Eban Pagan's model - Offer Top content Free...then sell the product - Who does this model ?

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Eban Pagens model of providing Free hot content to your customers first, and then get them warmed up and then sell them the product afterwards has been talked by many big guys too.

How many of you people apply this model to your business ?
#content #eban #freethen #model #offer #pagan #product #sell #top
  • Profile picture of the author Bill_Z
    I definitely use this model. Of course it depends on the niche just how much you give away. There can be a fine line between giving too much away and just enough to get them wanting more. When in doubt, I would error on the side of giving too much away.
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  • Profile picture of the author marcuslim
    Top internet marketing gurus do this a lot these days. Think all the big launches recently. Andy Jenkin's Video Boss 2 for example, where he gave away 3 top quality videos, plus more than 20 hours of live interviews. Eben Pagan calls this 'moving the freeline'. The idea is to give away something very very useful of high value for free, so that they'll think 'if your free stuff is so awesome, imagine how much more awesome your paid stuff will be!'
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  • Profile picture of the author timpears
    It obviously works as so many people use this type of model. But I shy away from building a huge list of freebie seekers which is what is bound to happen.

    I am no authority on this, so I would not take my word.
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    • Profile picture of the author Glyn
      Originally Posted by timpears View Post

      It obviously works as so many people use this type of model. But I shy away from building a huge list of freebie seekers which is what is bound to happen.

      I am no authority on this, so I would not take my word.

      There are a lot of "freebie seekers" out there. I think everyone likes getting something from free from time to time. But I've been studying Eben and his methods even before getting his Guru BluePrint program and I think his model isn't just to give away his best ideas for free... it's to give useful but incomplete information away so that your prospect gets a taste of whats possible.

      The ticket price for Guru BluePrint was a bit of a stretch for my budge but I know the value that Eben delivers and the value that I got from his useful but incomplete information bought me his program so it works.
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      • Profile picture of the author magnates
        Originally Posted by Glyn View Post

        There are a lot of "freebie seekers" out there. I think everyone likes getting something from free from time to time. But I've been studying Eben and his methods even before getting his Guru BluePrint program and I think his model isn't just to give away his best ideas for free... it's to give useful but incomplete information away so that your prospect gets a taste of whats possible.

        The ticket price for Guru BluePrint was a bit of a stretch for my budge but I know the value that Eben delivers and the value that I got from his useful but incomplete information bought me his program so it works.
        Exactly , if you give away the whole product , there is no reason for people to buy when you have given it for free

        I love Eben Pagan , his presentation and the way he communicate . He is top notch
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        • Profile picture of the author Spyder77
          Originally Posted by magnates View Post

          Exactly , if you give away the whole product , there is no reason for people to buy when you have given it for free
          Sure there is. The law of reciprocation: someone who is given something feels an innate compulsion to reciprocate when something small is asked for in return. Then you combine it with the foot-the-in-the-door-effect and the innate tendency to self-validate through consistency of action, and you have the one-two punch behind how this approach works on the human psyche:

          Someone is given something of value (say an e-book to opt-in to a list), they're then primed (through reciprocation) to return the gesture by giving something small in return when asked for it (providing the foot in the door); because having said 'yes' once, in the small buy, they'll buy in again and they'll buy in for more because to say no creates a state of cognitive dissonance where the 'no' response is at odds when the prior 'yes' response, and that's where they'll opt to validate their previous 'yes' decision to buy again.

          Cialdini explained this process very elaborately in his "Power of Persuasion" book (he's a Ph.D in Psychology who has researched marketing principles and broken them down on the elements of human nature that they work on, and why).

          It works and its used everyday, often times without either party even being aware of the underlying psychology involved. Where people blow it is when they go for the big prize all at once, which nullifies the reciprocation instinct.

          The need to affirm previous decisions is why people often throw "good money after bad" and why that phrase exists in the first place.

          -Spyder
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          • Profile picture of the author Amanda Craven
            Originally Posted by Spyder77 View Post

            Someone is given something of value (say an e-book to opt-in to a list), they're then primed (through reciprocation) to return the gesture by giving something small in return when asked for it (providing the foot in the door); because having said 'yes' once, in the small buy, they'll buy in again and they'll buy in for more because to say no creates a state of cognitive dissonance where the 'no' response is at odds when the prior 'yes' response, and that's where they'll opt to validate their previous 'yes' decision to buy again.

            -Spyder
            Fascinating thread and couldn't agree more with both Spyder and Peter - where this works particularly well is offline, hence it is always worth going armed with some small giveaway to hand to the prospect. Small, valuable but incomplete...until you fill in the missing pieces for them.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdwordsMogul
    I've done this - very successfully.

    That's probably the best way to go about building your list anyway.

    Then you focus on moving people into your buyer's list as fast as you can.
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  • Profile picture of the author nicholasb
    I live by it, it's my favorite business model and makes some serious money when done right.

    it works for affiliate products or your own products and makes for very high conversions.
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  • Profile picture of the author Clint Faber
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    • Profile picture of the author Gary J Martin
      I would say it depends on the niche too.

      In IM I would suggest not to employ it, BUT test first.

      It makes sense that it would work. You give lots of stuff away free and then people are so grateful that they want to buy your stuff to say thank you. But reality often works differently.

      I dug this out which I remembered seeing recently from one marketer:

      "Recently I did a couple JV's.

      Both were selling my products to others' lists.

      JV #1 has a bigger list than JV #2.

      And, JV #2 was selling a product that is more than twice as
      expensive (almost $1000) as the product JV #1 was selling.

      Both have similar relationships with their lists.

      And both are awesome copywriters.

      So what happened?

      JV #1 sold the product via my (not-so-brilliant) idea where I'd
      write a bunch of content for his list (moving the free line, in a
      sense).

      And JV #2... did zero teaching at all.

      Just selling.

      The result?

      JV #1 got only 1 sale.

      And JV #2?

      A whopping 7 sales!

      Again, even though JV #2 has a tiny list and was selling a
      near-$1,000 priced product."


      Some food for thought anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author PeterGarety
    I am a student of Eben Pagan Guru Blueprint, and I have to say this is the best model that works for me, and it works in every niche.

    Here is what Eben once said: "The value of your content is not in information itself, but in the way how you connect that information with a challenge or specific need of your prospects or customers."

    If you want proof for this - just go to WSO section and buy some WSO of The Day products. It is very rare when you will see something new and unique there. Most of the time you will just witness the mastery of connection between problem and need.

    I remember, just recently I purchased one of the SEO fast traffic techniques WSO (It was WSO of the Day) and the funny thing was most of the content for that particular product was created based on my blog post which I published on my blog 6 months ago and also on my e-book content that I shared in War Room.

    This was exceptional proof how simple information was turned into valuable information, and it was perfectly connected with the needs and wants of the target audience.

    I hope this gives you perspective how to look on valuable content.
    Thanks!
    Peter
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    • Originally Posted by PeterGarety View Post

      Here is what Eben once said: "The value of your content is not in information itself, but in the way how you connect that information with a challenge or specific need of your prospects or customers."
      Awesome quote!
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  • Profile picture of the author Brian Tayler
    I haven't incorporated this "move the line" sales thought into my sales strategy much, although I have done it some. One thing I can say is to stay on top of the latest trends. Becoming a copycat and only plugging and chugging what everyone else is doing because it appears to work will get you stuck always trying to play catch up.

    Anytime you're buying a guru's course to follow their "technique" it's usually last year's business model and all but effective anymore. Now this isn't 100% true obviously. Take it with a grain of salt. But you need to develop your own marketing methods, or at least embellish your own methods based off of what others are doing. Stop following the herd.
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    • Profile picture of the author Spyder77
      Originally Posted by Brian Tayler View Post

      I haven't incorporated this "move the line" sales thought into my sales strategy much, although I have done it some. One thing I can say is to stay on top of the latest trends. Becoming a copycat and only plugging and chugging what everyone else is doing because it appears to work will get you stuck always trying to play catch up.
      The beauty of the technique is that there's nothing truly new in how it works (its been around long before it was ever studied and refined), and knowing the technique doesn't invalidate the social conditioning it operates on.

      These principles are in play every day, in and outside of marketing, and aren't radical at all. I read Cialidini about a decade ago and nothing has changed since he published his book - except that it became adopted within marketing and added another level of sophistication to it.

      Its not a marketing 'trick' or 'fad,' and its therefore not something that's suddenly going to stop working tomorrow, or next year, or in 10 years from now.

      A few examples where big companies use this technique all the time:

      - internet companies who offer you a free or heavily discounted price in return for your signature on the line (signing your name in writing is another potent tool, and why successful offline companies will steer you to putting your John Doe on paper as quickly as they can, and before they close the sale - at that point you may not realize it consciously, but the sale's just been closed) and a 2 year contract where you pay the full rate when the promo is up, and with cancellation fees if you opt out;

      - cell phone companies who embraced this as their de facto operating model when they began giving away their cell phones in exchange for 2 or 3 year contracts;

      - bars that have happy hours;

      - restaurants that have certain specials on certain days;

      - newspaper companies who offer 7 day, no strings attached, trials.

      This is why you can also sell a product that's a digital download and still back it up with a long-term (30 day, 60 day, 1 year) 100% no hassles & satisfaction guarantee - and why the vast majority of people don't immediately (or ever) ask for their money back even though they'd keep the product and their money if they did. They don't because it goes against social conditioning: to do so would create cognitive dissonance and they would feel a stigma that is at odds with their sense of identity and how they define both themselves and their behaviour.

      -Spyder
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      • Profile picture of the author SpikeS
        It's not just Eben doing this stuff...Last night I read a PDF by Frank Kern with his take on how you can 'triple your income'. Whilst his approach isn't quite 'giving your best stuff away for free' like Eben does, it is along the same lines in that you give away a ton of stuff - something he calls 'stacking the cool':

        Originally Posted by Frank Kern

        The more bonuses you offer (i.e. free stuff), the more sales you should get.

        DUH.

        But where people drop the ball on this thing is when they offer worthless bonuses that suck.

        Damn them! We can only hope theyʼre your competitors.

        Your ultimate mission should make your offer irresistible by having the free bonuses be of even higher perceived value than whatever it is you're selling.
        Whatever you think of these guy's strategies really, it's hard to argue with them when their so successful, dont you think?
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        • Profile picture of the author PeterGarety
          Originally Posted by SpikeS View Post

          It's not just Eben doing this stuff...Last night I read a PDF by Frank Kern with his take on how you can 'triple your income'. Whilst his approach isn't quite 'giving your best stuff away for free' like Eben does, it is along the same lines in that you give away a ton of stuff - something he calls 'stacking the cool':



          Whatever you think of these guy's strategies really, it's hard to argue with them when their so successful, dont you think?
          It is not about how successful they are as this is based on UNIVERSAL LAW of reciprocity (as Spyder77 said - it was already put together by Robert B. Cialdini in his The Psychology of Persuasion book). By the way, this is a must study book if you want to make money online.

          When you give people something that is a great value for them and really helps (unlike 99% squeeze page opt-in offers on the net), then you just get back in a massive scale.

          You see, the interesting fact is that Eben Pagan, Frank Kern, Jeff Walker, Brendon Burchard - they do not teach anything new or unique. They just give the short version and actionable information that you can read in about 20-30 top books (like the one, which I mentioned above).

          So, this is not about gurus but about HUMAN PSYCHOLOGY, which is the foundation of all the marketing.

          Master this one skill and you will be extremely successful (like Jay Abraham, for example).

          P.S. If you will check out Tony Robbins New Money Masters and specifically where Tony Robbins interview Frank Kern, you will discover that Move The Free Line (or stacking the cool) was invented by Eben Pagan in 2001 or so.
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          • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
            Originally Posted by PeterGarety View Post

            You see, the interesting fact is that Eben Pagan, Frank Kern, Jeff Walker, Brendon Burchard - they do not teach anything new or unique. They just give the short version and actionable information that you can read in about 20-30 top books (like the one, which I mentioned above).

            So, this is not about gurus but about HUMAN PSYCHOLOGY, which is the foundation of all the marketing.
            That's what I find weird about these threads, people line up pumping up these 'gurus' for their amazing insights but they're just repeating what's been said 1000 times before by people way more successful for hundreds of years.

            I guess if they're also saying you don't have to create something new - just tell it to people in a way that they connect with then they're being very clear about this. It's just another case of "if someone doesn't already know it - it's 'new' to them", so they're living the same concept.
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  • Profile picture of the author swilliams09
    I'll say this, I have to get off eban pagan and andy jenkins mailing lists. Those two alone are half the clog in my inbox.

    That being said I want to start giving more free things away in my business, partially to educate my customers and partially to attract more customers.
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  • Of course it works!

    And it works because it's not just based on a marketing "trick" but on actual sound marketing principles that have been valid for centuries: let your prospects taste a spoonful of delicious honey, and charge them for the jar.

    If you give away valuable free content, they will think "WOW, if this is the free stuff, I cannot wait to see the PREMIUM paid content". And thus they queue up to swing their credit cards.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

      If you give away valuable free content, they will think "WOW, if this is the free stuff, I cannot wait to see the PREMIUM paid content". And thus they queue up to swing their credit cards.
      This is one of the things a lot of people miss. There's also an implied scale factor.

      "If he can give away this MUCH stuff for free, there must be a ton of stuff in the paid content."

      It's a subtle way of adding to the THUD factor of the paid package deal.

      A lot of people do this. In the IM/MMO markets, guys like Eben, Kern, etc. just do it bigger than many of us do. Then again, many of us aren't playing for the splashy million dollar day, either...
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
    The "freeline" is a great way to sell stuff if you do it the way Eban does, which is useful but incomplete. He is a master of that.

    Too many people take the freeline to mean give your best **** away, and that's the stupidest thing you can do. Why would people buy cows from you if your giving away milk.

    Here is an example:
    I have services in the stock market. The method I use is to find stocks that institutions can't buy. I go on to show some of the huge winners the service has had, I talk about all the work done done each night to find them and show some of it.

    I talk about the big money that institutions have to put to work, and how when they do put all of that money to work, it can cause a huge movement in a stock.

    Then I go on to say there are "Certain" stocks that institutions are just waiting to pounce on, but they can't. Maybe the volume is too low, sales are too low. There are certain volume figures, sales figures and 12 other rules that institutional quality stocks have....but many stocks are on the very verge of it.

    Then I'll give a few more examples of some stocks that I picked using this method, not explaining what the volume figures are, the sales, market cap, and the other rules.

    Useful, people don't know this. It's very powerful stuff...but it's totally incomplete. You don;t kow what the volume figure is, you don't know what the sales numbers need to be, what the market cap has to be etc.

    Now assume I gave that away, lets say I said, well a stock needs to have (im making this up) $10million in sales and be growing at 20% quarter over quarter for institutions to pile on. Well, what you want to do is find a stock growing at 20% quarter over quarter, but that only has $8.5million in sales, because you can safely figure that at it's next quarterly earnings report it will hit the $10million and all of the funds can buy.

    Well - if I gave all of that away in the prelaunch, which tons of people do, wtf is the point of spending $999 on my course? There isn't one.

    But, if I'm telling you there are certain volume figures, certain growth rates etc etc and 12 other reasons...im telling you something you don't know which you will appreciate, but I'm not giving you the entire thing. Your going to see the logic of what I'm telling you, your going to be curious as hell......and your going to buy.... and your going to like me when you do it.

    Hope this helps.
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    • Profile picture of the author kencalhn
      it's absolutely important to occasionally give away some top content, to develop credibility with your audience.

      people are burned out on "BMS" (buy my stuff) constant pitchathons, so those who differentiate with occasional solid great content can do well.

      of course you can't give away so much free content that they won't buy your paid stuff (why buy the cow when you can get enough milk to modestly take action on, for free).

      one helpful differentiation is "WHAT" you need to know (given as free) vs "HOW" to do it (sold as premium content). but you can't do "what" only teaser stuff (like some of the IM pitchfest large seminars used to do), need to occasionally give away "how" tips here and there as well, so you're developing rapport and delivering value.

      example you can say the top 5 things you have to know are (1-5), "here's how to do the first 2 of them, to get the other 3 (plus new bonuses), register now for my ___ product".... so you're both adding genuine value plus offering them the opportunity to continue learning with you.

      there's so much bs out there, virtually all of it/99%++ to be perfectly honest, you need to raise the bar and be a genuine expert who really is good at helping people, to succeed online. i have found very few compelling resources to continue investing in, since most is rehashed basics that's hyped up. classic IMers are selling to 'fresh leads'/new meat, those of us who've been around for a decade+ fulltime online are skeptics of most resources out there.

      candidly, the best resource most of you could invest in, is a coach that gets on the phone once a week to kick your butt into gear to take action, implement, test and followup, vs spending so much time chasing the latest shiny object and posting in forums. /:
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  • Profile picture of the author NoBSGuy
    I agree. Offering free quality content at the beginning is important to build up trust towards your prospects which will translate into a larger customer base later on.
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