DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY EXPIERENCE HIRING REAL EMPLOYEES?

by IM Pro
28 replies
I'm looking to hire real employees, not contractors. Does anyone have any advice on the process. I have no problem finding people who are interested, I just want to make sure I do it the right way.

I already searched on here and google and couldn't find anything good enough.
#employees #expierence #hiring #real
  • Profile picture of the author gorufus
    My advice would be to take your time in choosing the right person. In my other business, I have the person I am thinking about hiring go out with my guys for a day. And let them decide. This has been great in finding the right person. I can also tell you about the horror stories when desperately needing someone and just picking the first guy off of the list. Bad idea.
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    • Profile picture of the author IM Pro
      thanks gorufus,

      SOOOOOOO RIGHTTTTTTTTT about find the right person. I tried starting a bus business in college with a kid that I figured would be OK at best and it didn't go anywhere becuase he thought either I would do all the work or it would just happen.
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  • Profile picture of the author RichWill
    Mr Pro,

    I have had businesses and had to hire employees for over 25 years. The interview process is a difficult one. You will make up your mind if you want to hire someone subconscious and consciously in the first 2 minutes. The rest is follow up to see if the applicant is qualified and compatible with you.

    Have you heard you only get one chance to good first impression. I disagree with that. I believe a better last impression is more favorable. With that being said, know what you want from an employee. Have a expectation and job description sheet to hand to your prospective employee. If in the first few minutes during the discussion of your job description, if you feel the applicant could be a good fit, hire for a trial period.

    Don't forget that that last impression could be used for the future. Keep files and stay on top of it. Some businesses always run help wanted ad's just to see what kind of employee potential in in the job market.

    Man, I could go on but this should help you with your immediate future.
    Sincerely
    Rich

    need more information, email me at richwilens1@yahoo.com
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeannie Crabtree
      In addition to this, if you have them fill out a form, you can ask for referrals. If they have worked before, contact their previous employers and get an idea of what kind of worker they were, did they need constant supervision to do their work, or could they do things on their own, etc.

      Originally Posted by RichWill View Post

      Mr Pro,

      I have had businesses and had to hire employees for over 25 years. The interview process is a difficult one. You will make up your mind if you want to hire someone subconscious and consciously in the first 2 minutes. The rest is follow up to see if the applicant is qualified and compatible with you.

      Have you heard you only get one chance to good first impression. I disagree with that. I believe a better last impression is more favorable. With that being said, know what you want from an employee. Have a expectation and job description sheet to hand to your prospective employee. If in the first few minutes during the discussion of your job description, if you feel the applicant could be a good fit, hire for a trial period.

      Don't forget that that last impression could be used for the future. Keep files and stay on top of it. Some businesses always run help wanted ad's just to see what kind of employee potential in in the job market.

      Man, I could go on but this should help you with your immediate future.
      Sincerely
      Rich

      need more information, email me at richwilens1@yahoo.com
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      • Profile picture of the author walker22
        I used to manage anywhere from 6 to 75 people and I think everyone covered the biggies already:

        1. Run a background check first. If you can't afford that, you can't afford the employee. Plain and simple. Can tell you horror stories about people not running background checks and the legal nightmares they had later.

        2. Never hire friends or family. Not worth the headaches. They'll be the first to let you down , complain and not do the work you hired them to do. And they'll never forgive you for firing them.

        3. Hire SLOW. Fire FAST. Think that's a Dan Kennedy one but it should be one of the 10 Commandments. Use a temp service, outsource, interns, or independent contractors before you decide you absolutely need an employee.

        I avoided a lot of headaches by getting super talented employees from other companies to come moonlight for me on the side as independent contractors. Smartest move I ever made.

        I would only hire someone as an employee as a last resort, especially if you're in a state that's not an "at will" state. It can be really hard to get rid of an employee once you hire them, even if they're completely useless.

        Good luck!

        Michael
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by Jeannie Crabtree View Post

          In addition to this, if you have them fill out a form, you can ask for referrals. If they have worked before, contact their previous employers and get an idea of what kind of worker they were, did they need constant supervision to do their work, or could they do things on their own, etc.
          You can ask, but with our litigious society, you may not get any real answers, especially from larger companies. You'll be referred to a Human Resources person who will be allowed to tell you the dates of employment and the job title.

          You sometimes have better luck with smaller companies where the boss and the HR person often drink out of the same coffee cup.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rose Anderson
    Run background checks.

    Be sure you're set up for all the paperwork required with employees. Income tax with-holding, social security tax, medicare, worker's comp, unemployment tax, making tax deposits, filing 941's, etc. It can be a real headache. Or use a service like ADP and let them do it for you.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Rose Anderson View Post

      Run background checks.

      Be sure you're set up for all the paperwork required with employees. Income tax with-holding, social security tax, medicare, worker's comp, unemployment tax, making tax deposits, filing 941's, etc. It can be a real headache. Or use a service like ADP and let them do it for you.
      Add liability insurance and bonding if your employees will be going to client sites or working with clients' property.
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  • Profile picture of the author subho67
    Can you email me directly i may be intersted.My email is shubhadip.c@gmail.com
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  • Profile picture of the author IM Pro
    Thanks a lot everyone for your input. When I figure out how to do it I will come back with an update. I feel I have some direction now.
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    • Yes. Never hire a friend. Laziness, coming in late, excuses, cheating on timesheets, not following directions, getting $12 an hour and only generating $1 of value...

      And then she had the nerve to be pissed off when I fired her.

      Never hire a friend. No matter how badly they need the money.

      fLufF
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      • Profile picture of the author gorufus
        Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post

        Yes. Never hire a friend. Laziness, coming in late, excuses, cheating on timesheets, not following directions, getting $12 an hour and only generating $1 of value...

        And then she had the nerve to be pissed off when I fired her.

        Never hire a friend. No matter how badly they need the money.

        fLufF
        --
        I would add family to that as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author PatMil
    When hiring I always think of the quote "eagles don't flock you find them one at a time". Good people are like eagles.

    One process I have found very useful when hiring is conducting an assessment center. In essence this requires you to decide on what's important in the job and preparing a selection of tasks, exercises and/or questions that will demonstrate the applicants suitability.

    Then each candidate is given the tasks to complete or asked the same practical application questions and their performance is assessed and rated by a small group.

    In many cases it immediately shows very superficial knowledge or skill. In other instances their answers or the way they go about answering these questions are very revealing.

    Good luck, it's not an easy task!!
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  • Profile picture of the author NWJewelry
    There are still plenty of people laid off these days which means you'll have lots people who have no experience applying for the position. Don't be scared or act too nice, ask a tough question up front or two before even scheduling the interview. You'll be able to tell right away if someone knows your industry and if they can think on their feet since they won't be expecting it.
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    Consider taking on interns from a local college. This way you can see how they perform and if you like what you see you might offer them work. Some internships are unpaid while others offer a stipend. Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author WebsiteDeck
    Hire people through someone you already know. Or you can pick up people from Universities. Also make sure you have enough resources before going about hiring full time employees.
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  • Profile picture of the author Adili101
    You can check out Odesk.com. It shows there experience and what they specialize in. There are workers from America or you can outsource for very cheap in other countries. Just a suggestion.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lou Diamond
    Hello,
    I have hired many people in my past jobs, the best tip I can give you is to not hire people that say the word CAN'T you want to hear I can do that or I will learn it.
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  • Profile picture of the author interactivex
    I would say the most important thing is:

    Do you REALLY need to hire the person in the first place. If you are talking about Internet Marketing, hiring a full time person should only come when you are earning a lot of money online. Before this you can get by with just contractors, and work-from home full time contractors.

    What is the reason you want to hire an employee, rather than a contrator? It will cause you a lot of headaches with Payroll taxes, less flexibility etc. Why not just hire staff as contractors?

    If you run a cafe or a real local business, different story, but for an Internet Marketing business hiring an employee is most likely a mistake.
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    Great software for managing Philippine employees - Time Doctor

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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Gehr
    I've employed hundreds of people in my lifetime, and although there's a lot to be said on that subject, I find the following link to be along the lines of what I'd suggest to you:

    http://ezinearticles.com/?Employee-R...sults&id=95676
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  • Profile picture of the author Vexo
    Try elance they are have a great system
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
    I've never hired anyone to directly work for me, always had contractors and VA's. There are always people who give uninformed opinions, but I don't like to do that - so in terms of directly hiring someone I don't have much to offer.

    A "mis-hire" can be one of the most expensive mistakes you can make in your business, so it's important to get it right.

    A lot of my friends who have had to hire people have said that Eben Pagan gives some excellent info on hiring in one of his courses, I believe it's in Altitude. You may want to check that out.

    I don't own Altitude, but two of Eben's other courses and they are excellent, and I also trust the judgement of my friends who have Altitude, so I'd feel relatively confident in telling someone to check it out.
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  • Profile picture of the author djemerald
    Originally Posted by IM Pro View Post

    I'm looking to hire real employees, not contractors. Does anyone have any advice on the process. I have no problem finding people who are interested, I just want to make sure I do it the right way.

    I already searched on here and google and couldn't find anything good enough.
    what are you looking to have this employee do? speaking from my background in HR, the most important thing you need to do is to nail down the job description in fine detail . Then stick to it. You also need to be a good employer to get and keep good employees.
    There are lots of good people out there, good luck !
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    DJEmerald

    "professional writing priced right "
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  • Profile picture of the author The Wizard
    Real employees tend to be more proactive and loyal as opposed to contractors, however, go slow with the hiring process.
    Contact previous employers, check out testimonials and by all means trust your gut instinct as well!
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  • Profile picture of the author wesvista
    I have tried BUT i found out it is a lot easier/cheaper to just outsource.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brian Tayler
    If your cash flow is upwards of six-figures then considering hiring an employee. Not until.
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