34 replies
Hi,

This is not about "Guru". My assumption is that a Guru is called a Guru when there are many followers worshiping his theories, concepts and philosophies.

This take is about EXPERTS.

Some experts do require special licenses such as legal, medical and other professionals.

Some experts do not require licenses but instead certified as members of certain independent bodies, organizations or artisan groupings.

Some experts do not require licenses at all even though they are people with lengthy experience, training and unique skills.

I name some examples in the offline world :
  • indigenous jungle tracker
  • sharp shooter
  • sportsmen
  • break-dancer
  • kung fu exponent
  • hustler ... lol ..
  • and many more of course.
They don't need degrees, diplomas or PhDs.

So for the Internet Marketing world, how will I know whether the person is an expert or not.

Since I'm not sure how to define IM experts properly, so I evaluate them with the following attributes - regardless of age, gender, race, lingo or location:
-> accomplishments ( & project experience )
-> network of resources
-> proclaimed skills set and systems
-> speed of mobilization
-> customer services
-> testimonials ( list of clients )

I consider IM experts are not merely people with experience but people with quality experience. And they can help others to resolve issues, optimize use of resources or guide others to achieve goals.

Please note, I refer EXPERTS as people who can help others only.

Comments and inputs would be greatly appreciated.
#define #experts
  • Profile picture of the author winnerone
    A self proclaimed expert is not to be wholly trusted.

    I totally agree with you that many often get the terms guru and expert mixed up. The great thing about the internet is that one can find useful background info about an individual who claims to be an expert.

    If he/she has been an "expert" at what they do, surely they would have left virtual footprints such as websites, articles, resumes, forum posts, Facebook pages, tweets, etc.

    Google can reveal quite a lot...if you know how to search.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark_Babcock
      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      An EX is a has been and a spurt is a drip under pressure.
      I was going to say that but Tim beat me to it!

      What a GREAT thread - and very interesting perspectives on how to define "Experts."

      If you look it up in the dictionary, it refers to someone who has "special skill or knowledge in a particular field."

      But that begs the question how do you define "special" as it relates to that particular field (whatever it may be) - and that's going to vary depending on who you ask and what company you're in.

      Let's use web designers for a simple example of what I mean.

      So when the local designer who's been at it for a few months goes to the business owner who doesn't have a website and can't spell "www." and offers to create a simple 3 page template site on a hosted platform with a drag and drop design tool - she is the expert.

      But when the next designer comes along and can build a self-hosted site with 5 pages, customized header and an opt-in form that the customer can easily update - all of a sudden he's the expert.

      That is until the next designer comes along, because he's been doing it for years and has a degree in coding those funny "languages" with odd names that are just made up of letters - and he can not only do what they could - but can completely re-arrange things on the page and use different colors in different place, put videos on the site and use these things called APIs to connect the site to something else when certain things happen and who knows what else...

      But then along comes this newbie that can take all of what any of them did and make it look and display nicely on the desktop, laptop, iPad, smartphone and "hundreds of other devices" she says...then she's the expert.


      That may not be the best analogy, but hopefully it demonstrates the point.

      I'm not so sure any one of us can define "expert" except for ourselves - although we certainly can influence who is and who is not perceived as an expert (and perception is reality until and unless proven otherwise).

      So "expert" really is a "moving target" - an opinion if you will.

      Just because I think someone is an expert doesn't mean you will - and the same holds true when reversed.

      Just because a particular person "in the room" is viewed as an expert right now doesn't mean they will be 5 minutes from now - the present company may learn of somebody with even greater special skills and/or knowledge or the subject matter may change and all of a sudden the expert on "X" is now just like the rest of us when it comes to "Y" - until the subject matter comes back around to expert "X's" area of skill and knowledge.


      So really, we all have our "expertise" and define "experts" based on our own experiences, skills and knowledge...and the creation of preconceived opinions as influenced by our peers.


      One of the best things I've heard on the subject is that in order to be perceived and received as an expert - all you have to do is know a little bit more than the people or person around you at the time.

      And of course this would mean the only way one could be a self proclaimed expert is if in their own opinion, they had more specialized skill and knowledge than everybody else. More often than not though that's just arrogance - which is usually self serving for the most part - and precludes them from being an "expert."

      Now back to the analogy...

      So when the last designer storms through the door, looks around at everybody and says "I'm the expert here" - everybody knows he isn't - even if he may be the most skilled and knowledgeable.

      So to be or become an expert...

      Embrace opportunity; continuously educate and practice within your field so you can become knowledgeable and skilled; trust in your ability; let your actions and service positively influence others in such a manner as to earn the recognition from your peers...and confidently but with humility acknowledge acceptance when justified.
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    • Profile picture of the author Will Edwards
      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      An EX is a has been and a spurt is a drip under pressure.
      Beat me to it!

      Will
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      • Profile picture of the author azmanar
        Originally Posted by Will Edwards View Post

        Beat me to it!

        Will
        Hi,

        This is the 3rd time the phrase is being used.

        So the word comes from a combination of 2 latin words.
        -> EX = a has been
        -> SPURT = a drip under pressure

        If I recombine, the 2 syllables, it becomes :

        " An Expert is a has been drip under pressure. "

        So does the phrase refer to something useless that goes down the drain or simply a word play?
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    Originally Posted by azmanar View Post

    people with quality experience.

    The problem is how to define "quality experience" in a way that everyone can accept.

    Even with the word "guru", those folks are defined by people who either hold "reverence" or "disgust" for the individual.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Keith
    its often times very hard to tell who the experts are until you are one. then they are pretty easy to spot.
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  • Profile picture of the author sal64
    Expert... specialist... Teacher...

    How do we define them?

    If someone has gained expertise in a specific area, is she an expert?

    For example, their are a ton of qualified life coaches out there who have not achieved real success.

    Does an academic who teaches and specializes in a subject, whilst not being out in the real world - constitute an expert?

    It's a tough one to define.

    I think there are different levels to be honest.

    Product creators can be experts in what they do, but have never created their own or sold it successfully.

    For me, the thing that separates a specialist from an expert is that the expert has a track record of success.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Andrews
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    Originally Posted by azmanar View Post

    So for the Internet Marketing world, how will I know whether the person is an expert or not.(?)
    Does the person talk in plain English which can easily be understood by the layman in very simple terms, at length, with a real sense of understanding and clarity?


    Pete Walker
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  • Profile picture of the author Rach72
    Does the person talk in plain English which can easily be understood by the layman in very simple terms, at length, with a real sense of understanding and clarity?
    .... and can they back it up with real experience and real results?
    (not just from the monetary angle either)
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    • Profile picture of the author azmanar
      Originally Posted by Rach72 View Post

      .... and can they back it up with real experience and real results? (not just from the monetary angle either)
      Yup. I totally agree. Monetary value is not the main concern. The value of an expert is in his real experience and real results.

      Originally Posted by Pete Walker View Post

      Does the person talk in plain English which can easily be understood by the layman in very simple terms, at length, with a real sense of understanding and clarity?
      Pete Walker
      Make sense Pete. A subject matter expert should be able to express himself clearly according to his audience's level of knowledge.

      Originally Posted by sal64 View Post


      For me, the thing that separates a specialist from an expert is that the expert has a track record of success.
      Sal,

      Like you stressed, an expert is a hands-on person with real track record. You're definitely one of them.

      Originally Posted by owslaw123 View Post

      its often times very hard to tell who the experts are until you are one. then they are pretty easy to spot.
      Hope I can be an expert of at least an area of IM. And later on, be able to help a lot of people in that area.

      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      The problem is how to define "quality experience" in a way that everyone can accept.
      Well Bill... I consider you as a person of quality experience. Most of us here know your accomplishments, ups and downs in business.

      Thus, you can easily and quickly help another person who is facing the same issues that you faced before, in your area of expertise. To me, this is a true expert.

      Originally Posted by Tim_Carter View Post

      An EX is a has been and a spurt is a drip under pressure.
      Tim... that is deep. I'm not sure I can understand. My English is not that good.

      But what I know is, all the videos you produced are fantastic ! I watched ALL OF THEM !

      Originally Posted by winnerone View Post

      I totally agree with you that many often get the terms guru and expert mixed up.
      Very true. This is the sort of mixed up that I would like to stay away from. Which is one of the reason I opened this thread.

      A GURU can talk or write about a topic even if he has not accomplished a thing in that area. The content is from what he read, heard and scraped.

      IMHO, an EXPERT talks only about a subject which he is truly familiar with - experienced, failed, succeeded, accomplished and still doing it. We can feel his passion.
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  • Profile picture of the author IMWinner
    It's really tough on how to define and classify people as expert, guru or specialist in their respective areas. I totally agree that we shouldn't wholly trust a person who claims to be an expert or a specialist on something or what we call a self-proclaimed expert. It should not come from the person himself but rather on the people around that person. The people around that are witness and living proof of the person's skills and abilities not just for the benefit of himself but on how he/she had shared his/her skills and capabilities to others, that's what a person an expert. He/she is able to share his knowledge and skills to the people around him and had contributed a lot to their lives as he/she had used what he/she had learned not just for personal gain but rather for everyone around him.
    And I also would like to add that it is not about how much a person earn would be the basis to say that a person is an expert. Money could not be the measurement of a person's success and can be a barometer to say that he/she is an expert or a guru on something. It has to be his/her contribution to the people around him or to the community.
    He/she doesn't have to show some proofs about his success or how expert he/she is, since the people who are recipient of his learning and capabilities are living proof enough to back what he/she had to say. Proofs such as snapshots of money and cheques can be altered and is surely not the measurement of being an expert.
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  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    Originally Posted by azmanar View Post

    kung fu exponent
    I raise this number to the power of... seven! Hai-yaa!
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    • Profile picture of the author azmanar
      Originally Posted by IMWinner View Post

      I totally agree that we shouldn't wholly trust a person who claims to be an expert or a specialist on something or what we call a self-proclaimed expert. It should not come from the person himself but rather on the people around that person. The people around that are witness and living proof of the person's skills and abilities not just for the benefit of himself but on how he/she had shared his/her skills and capabilities to others, that's what a person an expert.
      An expert who has many clients already, don't need to market himself. Many get clients by word of mouth.

      Others definitely need to market themselves. Obviously, they need to spell out their expertise clearly, accomplishments, testimonies and references. Almost like bragging.

      IMHO, there is nothing wrong to actually proclaim their abilities to the right audience. Wise prospects will definitely evaluate and test them before making any decision.

      Originally Posted by Naren Shayc View Post

      Topic of cool ;-)
      In my book, an expert is a real world person, contributes to their "community" or "industry" - Be it online, forums, publications or products. Being at the forefront.
      Exactly !

      I hope what you meant by real world person is about his real world experience and track records.

      Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

      I raise this number to the power of... seven! Hai-yaa!
      lol ... of all examples, you took notice of that one. There must be a reason.

      Incidentally, all of my 4 kids ( 2 girls and 2 boys ) practice a type of Chinese-Malay martial art for physical health, mental sharpness and self-defence.

      Unlike my children, exponents (experts) are tested and proven in the rings. And mostly will impart their skills to others as well, while training.
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      • Profile picture of the author IMWinner
        [QUOTE=azmanar;4620184]An expert who has many clients already, don't need to market himself. Many get clients by word of mouth.

        Others definitely need to market themselves. Obviously, they need to spell out their expertise clearly, accomplishments, testimonies and references. Almost like bragging.

        IMHO, there is nothing wrong to actually proclaim their abilities to the right audience. Wise prospects will definitely evaluate and test them before making any decision.


        Totally agree with you Azmanar, these people doesn't have to market themselves since people around them will do the marketing for him as his name will be passed on to people who are in need of some help. As information of his name will be spread not by him but by the people who had witnessed and see the credibility and reliability of the expert, he will no longer try to boast or brag anything or show anything to prove his skills and achievements.
        Also, there's nothing wrong about it but what other people will try to realize is that not all that can be seen and heard are true, some of the screenshots about how much a person had earned can be fake. There are those people nowadays will do anything just to make some money and will do to the extent to make a fool of other people. We need to be careful because what we have seen or heard is not even close to what this person really earn.
        We need to check his credibility and his name.
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  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
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    • Profile picture of the author Raydal
      Compared to the general population, if you've read three books
      on the subject then you are an expert.

      -Ray Edwards
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  • Profile picture of the author azmanar
    Hi Mike,

    wow !

    A very solid definition !

    Exactly the one I'm looking for and totally agreed with.

    The Length Of Time in that IM scope really matters a lot.

    This is one of the most important benchmark to look at, when evaluating someone who proclaimed himself as an expert.

    In the Length of Time, we need 2 simple quantification :
    -> for how long
    -> since when he has been doing that

    We're now getting closer to a set of factors to look at.

    4 W's and 1 H.

    Thanks Mike.

    Such an amazing tip that really triggers much in my mind.

    Thanks !
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  • Profile picture of the author billspaced
    Originally Posted by azmanar View Post

    Hi,

    Comments and inputs would be greatly appreciated.
    An expert is defined as one who has expertise in a certain area or field. They don't just "know more" but rather they have sufficient knowledge to perform a task.

    Take "brain surgeon." I may (but probably not) know more about the brain than you do but that doesn't qualify me to be a brain surgeon.

    Experts are also folks who are regarded by their peers as experts. So it's not just knowledge, but the acceptance of the individual as an expert in his field.
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  • Profile picture of the author Debra Barrow
    IM spans many areas. I don't believe a person can be an overall IM expert. To be called an expert, they should have special skills, training, experience, published works and have spent a lengthy amount of time in a particular area. They cannot be a "Jack of all trades, and master of none".
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve B
      My favorite definition of an expert:

      "An ordinary fellow a safe distance from home."

      Steve
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      • Profile picture of the author azmanar
        Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

        My favorite definition of an expert:

        "An ordinary fellow a safe distance from home."

        Steve
        Hi Steve,

        Attached, see how a guy wrote to his daughter before he left for work.

        He is really an expert communicator to his audience ( daughter ).

        He is no ordinary fella.
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  • Profile picture of the author CyberSorcerer
    Well I can only use my own situation as an example in what my belief is in defining 'Expert'

    I'm well known in the security industry as a expert in reserve engineering and vulnerability discovery. Did I bestow that title on myself? No.

    My peers, so to speak, are the ones that put me into that category through my extensive knowledge and ability in reverse engineering and vulnerability analysis. I do not have any professional security or computer certifications. But yet when it comes to a speaking finding a seminar speaker, or consultant, in these two fields I'm "only one" of the people that are automatically contacted.

    Another expert, and my competition, is Lenny Zeltser just letting you know that there are other experts in this same field so it doesn't look like I'm tooting my own horn.

    But this is just my opinion of how the 'Expert' title gets bestowed onto someone.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
    I think it's a very subjective topic.

    I am considered an expert in several fields but I don't call myself an expert - just someone with a fair bit of knowledge.

    In IM many people are considered experts using the "if they know more than me then they're an expert" philosophy.

    You could consider yourself not to be an expert and someone else could say you are one.

    You could say you are an expert and someone else could say you are not one.

    There are no benchmarks that would please everyone because it depends on the subjective viewpoint of the person involved.

    You could tell me that 5000 IMers consider someone an expert but that would have zero impact on my own perception of them. I've seen a LOT of people called experts by others and even proclaiming themselves to be experts in IM that I wouldn't trust to tell my nephew what IM is about.

    You see, since IM is just a tool that you use on a business and a business can be an infinite number of things depending on the person creating it - there is never a fixed answer or definition that applies to all.

    It's a circular issue where you'll never find something that everyone can accept - and I'm not sure there's any point in doing so anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Wells
    I would say that the generic answer to this is: A person with a high degree of skill in or knowledge of a certain subject, which is how most dictionaries define this word.

    But I would add that they should have plenty of hands on real experience in the field at question, be very seasoned, and should be relaible at obtaining a certain level of success or performance over and over again.

    Not that they are to be considered perfect or flawless, but someone who rarely misses the mark, the goal or screws up the task at hand.

    Also, they should be someone who is always looking for ways to improve........
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  • Profile picture of the author sal64
    what defines an expert and what we perceive to be an expert are 2 separate issues IMO.

    Simply because we accept according to our own expectations and pre-conceived prejudices.

    I once had it described at a speaker training seminar as follows:

    There are 3 types of experts...

    The first is the hands-on who has done it - you have a track record.

    The second is as a student of - for example, you have studied under a guru such as Trump and understand his stuff.

    The third is the reporter - someone who has studied a concept and has a through working knowledge of a topic.

    Mind you, this was explained in the context of how one can become an expert for business purposes.

    And then there is always the Authority. Are they an expert??
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    • Profile picture of the author azmanar
      Originally Posted by sal64 View Post


      The first is the hands-on who has done it - you have a track record.

      And then there is always the Authority. Are they an expert??
      Sal,

      IMHO, an expert is a person who can complete and deliver specific range of goals accordingly. To deliver, he has to have hands-on experience and can pool resources anytime he wants. Therefore he can deliver as quickly or as slowly as he wants.

      IMHO, an authority ( not the authorities in public office ), is a senior expert who has tremendous years of experience. He is highly respected for his accomplishments and has contributed a lot in the area of expertise. Everyone including other experts see him as THE BENCHMARK.

      Originally Posted by Steve Wells View Post

      I would say that the generic answer to this is: A person with a high degree of skill in or knowledge of a certain subject, which is how most dictionaries define this word.

      But I would add that they should have plenty of hands on real experience in the field at question, be very seasoned, and should be relaible at obtaining a certain level of success or performance over and over again.

      Not that they are to be considered perfect or flawless, but someone who rarely misses the mark, the goal or screws up the task at hand.

      Also, they should be someone who is always looking for ways to improve........
      Steve,

      I believe so too.

      Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post


      I am considered an expert in several fields but I don't call myself an expert - just someone with a fair bit of knowledge.

      In IM many people are considered experts using the "if they know more than me then they're an expert" philosophy.

      You could consider yourself not to be an expert and someone else could say you are one.

      You could say you are an expert and someone else could say you are not one.

      There are no benchmarks that would please everyone because it depends on the subjective viewpoint of the person involved.

      It's a circular issue where you'll never find something that everyone can accept - and I'm not sure there's any point in doing so anyway.
      Hi Andy,

      Indeed it is a circular issue and very subjective.

      But it has got to start at some point of time like any other professions.

      Google has been patient with a lot of junks. Then G decided set a standard against the wishes of junk-mongers who made lots of $$$. G did it for the sake of user experience ( successful to a certain extend ).

      So previously we have 2 sets of "experts" :
      (A) those who promote products on how to create junks for quick bucks in G
      (B) those who promote products on how to create value for G users, and make money.

      Nowadays we have more of (B)s than (A)s in here.

      So the point is, when we say EXPERTS, we look at VALUEs and NOT JUNKS.

      Originally Posted by CyberSorcerer View Post

      I'm well known in the security industry as a expert in reserve engineering and vulnerability discovery. Did I bestow that title on myself? No.

      My peers, so to speak, are the ones that put me into that category through my extensive knowledge and ability in reverse engineering and vulnerability analysis. I do not have any professional security or computer certifications. But yet when it comes to a speaking finding a seminar speaker, or consultant, in these two fields I'm "only one" of the people that are automatically contacted.
      Hi,

      I know someone with the same situation like yours at my location.

      His main biz is providing SMS Applications for TV, Radio and Telcos. Yet, he is more popular in Internet Security than his biz. He has been invited to give talks here and internationally. He had also gave briefings to NYPD, LAPD and London Met a couple of times. Right now he is one of the committee member for Gov-initiated Cybersecurity Group.

      His specialty is not Internet Forensics but more about User Security POV. None of the IT experts here can deliver as good as he does... so far.

      Is he an expert? People say he is. But he say he is not. Yet, right now he is also advising the Military. lol.

      Probably, he got sucked in so deep as an "EXPERT" because people felt they got more VALUE from him than IT Security Experts. Exactly as AndyHendry described earlier.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mary Wilhite
    Originally Posted by azmanar View Post

    -> accomplishments ( & project experience )
    -> network of resources
    -> proclaimed skills set and systems
    -> speed of mobilization
    -> customer services
    -> testimonials ( list of clients )
    You've got most of it.

    Just want to add that since we are in marketing.

    I think the best way to gauge an expert is how much he can sell over a period of time. Remember, marketing is about the business of promoting and selling products or services.

    So in my opinion, the true gauge of an expert is how much she can sell over a period of time.

    Best regards,

    Mary
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  • Profile picture of the author BenKJunya
    An expert is someone who is far and wide recognized as a dependable and efficient source of technique or talent for his sheer ability to judge or decide rightly. An expert is a person with wide ranging knowledge or knack based on research, experience, or occupation and in a particular area of study.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hostpany
    An expert is someone who succeed.
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  • Profile picture of the author MattVit
    I agree with everything said so far, though I would define it a little more succinctly:
    A person who has a comprehensive and authoritative knowledge of or skill in a particular area.
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark_Babcock
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      This is why the title of expert can only be conferred by one's peers, who also have education and experience in the same area.

      While a customer or group of customers may perceive someone to be an expert, it does not necessarily follow that they are an expert.
      Very well said and I agree 100% - in theory.

      But, you have to remember that in the "real world:"

      Perception is reality to those who perceive it until and unless proven otherwise.

      And consider:

      If an expert couldn't become an expert unless and until it was conferred by peers with comparable education and experience in the same area - where would they begin?

      And recognize:

      There are far more non-experts out there who are recognizing people as experts than there are experts doing so. And yes, this includes customers, prospects and others who are less knowledgeable on the subject than the person they characterize as an expert.


      And then there are the "Experts In A Box" - who are "created" and (at least initially) validated by a group who has something to gain from this person being an expert (anybody think of any examples..... ?)

      In fact, one could argue that "experts" in general - right, wrong or otherwise - are characterized and held to different standards depending on the subject matter, audience and situation (which is what I mean when I say defining an experts is a moving target subject to a number of variables)

      Consider the following:

      While characterization as an expert should, as Big Mike pointed out, be conferred by ones peers who also have education and expertise on the subject matter - in reality (particularly in some fields more so than others), the "expert" is defined and/or perceived by an audience other than what would be considered comparable peers - by an individual or group who is not qualified to characterize them as such by anyone other than themselves and their perception.

      In many cases the audience or group granting expert status to an individual is the prospects or customers who perceive this person as an expert simply because they "know a lot more than I do about it - but I admit, I don't know much," and where the deciding audience has no point of reference by which to gauge the level of expertise and determine whether or not the person really is an expert (probably why the "How to Choose A......" free reports work well to get opt-ins in certain niche markets - but that's a marketing topic).

      I think this is Acceptable - so long as the perceived expert (who may only have more knowledge and expertise than the one viewing them as an expert...and may have no experience at all) follows through with action and service from which others benefit.

      When she does, she gains credibility as an expert which results in additional validation, more exposure and bigger challenges - which, if she again follows through with action and service from which others benefit - she continues the journey - each time reaching another level of "expertise" and ultimately achieving recognition as an expert from her peers who also have education and expertise in that area.

      (I hope that makes sense...it did when I thought it )

      But back to the "Expert In A Box" for a minute.

      Let's look specifically at Internet Marketing Make Money Online (not sure why other than it seemed the right way to go) and its Experts, and let's use info products where the experts are selling info, training and coaching to the "want to be experts."

      DISCLAIMER: This certainly isn't true 100% of the time (maybe more so than not), and I think many IM MMO Experts would agree that this occurs - at least to some extent - in virtually all IM MMO "circles" (and yes - there are groups and sub-groups within the IM MMO community).

      So here's my observation - many of the "experts" are perceived and viewed as experts from the customer's perspective because they are positioned that way by a group of peers who are thought to be "experts" (some are / some aren't) by their followers, who in turn may have gained recognition as an "expert" initially by being positioned and presented that way by a group of peers who are also considered "experts" by their followers....and so on, and so forth, etc, etc, etc.

      In reality and when measured by "expert" standards for other subject matter, these "experts" may or may not be now - and may or may not have been when they were positioned that way - actual "experts" (but perception is reality...so if someone views them as experts - then they are experts to them despite what others might think).

      But some become "experts" as a result of being positioned that way at some point in time by a group of peers who did so NOT necessarily because of their skill and expertise on a subject matter - but in their mutual quest for financial gain (yes...GREED).

      Here's an example: Call it the "IM MMO "Expert" Revealed...the truth THEY don't want you to know (you may be smarter than they are)" (WSO to be released....LOL)

      IM MMO "A" decides to launch a new product and is going to be paying a nice affiliate commission. At the last event, she met IM MMO "B" who has done a few product launches and is very well connected, has a large "list" of people that perceive him as an "expert" and are responsive to his call to action.

      So IM MMO "A" calls IM MMO "B" and pitches her idea.

      IM MMO "B" likes it, and agrees to leverage his list and bring in his "partners" to help promote the launch/product (who once positioned IM MMO "B" as an "expert" to their audience in order to sell his product).

      Collectively, IM MMO "A" and her new partners know that in order to maximize their return, they need to position IM MMO "A" as an "expert" - so as peers, and whether they believe it to be true or not - they collectively tell the marketplace that IM MMO "A" IS an expert. And since many in the audience are on several of the IM MMO Partners lists, they are getting told repeatedly that IM MMO "A" IS AN EXPERT - go buy her stuff (here's the link).

      And since the audience perceives these IM MMO Partners to be experts (because they have characterized each other as such), they believe IM MMO "A" must be an expert.

      Now, whether or not IM MMO "A" remains an expert after all her peers have positioned her as such depends on how successful she and her product are for her, the partners that positioned her as an expert and the customer who bought her product.

      At first glance one might say "how terrible - that's deceptive and manipulative, and it takes advantage of the less knowledgeable people who don't know any better." But is it?

      If IM MMO "A" delivers as promised and meets and exceeds the expectations of the audience purchasing the product and leaves them wanting more, she's validated herself as an expert.

      And if she pays her affiliates well and reciprocates to her new audience by continuing to edifying those affiliates as "experts" on their subject matter; and if she promotes and sells their products; and if she promptly handles customer issues and minimizes refunds - THEN she will validate the expert status her peers granted her previously and solidify her position as an "expert" among peers.

      If she doesn't....."Next!"

      Now let's put a bit of a different spin on it - and say IM MMO "A" really is an "expert" - in the subject matter, but has never actually built an online business or made a dime. Does that make her less of an expert or less qualified to create, launch and teach an audience that knows less on the subject matter than she does?

      Society would say "no" in most cases. Take for example the professor in law who is highly educated with Doctorate and JD Degrees, and whose students become top lawyers - but who never passed the Bar exam and has never practiced law. Are they any less of an expert on law than practicing attorneys?

      So really - initially an "expert" could be nothing more than a "hustler" (in the negative sense).

      BUT - that's not necessarily a bad thing IF ultimately they deliver value that meets or exceeds the expectations of the audience - which is a good reason to identify your target market & set expectations according to not only your skill and expertise as the "expert" but also their expectations in viewing you as such (but that's another marketing discussion for another day) - and it's why expert classification is influenced by perception and opinion.

      "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder." This applies to experts too.

      For example, a number of years ago I had a colleague/friend who was working on taking his company public. He had hired a new CFO that (supposedly) had the knowledge and expertise to help him accomplish this objective. So he called my up and said "hey you got to meet this guy - he's an expert - and he's going to be a huge asset in helping me with the IPO."

      So we met for lunch.

      Within 5 minutes I saw right through this clown and actually asked my friend to step outside with me where I literally asked him if this was a joke, and when he said no - I told him he had lost his mind and this guy didn't know his *ss from third base, was a "hustler" in every negative sense of the word - and my recommendation was to "run" as fast and far away from him as he could. If I remember correctly I didn't even go back in for lunch - and was pissed at my friend/colleague for wasting my time to come meet this....(I'm pretty sure I used some "not so nice" descriptive words).

      Well, unfortunately he didn't see it the way I did and didn't heed my advice, and the IPO kept getting delayed and put off for one reason or another until finally, about 9 mos later my friend discovered this guy had been stealing from him, not paying vendors, creating receivables to borrow against that didn't really exist (yes that's fraud), not paying down credit lines when customers paid invoices and lying to him about the IPO status - and the company was broke.

      Needless to say, there was no IPO - and within the next 90 days it reached a point he could no longer operate. Within the next 60 days he was completely out of business - then spent the next 2 years going though hell defending lawsuits and attacks on him personally while he sorted everything and proved that while he was responsible (it was his company), he wasn't involved in the fraudulent activity and was himself a victim.

      But the point is - here was this guy who I didn't see as an expert but recognized as a "hustler" that brought nothing but trouble - yet he somehow managed to position himself or get positioned as an expert AND gain the acknowledgement and trust of my colleague/friend as such - to the point that my colleague/friend actually endorsed and promoted him to me and many others as an expert.

      Now - whether or not the guy was actually an expert at the time my colleague/friend hired him isn't important and discounting the fact that he was a crook, IF he had delivered as promised he would have solidified his characterization as such...and my friend could have said "see, I told you he was an expert" and I would have acknowledged.


      So I guess my point is that (virtually) anybody can become an expert in (almost) anything they want.

      But you have to start somewhere.

      For most, that starting point is going to be finding an audience that has an interest in a subject matter but is less knowledgeable, then sharing their "greater knowledge" while gaining more and seeking an even larger audience. audience. This process continues until at some point someone in the audience (who most likely has less knowledge and expertise) steps up and says "hey, this is an expert."

      Now there is validation from others as well, so the "entry level" expert steps up a bit, gains more knowledge and continues their advancement through the ranks - incrementally expanding their knowledge and reach (and growing the audience that views them as an expert), and one day they wake up and have been recognized as an expert by another expert who has comparable knowledge and expertise on the subject matter. Now they are an "expert among experts."

      With validation from peers it goes to even another level, and with continued learning and advancement on the subject matter and the exposure gained by being an "expert among experts" - ultimately they can become "the experts expert."


      And with that....I got to get a couple things done now.

      Mark
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      Mark Babcock
      The Prolific Profit Coach

      "Turning Passion, Purpose & Potential into Profit"
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  • Profile picture of the author g36
    Just want to throw a short comment, according to my opinion, Alexa is an expert.
    Signature

    :)

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    • Profile picture of the author azmanar
      Originally Posted by Mark_Babcock View Post

      Let's use web designers for a simple example of what I mean.

      So when the local designer who's been at it for a few months goes to the business owner who doesn't have a website and can't spell "www." and offers to create a simple 3 page template site on a hosted platform with a drag and drop design tool - she is the expert.

      But when the next designer comes along and can build a self-hosted site with 5 pages, customized header and an opt-in form that the customer can easily update - all of a sudden he's the expert.

      That is until the next designer comes along, because he's been doing it for years and has a degree in coding those funny "languages" with odd names that are just made up of letters - and he can not only do what they could - but can completely re-arrange things on the page and use different colors in different place, put videos on the site and use these things called APIs to connect the site to something else when certain things happen and who knows what else...

      But then along comes this newbie that can take all of what any of them did and make it look and display nicely on the desktop, laptop, iPad, smartphone and "hundreds of other devices" she says...then she's the expert.

      So "expert" really is a "moving target" - an opinion if you will.
      I really wished I could express myself like you do.

      Very good example and a powerful respond too.

      However, being able to deliver is not the only determining factor of being an expert. She can be recognized as an "expert" by that customer. How about others?

      Having only 1 customer is not reassuring, though. A good number (quantity) of customers remains an important factor. That shows more experience. At a another level, quality experience counts much more than many experience. Another differentiating factor is cost. An expert will cost much more because of the value. Also "speedy" problem solving is required - which can only be achieved from experience.

      Some years ago, there was a tender project for an international airport - baggage management system. A company got it by virtue of being an experienced software development company with scores of software engineers. But they haven't done any airport baggage management system before.

      So they developed, supplied and installed the system. It was running fine during the dry run and finally commissioned.

      Later on, they bid and won another tender for a Middle Eastern airport and then another one in Eastern Europe. They won both bids by virtue of the first system they installed and probably because of their lower cost.

      After a couple of months, the 1st airport started to face lots of problems, then the 2nd one and finally the 3rd. Baggage went missing and found their way to other parts of the world. ... lol .... My baggage arrived in Jakarta and stayed there. Then it went to Amsterdam and stayed there. By the time it reached me, I'm already 2 weeks in Accra Ghana ... with new sets of clothes and about to leave for London. ... lol

      I heard that company got kicked out and replaced.

      They may be an expert software dev company in client-server apps for business productivity. But they never had "that particular project experience", therefore they have difficulty in resolving issues, hence failed in those projects. LOW QUALITY and INSUFFICIENT EXPERIENCE.

      Knowledge is not enough. Quality knowledge delivers better, which can only be acquired through a number and length of experience.



      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      This is why the title of expert can only be conferred by one's peers, who also have education and experience in the same area.

      While a customer or group of customers may perceive someone to be an expert, it does not necessarily follow that they are an expert.

      "Special" in this case means significantly advanced knowledge and experience in a given area.

      This is why in science and academics we have something called "Peer Review". Allowing other experts in our field to view our work and validate it (or not).
      Exactly true. That is why there are associations and groupings. Every year or so, they have events in recognition of achievements by members in their field.

      Originally Posted by g36 View Post

      Just want to throw a short comment, according to my opinion, Alexa is an expert.
      I think so too.
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      === >>> Tomorrow Should Be Better Than Today

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  • Profile picture of the author warrich
    His work should do the talking if he is an expert and you should be able to see it for yourself. If he needs people to do the talking then he is most probably just that a "Guru".
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