Rich dad Poor dad ? Have you read this?

96 replies
Hi,

do you guys like this book? And do you like the ideas of Robert K. ?

What is your opinion for this whole concept they came out with?

Adam
#dad #poor #read #rich
  • I'm not sure this belongs here but I'm not the one who makes that decision.

    I agree with Robert Kiyosaki that you should not consider your house an asset.

    I disagree with him on many other things, such as the high-pressure RDPD seminars put on in his name around the country. I have heard many horror stories from reputable sources.

    Here's a WF thread on RK:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/mind-war...-poor-dad.html

    and another here:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...technique.html

    fLufF
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  • Profile picture of the author webwriter
    I've read a few of Kyosaki's books and like them overall. Kyosaki does present important practical concepts. For example, he suggests that you don't buy miscellaneous things (doodads) that don't give you a ROI, such as jewelry and golf clubs. Buy them when you're business has sufficient money to pay for them (if you wish). Kyosaki, in some of books, has a lot of good things to say about real estate and he's inspired me to consider investing in single homes. He recommends looking at a LOT of properties before investing.

    The book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad, in my opinion, was and still is a real eye-opener. It makes you think. Of all of Kyosaki's books, that one is a must-read.
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    • Profile picture of the author lisakleinweber
      I've read several of Kiyosaki's books. I love the concept - that school doesn't teach you anything real about money (so true) and that the way to wealth is not through a job.

      I don't think that everyone can or wants to invest in Real Estate. This is what Kiyosaki invests in. That's not my thing and honestly, I don't see it ever being my thing - but I still think his concepts are valuable.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tiffiney Cowan
        Originally Posted by lisakleinweber View Post

        I've read several of Kiyosaki's books. I love the concept - that school doesn't teach you anything real about money (so true) and that the way to wealth is not through a job.

        I don't think that everyone can or wants to invest in Real Estate. This is what Kiyosaki invests in. That's not my thing and honestly, I don't see it ever being my thing - but I still think his concepts are valuable.
        I totally agree with you Lisakleinweber regarding the fact that school doesn't adequately prepare students for handling their finances and growing their income stream beyond their job. Sometimes it's frustrating to be in my 40s and just now beginning to grasp important money concepts - like investing.

        I also agree with your comment on real estate. My husband and I listened to RDPD on cd and talked briefly about investing in real estate - but what held us back were the thoughts of unexpected maintenance bills and the additional cost when the property is without a tenant.

        I have found myself thinking about this concept of investing in real estate in Internet terms and have been interested in learning more about Flippa in terms of buying/selling sites - but I'm very new to the IM thing and still working to master the business I'm currently building.
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  • Profile picture of the author ContentMachine
    Yes it's a terrific book. Kiyosaki is a genius within his field of work. He is full of knowledge and wonderful advice.
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    • Profile picture of the author Snow_Predator
      Get it. Rich dad Poor dad is an excellent book, so is the next one in the series - Cash Flow Quadrant. But don't buy any other of his books. Beyond these two books, the guy is a complete fraud. All of his other books are full of rubbish non-practical babble. He also doesn't practice what he preaches. He himself makes most of his money from the sale of his books, he is in no way a big-shot investor like he claims to be.
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      • Profile picture of the author Bruce NewMedia
        Originally Posted by Snow_Predator View Post

        Get it. Rich dad Poor dad is an excellent book, so is the next one in the series - Cash Flow Quadrant. But don't buy any other of his books. Beyond these two books, the guy is a complete fraud. All of his other books are full of rubbish non-practical babble. He also doesn't practice what he preaches. He himself makes most of his money from the sale of his books, he is in no way a big-shot investor like he claims to be.

        I'd have to agree with Snow Predator here. I think Rich Dad Poor Dad led him to great media success, which he wisely translated into financial success...but without that fame, his advice alone is pretty thin, imo.
        _____
        Bruce
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        • Profile picture of the author entrprnr
          Originally Posted by brucerby View Post

          I'd have to agree with Snow Predator here. I think Rich Dad Poor Dad led him to great media success, which he wisely translated into financial success...but without that fame, his advice alone is pretty thin, imo.
          _____
          Bruce
          Beat me to it... so QFT.
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      • Profile picture of the author Henry White
        Originally Posted by Snow_Predator View Post

        Get it. Rich dad Poor dad is an excellent book, so is the next one in the series - Cash Flow Quadrant. But don't buy any other of his books. Beyond these two books, the guy is a complete fraud. All of his other books are full of rubbish non-practical babble. He also doesn't practice what he preaches. He himself makes most of his money from the sale of his books, he is in no way a big-shot investor like he claims to be.
        I agree about the books, but I'm not sure about how much he makes as a real estate investor. He did team up with Donald Trump... but I think their timing was off. Something about a bubble...

        The thing to take away from this is the branding - the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series would make an excellent case study, and handled by someone with markedly better writing skills could rivaled Covey's "numeric" series - First Things First, The 4 Disciplines of Execution, The 6 Most Important Decisions, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families, The 8th Habit.
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        • Profile picture of the author drmfitz
          After reading the book, i was a tad disappointed at not getting more "meat". his message could be summed up in 10 seconds-buy more assets than liabilities, assets make you money, liabilities cost you money. End of story. He told us nothing with a great story. No formula, no path to follow like David Bach in the Automatic Millionaire, at least there was a clear path for someone who wanted more than a story.

          This is a clear example of how big the Americans hearts are, that they pour out for the underdog who overcomes adversity. Great story teller, i bought his first 3 books thinking it had to get better, it did not.

          If Robert could start a business from scratch, (mlm or something home-based-no donald) change his name, have a zero advertising budget like most home biz persons, then make reall money, i would be impressed. Dr. Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author colinph970
    If you want a better book about making money on the internet - with real practical advice then take a look at "Get Out While You Can" by George Marshall. Very thought provoking and better than anything by RK in my opinion. Best price is Amazon Kindle at around £4.59.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adam Svacina
      Originally Posted by colinph970 View Post

      If you want a better book about making money on the internet - with real practical advice then take a look at "Get Out While You Can" by George Marshall. Very thought provoking and better than anything by RK in my opinion. Best price is Amazon Kindle at around £4.59.
      I don't think that Robert K. talks about getting rich on the internet. He just talks about the basic. The basic ideas that changes the way you look at the world.

      Adam
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  • Profile picture of the author colinph970
    Adam, agreed, but the theme of "passive income" is far better described in Georges book (and also how to get it)
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  • Profile picture of the author BabyMama
    I really liked the book for mindset purposes. My only problem is the book doesn´t really lay out a stratgy or key steps to getting that success rate and some parts are a bit vaugue. I enjoyed reading his wifes book more "Rich Women" as it was more focussed on real estate which is something I am interested in in the long term.
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  • Profile picture of the author dark witness
    I found Rich dad poor dad to be a lot more about your mindset. sure he talks about property as an avenue for investment but overall I thought it was a lot more about educating your mind towards being financially free and not trapping yourself with the "my job is my life mentality".

    It changed my thinking about money and I think I would not be on this forum if I had not read it.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    The Kiyosaki books changed my life. Literally.

    RDPD got me started and CFQ had me quitting my job soon after.
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    • Profile picture of the author XponentSYS
      Originally Posted by John Romaine View Post

      The Kiyosaki books changed my life. Literally.

      RDPD got me started and CFQ had me quitting my job soon after.
      RDPD is about MINDSET and if you "get" that mindset, it can be a game changer.

      It teaches the crucial financial ideas that they don't teach in College.

      I am putting my little sister through college right now. She is an undergrad. She has a "full ride", on me. I pay everything. She's lucky but there is a caveat I gave her....

      In order for me to continue supporting her, I REQUIRED that she read RDPD this year between terms and submit me a "book report" (lol, remember those?). She did, and ended up liking it. The book report was soly to PROVE that she read it, and opened the channels for discussions.

      Yup, I believe it's that good.... that IMPORTANT.
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  • Profile picture of the author GregSilva
    My father gave me this book as a present a few years ago. Great book. Kiyosaki's books are all great.
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    • Profile picture of the author YasirYar
      Originally Posted by GregSilva View Post

      My father gave me this book as a present a few years ago. Great book. Kiyosaki's books are all great.
      Yeap great book. It does give you an idea on what a small percentage of the elite is doing in order to get rich. Some principles mentioned in the book are always overlooked by most of the people.
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  • Profile picture of the author JustSomeWarrior
    I never read THAT book, but some of the others in the series. Not bad stuff. Can't comment on the rest.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ansar Pasha
    Banned
    Robert Kiyosaki is a hustler.

    ... I've read his books and while the concept is interesting and engaging, the practicality of it is non existent.

    Also, if you do a little cross checking between his books there are a LOT of inconsistencies in his stories... plus, I highly doubt 90% of his stories are even real. There's now way he could recall exact conversations that took place like he describes in his book.

    And some of the advice is just plain bad ... if you want a detailed breakdown of this, here's a good resource:

    John T. Reed's analysis of Robert T. Kiyosaki's book Rich Dad, Poor Dad

    Be careful who you listen to.

    Ansar
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    • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
      Originally Posted by Ansar Pasha View Post

      Robert Kiyosaki is a hustler.
      Haters gonna hate, potatos gonna potate
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      • Profile picture of the author Ansar Pasha
        Banned
        Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

        Haters gonna hate, potatos gonna potate
        Ramone, I'm not hating on him... I've read his first 4-5 books and it wasn't until a few years later when I finally became "aware" enough to realize he's just a really good marketer.

        ... plus, the fact he had an MLM book out doesn't help his case in my eyes.

        Also, I attended a seminar in Auckland, NZ a few years back where I spoke with him briefly...

        Basically, the whole thing had a bunch of recycled "feel good" advice... followed by a pitch for his board games, books, DVD's, CD's, coaching and a 3" bobble head figure (maybe not the last one, you get the idea though).

        Ansar

        P.S. You got a license for those guns?
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        • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
          Originally Posted by Ansar Pasha View Post

          P.S. You got a license for those guns?
          I do actually, you wanna squeeze em?

          I think Robert probably started out with good intentions with his first book, then became completely overwhelmed with its response, then well.....probably just got caught up in all the marketing hype.

          Either way, I couldnt care less, I read the first 2 books, started the 3rd, then realised it was just recycled crap from the first 2 - put it down and never finished it - but the seeds had already been planted.

          I can honestly say, if it werent for those books, Id still be sitting at my desk whinging about having a lousy job.

          Instead, Im whinging here
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          • Profile picture of the author Ben Armstrong
            I agree with Mandom.

            I read it and thought it was great as far as learning how to change your mindset from an employee to an entrepreneur goes.

            I started looking into kiyosaki's past though, and it became apparent that he wasn't exactly the most honest guy, or anyone people should consider a role model.

            I certainly wouldn't attend a seminar of his or join any of his programs.

            As RJ has mentioned above... I most likely would not have ventured down this path if I had not read that book.

            Having said that, I'd rate "Think and Grow Rich" as the best self-help type book I've read as far as having an impact on my business goes.
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            • Profile picture of the author Adam Svacina
              Originally Posted by Ben Armstrong View Post


              I started looking into kiyosaki's past though, and it became apparent that he wasn't exactly the most honest guy, or anyone people should consider a role model.

              This is a realy strong statement, I think RK is just doing his job, he helps others to become self employed. And whether he tells the whole true about his past or if he laves out some parts to make the stories more readable, I don't see any problem with that.

              But I agree that some of the details ain't exactly the same in his books.
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    • Profile picture of the author wordofmouthmagic
      Originally Posted by Ansar Pasha View Post

      Robert Kiyosaki is a hustler.

      ... I've read his books and while the concept is interesting and engaging, the practicality of it is non existent.

      Also, if you do a little cross checking between his books there are a LOT of inconsistencies in his stories... plus, I highly doubt 90% of his stories are even real. There's now way he could recall exact conversations that took place like he describes in his book.

      And some of the advice is just plain bad ... if you want a detailed breakdown of this, here's a good resource:

      John T. Reed's analysis of Robert T. Kiyosaki's book Rich Dad, Poor Dad

      Be careful who you listen to.

      Ansar

      John's site is a great summary of all the bashing that Kiyosaki gets. It ranks REALLY well in Google.

      But I've found it a bit nit-picky and hollow. Checking just now I may know why.

      Robert has been more vindicated in his views eg about 401ks, houses not being assets, silver & gold, invest for cashflow not capital growth, since the GFC hit in 2007/2008.

      John's Kiyosaki page says at the bottom

      "Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 by John T. Reed"

      ie not been updated since 2007?

      For example, I think Rich Dad has now named himself publicly and is giving seminars himself.

      If nothing else RK has been an catalyst in many, many people's lives, so credit where credit is due for this alone.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Harper
    There are some good insights, but Kiyosaki made up the whole rich dad, poor dad story.

    I recommend The Millionaire Next Door instead.
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  • Profile picture of the author EugeneA
    It was a fine book. I was forced to read it a while back as a means to get me interested in business. It's a good eye opener, but definitely not a guide.
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  • Profile picture of the author rwbovee
    To me the material is too general to be of much use. I agree with him that the new golden rule is that those with the gold are now making the rules.
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Svaciada,

      I always find threads about RDPD interesting.

      I agree that the title/branding and main plot was genius.

      I think that for some people, certain books/products turn on a light bulb above your head (epiphany) that ultimately lead to a different lifestyle and philosophy. However much BS they may have been padded with, as long as the general message wasn't misleading and dead-end-ish then they always maintain a place in your heart.

      A good writer can utilise a little BS in an entirely positive way in order to suck you in to buying it and suck you into the story line - without leaving you feeling robbed after the event - as long as the underlying lessons are sound ones.

      RDPD did this for me for many reasons. One was to teach me to hate PAYE (Pay As You Earn, the British tax system for employees which deducts before you receive) and all that it stands for as well as highlighting the alternative and why it is empowering.

      Another was to emphasize how dangerous a 'poor dad' can be when they reel off advice that has been moulded from state conditioning and confirmation bias in order to assuage their bruised ego and justify their existence, even if they truly have your best interests at heart.

      I also liked the way the rich dad figure provided lessons surrounded by tough love and how he didn't give them freely - the lessons had to be earned based on faith/trust, which initially gave the forthcoming lessons a higher perceived value to the child in the story.

      Another example for me was Robert G Allen. I'm not the biggest fan of his online business, but he implanted entrepreneurial seeds in my head via his cassette tapes years before I actually left the rat race. When I finally did, those seeds had been germinating for some time (unbeknown to me) and had subconsciously grown into an underlying winner's mentality and philosophy.

      This also taught me (in retrospect) a lot about how powerful the mind is and why we should treat it with massive respect in terms of shielding it from poor input, which is all around us in everyday life along with how important it is to nudge positive influences on those you would seek to teach because you have influence (a child of your own for example), as early as possible. Those influences can compound over time (derived from another of Robert G Allen's memorable lessons - compound interest.)
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    • Profile picture of the author Doran Peck
      My take away from the book had nothing to do with real estate or specific money making mechanisms. The basic concept is to think in terms making time. Own your own time. Obviously in order to do that, learning to make money is an automatic byproduct.

      I say he is 100% correct...there is no room in my mind for differing opinion.

      You can either be in a job...or create jobs. If you work for someone else you are trading your precious time for a pittance of a wage, and giving them ownership of their time...at the expense of yours.

      Sure...in hard times you may be grateful for the wage, while you work to something better...but if you are the type of person who is satisfied with it and never progress, or feel that your job is the end-all-be-all and final goal in lfe...

      ...then yer just stupid. There simply is no other explanation.

      harsh, I know
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  • Profile picture of the author Gary Ning Lo
    Very interesting books that sort of got me started in IM...

    Just read it and build your own opinion.

    Cheers,

    ~Gary
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    • Profile picture of the author RubenJames
      RDPD is an Excellent "starter" book for those just starting out in taking control of one's finances.

      Cashflow Quadrant is also good. :rolleyes:

      The later books are written by other people and are NOT as inspiring (IMHO).

      He DOES get into MLM companies, but NOT in his books...I found them in a couple of magazines...so he DOES go for internet marketing (if you go the MLM route)!

      Ruben
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  • Profile picture of the author gefflong
    I think my problem with the book and the things that Robert Kiyosaki "teaches" is this...

    He became rich because of the things he "teaches", not by DOING the things that he "teaches".

    I'm not saying some of the stuff in his book doesn't work or isn't true (even though not all of it IS true)... I'm saying the stuff in his book(s) did NOT make him the rich man he is today.

    Sort of like Susie Orman. She is rich. However, she is rich because she sells books on financial advising, not because her advice is good/sound. She doesn't even follow her own advice. She doesn't have to.
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    • Profile picture of the author WebPen
      Originally Posted by gefflong View Post

      I think my problem with the book and the things that Robert Kiyosaki "teaches" is this...

      He became rich because of the things he "teaches", not by DOING the things that he "teaches".

      I'm not saying some of the stuff in his book doesn't work or isn't true (even though not all of it IS true)... I'm saying the stuff in his book(s) did NOT make him the rich man he is today.

      Sort of like Susie Orman. She is rich. However, she is rich because she sells books on financial advising, not because her advice is good/sound. She doesn't even follow her own advice. She doesn't have to.
      Welcome to the world of education (and the MMO niche...)

      As a few other posts mentioned, this is a good book, and Cash Flow Quadrant is good, but after that everything went VERY downhill.

      And I've never read a SINGLE good thing about the seminars the company hosts.

      I actually went to a free one, which is just an upsell to the $500 one, which is another upsell to seminars that cost at least $12K
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    • Profile picture of the author Brian John
      Originally Posted by gefflong View Post

      I think my problem with the book and the things that Robert Kiyosaki "teaches" is this...
      He became rich because of the things he "teaches", not by DOING the things that he "teaches".
      I'm not saying some of the stuff in his book doesn't work or isn't true (even though not all of it IS true)... I'm saying the stuff in his book(s) did NOT make him the rich man he is today.
      Sort of like Susie Orman. She is rich. However, she is rich because she sells books on financial advising, not because her advice is good/sound. She doesn't even follow her own advice. She doesn't have to.
      remember the samuel brennan story??? don't dig for gold, sell the shovels!
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  • Profile picture of the author SandraElam
    Rich Dad Poor Dad... amazing book... proper investment strategies are so important in life...
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  • Profile picture of the author Trent Brownrigg
    It was one of the first books I ever read when I was just getting started with my business. I'd say it definitely helped put me in the right mindset, which helped with my success in a huge way.
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  • Profile picture of the author mandom
    God I hate this book. WAYYYYY too many people take it and try to use it as a guide to making money rather than reading it for inspiration to figure out their own methods. What they seem to miss is that RK ADMITTED that he committed fraud and the results he talks about are not possible using legal methods. I used to be a CFP and people asked me about this book all the freaking time. I always warned my clients away from it...there are MANY other books out there that are better and more realistic. When I worked for a book store I always talked people out of buying it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nanaswhimsy
      Originally Posted by mandom View Post

      God I hate this book. WAYYYYY too many people take it and try to use it as a guide to making money rather than reading it for inspiration to figure out their own methods. What they seem to miss is that RK ADMITTED that he committed fraud and the results he talks about are not possible using legal methods. I used to be a CFP and people asked me about this book all the freaking time. I always warned my clients away from it...there are MANY other books out there that are better and more realistic. When I worked for a book store I always talked people out of buying it.

      Seriously? He admits to doing fraud???

      Why would any honest business person want to read it then?
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      • Profile picture of the author gvsridhar171
        It stands out as "Best Seller" despite conflicting views and opinion. He promotes leveraging and "Network Marketing" is what he is promoting. Theory of Network Marketing really sounds great. But in reality 99% people fail and only 1% succeed out of this.

        My personal opinion about this book "Nope. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone"
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      • Profile picture of the author Ben Armstrong
        Sounds like a scumbag of a person but I love the concepts of thinking like an entrepreneur vs thinking like an employee etc and took a lot away from his books.

        They helped me change my mindset more than teaching me anything practical. Think and Grow Rich is probably the book that's had the most profound effect on my business life.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adam Svacina
      Originally Posted by mandom View Post

      God I hate this book. WAYYYYY too many people take it and try to use it as a guide to making money rather than reading it for inspiration to figure out their own methods. What they seem to miss is that RK ADMITTED that he committed fraud and the results he talks about are not possible using legal methods. I used to be a CFP and people asked me about this book all the freaking time. I always warned my clients away from it...there are MANY other books out there that are better and more realistic. When I worked for a book store I always talked people out of buying it.
      Ha, ha, you say this is not possible? Ha, i have got to laugh. He describes the real story. I got several people in my list to be as rich as he is doing the same legal method..

      If you say it is not possible, it is not possible for you!

      Adam
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  • Profile picture of the author Sparhawke
    I first got introduced to his books here, or in the marketers chat (Im not sure) but when any turn up on the shelves of my bookshop I am the first to read them because they are not confusing, I hate books that go out of their way to be clever.
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  • Profile picture of the author Shafiq Kamal
    Rich Dad Poor Dad is very inspiring book. A lot of marketing tricks and life tricks can be learned from it. Overall good book.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Racine
    Hi have read Rich Dad Poor Dad and a few of Robert's other books. I think they are great and do a fantastic job of giving you the big picture.

    One of his former trainer's Loral Langemeier took Robert's work and put it into much clearer focus for me. I would recommend reading her first book The Millionaire Maker. I think it explains everything much better.

    Her Cash machine Book is also very good. Both Robert and Loral teach the same thing: Create a business which generates money then invest those earnings into Passive Income like real estate and stocks.

    My 2 cents anyways.

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author co-creator
    Originally Posted by Svaciada View Post

    Hi,

    do you guys like this book? And do you like the ideas of Robert K. ?

    What is your opinion for this whole concept they came out with?

    Adam

    It's a good book with some good ideas.

    You have to watch out for the Rich Dad seminars he hosts every year... they did a special report on them here in Canada on CBC... and apparently they just try to rip you off. the whole thing is a sales pitch. watch it on cbc if you'd like. just google cbc robert kiyosaki or cbc rich dad poor dad

    just a heads up. don't get scammed
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  • Profile picture of the author rossmore
    I think his books and concepts are excellent. Especially the concept of owning a business that runs itself and makes money 24/7 or one where you get residual income. Like a membership site or joining a MLM networking and building a organization where you get continual residual income.
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  • Profile picture of the author Souldja
    I finished reading this book one month ago. Kiyosaki motivated me to ger rich, I won't give up until I will succeed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adam Svacina
      Originally Posted by Souldja View Post

      I finished reading this book one month ago. Kiyosaki motivated me to ger rich, I won't give up until I will succeed.
      This is good for us, Kiyosaki is a person that has changed a live to tons of people
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  • Profile picture of the author Carl Fridsjö
    I've actually never come to read this book but I bought it a few days ago and started reading, so far it has been great and pretty much a reflection of thoughts i've been preaching to my family & friends.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adam Svacina
      Originally Posted by Carl Fridsjö View Post

      I've actually never come to read this book but I bought it a few days ago and started reading, so far it has been great and pretty much a reflection of thoughts i've been preaching to my family & friends.
      Good step ahead... Read this book and keep going... You will achieve what ever you want!!
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  • Profile picture of the author seobro
    Robert Kiyosaki has said a lot of things with which I do not agree. He makes it all seem so easy. Well, that is not the truth that we see. Sadly, hard work is the secret sauce. It does not matter if your dad is rich or poor. Basically, I do not agree with his premise. People think they can wave a wand and money can appear. Yeah, just like magic. Wish that were so.
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  • I think his books are all excellent. Calling him a fraud, etc. is excessive and here is why. No book is a magic bullet that will instantly transform anyone's life.
    The key, to me as an author, is that a book creates a catalyst, what I call a pearl, that hopefully inspires the reader to take one small step towards success.
    Robert's books are full of pearls, including Sales Dogs. It's our job as readers to decide what those pearls are.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bredfan
    XponentSys is right... RDPD is about a mindset. All the other stuff is just illustrating the point: If you believe it, you can do it.

    Like others, this was the first business self improvement book I read, and it changed my life. I remember telling my Dad, "I want to make something!"

    So - the lesson is one about mindset, not about the specifics behind what he did (or told the story of doing).

    The original is Napoleon Hill. Get a copy of the original Think And Grow Rich. This book focuses intensely on the mindset. I listen to chapter 2 of this book about every week on audio book...makes driving in northern VA bearable and drills important lessons into your head...
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  • Profile picture of the author Cataclysm1987
    It's good reading for philosophy, mindset and not much else.

    If you want something to get your mind into a better state to make money, read it.

    If you want something to actually learn what the hell you can do with that mindset and how to go about doing it, don't even bother.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jase1977
    The way he explains the difference between how rich and poor think is very good to read. (Been 10 years since I read the book, but that's what I got out of it) But the practicality of executing his strategies, just aren't realistic. It isn't as easy as he makes it out to be.
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  • Profile picture of the author canada94
    It still sells by the boatload, been a bestseller for years, that speaks for itself, I believe'Think and grow rich' by Napoleon Hill is far better, the greatest book ever published,after the Bible that is.


    Kevin
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  • Profile picture of the author wizzard74
    Just picked up a copy, looking forward to a good read
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  • Profile picture of the author silverline
    I have read this book about a year back and realized why we were always struggling in-spite of my father working hard all the time. I always wanted to have a great life-style. This book taught me the advantage of having your own business. But I did not know what business can I do being short on money. I am so glad I came to know about IM. I am only in the learning phases and banking on it to take me to the land of my dreams.
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  • Profile picture of the author Simon Ashari
    I am a fan myself (though not worshiping him or anything).

    A lot of what he says can be (and is) misrepresented or distorted.

    Of course there is the misconception that he just makes money out of his books (making money by telling people how to make money). However this doesn't take into account that he had already retired before writing the book.

    As with anything, you should take what he says with a grain of salt. Implement what you think is good and disregard the best.

    -Simon
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  • Profile picture of the author cathyzxy
    I know it's a good book, I have heard of it for many times.
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  • Profile picture of the author Flores
    That book has some good concepts, yes. But the rest of his series does not deliver. They all claim to give you an edge, when all they do is tell you the obvious stuff with no actionable strategy to follow. Furthermore, his "Rich Dad Coaching" was outsourced to a 3rd party that does nothing but scam people. They are nothing more than a terrible OTO company that sells an idea. People pay up to $30,000 for nothing. There are a few good reviews, but there have been investigative reports that make it clear that his stuff is bogus.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
      It's possible Rich Dad is my next read after of one of Paul McKennas books.

      It's one of few famed books I haven't got around to reading.


      Daniel
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  • Profile picture of the author Rukshan
    RDPD book changed my mind to focus own business. I can't agree with all details which he follows. Specially with real estate.Now I'm going to read CFQ.
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  • Profile picture of the author Anton Nadilo
    What can we learn from Robert Kiyosaki's? His marketing...pure genius!!
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  • Profile picture of the author XponentSYS
    Originally Posted by Young And Opulent View Post

    Rich Dad Poor Dad is cool if a person wants to change their perspective on life and money. For that purpose alone, its a good book. The financial advice is pretty average. Overall, I'd probably give it to an elementary or middle school aged child to read.
    It disturbes me (but doesn't surprise me) that many DO NOT SEE the importance of BOTH.... the MECHANICS of making money as well as the MECHANICS of how such money made WORKS.

    :-(((

    We're MIXING things up in this thread.

    I'll be the first to shout out loud that MAKING MONEY is NOT enough.

    KEEPING it is also important.

    I know, because I screwed this up once.

    Lets forget about the "blue pill" mentality for a moment and focus on RDPD for what it is... A MINDSET TO HANDLE MONEY MADE..... ANY money mode!

    The pipe-dreams can be found in the WSO section.

    Should any of those "pan out", please read RDPD.

    I am sorry to come off aggressive, but I can't stress enough how important this is. I know from experience.
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    • Profile picture of the author XponentSYS
      Originally Posted by Young And Opulent View Post

      I can guarantee you I know about money than you do. How it works and why. This book doesn't answer either of those questions fully.

      I said nothing about looking for a *blue pill.* I said that his financial and investment advice is average, which it is. I was actually being nice in saying that because some of the things he recommend can land you in trouble with the Irs. I make my living as a Commodities Trader and Investor, so I'm sure I know what I'm talking about. Just because I actually know finance as a practitioner in the field and don't recognize RDPD as some sort of financial bible, doesn't mean I was looking for a *blue pill.* As I said, its a good book for changing your perspective on money and nothing more. If you give this book high praise like its the greatest financial/investment book ever written, then chances are...you've never made any real money.

      If a person is looking for a starting point, RDPD is cool. If you want real financial and investment advice, this isn't the book for you.
      Okay, lets take a step back. I am NOT sure why I quoted YOU; it wasn't intended.

      The "blue pill" comment wasn't an attack on your character, personally.

      I was making more of a general statement because I read through this thread and saw people mixing up the idea of MAKING MONEY.... versus MANAGING MONEY already made.

      Seems some here who gave critical reviews of RDPD were doing so because they couldn't replicate his MONEY MAKING strategies. Reading back through, how many people said "real estate wasn't their thing"?

      More than one.

      THESE were the people I was schooling, not the likes of you.

      As for the personal wealth of both of us, now's not the time to debate that. I am sure we're both more than comfortable. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author Victoralexon
    I have been meaning to read that book. I have heard great things said about it and the author.
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    I lost my respect for him a few years ago. "Fake it till you make it" Rob

    He became rich because of the things he "teaches", not by DOING the things that he "teaches".
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  • Profile picture of the author Jon Penberthy
    It's a fantastically inspiring book, definitely worth a read when you get a chance.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
      I'll have my copy later this week hopefully!


      Daniel
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      • Profile picture of the author fin
        I liked it as much as the four hour work week: not at all . What's wrong with me.
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      • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
        Originally Posted by Daniel Evans View Post

        I'll have my copy later this week hopefully!


        Daniel
        OK, this is my follow up.

        Admitedly I've only made my way through a few chapters of Rich Dad but it's enough for me to chime in with something. I will give my full review once I'm finished the book.

        For now however there's something I need to comment upon.

        He explains that as a child his first venture happened to be forging coins (as he discovered) out of toothpaste tube lead which they gathered from neighbours. Him and his friend supposedly set up a "production line" on the driveway and spent the day handling molten hot lead which they poured into plaster of Paris moulds.

        In the next instance, he claims the next venture involved collecting dated comics from the local store which were given to him and his friend in return for labour. Because they weren't permitted to sell these comics, they set up a "library" (in a basement if I recall) and the whole neighbourhood / school of children would pay to enter to read comics during the strict opening hours which they set. Note that the wording of this story was a prime contributor to me disbelieving his claim. The coin making story just speaks for itself.

        I believe those two stories are completely fabricated, if not severely exagerated for no other reason that they seem completely surreal. I understand differences in cultures and people but kids don't generally handle molten lead and plaster moulds and "comic book libraries", despite being more realistic than the coin making story is like something ripped straight out of The Waltons.

        If it were possible I'd like to be proved wrong so that I have more faith in the book however those two tales seem to be the product of an adult mind which have been introduced to the book to give flow from his childhood to adulthood.
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        • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
          Originally Posted by Daniel Evans View Post

          I believe those two stories are completely fabricated, if not severely exagerated for no other reason that they seem completely surreal.
          A lot of the stories in Rich Dad, Poor Dad are made up.

          Kiyosaki is a story-teller.

          You may be interested in a deeper analysis of the book
          and author by John T. Reed:

          John T. Reed's analysis of Robert T. Kiyosaki's book Rich Dad, Poor Dad (no affil.)

          I enjoyed Kiyosaki's main books but it's mainly big picture
          stuff rather than nitty gritty details.

          Dedicated to mutual success,

          Shaun
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  • Profile picture of the author ashishaffiliate
    it is must read for entrepreneurs, infopreneurs, netrepreneurs and all other small business owners this book will be soon found on my bookshelf.

    - Ashish Patel
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  • Profile picture of the author nadia712
    I haven't read it, but I've heard mixed reviews (quite a few critical ones).

    If you're looking for a good overall strategy for your business and investing, check out The Millionaire's Fastlane by MJ DeMarco. It's an AMAZING, amazing book.
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  • Profile picture of the author joefizz
    Hi

    His first book was genius. It mad me leave my J.O.B. and start up a new business. Yay!

    I feel that subsequent books have lost their way and a little bit of the magic!

    HTH?

    Joe
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  • Profile picture of the author Deepikarajpal
    don't know about others..but i love d concept of book and i recommend everybody to read this book once
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  • Profile picture of the author Noel Cunningham
    I read it about 9-10 years ago and at the time it did have a strong effect on me. From what I can remember Kioysaki impressed the importance of acquiring revenue generating assets to fuel your lifestyle...

    I remember at the time everyone was putting their cash into real estate (and we all know how that ended - especially over here) who I think the lessons hold true but with an caveat....know when to exit the market before the bubble bursts..
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  • I have read this book a couple of times and really liked it. It actually inspired me to come online and start building and selling websites. I figured if the theory can be done offline it can be done online too with websites instead of property.

    Although I do think he makes it sound a lot easier than it actually is. I know people who have lost a lot of money with property development.

    The cashflow game is well worth playing though. You can play it online and its great for kids.
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  • Profile picture of the author papacuppa
    I agree with most people here. I think it's an important book from the standpoint of perspective towards money.

    Robert Kiyosaki opened the laborious-sounding door of 'financial education' a door that would have stayed closed for many had he marketed it without a story - the audience in need didn't want to read in statistics and facts alone.

    To all the haters, if he had to invent 'Rich Dad' then so be it - would the story have been as good without the character? Without the dichotomy of the two Dad's the message would have fallen apart - readers wouldn't have been able to place themselves between the two financial realities.

    And, oh right, you're telling me the Bible is full of legitimate stories? Humans learn through jumps of imagination. To tell a great story you need plot devices and real-life doesn't always offer that - without fabrication, your intention to teach is really limited.

    I challenge anyone to write a more engaging and welcoming book on Finance, and one that appeals to all us non-finance types.

    No matter about his personal issues, so what if Sharon Lechter sued him? There are two sides to every story and it's none of my business. Read the original Rich Dad Poor Dad, you can skip all the rest. In hindsight I consider it to have been a seminal step in my life and I count my blessings to have come across it, every day.

    I'm now in the fortunate situation of running my own business from home, in fact anywhere with an internet connection - I had my best week while staying with my parents in France at Xmas; out in the sticks, armed with only laptop and an internet connection.

    If I hadn't built my own business I would have been 'downsized' with all my other ex-colleagues, now looking for work.

    I saw it coming, but they didn't. I have only Robert Kiyosaki to thank for pointing me in the right direction.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
      Originally Posted by papacuppa View Post

      To all the haters, if he had to invent 'Rich Dad' then so be it - would the story have been as good without the character? Without the dichotomy of the two Dad's the message would have fallen apart - readers wouldn't have been able to place themselves between the two financial realities.

      And, oh right, you're telling me the Bible is full of legitimate stories? Humans learn through jumps of imagination. To tell a great story you need plot devices and real-life doesn't always offer that - without fabrication, your intention to teach is really limited.

      I challenge anyone to write a more engaging and welcoming book on Finance, and one that appeals to all us non-finance types.
      I'm not sure I'd condone using the word "hater" to label someone who has merely identified falsehood in a book that's passed off as non-fictional any more than I'd take the liberty to assume that that same person takes the bible seriously.

      In light of your challenge, Napolean Hill seemed to do a fine job with his work without raising any BS sirens in my mind as I was reading, nor did George Clason or many other authors. Indeed, there may be fabricated and exagerated segments to their works however the difference is telling a story which is believable and undetectable and one that is far fetched to the point of being ridiculous.

      You'd be brilliantly wrong to assume a person can't tell a truthful story relating to their own experiences. Not everything has to be fluffed up with falsehood for it to be interesting. You'll probably find truth can be interesting if it's presented properly.


      Daniel
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  • Profile picture of the author Rynos
    Hey I have read Rich Dad Poor Dad and that was the beginning of my Entrepreneur journey. Since then I have read many books with like wise topics my all time favorite being the classic Think And Grow Rich by The Never Fading man himself Nepolean Hill
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  • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
    Of all the books I've read...I admit, I've never read Rich Dad/Poor Dad...

    By the sound of many responses in this thread, it sounds like I should read it ASAP...
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  • Profile picture of the author stretch361
    This book goes right in line with the 4 hour work week books. The goal is not to be an employee...but to be the owner.
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