getting 1-5 subscribers per day, I would try and not piss them off. lol

    Like mentioned above, your list adapts to how you treat them. Email people everyday with quality and you will have lots of people on your list that like to get emailed everyday.

    Travis
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    TEESPRING Student Rakes In Over $116k In Less Than 3 Months
    Niche Pro Profits - How I raked in OVER $120k in 9 months with authority niche sites...

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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Hmm, interesting. Im emailing my list every 3rd day. Should I up this to at least 2? Guess I should ask them hey?
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    BS free SEO services, training and advice - SEO Point

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    • Profile picture of the author anthony2
      Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

      Hmm, interesting. Im emailing my list every 3rd day. Should I up this to at least 2? Guess I should ask them hey?
      You can test it out and see how it works for you.
      Remember its your business.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Alexa, how long is "forever"
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  • Profile picture of the author dicky2011
    Marketers belief that their list will get unresponsive after sometime.
    Now I know what could really happen: It's not their list that get unresponsive, it's the marketers that being insensitive to their list.
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  • Profile picture of the author AnonymouS12
    Hah, that's the 5th post I see today about the same issue. Perhaps you all got spammed by the same greedy warrior? Who knows... Who knows.
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  • Profile picture of the author uebomoyi
    Fewer emails is precisely what it's all about. That's all I've been thinking about as a matter of fact. Those experienced marketers who just send you email templates to buy a new product don't care about you. They just want your money. Luckily though there are some sincere ones out there who really want to help you. I actually wanted to do a quick name drop: the guy's name is Jon McNeil. He's been coaching me free of charge and he answers all my questions and whatnot and provides value and I haven't even bought anything from him yet! So if you are looking for valuable lucrative advice from an experienced marketer, then check out Jon McNeil on youtube, facebook or twitter. His youtube channel is clickbankmoney1. I'm praising him so much because he brought me very far in my online endeavors. He's a good guy and definitely doesn't email too frequently unless it's to sincerely help you.
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    • Profile picture of the author AnonymouS12
      Originally Posted by uebomoyi View Post

      Fewer emails is precisely what it's all about. That's all I've been thinking about as a matter of fact. Those experienced marketers who just send you email templates to buy a new product don't care about you. They just want your money. Luckily though there are some sincere ones out there who really want to help you. I actually wanted to do a quick name drop: the guy's name is Jon McNeil. He's been coaching me free of charge and he answers all my questions and whatnot and provides value and I haven't even bought anything from him yet! So if you are looking for valuable lucrative advice from an experienced marketer, then check out Jon McNeil on youtube, facebook or twitter. His youtube channel is clickbankmoney1. I'm praising him so much because he brought me very far in my online endeavors. He's a good guy and definitely doesn't email too frequently unless it's to sincerely help you.
      +1, I completely agree. Thanks for the Youtube Channel, by the way.
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