How I got My Amazon Account Back

68 replies
I make quite a good monthly income from Amazon and a few days ago I got the boot along with over 20 000 other California Affiliates.

The next day I got my account fully restored.

What I did was to incorporate overseas, change my details in my Amazon account to my new incorporation address and name. I then called up Amazon and got my account reinstated 100%.

You could easily setup a LLC or Inc in a business friendly state. The process takes one day and the cost is very little. What you then do is open a corporate bank account in that state or country and have your Amazon and other business checks go to that account.

You can then pay yourself salary each month in your home state and pay taxes on that income.

Incorporating yourself is something you should really consider doing anyways because there are many advantages over doing business as a sole proprietor.

There's a good book on Amazon called Inc Yourself which explains the many reasons why one would want to Inc themselves.

As far as getting yourself incorporated, there are many agencies and companies offering these services online. Just do a Google search for the state you wish to incorporate in and you'll find a whole bunch of these companies that'l do it for you.

What I did was to Incorporate in a different country that is extremely business friendly and has no corporate income tax and then bank in yet another country.

This way when I go travel the world next year I will pretty much pay zero taxes. I will only pay taxes on the salary that I pay myself here in the U.S.A for the rest of the year.

Now I know this might not be a good option for most but at least think abut incorporating in a different state here in the U.S as it will be beneficial to you in the long run.

Also, do your own due dilligence. I am not giving tax advice or any of that. I am just sharing what I've done to get around the issue at hand. I make a good living from Amazon and I worked hard for it. There's no way greedy politicians will take that from me without a fight.

Cheers,

Jan
#account #amazon #back
  • Profile picture of the author Andrew S
    i didnt know you could get an llc so fast

    thats cool
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  • Profile picture of the author rekerlolz
    Hey thanks for the great advice
    I live in CA ...I think I will try this out soon..I want my Amazon account back
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  • Profile picture of the author EA
    Oh Mr Jan Roos once again you rock this world...

    I know there will be many people here who will appreciate this
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  • Great job Jan! Way to bounce back! So guess you will hanging around in Cali for a while after all
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  • Profile picture of the author nubchai
    Single owner LLCs in the US have pass-through taxation. So the LLC doesn't pay taxes in its name but the owners of the LLC do pay the business taxeson their personal income tax form. This isn't a case of paying taxes only on the salary you're paid. You have to pay the taxes on LLC profits as well. Good to see an accountant on this one.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by nubchai View Post

      Single owner LLCs in the US have pass-through taxation. So the LLC doesn't pay taxes in its name but the owners of the LLC do pay the business taxeson their personal income tax form. This isn't a case of paying taxes only on the salary you're paid. You have to pay the taxes on LLC profits as well. Good to see an accountant on this one.
      Yes of course you have to pay taxes on the LLC profits as well but at the end of the day your total taxes should be less if you do it this way. Again, I am no accountant so do your own due diligence.

      Cheers

      Jan
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Interesting post. I'd want to consult a lawyer before doing something like this. But it might never be an issue for me, hopefully.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    In Indiana, you can file for and receive your LLC online instantly.

    It's becoming one of the most business-friendly states in the US by the way. Just passed a venture capital investment state tax credit to foster new business development.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      In Indiana, you can file for and receive your LLC online instantly.

      It's becoming one of the most business-friendly states in the US by the way. Just passed a venture capital investment state tax credit to foster new business development.
      Thanks for sharing. Btw, it was nice meeting you in Raleigh. I really enjoyed your presentation and learned a lot from you in the bar as well.

      Cheers

      Jan
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      • Profile picture of the author Scott Lilly
        Did you need to fill out a W8BEN, or anything else to avoid Amazon withholding anything from the payments to the foreign corporation?

        Did they have any questions with you changing the name on your account (I'm assuming that your foreign corp has a different name than what you were being paid under previously)?
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        • Profile picture of the author jan roos
          Originally Posted by TheUruguayan View Post

          Did you need to fill out a W8BEN, or anything else to avoid Amazon withholding anything from the payments to the foreign corporation?

          Did they have any questions with you changing the name on your account (I'm assuming that your foreign corp has a different name than what you were being paid under previously)?
          No questions from them and they don't have to report anything to foreign governments so there is no need for tax Id numbers etc.

          Also, another benefit of incorporating is that if something ever goes wrong in your business such as bankruptcies or a lawsuit your personal assets are safe because the Corp is a separate entity and you just work for the Corp.

          Cheers
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          • Profile picture of the author Scott Lilly
            Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

            No questions from them and they don't have to report anything to foreign governments so there is no need for tax Id numbers etc.
            What I was told when I talked with an offshore incorporation agent a while back was that with the 2012 HIRE Act, US companies that make payments to foreign corporations will need to withhold 30% of the payment if the company has not filed a W-8BEN and the foreign bank is not a Qualified Intermediary.

            Some more information about it here Withholding Tax on US-sourced Income
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            • Profile picture of the author protraderz
              Nice work Jan . Thinking outside the square once again !
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  • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
    Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

    What you then do is open a corporate bank account in that ... country and have your Amazon and other business checks go to that account.
    Careful. The IRS requires US citizens to report all information, including account numbers, of foreign held bank accounts that reach a certain monetary amount (I believe $5000).

    The reporting applies even if the account is in the name of a separate company - if you can sign checks on the account.

    The penalties are extremely severe for not complying.

    - P.S. - Don't assume the only taxes you'll pay are on your salary. You may want to look into this a little more.

    .
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

      Careful. The IRS requires US citizens to report all information, including account numbers, of foreign held bank accounts that reach a certain monetary amount (I believe $5000).

      The reporting applies even if the account is in the name of a separate company - if you can sign checks on the account.

      The penalties are extremely severe for not complying.

      - P.S. - Don't assume the only taxes you'll pay are on your salary. You may want to look into this a little more.

      .
      I am not an U.S citizen and plan on leaving the U.S next year anyways and that's why I said the offshore route might not be for everyone but warriors could definitely inc themselves in a business friendly state within the U.S

      Cheers
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  • Profile picture of the author PhilG
    Thanks for this information Jan. I think a lot of affiliates are going to have to look into such ideas in the future. States and cities are the hardest hit by the financial meltdown and more and more will be trying to grab our money.

    As to LLCs, it seems to me that Nevada and New Hampshire are very business oriented states that have quick setups. So far, Arizona is still quite business friendly and the winters are great! You could pick up a cheap condo here for peanuts and make it a business expense for spending your winters here! I saw a 2 bedroom condo the other day with granite countertops, maple cabinets and stainless steel appliances for only $39K! Even the golf membership would be a write-off as long as you played golf with a customer every now and then.

    PhilG
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Wherever you file your LLC, you still will have to have pay an annual fee of $800 to the California Board of Equalization. There are also other very stiff compliance issues unique for California affiliates. Don't do this at home; get competent legal advice. Many affiliates are already running into trouble.
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      • Profile picture of the author Chris Sorrell
        Where's there's a law or a will, there's a way. Plenty of cali affiliates will no doubt be up and running again in no time. Good recommendation.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by PhilG View Post

      Thanks for this information Jan. I think a lot of affiliates are going to have to look into such ideas in the future. States and cities are the hardest hit by the financial meltdown and more and more will be trying to grab our money.

      As to LLCs, it seems to me that Nevada and New Hampshire are very business oriented states that have quick setups. So far, Arizona is still quite business friendly and the winters are great! You could pick up a cheap condo here for peanuts and make it a business expense for spending your winters here! I saw a 2 bedroom condo the other day with granite countertops, maple cabinets and stainless steel appliances for only $39K! Even the golf membership would be a write-off as long as you played golf with a customer every now and then.

      PhilG
      Wow, 39k on a Golf course. That's not bad at all. What kind of rent can one expect for a condo like that in the area?

      Cheers

      Jan
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  • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
    Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

    I make quite a good monthly income from Amazon and a few days ago I got the boot along with over 20 000 other California Affiliates.

    The next day I got my account fully restored.

    What I did was to incorporate overseas, change my details in my Amazon account to my new incorporation address and name. I then called up Amazon and got my account reinstated 100%.

    You could easily setup a LLC or Inc in a business friendly state. The process takes one day and the cost is very little. What you then do is open a corporate bank account in that state or country and have your Amazon and other business checks go to that account.

    You can then pay yourself salary each month in your home state and pay taxes on that income.

    Incorporating yourself is something you should really consider doing anyways because there are many advantages over doing business as a sole proprietor.

    There's a good book on Amazon called Inc Yourself which explains the many reasons why one would want to Inc themselves.

    As far as getting yourself incorporated, there are many agencies and companies offering these services online. Just do a Google search for the state you wish to incorporate in and you'll find a whole bunch of these companies that'l do it for you.

    What I did was to Incorporate in a different country that is extremely business friendly and has no corporate income tax and then bank in yet another country.

    This way when I go travel the world next year I will pretty much pay zero taxes. I will only pay taxes on the salary that I pay myself here in the U.S.A for the rest of the year.

    Now I know this might not be a good option for most but at least think abut incorporating in a different state here in the U.S as it will be beneficial to you in the long run.

    Also, do your own due dilligence. I am not giving tax advice or any of that. I am just sharing what I've done to get around the issue at hand. I make a good living from Amazon and I worked hard for it. There's no way greedy politicians will take that from me without a fight.

    Cheers,

    Jan

    This is a good way to be charged with tax evasion.

    Do you have an actual presence in the foreign country?

    No? That could be a large problem.

    Have you reported your foreign owned corporations to the IRS?

    No? That will be an enormous problem.

    Have you reported your foreign bank accounts to the IRS?

    No? That will be a considerable problem

    Nexus is an important thing. Is somebody your employee in the foreign state? Is somebody there doing your work for you?

    Are you paying yourself a salary?

    If you hare, has your foreign business qualified to do business in your home state here in the US, i.e. California?

    No? The Franchise Tax Board will want to speak with you about that, as will the Division of Corporations.

    Can you do this legally? Yes?

    Is it easy? No!!!

    You are going to want well informed counsel in the nation you are setting up your foreign corporation in, and well informed American counsel from your home state.

    Someone who specializes in business practice!

    If a client approached me with the story you just told me I would be very worried about them.

    I'm not licensed in California as an attorney, but I've been an attorney here in New York for seven years now, and I've looked into doing precisely what you've suggested with an LLC set up in Nevis and St. Kitts to operate my own business, and I've got to tell you, it would involve multiple entities including a New York based entity that is completely separate from the Nevis one to do it in a way that would have me less concerned about the tax man, than what I'm hearing right now, and even then, I would probably write the New York Dept. of Taxation and Finance, and the Internal Revenue Service for No-Action Letters before proceeding with the plan.

    The USA is one of only two nations that taxes income worldwide on it citizens and legal residents. When Haliburton or some other major US corporation re-incorporates in say the Bahamas, there is a reason an Army of attorneys are involved in the process!

    The difference between tax avoidance and tax evasion is a considerable jail term. Just ask Wesley Snipes.

    Many of these issues remain true when talking about incorporating or setting up an LLC in another state as well.

    Many companies, Microsoft as an example set up as a Delaware corporation, even though it is a company based in the State of Washington. For the privilege of Delaware's more favorable corporate governance laws, Microsoft gets to pay taxes in Delaware, AND Washington State, and they get to pay filing fees in both states, because they have to qualify to do business in Washington.

    The real question for a California based affiliate the sets up as a Nevada corporation isn't where they are incorporated, it's where are there offices. That's where they are taxed, that's where they are doing business with Amazon.

    Unless you are leaving California, this plan is not a very good plan.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by OrangeBull View Post

      This is a good way to be charged with tax evasion.

      Do you have an actual presence in the foreign country?

      No? That could be a large problem.

      Have you reported your foreign owned corporations to the IRS?

      No? That will be an enormous problem.

      Have you reported your foreign bank accounts to the IRS?

      No? That will be a considerable problem

      Nexus is an important thing. Is somebody your employee in the foreign state? Is somebody there doing your work for you?

      Are you paying yourself a salary?

      If you hare, has your foreign business qualified to do business in your home state here in the US, i.e. California?

      No? The Franchise Tax Board will want to speak with you about that, as will the Division of Corporations.

      Can you do this legally? Yes?

      Is it easy? No!!!

      You are going to want well informed counsel in the nation you are setting up your foreign corporation in, and well informed American counsel from your home state.

      Someone who specializes in business practice!

      If a client approached me with the story you just told me I would be very worried about them.

      I'm not licensed in California as an attorney, but I've been an attorney here in New York for seven years now, and I've looked into doing precisely what you've suggested with an LLC set up in Nevis and St. Kitts to operate my own business, and I've got to tell you, it would involve multiple entities including a New York based entity that is completely separate from the Nevis one to do it in a way that would have me less concerned about the tax man, than what I'm hearing right now, and even then, I would probably write the New York Dept. of Taxation and Finance, and the Internal Revenue Service for No-Action Letters before proceeding with the plan.

      The USA is one of only two nations that taxes income worldwide on it citizens and legal residents. When Haliburton or some other major US corporation re-incorporates in say the Bahamas, there is a reason an Army of attorneys are involved in the process!

      The difference between tax avoidance and tax evasion is a considerable jail term. Just ask Wesley Snipes.

      Many of these issues remain true when talking about incorporating or setting up an LLC in another state as well.

      Many companies, Microsoft as an example set up as a Delaware corporation, even though it is a company based in the State of Washington. For the privilege of Delaware's more favorable corporate governance laws, Microsoft gets to pay taxes in Delaware, AND Washington State, and they get to pay filing fees in both states, because they have to qualify to do business in Washington.

      The real question for a California based affiliate the sets up as a Nevada corporation isn't where they are incorporated, it's where are there offices. That's where they are taxed, that's where they are doing business with Amazon.

      Unless you are leaving California, this plan is not a very good plan.
      Thanks for the great advice and taking the time to write this up.

      I said before that I am leaving CA and also I do have an office with a secretary in the country that I incorporated in but of course I will do my own due diligence some more and make sure I comply with all laws here and reporting before my departure.

      Just out of curiosity, would the tax rate be the same on our foreign corps as it is here and also how does all these fortune 500 companies get to incorporate overseas and keep their trillions there tax free even though they operate in the U.S?

      I understand they also pay taxes here but the vast majority of their profits are offshore where they pay a much lower tax rate there. I watched a segment on CNBC where they interviewed a silicon valley tech company's CEO about this and that's pretty much what he said all of those companies are doing.

      Cheers

      Jan
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  • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
    When a company re-incorporates overseas, they generally put some staff on the ground, and they keep an entity or two here in the US. The foreign parent or subsidiary will be where a large part of the profits are "earned" The key questions involve nexus. The very issues that the whole Amazon affiliate debacle are about.

    The way I think it can work legally, but again, this is a theory I haven't finished the research on myself is Corp A. is in Nevis say, where there IS NO TAX.

    It is the "Parent Company." It's Board of Directors are American. They are paid a nominal salary from the parent company, and have an annual meeting, Outside the US, in say Nevis. Why not? It's a tropical paradise in the Caribbean, that seems like a good place for a vacation/shareholders/board meeting right?

    The Board then appoints Corp b. or LLC B, whatever the case may be to act as the Manager of the "Parent Company" for a fee. Corp B. or LLC B. is an American based company, say, Nevada if you lived there for example, or California, or New York, or whatever fill in the blanks state you live in. The management fee pays the salaries for you as the primary shareholder of the Nevis Corp. and the principle employee of the American subsidiary, which is in fact the management company for the Nevis Corp.

    This is possible because Nevis, as I understand it, allows a company to act as an officer, or board of directors or both, for a Nevis entity. This is an interesting concept that isn't usually the case in America, although I can see more business friendly states like Nevada, Wyoming, Delaware, or possible Texas, or New Hampshire adopting similar rules.

    So you aren't employed by the offshore corporation.

    You are employed by the American subsidiary, which in fact manages the foreign parent corporation.

    Are you with me so far?

    The American subsidiary pays all of the costs of the business, and takes tax deductions against the fees that the parent company pays to manage the enterprise, and your servers are purchased or leased in the name of the parent company. Your domain names are owned in the name of the parent company, your drop shippers if you have them are moving product for the parent company. These businesses are contractors, perhaps American contractors.

    The sales take place, on servers overseas, connnected to bank accounts through maybe Alertpay or a similar non-American payment provider, connected to a bank account in a foreign jurisdiction in the name of the foreign corporation, in an example where you are actually selling something and not acting as an affiliate.

    The problem of course is that YOU UNDER THE NEW CALIFORNIA LAW, and NOT AMAZON, have just become liable for the sales tax in this scenario if you ARE LIVING IN CALIFORNIA, and it is a tax YOU HAVEN'T COLLECTED!!!!

    Why, and how?

    You're Nevis Corp. is doing business in Nevis, but it IS AFFILIATED WITH YOUR CALIFORNIA Company, right?

    Amazon doesn't have a California affiliate necessarily in this scenario, but Nevis Corp. does, and that California subsidiary definitely does!

    Who is on the hook here for the sales tax?

    That California subsidiary and it's tax matters partner, i.e. YOU!!!

    As I've said, I don't think this tax survives the "International Shoe Doctrine," but I wouldn't set up an affiliate operation and fail to pay the tax just to find out.

    That involves potential criminal liability.

    How does Haliburton set up in the Bahamas and pay no tax? Well it performs services OUTSIDE THE US through that parent company, and IT enters into those contracts in that foreign nation.

    It's U.S. business is most likely conducted here, but it is such a small portion of the business it doesn't matter.

    Of course the secret for a products company is to build in the company you own in China, ship to Panama, where you sell from your Chinese subsidiary, to your Nevis parent company, that is managed by your Nevada LLC. Then those products you plan to send to the US are sold at a markup which is essentially the retail price, to a Texas based subsidiary LLC which has nothing to do with the Nevada management company, and all of your profit is locked in overseas, in the form of accounts recievable that get paid from the profits when you sell the final goods to consumers here in the U.S. for a $0.01 profit over the "wholesale" price.

    That's how I think it's done, but like I said, even I as an attorney want someone to check my work, and get a blessing from the various state departments of tax involved and the IRS.

    Also they would need to report those foreign owned corporations and bank accounts to comply with IRS regs.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      OrangeBull, thanks for that. I think I follow you but it sure sounds a bit complicated. How about this scenario.

      You setup a corp in a no tax country which also keeps your info confidential. Meaning the country does not report any of your business details etc to foreign governments. You then open an offshore corporate bank account under the Corp name in a place like Hong Kong.

      It seems to me that if one do it this way there is a very good chance that one's business remains confidential from foreign governments.

      If one was to then still live in the U.S and need to move some funds back into the country it could possibly get complicated however this is not something I plan on doing but If I were wouldn't it work to just basically be paid a salary from this foreign corp here in the U.S and pay taxes on that?

      Cheers
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      • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
        Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

        OrangeBull, thanks for that. I think I follow you but it sure sounds a bit complicated. How about this scenario.

        You setup a corp in a no tax country which also keeps your info confidential. Meaning the country does not report any of your business details etc to foreign governments. You then open an offshore corporate bank account under the Corp name in a place like Hong Kong.

        It seems to me that if one do it this way there is a very good chance that one's business remains confidential from foreign governments.

        If one was to then still live in the U.S and need to move some funds back into the country it could possibly get complicated however this is not something I plan on doing but If I were wouldn't it work to just basically be paid a salary from this foreign corp here in the U.S and pay taxes on that?

        Cheers
        There are a large number of Americans who thought the Swiss would never tell their information to the IRS. Boy were they wrong.

        It's ILLEGAL for a US National to fail to report a foreign owned corporation, or a foreign held bank account, or a foreign trust of which they are a beneficiary to the Internal Revenue Service.

        That is a criminal act for an American. You can own a foreign company, and a foreign account, but YOU MUST REPORT IT!
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        • Profile picture of the author jan roos
          Originally Posted by OrangeBull View Post

          There are a large number of Americans who thought the Swiss would never tell their information to the IRS. Boy were they wrong.

          It's ILLEGAL for a US National to fail to report a foreign owned corporation, or a foreign held bank account, or a foreign trust of which they are a beneficiary to the Internal Revenue Service.

          That is a criminal act for an American. You can own a foreign company, and a foreign account, but YOU MUST REPORT IT!
          Ok so if you report it what does that mean exactly? Would you be liable for taxes on the money offshore or only on the money brought back to the States and if you do have to pay, do you know if the rate would be the same?

          Cheers
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          • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
            If you followed my original post you understand that if you are doing this for tax avoidance purposes that have nothing to do with Amazon, which is a whole other ball of wax, then you understand that you wouldn't want that foreign company to have a "nexus" with the U.S. directly, i.e. no U.S. based employees, because then the company would have to register with the Secretary of State in the state that employee is based in as a foreign entity doing business in that state, and the whole tax avoidance plan is nullified.

            Multiple entities will be required, along with a management plan, and some employees in the jurisidiction where the company is incorporated.

            Money earned overseas will be taxed by the jurisdiction where the money is earned at whatever rate it is taxed there. If it is a country that has a reciporical tax treaty with the U.S. the money may be repatriated to the U.S. with a nominal or possibly even no tax. This is a your mileage may very scenario that depends on specifics.

            Nevis for instance, doesn't tax the income at all, so as long as the money remains in Nevis, it remains untaxed.

            You said you aren't a U.S. citizen, which is probably good for you, if you leave the U.S. you are no longer subject to U.S. taxes.

            If you are a U.S. citizen, the moment that the money from that corporation is repatriated to you in the U.S., either in the form of a payment of a management fee to the U.S. entity you set up to manage the business, or in the form of a dividend from your Nevis corporation, it is taxed at the ordinary U.S. rate. If you have a U.S. based parent company, that has a Nevis subsidiary, then the money would be taxed at the U.S. corporate rate in the case of a corporation, then taxed again, if distributed to you as a dividend as a shareholder.

            Again, this is all very specific to the facts on the ground.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ben Holmes
    I looked into an LLC - but California whacking you with another $800 every year just to have an out-of-state LLC put me off.

    So I went with Skimlinks and Viglink - and although I'll end up paying a percentage to them, it's a completely legal option for me until I can move out of California.
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    • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
      Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post

      I looked into an LLC - but California whacking you with another $800 every year just to have an out-of-state LLC put me off.

      So I went with Skimlinks and Viglink - and although I'll end up paying a percentage to them, it's a completely legal option for me until I can move out of California.
      Of course, the reason California would whack you with that $800 a year fee, is precisely why this idea doesn't work.

      Yes, the new entity is a Nevada entity for example, but and this is a very big but, it is doing business in California. If California is taxing sales, then the company doing business in California, even though it is a Nevada LLC or corporation, is a California affiliate for Amazon under the law!

      The problem continues for Amazon!
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      • Profile picture of the author tcraw1010
        Originally Posted by OrangeBull View Post

        Of course, the reason California would whack you with that $800 a year fee, is precisely why this idea doesn't work.

        Yes, the new entity is a Nevada entity for example, but and this is a very big but, it is doing business in California. If California is taxing sales, then the company doing business in California, even though it is a Nevada LLC or corporation, is a California affiliate for Amazon under the law!

        The problem continues for Amazon!
        I'm not sure who to be more upset with . . . our DOPE of a Governor and his Democrat money-grabbing comrades, or Amazon for turning their back on their California affiliates.

        This really sucks .... I was JUST about to get a new site going in which the Amazon affiliate program would have been a great (potential) revenue generator. Now I'm screwed because Geriatric Brown and the tax-and-spend Dumbocrats needed to find a back-door way to create new taxes rather than developing a responsible budget that WON'T effectively destroy millions in income tax revenue that would have otherwise been generated by California Amazon Affiliates. (How these morons continue to be elected is beyond the capacity for rational thought).

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      • Profile picture of the author xwindowuser
        Originally Posted by OrangeBull View Post

        Of course, the reason California would whack you with that $800 a year fee, is precisely why this idea doesn't work.

        Yes, the new entity is a Nevada entity for example, but and this is a very big but, it is doing business in California. If California is taxing sales, then the company doing business in California, even though it is a Nevada LLC or corporation, is a California affiliate for Amazon under the law!

        The problem continues for Amazon!
        OB maybe you can explain where the 800$ is coming from or going to and why? I'm in San Diego and I'm thinking about doing an LLC in Nevada so I can get my Amazon account back.

        I've read your posts and I am a little confused.

        So I set up a PO forwarded to my home here, I get a bank account in Nevada, I get my LLC done with Legal zoom and i am good to go, right?

        you say no.

        So where is the 800$ coming from or going to and why?

        and if I am paying taxes on the LLC income or profit and then I am paying taxes for my income that I get paid from that LLC, I should be ok shouldn't I?
        thanks for the help.
        Larry
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        • Profile picture of the author Ben Holmes
          Originally Posted by xwindowuser View Post

          OB maybe you can explain where the 800$ is coming from or going to and why? I'm in San Diego and I'm thinking about doing an LLC in Nevada so I can get my Amazon account back.

          Larry
          A simple Google search on 'California LLC 800' came up with the following information:

          "In addition, some businesses are so small that the fees and paperwork involved in setting up and running an LLC just aren't justified, especially in California, where both LLCs and corporations must pay an $800 annual tax to the Franchise Tax Board."

          This was the way I was looking to go, with a Wyoming LLC, but since my current monthly revenues would mean that I would spend nearly half a year just to pay the fees - I looked around for another way.

          And thanks to the Warrior's forum, I do believe I've found what will work for me... Skimlinks & Viglink

          Between the two, Skimlinks looks like it's more robust - but either platform will legally allow you as a Californian to still collect affiliate income. Both of them take 25% of your commission for their efforts - but until I move out of California, this will be my solution.
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          • Profile picture of the author xwindowuser
            Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post

            A simple Google search on 'California LLC 800' came up with the following information:

            "In addition, some businesses are so small that the fees and paperwork involved in setting up and running an LLC just aren't justified, especially in California, where both LLCs and corporations must pay an $800 annual tax to the Franchise Tax Board."

            This was the way I was looking to go, with a Wyoming LLC, but since my current monthly revenues would mean that I would spend nearly half a year just to pay the fees - I looked around for another way.

            And thanks to the Warrior's forum, I do believe I've found what will work for me... Skimlinks & Viglink

            Between the two, Skimlinks looks like it's more robust - but either platform will legally allow you as a Californian to still collect affiliate income. Both of them take 25% of your commission for their efforts - but until I move out of California, this will be my solution.
            Well I can still collect affiliate income on many of my sources, many have a physical presence in Ca and I don't think that effects this.

            So this 800$ is for an LLC in Ca.? or in any other state? I guess I am still unclear where it comes from.

            So if I open a biz in another state doing the LLC I have to tell Ca about it and then pay them 800$ to be able to do my business in another state yet live here?

            Skimlinks & Viglink do they do amazon stuff? or other stuff?
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            • Profile picture of the author Ben Holmes
              Originally Posted by xwindowuser View Post

              Well I can still collect affiliate income on many of my sources, many have a physical presence in Ca and I don't think that effects this.
              Absolutely! But sadly for me, Amazon is by far my largest source of revenue.

              So this 800$ is for an LLC in Ca.? or in any other state? I guess I am still unclear where it comes from.

              So if I open a biz in another state doing the LLC I have to tell Ca about it and then pay them 800$ to be able to do my business in another state yet live here?
              I'm not a lawyer, so take everything I say with a grain of salt, but as I read the law, if you do any LLC business while you are in the state of California, you owe the yearly $800 tax on LLC's.

              Unless you frequently travel to the state where your LLC is at, I think it would be very difficult to defend to California that you did not do any business while physically in California.

              Skimlinks & Viglink do they do amazon stuff? or other stuff?
              They apparently can only over-write Amazon affiliate links (so you don't even have to change your links), but both Skimlinks and Viglink are affiliates for hundreds, or thousands of other affiliate programs. Take a look, it's free to sign up.
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              • Profile picture of the author xwindowuser
                Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post

                Absolutely! But sadly for me, Amazon is by far my largest source of revenue.



                I'm not a lawyer, so take everything I say with a grain of salt, but as I read the law, if you do any LLC business while you are in the state of California, you owe the yearly $800 tax on LLC's.

                Unless you frequently travel to the state where your LLC is at, I think it would be very difficult to defend to California that you did not do any business while physically in California.



                They apparently can only over-write Amazon affiliate links (so you don't even have to change your links), but both Skimlinks and Viglink are affiliates for hundreds, or thousands of other affiliate programs. Take a look, it's free to sign up.
                Thanks for that explanation, I think this is what I am going to do for now. but I have a question maybe you know. I have a site that sells amazon stuff and it also sells ebooks too. I want it to only effect the amazon links, I don't want them taking a cut of my ebook sales. can I dis-clude those links somehow?
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post

      I looked into an LLC - but California whacking you with another $800 every year just to have an out-of-state LLC put me off.

      So I went with Skimlinks and Viglink - and although I'll end up paying a percentage to them, it's a completely legal option for me until I can move out of California.
      Judging from Orange Bull's post this might not be legal as well because you are still operating your own business in CA but using a foreign company to shield it. I am just thinking out loud here btw.

      Cheers
      Signature

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      • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
        Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

        Judging from Orange Bull's post this might not be legal as well because you are still operating your own business in CA but using a foreign company to shield it. I am just thinking out loud here btw.

        Cheers
        It would be perfectly legal for someone to set up a company in Nevada, file the paperwork to do business in California, do business in California, set up a bank account in Nevada, have a mail drop in Nevada that they used for Amazon, and Amazon would still be liable for the California tax under that scenario, unless they require the affiliate to make a fairly broad representation and warranty which of course they will stating that the affiliate has no connections to a state that has one of these "Amazon Taxes." In which case, Amazon would probably also require such affiliate to indemnify them against loses suffered due to a breach of that representation and warranty.

        In other words, that affiliate would be on the hook to Amazon and the State of California for the sales tax due on every sale in California.

        Read your affiliate agreements people! You are likely putting yourself on the hook for literally millions of dollars in liabilities if you commit fraud.
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    • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
      Orange Bull, welcome to the forum.

      This is an issue I have looked at several times over the years, and I was formerly local counsel for a billion dollar international company.

      You are correct that the key is to setup up multiple entities. Essentially, the holding company has the major assets. A management company drains the income. Local companies do the real business with minimal liability exposure.

      The first problem for virtually everyone on this forum is that they will be majority owners, if not the sole owner, of each entity. IRS rules will typically create an umbrella and say the person is ultimately responsible for this group of companies. This can create a huge tax problem even if cash is not held in the US.

      The second problem is getting the cash into the US. Storing it in a bank account in Nevis means it cannot be used for groceries.

      This is very simplistic and the IRS is waayyy ahead of this issue. Companies like Google that get to store billions offshore without being taxed, as you note, have obtained written permission from the IRS. Permission it takes them years to obtain at an unbelievable cost in attorney time.

      Permission requiring transparency disclosures to the IRS that would likely be yet another problem for many here.

      .
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      • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
        Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

        Orange Bull, welcome to the forum.

        This is an issue I have looked at several times over the years, and I was formerly local counsel for a billion dollar international company.

        You are correct that the key is to setup up multiple entities. Essentially, the holding company has the major assets. A management company drains the income. Local companies do the real business with minimal liability exposure.

        The first problem for virtually everyone on this forum is that they will be majority owners, if not the sole owner, of each entity. IRS rules will typically create an umbrella and say the person is ultimately responsible for this group of companies. This can create a huge tax problem even if cash is not held in the US.

        The second problem is getting the cash into the US. Storing it in a bank account in Nevis means it cannot be used for groceries.

        This is very simplistic and the IRS is waayyy ahead of this issue. Companies like Google that get to store billions offshore without being taxed, as you note, have obtained written permission from the IRS. Permission it takes them years to obtain at an unbelievable cost in attorney time.

        Permission requiring transparency disclosures to the IRS that would likely be yet another problem for many here.

        .
        I'm glad there is at least one other person here who understands that when you are asking for something like a no action letter from the IRS, or the SEC or one of the other alphabet soups it means that you have several thousands of hours of legal research, with precedents to be cited, and a detailed plan involved to succinctly express the plan in a letter written to the IRS that will go through rounds of discussion before they give it their blessing for something like this to work.

        I was primarily focused on the fact that overseas could be creating enormous problems, but the bigger basic problem is that people probably aren't reading their affiliate agreements.

        If you don't realize that lying about a representation and warranty in an affiliate contract could put you on the hook for hundreds of millions of dollars in damages to a multinational corporation like Amazon when they become subject to a California sales tax liability because you lied, somebody should point that out to you. Especially if you are considering doing it to preserve a thousand dollars a month in income.

        Amazon did this to cause those people to put pressure on their state legislators. The problem is that push is coming to shove in the revenue wars. Time for big click-and-mortar to pay up just like other retailers.
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    • Profile picture of the author magentawave
      What is the percentage you will pay Skimlinks and Viglink, and do you know for sure those links will still work for Amazon while still resideing in California?

      Thanks
      Steve

      Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post

      I looked into an LLC - but California whacking you with another $800 every year just to have an out-of-state LLC put me off.

      So I went with Skimlinks and Viglink - and although I'll end up paying a percentage to them, it's a completely legal option for me until I can move out of California.
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    • Profile picture of the author jerryp
      Originally Posted by Khadaji View Post

      I looked into an LLC - but California whacking you with another $800 every year just to have an out-of-state LLC put me off.

      So I went with Skimlinks and Viglink - and although I'll end up paying a percentage to them, it's a completely legal option for me until I can move out of California.
      When I talked to Skimlinks they said that Amazon had asked them not to take California affiliates for the Amazon program. They said they would respect this. Is it really working for you?
      Signature
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      • Profile picture of the author CopyAcolyte
        Originally Posted by jerryp View Post

        When I talked to Skimlinks they said that Amazon had asked them not to take California affiliates for the Amazon program. They said they would respect this. Is it really working for you?
        I'd like to know the answer to this question, as well.
        Signature

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        • Profile picture of the author Frugal Jen
          I am in Ca and am using Skimlinks for my Amazon links.

          jen
          Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author John Galt
    @Kindsvader - The ceiling is $10,000. Then you have to report via FBAR by June 30th every year. Of course, this only applies to yankees and the OP isn't one.

    @Orange - Can you explain your reasoning for setting up a separate US business underneath the foreign company? If you're the advertiser then the situation might be different, but as an affiliate there is no reason (legally or otherwise) to have a corporate presence in every market you advertise in.

    @Jan - Financial privacy is a thing of the past. Don't assume simply because you've incorporated in one jurisdiction and hold your money elsewhere that nobody knows. There is always an electronic paper trail these days.
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    • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
      Originally Posted by John Galt View Post

      @Kindsvader - The ceiling is $10,000. Then you have to report via FBAR by June 30th every year. Of course, this only applies to yankees and the OP isn't one.

      @Orange - Can you explain your reasoning for setting up a separate US business underneath the foreign company? If you're the advertiser then the situation might be different, but as an affiliate there is no reason (legally or otherwise) to have a corporate presence in every market you advertise in.

      @Jan - Financial privacy is a thing of the past. Don't assume simply because you've incorporated in one jurisdiction and hold your money elsewhere that nobody knows. There is always an electronic paper trail these days.
      Assuming that you are the little affiliate doing this, well the problem comes from that "nexus" word I've been talking about.

      You set up a Nevada LLC to operate your affiliate marketing business to make it less about the overseas issue. You set up a bank account in Nevada.

      You live in California. You work in California. You design your websites in California. You host your servers in Texas, I gotta tip my hat to hostgator! You manage your business from California.

      You have a mail drop in Las Vegas, Nevada that sends you your business mail in California.

      You are doing business in California. One problem. You are not authorized to do business in California. Your profits are being generated in California, not Nevada, do to labor being done in California.

      You never filed with the Secretary of State to register your business in California. This could present some issues in terms of your liability shield, and a whole host of other issues regarding the "nexus" question that it even hurts lawyers' minds to think about.

      Substitue Nevis, or the Isle of Man, or Sechylles, or Hong Kong, or Panama, or the Cayman Islands, or Vanuatu, or whatever tax haven you want to talk about for Nevada.

      The same holds true, when you fail to register to do business as a foreign entity in your home state, and if you do register to do business in your home state with that foreign company, well there is now a tax nexus in the U.S.

      However, when that U.S. owned subsidiary acts as the management company for a foreign entity that holds the assets and earns the money outside the U.S. at least under the current set of legal fictions on which our system operates, that piece of paper sitting in a drawer in an office on Grand Cayman that is the foriegn legal entity you are doing business through isn't doing business in the United States.

      Of course the control group tests that have been mentioned by my fellow attorney still present some legal issues that are challenging as well.

      This is a topic that a team of lawyers could talk about for weeks without coming to a real answer.
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      • Profile picture of the author jan roos
        Originally Posted by OrangeBull View Post

        Assuming that you are the little affiliate doing this, well the problem comes from that "nexus" word I've been talking about.

        You set up a Nevada LLC to operate your affiliate marketing business to make it less about the overseas issue. You set up a bank account in Nevada.

        You live in California. You work in California. You design your websites in California. You host your servers in Texas, I gotta tip my hat to hostgator! You manage your business from California.

        You have a mail drop in Las Vegas, Nevada that sends you your business mail in California.

        You are doing business in California. One problem. You are not authorized to do business in California. Your profits are being generated in California, not Nevada, do to labor being done in California.

        You never filed with the Secretary of State to register your business in California. This could present some issues in terms of your liability shield, and a whole host of other issues regarding the "nexus" question that it even hurts lawyers' minds to think about.

        Substitue Nevis, or the Isle of Man, or Sechylles, or Hong Kong, or Panama, or the Cayman Islands, or Vanuatu, or whatever tax haven you want to talk about for Nevada.

        The same holds true, when you fail to register to do business as a foreign entity in your home state, and if you do register to do business in your home state with that foreign company, well there is now a tax nexus in the U.S.

        However, when that U.S. owned subsidiary acts as the management company for a foreign entity that holds the assets and earns the money outside the U.S. at least under the current set of legal fictions on which our system operates, that piece of paper sitting in a drawer in an office on Grand Cayman that is the foriegn legal entity you are doing business through isn't doing business in the United States.

        Of course the control group tests that have been mentioned by my fellow attorney still present some legal issues that are challenging as well.

        This is a topic that a team of lawyers could talk about for weeks without coming to a real answer.
        Ok, let's assume a U.S permanent resident Im'er who not only earns aff commission from Amazon but also sells his/her own info products all over the world decides to go travel the world extensively for 2 years thus the business (incorporated offshore SeyChelles) is not being operated in the U.S or CA for those 2 years. Would the Im'er still be liable for taxes in the U.S? I know he'she would still need to file a tax return but would he/she actually have to pay income tax?

        It would be so nice if the world governments could make taxes more straight forward and easier to understand for regular folks. As you mentioned above, a team of lawyers could talk about this for weeks and still not come to a conclusion.

        Cheers

        Jan
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        • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
          Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

          Ok, let's assume a U.S permanent resident Im'er who not only earns aff commission from Amazon but also sells his/her own info products all over the world decides to go travel the world extensively for 2 years thus the business (incorporated offshore SeyChelles) is not being operated in the U.S or CA for those 2 years. Would the Im'er still be liable for taxes in the U.S? I know he'she would still need to file a tax return but would he/she actually have to pay income tax?

          It would be so nice if the world governments could make taxes more straight forward and easier to understand for regular folks. As you mentioned above, a team of lawyers could talk about this for weeks and still not come to a conclusion.

          Cheers

          Jan
          I don't know.

          I know that U.S. Citizens are subject to U.S. taxes on income earned worldwide. You aren't a U.S. citizen. It puts you outside the realm of my immediate knowledge. Also a foreign entity is generally taxed locally first, and until the money is repatriated to the U.S. it generally isn't taxed as income earned in the U.S., although, a U.S. citizen working overseas will be taxed on their earned income by the U.S. while they are overseas in addition to the foriegn taxes they pay, subject to any tax treaty restrictions. But you aren't a U.S. citizen. I suspect permanent residents who haven't renounced their residency are probably subject to similar taxation, but if the money remains in the entity, and as my collegue suggested, the plan for retaining the income in the foreign entity has been approved by the IRS, then it likely won't be taxed until it is in an individual's hot little hands.

          It also presents and even more challenging "nexus" question. Where is your business doing business if you are the business to a large degree, which is the case for many IMer's.

          I mean if you are visiting Ireland and you check your bank accounts, or login to your website to give it a tweak while you are there, are you "doing business" in Ireland? I don't know the answer to that question. If you do are violating the local labor laws?

          Freaky set of questions.
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    • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
      Originally Posted by John Galt View Post

      @Kindsvader - The ceiling is $10,000. Then you have to report via FBAR by June 30th every year. Of course, this only applies to yankees and the OP isn't one.
      Thanks John. This may be old too, but I believe the failure to report an account penalty was something like up to $100,000 or 50% of the account balance, for each failure to report. It was draconian.

      .
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      • Profile picture of the author WhosGotMoves
        What are the potential dangers of just using an out of state address from a family member? For example I read somewhere here on WF that their state was banned a few yrs ago and they have just been using an out of state address since then with no problems. I wish I could find the original thread, but wouldn't this be considered tax evasion?
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      • Profile picture of the author jan roos
        Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

        Thanks John. This may be old too, but I believe the failure to report an account penalty was something like up to $100,000 or 50% of the account balance, for each failure to report. It was draconian.

        .
        Yeah that's what I read as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author kimberly Aita
    I tried setting up an llc and while that part might have been easy, I could not find a bank that would allow me to set up an account online or over the phone. Believe me, I tried several, including wells fargo, and every one of them wanted me to come in person so they could see who I am.

    Someone from one of them said it's actually a law that banks have to know their customers on a personal basis. I don't know if that's actually true but it seemed quite a pain.

    Just my experience,
    Kim
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    • Profile picture of the author Scott Lilly
      Originally Posted by kimberly Aita View Post

      I tried setting up an llc and while that part might have been easy, I could not find a bank that would allow me to set up an account online or over the phone. Believe me, I tried several, including wells fargo, and every one of them wanted me to come in person so they could see who I am.

      Just my experience,
      Kim
      Kim,

      Try contacting a branch of the bank in your corporation's state and ask if you can have them open the account for your corporation with you going into one of the local branches to complete the opening and show your ID.

      When I was living in Texas, I was able to open a Nevada bank account for my Nevada corporation by doing all the signatures and "know your customer" stuff at a branch in Houston.

      You'll need to find a bank that has branches in both your hometown and whichever state your corporation is in. I was able to do this with Wells Fargo.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Galt
    @Kimberly - These are the so-called KYC (Know Your Customer) guidelines. Banks have to see you face to face in order to open your account. One way to get around a flight is to look for banks headquartered elsewhere with a local branch. Otherwise, you're gonna have to hop on a plane.
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  • Profile picture of the author PhilG
    Wow, 39k on a Golf course. That's not bad at all. What kind of rent can one expect for a condo like that in the area?
    Cheers
    Jan
    Unfortunately, it sold before I had a chance to jump on it. Rents for that type of property are in the $650 to $850 range. Lots more deals in the area, especially Chandler and Gilbert. Check Zillow.com.

    PhilG
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by PhilG View Post

      Unfortunately, it sold before I had a chance to jump on it. Rents for that type of property are in the $650 to $850 range. Lots more deals in the area, especially Chandler and Gilbert. Check Zillow.com.

      PhilG
      If you can get $650 a month then it'll be a great investment with positive cash flow while waiting for the market to rebound.

      I've heard the market there in Arizona is quite affordable right now I might have to keep an eye out there.

      Cheers
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  • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
    kidsvater,

    So I hadn't looked at these rules in a while regarding taxes on foreign corps, but I perused them again, and is it just me or has the U.S. created a tax regime that is far more harsh than other countries regarding foriegn investments?

    I mean the only way for a "United States Person" which includes domestic entities, US Citizens and Green Card holder to not be immediately taxed by both the U.S. and the country where an investment is made is by essentially finding a business partner who is a foreign national and not a permanent U.S. resident from a country that doesn't have similarly punitive tax rules for foreign investments to be the majority shareholder of a foreign corporation.

    They way I read the U.S IRC, US persons can own 49 percent of a foreign corporation and it doesn't become a Controlled Foreign Corporation subject to tax under subpart F. I've read a KPMG report to the Canadian government that purports that the United Kingdom has similar attribution rules for "entities" that own foreign subsidiaries, but not for individuals, so a UK partner who owns 51% of an IBC could potentially provide for both parties enjoying significant tax savings if managed properly.
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  • Profile picture of the author onegoodman
    Thank you for the information jan,

    I will try to find out, although I am not sure Amazon worth the try. I used to sell on them and make a decent income few years ago.

    Their terrible customer service for seller made me move to eBay on no time.
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  • Profile picture of the author celente
    Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

    Also, do your own due dilligence. I am not giving tax advice or any of that. I am just sharing what I've done to get around the issue at hand. I make a good living from Amazon and I worked hard for it. There's no way greedy politicians will take that from me without a fight.

    Cheers,

    Jan
    I think you hit the nail on the head here jan.

    if you make a good living on amazon, and it is taken away you uses your smarts to get yourself out of bad situation. It is another reminder to use all to not have all you eggs in one basket, one system, one income. The internet allows you to create multiple incomes in various ways, that way if one system collapses, you have many other ways to cover your arse.

    Good profits to you. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author mattball
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author xwindowuser
      Originally Posted by mattball View Post

      I paid $32.67 for a XBOX 360 and my mom got a 17 inch Toshiba laptop for $94.83 being delivered to our house tomorrow by FedEX. I will never again pay expensive retail prices at stores. I even sold a 46 inch HDTV to my boss for $650 and it only cost me $52.78 to get. Here is the website we using to get all this stuff, BidsGet.com
      Frakin spammer...reported.
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  • Profile picture of the author OrangeBull
    The big problem is that if you set up an LLC or Corporation in a state other than the one where you live, you will have to file to do business in your home state. There are fees associated with that, and you will have to pay taxes in your home state.

    If you set up overseas, you face serious problems in regards to the foreign controlled corporation statutes with the IRS.

    There are ways around it, like having a foriegn national as a partner who owns at least 50 percent of the company. You still potentially have foriegn bank account reports you will need to file with the IRS.

    There are more complicated strategies involving the use of foriegn charitable trusts that neither you, nor another American controls that limit your exposure as a U.S. resident, and which potentially reduce your tax liability, but they are pretty damn complicated too.

    The simple reality is that if you live in California, are an Amazon affiliate, and have a SIGNIFICANT income from this source, the BEST way to protect it would be to MOVE to a jurisdiction that won't be enacting an affiliates tax. If it doesn't make economic sense to do that, well, then your best bet is to complain to your state legislators.
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  • Profile picture of the author efwebm
    I'm in Oregon, and there is no sales tax, so hopefully nobody here will try to box Amazon into collecting sales taxes from customers. From what I understand, that is the issue - Amazon wants to stay sales tax free.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sfrew
    Your approach is a valid option. The one drawback is that you actually have to have a valid business in the foreign state and do your business from there or you have to register as a foreign corporation in your home state, which may have more tax and cost consequences than are worth it. California is one of the states that is very picky about taxing anything that even comes close to their state, so people should just get good legal and tax advice if they choose that route.

    I am in Illinois and got the same letter in April but was not doing enough to justify going the foreign corporation route. My son got a notice too, but he lives in Iowa now, so he got reinstated by simply updating his address with Amazon. My approach was to just change the affiliate link to my son's and I will just help out with his student loan payments that way.
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  • Profile picture of the author stig57
    Jan - Why were you booted in the first place ?
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Originally Posted by stig57 View Post

      Jan - Why were you booted in the first place ?
      Amazon booted out all affiliates living in California unless they were incorporated in another state.
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      “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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  • Profile picture of the author NoBody Special
    This thread has had a lot of back and forth, then just stopped. I am in Connecticut, Amazon dropped me, and other affiliates have brought concern. Did we establish that I can't just open a Mail Box and LLC in New Hampshire, then pay taxes on my own income?

    This whole thing is just silly. The Server is in Texas, my assistant is in Hungary, my sales are digital downloads from around the world, and Connecticut wants to get paid, because I did? They already got me on income taxes, no idea why I should be paying for sales taxes too.
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    • Profile picture of the author xwindowuser
      Ok So I did the LLC in Nevada, got my account reinstated and today I received an email wanting ONE of the following:
      • Utility bill, not more than two months old, addressed to you at your residence (examples include gas, electric, sewer, water, cable or phone bill). Cellular phone and pager bills are not accepted
      • Receipt for personal property taxes or real estate taxes paid within the last year and addressed to you at your residence
      • Current automobile or life insurance bill (cards or policies are not accepted) addressed to you at your residence
      • Certified copy of school records/transcript from a school in which you are currently enrolled, issued by a school accredited by a U.S. state, jurisdiction, or territory (report cards are not accepted)
      • Voter registration card displaying your current address
      • Driver's license, learner's permit or DMV-issued photo ID cards displaying your current address
      • Current homeowners insurance policy or bill for your residence
      • Deed, mortgage, monthly mortgage statement, or residential rental/lease agreement for your residence
      • U.S. Postal Service change of address confirmation form or postmarked U.S. mail with forwarding address label (must display the applicant's full name and current address)
      I did a change of address from my po box to my Nevada address. I'll go get the change of address confirmation and scan and email it to Amazon. I hope that works, this is getting ridiculous.
      I feel like they have no business micro managing crap like this.
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  • Profile picture of the author rodem
    Hi Jan,
    I am trying to get your Physical Product Course but I cant find the buying page. Is it still on sale. I am realyy interested. Thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author danieldroga
    You did a very good job on getting your Amazon account bank. However, I am new to your idea on getting it back. I would still ask from a legal advice so that I wouldn't mess things up.
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