your passion and not money should drive you

by FreedomOffshore Banned
64 replies
I have thought to myself if people concentrate on their passion then
there would be too many adult sites out there polluting the internet
world. But passion is more than just physical desires.


There is a passion that arises out of the soul and spirit of man and
you need to look at the things that have formed your life and what
you are interested in and then form a business that will help people
in that area.


I have spent a lot of time reading and studying about offshore living
and offshore financial matters and I am extremely interested in the
whole concept of how this relates to freedom in a world of declining
personal privacy and freedoms.


I do not expect to make a lot of money from my concept but I love
what I am doing and I love building a web site business to help people
become more and more free in their personal and financial lives.


Spend some time looking over your past and what has interested
you and what you think you will be studying about and spending time
doing in the future and follow your passion. From that passion build
your business and do not let money be your guiding motivation. You
can always move to South or Central America and live there in
comfort on only $1,000 per month.


Sincerely, FREEDOM
#drive #money #passion
  • Profile picture of the author jmidas
    For me, I think it is a combination of passion and finances. Both motivate me.

    Freedom, a few years ago, I read a book called "How to be Invisable" I think the author was something or other Luna or Lune. kind of interesting - along the lines of what you are suggesting.

    Only problem I see is that nowadays we all love on line and it is tough (but not impossible) to remain invisable.
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi freedom,

      Don't know if you've seen this -

      I'm a big fan of this site and it's owner, and I particularly enjoy the essays here -

      Essay Index

      There are all sorts of resources on that subject around the site, and I've been on the newsletter for a year and enjoy it. HTH
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      Roger Davis

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      • Profile picture of the author jdmitchell
        We are on the same page man. I am all about freedom in every way.
        Signature

        It Does

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        • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
          I think it is up to each individual to decide what drives them. There is no
          right or wrong.

          Many people build businesses in a certain market simply because they know
          the market is one where they can make a lot of money. The reasons for
          wanting that money can range anywhere from simply wanting to leave
          their children something when they die to wanting to own every fancy toy
          that the world has to offer.

          There is no right or wrong in either approach.

          Also, many people's "passions" may not be profitable enough to live
          anywhere, South America or not.

          If my daughter comes to me and says that she wants to be a lawyer
          because they make a lot of money, then I will see nothing wrong with
          that. Conversely, is she says she wants to be a social worker because
          she wants to help people, that is just as fine with me.

          I'm not trying to nit pick at your post, but you've done what, ironically,
          I've done way too many times. It's funny how sometimes when you look,
          you can see yourselves in others.

          The bottom line is simple. Each person has to decide what their motivating
          force is and it isn't for us to say what is right or wrong.

          At least that's my honest opinion...for whatever it's worth.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bryan Kumar
    I've found that if you choose what really, truly makes you happy, what makes you feel good for most of your day, you can't go wrong.

    If you keep asking yourself why you want "XYZ"...whether that's a house, a new car, a relationship, or whatever... you'll always find the final answer to be "because it makes me happy" or "it makes me feel good."

    So, why not just start there. Choose what will make you happy from the beginning...including the marketing methods, the niches, and so on (if you happen to be a marketer.

    I've always been big on helping people. That got instilled in me very early on, as a child. But, even that has to be done in a way that makes YOU happy as well.

    You can't run yourself ragged trying to help others either. I've done that many times before. My health, relationships, and even my wealth suffered, eventually.

    Find a way to live your true passion(s), whether it is teaching or building a corporation. (It's your passion. No one can tell you what it is.)

    But, leverage everything so that following your passion doesn't cost you other areas of your life. The end result should be happiness, while maintaining good health.

    Bryan
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Long
    I like staring off into natural landscapes for hours on end. But that doesn't exactly pay the bills.

    What I can't figure out is what you do when you have no real passion for anything. My life often looks a lot like the movie Groundhog Day. It isn't necessarily bad, it's just sort of the same thing over and over again.

    So what do you do when nothing in life "sparks" you?
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Mike,

      So what do you do when nothing in life "sparks" you?
      Good question.

      Get on a mission to find it.

      Where to start? Change, any change. Ideally change that challenges you and puts you into situations that you are not used to.

      Still stuck? Talk to your friends. Tell them your mission. Tap their brains for ideas. Act like a sponge.

      STILL stuck? Go and live somewhere new. Too drastic? Ok, as you like staring into space (I do too) go away somewhere likely to be a good place for reflecting. Somewhere that makes you feel good. Get away from all of the usual stimuli. Give yourself time and space.

      Then stare and think. Stare at something inspiring, like nature in all of it's glory. Keep staring and thinking until it hits you like a lightning bolt. Write it down. Stare some more. Develop that plan. Think of alternatives.

      None of that works for you?

      Plan B. Accept that plan A didn't work. Find something profitable that can sustain you or hopefully turn a profit. Accept that it will bore you but focus on the money. In the meantime, re-invent the mission.

      If you get 'on a mission' to do something, such as trying all those things, eventually you will find something. If you don't, open your eyes and your mind wider.

      HTH
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      Roger Davis

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      • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

        STILL stuck? Go and live somewhere new. Too drastic? Ok, as you like staring into space (I do too) go away somewhere likely to be a good place for reflecting. Somewhere that makes you feel good. Get away from all of the usual stimuli. Give yourself time and space.
        Moving house may be drastic but that's exactly what we did and it's by far the best thing we could've done. The idea was to simply move somewhere where we felt more comfortable, away from the hustle and bustle of the city.

        We figured that we'd get inspired and find our passion in due course. As is probably the case with many folk that take this approach, we 'discovered' that we already knew our passion, we just hadn't tapped into it. All that was left to do was to figure out a way to monetise it without ruining it.

        We think we're doing that and we're exploring new avenues every day.

        The biggest issue we face these days is actually doing some work. We too love "staring off into natural landscapes for hours on end" like Mike. We now have the opportunity to spend walking in those landscapes which takes up even more time (just a wee bit colder this time of year) It's on those walks that most of our business planning takes place - so it's not wasted time at all.

        Peter
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        • Profile picture of the author ExRat
          Hi Peter,

          Moving house may be drastic but that's exactly what we did and it's by far the best thing we could've done.
          Likewise here - except I did it alone. My priority was to be near the sea (with a view of it over my monitor), somewhere as warm as possible in UK, where I didn't know a single soul. Like pushing the 'reset' button. It became such an independence based mission that I had to fight my new neighbour off from helping me to carry my larger furniture in.

          It's a simple equation, but when you face something that inspires fear and walk straight through it, then everything else that is less fearful is no longer an obstacle. Kills a million birds with one stone.

          Which is why after two years here, although I am happy, I'm currently squeaking in my chair and trying to stop myself from u-turning on the next step in the same direction. It's not easy currently because the fear appears overwhelming, but I have learnt to recognise when comfort is setting in and those alarm bells will not stop ringing
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          Roger Davis

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          • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
            Roger,

            Good luck.

            Sometimes it's OK to be comfortable.

            Peter
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            • Profile picture of the author ExRat
              Hi Peter,

              Good luck
              Thankyou Sir!

              Although, 'good strength, courage, desire and persistance' is probably more apt.

              Sometimes it's OK to be comfortable
              I agree, and would go further - it's the ultimate goal, bearing in mind the different ways in which those comforts can be achieved.

              But I guess it's entirely dependent on we are at, in terms of achievement. As can be observed by our posts, we are in different 'places', with different goals. For example, some of my principle goals are still not clearly defined yet, therefore one of my current tasks is to successfully educate myself further, before I can proceed to the next stage.

              Plus I have been distracted from challenges many times, in order to sample many of the 'comforts' along the way. There is some logic behind this approach, as many of those comforts are more easily sampled with the aid of youth, to the point where youth is no longer an attribute and certain opportunities disappear forever.

              As time passes, it appears wise to find better ways of achieving the same goals, that maximise whatever attributes are in abundance at that time.

              Fresh stimuli, experiences and challenges, help me to continually discover those new attributes, which in turn lead to new discoveries, and hence new comforts. I could summize that the best way to be as comfortable as possible, is to first seek discomfort that leads to positive gains.
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              Roger Davis

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              • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
                Finding a passion to hold on to can be tough, especially you aren't a spring chicken anymore.

                When a child has a dream about becoming something we encourage them but when an adult comes up with something similar they are often met with opposition

                "You? At your age?"

                When I told my wife I wanted to be a rock star (at the tender age of 43), she took it quite well, considering. She helped lug speakers from venues at 2 a.m. and gave out flyers in the street, bless her.

                It was a real uphill struggle (I wasn't 17 and cute) but I think the biggest reason it didn't work out was that I didn't plan - I just jumped in and did it.

                I had no real idea where we were going (2 years in I was discussing fame with the bass player and he said "Don't want to be famous, Just do a few gigs now and then" - oops!).

                I spend all my time promoting the band when I should have been practising
                guitar. Or taking singing lessons (ExRat and Tomw can vouch for that ).

                My passion is rock music, 60s to the 80s, and that's the kind of music that I wrote. Not the stuff people wanted to listen to in droves.

                So, those of you looking for a December passion here's my advice.

                Read Sonia Choquette's "Your Heart's Desire". It's ten times better than "The Secret" and was written 10 years earlier.

                Then, once you find your passion that you want to monetize

                1. Find the right market
                2. Know where you are going
                3. Plan
                4. Practise your skills
                5. Accept no opposition to your plan based on your age

                If this guy can climb Mt Everest at the age of 76

                Min Bahadur Sherchan Climbs Mount Everest - Min Bahadur Sherchan Becomes The Oldest Man To Climb Mt Everest

                what can't you do in your forties, fifties or sixties?

                Martin
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                • Profile picture of the author jbsmith
                  The perfect marriage is one between passion and commerce.

                  Here's a great example...

                  I deal with many writers - book writers, freelancers, wanna be writers - they have immense talent and passion for their craft.

                  Those that do NOT find a way to make money from their craft cannot spend near the time they wished on doing what they love - instead they must sneak in a few minutes here and few minutes there, but eventually become frustrated and angry they can't get more time to do what they want to do.

                  On the other hand, those that learn to direct their craft in a way that is in-demand by their community - learn to direct their focus to an area of specialization, learn to teach others, learn to market themselves find themselves getting more and more time to direct to their passion - AND they have to worry less and less about the bills being paid.

                  The first group typically end up unhappy and often give up their passion - the second group end up much happier and deepen the love for writing.

                  Same goes for almost anything in life - if you can better learn to marry commerce with your passion you have a formula that will both make you happy and fulfilled.

                  Jeff
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                  • Profile picture of the author drmani
                    Great discussion, some wonderful posts, especially loved
                    Bryan's message.

                    I've found that if you choose what really, truly makes you happy,
                    what makes you feel good for most of your day, you can't go wrong.
                    ...

                    Find a way to live your true passion(s), whether it is teaching or
                    building a corporation. (It's your passion. No one can tell you what it is.)

                    But, leverage everything so that following your passion doesn't cost
                    you other areas of your life. The end result should be happiness,
                    while maintaining good health.

                    Bryan
                    My Passion Manifesto got published recently on ChangeThis.com - you may find it relevant to the subject - and hopefully it gets you started on following your passion!

                    ChangeThis :: Passion Manifesto

                    All success
                    Dr.Mani
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                    • Profile picture of the author tomw
                      Originally Posted by drmani View Post

                      My Passion Manifesto got published recently on ChangeThis.com - you may find it relevant to the subject - and hopefully it gets you started on following your passion!

                      ChangeThis :: Passion Manifesto

                      All success
                      Dr.Mani
                      Funny, your book came to my mind when I read some of the posts in this thread. I read it over the holidays and it had quite an impact on some of my thinking in regard to some key decisions.

                      Thank you.

                      Thomas
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      • Profile picture of the author GuruGazette
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

        STILL stuck? Go and live somewhere new.
        This is hands down one of the best ways to shake things up that I've ever found. You can break bad habits, shake out of stale routines, de-stagnate, re-inspire, etc etc.
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Mike,
      I like staring off into natural landscapes for hours on end. But that doesn't exactly pay the bills.
      Depends on how good your camera and your eye are.

      Or your pen.

      Can you communicate to others the thing you get from that time? A lot of people don't make the time, but want the experience, the feeling and the connection that come with it. Give them that, and they'll give you what you want.

      Ansel Adams. Henry David Thoreau. Frederic Remington. Claude Debussy. The Buddha.

      If you understand it so well that it's perfectly clear, you can communicate it to others.

      That's value.


      Paul
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      • Profile picture of the author ExRat
        Hi Sevenish,

        Thanks for the SovereignLife.com link. It appears most worthwhile.
        I find there's always someone who gets something from that when I share it. Personally, I find even if I'm not 100% with the guy on a particular essay, it still helps me to see 'the landscape' from that unforgiving, 'I've had enough' point of view.

        Ah! I know the OP was spamming, but this thread has been very helpful for me. I hope others have enjoyed the same benefit.
        Looks like conclusive proof to me that you can polish a turd, and that you can make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

        Warriors are so cool they can even take spam and turn it into an educational masterpiece.

        Hi Paul,
        Depends on how good your camera and your eye are.

        Or your pen.

        Can you communicate to others the thing you get from that time? A lot of people don't make the time, but want the experience, the feeling and the connection that come with it. Give them that, and they'll give you what you want.

        Ansel Adams. Henry David Thoreau. Frederic Remington. Claude Debussy. The Buddha.

        If you understand it so well that it's perfectly clear, you can communicate it to others.

        That's value.
        I realise that was for Mike, but thanks anyway. What you say is kind of obvious, but for those of us who can find everyday solutions by watching the sun rise, but struggle for hours with 'what's for dinner?' - it's helpful.
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        Roger Davis

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  • Profile picture of the author Bryan Kumar
    Cool post, Roger.

    Mike, you're not alone. It seems that at least 70% (my guess) of the people out there haven't figured that first step out...

    Most of us have no idea what our true passions are.

    As Roger pointed out, oftentimes, it takes a LOT of thinking, searching, and digging to find 'em. But, it's well worth putting the time in to find out. (Even if it takes an hour a day for several months - or more)

    As for staring off into landscapes....photography, tour guide... just off the top of my head. And if you wanna add the IM aspect to it, sell the info, pics, reports, whatever it is that you gather while staring off.

    Also, do look at your past - especially the ages between 5 and 21. You'd be surprised at how many times I've worked with people for hours only to find that their passion turned out to be what they enjoyed doing as a kid or during their high school years. Baking, dancing, even something as obvious as "talking and socializing a lot."
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    • Profile picture of the author richard92780
      Hey guys,

      I believe that the only way to maintain a passion we already have for something, is that we need to make sure that we put other people first over us and make sure that their needs are met.

      Many people gain a passion and loose it because they develop a "selfish" and "self centered" attitude of what can other people do for me, instead of what can I do to help others and make a huge difference in their lives.

      There is always great and continuous JOY in giving to others first and making sure their needs are met.

      I hope I made some sense by what I just said.

      Best wishes to all of you.

      Richard
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Brian,

      Cheers.

      As Roger pointed out, oftentimes, it takes a LOT of thinking, searching, and digging to find 'em. But, it's well worth putting the time in to find out.
      I agree. I'm actually in the process myself. I started the day I quit my offline business and went online. That was the start of my mission to 'find my calling', as it were.

      The biggest problem I have at times is that the process is so absorbing and enlightening that work becomes secondary. It's kind of a good and bad thing all in one.

      You know when you are 'on the mission' when you will sacrifice almost all comforts to find the answer. Then, you are engrossed and on the way.

      Mike,

      Living without passion is short-changing yourself - massively. Don't do that. The worst scenario is that you finally 'get it' just as the lights are going out, and then you will wish you had the time again to do it differently. Regrets suck.

      I use that scary scenario to drive me forward, constantly. Even if achievements are in short supply on a particular day, as long as one is 'growing' in the right direction - it's all good.

      Put another way -

      'The journey is the reward.'

      (Chinese proverb.)

      If your journey is currently tedious, where's your reward?
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      Roger Davis

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      • Profile picture of the author kf
        You'll be happier if your passion and not money drives you, but ... in many cases, there won't be a market where your passion lies. Unless you can somehow wedge two things seemingly unrelated (and difficult to monetize) together. Like the woman who loved walking, cooking and Italy and now does walking tours in Tuscany to visit fabulous restaurants.

        I'd recommend a book by Barbara Sher called 'I could do anything... If I only knew what it was: How to discover what you really want and how to get it.' (She also has a title for those with so many passions they have trouble choosing.)

        Really anything by Barbara Sher is worth reading - it's been her life mission to help people suss out what they most want and live passionately, and she's good at it.

        As Bryan said, your childhood is a great clue. Or anything that makes your heart sing. Or --- big one --- any activity where you lose track of time when you are doing it.

        Or one where you will pour money into a hole to feed your passion (like flying )

        And I second Roger, about regrets. That's what keeps me moving. Ticking things off the list. I don't want to look back and say 'I wish I'd ...'

        There is nothing more interesting to me than something new that challenges me to expand my horizons and keep learning. So my passion doesn't have to be 'sailing' or 'teaching' ... it can just be to 'experience' and 'learn' .. and by that criteria I can measure the ways I might spend my time to see if it will be satisfying or not.
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      • Profile picture of the author sevenish
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

        The worst scenario is that you finally 'get it' just as the lights are going out, and then you will wish you had the time again to do it differently. Regrets suck.
        Good one Roger. That's something I've been thinking about a great deal recently.

        Last year I was with my father as he was dying. He had always taken big, lusty bites out of life and relished every minute of it. Before he closed his eyes for the last time he fixed me hard with his eyes, grabbed my hand and gasped "Too short ... it's too short."

        Knowing that he died with no regrets is not only a source of great comfort to me, but a lesson I've realized I'd better heed.

        I'm getting there; thanks to everyone for the perspective ... spammer or not.
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        • Profile picture of the author ExRat
          Hi Allen,

          Nice touch. Boot 'em out, but keep any good stuff they leave behind

          Hi Sevenish,

          I was lucky. I made so many mistakes and wasted so much time on nonsense when I was young that I learnt the lesson earlier and got a second chance to do something constructive.

          I know many people who I was often a little envious of previously - everything seemed to slot into place for them and they seemed to get the breaks and had people on their side, rooting for them and showing them the way. It was too easy for them....

          Now, they have everything and nothing. Eventually they get bored of the merry-go-round and the endless circular race, turning tricks on everyone who gives them the chance, and constantly feeding their ego.

          And these are the people who will come to us with empty plates, complaining that their wife and kids don't know them, asking for sage advice! People need a bit of struggle to make them get their act together and appreciate the gift of life.

          Knowing that he died with no regrets is not only a source of great comfort to me, but a lesson I've realized I'd better heed.
          What a great example, and legacy. You must be very proud, and rightly so.

          Hi Matt23,

          I know other people who do what they do because they love and it and have a great deal of passion for it. I myself do what I do for a little bit of both.
          A BIG bit of both is preferable though, eh?
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  • Profile picture of the author Ken Preuss
    Originally Posted by Mike Long View Post

    I like staring off into natural landscapes for hours on end. But that doesn't exactly pay the bills.

    What I can't figure out is what you do when you have no real passion for anything. My life often looks a lot like the movie Groundhog Day. It isn't necessarily bad, it's just sort of the same thing over and over again.

    So what do you do when nothing in life "sparks" you?
    Mike,

    You bring up a vital point as it relates to building a business based on your passions. And that is this:

    A business generates revenue only when customers are willing to actually pay for whatever product or service you provide.

    It's one thing to identify one's passion and want to build a business around it. It's entirely another for that business to actually make money.

    For those who have an identified passion, see where there's a match for your passion in the marketplace. Meaning people hungry for and paying for products/services related to your passion. Then tailor your passion toward those existing successful business models.

    For those who do not have a passion identified, no problem. Simply find something in the marketplace working outrageously well where hungry buyers are spending money hand over fist.....then build your own version of that.

    Are there many details to fill in, skills to learn, hoops to jump through? Yes.

    However when you cut out the noise and the time-wasting activity, building a successful business really is that simple.

    Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author tomw
    Maybe my eyes are clouded and my brain a little addled by all of the recent shenanigans around here of late, but am I the only person who sees this thread as spam?

    Based upon the responses by such esteemed Warriors maybe I'm completely off base. If so I apologise to the OP...

    Thomas

    (p.s. Brian...great to see you posting again. Your books, Beyond Storytelling, Seduction Marketing 1 & 2 should be required reading!)
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by tomw View Post

      Maybe my eyes are clouded and my brain a little addled by all of the recent shenanigans around here of late, but am I the only person who sees this thread as spam?

      Based upon the responses by such esteemed Warriors maybe I'm completely off base. If so I apologise to the OP...

      Thomas

      (p.s. Brian...great to see you around again. Your books, Beyond Storytelling, Seduction Marketing 1 & 2 should be required reading!)
      Tom, I checked to see if this was a copy and paste job from somewhere
      else. It's not.

      Since there is no sig (I know, he can't have one yet) and there is really
      nothing promotional about it in any way, my gut tells me it's legit.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tom B
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        Tom, I checked to see if this was a copy and paste job from somewhere
        else. It's not.

        Since there is no sig (I know, he can't have one yet) and there is really
        nothing promotional about it in any way, my gut tells me it's legit.
        He has a link strategically placed. You just need to look closer.
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        • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
          Originally Posted by Thomas Belknap View Post

          He has a link strategically placed. You just need to look closer.
          That is very clever. I would have never thought of looking there.

          Thanks Thomas.

          So, is this spam then? It seems like a decent message.
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          • Profile picture of the author Tom B
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

            That is very clever. I would have never thought of looking there.

            Thanks Thomas.

            So, is this spam then? It seems like a decent message.
            I didn't report it because it has some good info even if it started off as spam.


            I am getting softer (geez, I just typed software instead of softer. I must be working too much lol) in my old age.
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    • Profile picture of the author Bryan Kumar
      Originally Posted by tomw View Post

      Maybe my eyes are clouded and my brain a little addled by all of the recent shenanigans around here of late, but am I the only person who sees this thread as spam?

      Based upon the responses by such esteemed Warriors maybe I'm completely off base. If so I apologise to the OP...
      Thomas, no your eyes are not clouded. Heck it very well could be spam. I thought the exact same thing when I first saw the OP, then the username.

      Originally Posted by tomw View Post

      (p.s. Brian...great to see you around again. Your books, Beyond Storytelling, Seduction Marketing 1 & 2 should be required reading!)
      Thank you! Appreciate that.

      Bryan
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    • Profile picture of the author kf
      No, I think you're right on the money. But it morphed into an engaging discussion.

      Originally Posted by tomw View Post

      Maybe my eyes are clouded and my brain a little addled by all of the recent shenanigans around here of late, but am I the only person who sees this thread as spam?

      Based upon the responses by such esteemed Warriors maybe I'm completely off base. If so I apologise to the OP...

      Thomas

      (p.s. Brian...great to see you posting again. Your books, Beyond Storytelling, Seduction Marketing 1 & 2 should be required reading!)
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      • Profile picture of the author Joanne Greco
        Interesting thread....I am personally motivated by making money AND things I'm passionate about. When they're combined, that's even better.

        I have thought to myself if people concentrate on their passion then
        there would be too many adult sites out there polluting the internet
        world.
        Unless you're talking about child porn sites, I disagree that adult sites pollute the internet. One of my passions IS related to the adult industry.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bryan Kumar
    Good points, Ken.

    Here's another thing that often gets people stuck or confused...

    Your passion does not have to turn into your main source of income.

    (I realize some will disagree with that statement.)

    It could be your side income. Or no income at all.

    I know some people who make good money online but still go to their 9-to-5 job. Because they love what they do at the job.

    Nothing wrong with that.

    Your passion doesn't have to turn into a home business. If you're happier doing what you do while someone else (the boss) handles the paperwork, customers, and other things that you'd consider "not fun," there's nothing wrong with that either.

    There are some people on this forum that could easily turn into the next 'guru' or double their income. If doing so will make a person happier overall, then go for it.

    If, instead, the extra income will also double the work, stress, etc. then it really doesn't make sense to do so.

    Happiness and financial freedom don't have to be a "one or the other" situation. If you do it right, you can have both.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ken Preuss
      Originally Posted by Bryan Kumar View Post

      Good points, Ken.

      Here's another thing that often gets people stuck or confused...

      Your passion does not have to turn into your main source of income.

      (I realize some will disagree with that statement.)

      It could be your side income. Or no income at all.

      I know some people who make good money online but still go to their 9-to-5 job. Because they love what they do at the job.

      Nothing wrong with that.

      Your passion doesn't have to turn into a home business. If you're happier doing what you do while someone else (the boss) handles the paperwork, customers, and other things that you'd consider "not fun," there's nothing wrong with that either.

      There are some people on this forum that could easily turn into the next 'guru' or double their income. If doing so will make a person happier overall, then go for it.

      If, instead, the extra income will also double the work, stress, etc. then it really doesn't make sense to do so.

      Happiness and financial freedom don't have to be a "one or the other" situation. If you do it right, you can have both.
      Bryan,

      Great points you make here.

      It's a bit of a catch 22 because a lot of folks enter into entrepreneurship seeking not only financial success but also personal fulfillment in their work - something plenty of people are not getting in their current jobs.

      In addition there are some who can't seem to motivate themselves to take action unless they are doing something they are passionate about.

      That said, you are 100% correct. Your passion does not have to relate to your income.

      However in order to actually earn revenue online - or through any other entrepreneurial endeavor - we obviously agree that you'd better be motivated enough to do whatever is necessary, whether you're passionate about it or not.

      Ken
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
        You know, this conversation has made me realize a lot of things.

        My passion is my music. Always has been.

        Yet, I make no money from it. I don't even try to.

        What I do, I am only able to do through the motivation of providing for my
        family. It is the thought of letting them down that keeps me doing what I
        do.

        This isn't to say I don't enjoy what I do. But to say it is my passion, that
        would just not be true.

        Let's just say I have "learned" to love IM.

        But if I'm honest, I'd rather be in the recording studio cranking out tunes
        all day.
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        • Profile picture of the author Bryan Kumar
          Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

          You know, this conversation has made me realize a lot of things.

          My passion is my music. Always has been.

          Yet, I make no money from it. I don't even try to.
          Why not, Steven? Absolutely nothing wrong with turning your passion into a side income. (In fact, a lot of things really right in doing so.)

          I just picked up my guitar again 3 months ago (after 12 years of it collecting dust) because a friend decided he wanted to learn to play the guitar this year.

          Now, I wish I had never stopped playing. (I would have logged in my 10,000 hours by now - ala Malcolm Gladwell.

          Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

          But if I'm honest, I'd rather be in the recording studio cranking out tunes all day.
          Crank out some tuneage, dude. Record some stuff and offer it as a WSO - with PLR - for folks to use on the audio/video product - as intros, outros, etc. (Only one way to find out if it will sell or not.) Or just put up a myspace/youtube page and throw up some of your stuff. Just for fun. (If you don't make a penny from it who cares.) You never know how it will unfold from there.

          One of the most common pieces of advice I've given niche iMarketers (aside from picking an existing hobby, interest to write about) is to pick something they're interested in but never had the time to learn, or just never got around to.

          Then, put the time in to learn, study it...with the goal that they will turn it into an income source, even if it's a few hundred bucks per month. (That's one way to 'force' people into sucking a little more enjoyment out of life while they still can.)

          In your case, you're already good at it. Plus, you still enjoy it. Why not have some fun with it. Combine it with IM in some way.

          If nothing else, it might make IM a bit more fun for you.

          Bryan
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          • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
            Originally Posted by Bryan Kumar View Post

            Why not, Steven? Absolutely nothing wrong with turning your passion into a side income. (In fact, a lot of things really right in doing so.)

            I just picked up my guitar again 3 months ago (after 12 years of it collecting dust) because a friend decided he wanted to learn to play the guitar this year.

            Now, I wish I had never stopped playing. (I would have logged in my 10,000 hours by now - ala Malcolm Gladwell.



            Crank out some tuneage, dude. Record some stuff and offer it as a WSO - with PLR - for folks to use on the audio/video product - as intros, outros, etc. (Only one way to find out if it will sell or not.) Or just put up a myspace/youtube page and throw up some of your stuff. Just for fun. (If you don't make a penny from it who cares.) You never know how it will unfold from there.

            One of the most common pieces of advice I've given niche iMarketers (aside from picking an existing hobby, interest to write about) is to pick something they're interested in but never had the time to learn, or just never got around to.

            Then, put the time in to learn, study it...with the goal that they will turn it into an income source, even if it's a few hundred bucks per month. (That's one way to 'force' people into sucking a little more enjoyment out of life while they still can.)

            In your case, you're already good at it. Plus, you still enjoy it. Why not have some fun with it. Combine it with IM in some way.

            If nothing else, it might make IM a bit more fun for you.

            Bryan

            Bryan, thank you for taking the time to make this reply. I certainly wasn't
            expecting it.

            Maybe it's the mathematician in me (I was originally a math major in
            college) but I can objectively look at the music I've created in 30 plus
            years (over 700 songs) and quite honestly, I ain't that good.

            I hear music written by so many talented people (I won't go into the long
            boring list) that I am just in awe of them. I wish I had a dime for every
            time I heard a song and afterwards said to myself, "I wish I had written
            that" or "I wish I could write like that."

            And it's not that I'm not trained. Hell, I'm classically trained thanks to my
            mother who was an opera singer and concert pianist (talk about an odd
            combination) but you can't teach talent.

            This is an argument that I have been making in regard to IM that you
            can't make somebody a great copywriter or article writer or whatever no
            matter how much "education" you give them. I know people will tell me
            I'm wrong, and have. But I'm living proof of that. Nobody, and I mean
            nobody who has ever heard any of the music I've produced in 30 years
            has ever said, "Steve, that's good enough to be on the radio." Certainly
            the hundreds of publishers I've sent my stuff too haven't said it.

            One song that I've written in 30 years...one song...finally received an
            honorable mention in a song writing contest and actually got published.

            It never got recorded and probably never will unless somebody happens
            to stumble onto it one day and decide it's just right for them. Yeah, I
            know, I should push it harder. I should send it to more people. Heck, there
            are a lot of things I should be doing with my music.

            But it still all comes back to one thing...I'm just not that good and I'm
            intelligent enough to know it.

            The intangibles of songwriting elude me. It's like a magic formula that you
            can't write down...that magic combination of words and music that
            produces something that many people want to hear over and over.

            It's been the one true mystery in my life that I don't think I'm ever going
            to figure out...with all my training.

            Anyway, I'm sorry. I've rambled on enough. I guess you can tell this is a
            subject near and dear to my heart. Today I'll be going back into my little
            recording studio and finishing yet another tune that I started on Monday.

            Thanks again for replying to my thoughts Bryan.

            It's much appreciated.
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            • Profile picture of the author Nick Garcia
              Bryan,

              As a fellow musician I can relate to what you say. I write music as my life passion. As much as I've wanted to try going professional, I know that the risk of dropping everything in my life and gearing towards that is far too high. Having a career based on music is all about your audience, and not everyone will think that your most recent creation is the next biggest hit in the music industry (whatever genre you might compose in).

              So, I'm in the same boat as you. I continue writing music because it is my passion and always will be. My friends enjoy my songs and I sometimes post them online for a greater amount of reviews. I've decided that if it ever does go somewhere, only then would I pursue a career. But until then, it's wonderful therapy for the mind and soul, and at the very least it creates great memories of sharing my music with my close group of friends.

              To conclude my main point, I think that any form of art should be a passion until 'proven' otherwise. I've seen too many people strive for a career in music, acting, drawing, sculpting, or painting, and they become one more of the stereotypical 'starving artists'. I think it's good to have a main career in addition to whatever passion you might have. If you're lucky enough to make their passion into a career, great! Follow it until you reach the sky, then keep going to see how high you can really go. But if not, at least you have that main career to keep a roof over your head and food coming your way.

              I hope my two cents are helpful to someone out there!

              -Nick Garcia
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              • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
                Steven and Nick,

                If you have such a stock of songs you could go into the royalty free niche.

                Or how about this one?

                You put 30 of your best ones online with lyrics that can be customized to suit the customer "I love you (first_name fix)".

                For $250 people get a great personalized present.

                With the quality of voip you could even set up a virtual recording studio. You play the backing track, they do the karaoke bit via Skype and then you mix the result.

                You get $250 for 2 or 3 hours work and the satisfaction of your music making 2 people very happy.

                Martin
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                • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
                  Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

                  Steven and Nick,

                  If you have such a stock of songs you could go into the royalty free niche.

                  Or how about this one?

                  You put 30 of your best ones online with lyrics that can be customized to suit the customer "I love you (first_name fix)".

                  For $250 people get a great personalized present.

                  With the quality of voip you could even set up a virtual recording studio. You play the backing track, they do the karaoke bit via Skype and then you mix the result.

                  You get $250 for 2 or 3 hours work and the satisfaction of your music making 2 people very happy.

                  Martin

                  Martin, actually my friend Warner Kielwasser and I (hope he finds this
                  because I have lost track of him) did this years ago. We made recordings
                  for people who were getting married and wanted their life story of how
                  they met put to song.

                  It was a heck of a lot of work back in the 80s with the limited technology
                  we had available to us. Today, it would probably be a lot easier.

                  Don't get me wrong. Don't think I don't know that there are a gazillion
                  ways I could "monetize" my "gift"(???) if I sat down and put my mind to
                  it. I may yet someday do just that. But right now I have to keep my
                  priorities in order and concentrate my efforts on what I know for certain
                  is going to continue to put food on the table.

                  Otherwise, my wife would kill me.
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            • Profile picture of the author drmani
              Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

              But it still all comes back to one thing...I'm just not that good and I'm
              intelligent enough to know it.

              The intangibles of songwriting elude me. It's like a magic formula that you
              can't write down...that magic combination of words and music that
              produces something that many people want to hear over and over.
              Only 1,000, Steven. Only 1,000.

              This paradigm-shifting article may show you another perspective.

              Kevin Kelly -- The Technium

              All success
              Dr.Mani
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              • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
                Originally Posted by drmani View Post

                Only 1,000, Steven. Only 1,000.

                This paradigm-shifting article may show you another perspective.

                Kevin Kelly -- The Technium

                All success
                Dr.Mani
                Very interesting article Dr. Mani.

                Thank you for sharing it.

                Now to find my 1,000 true fans.
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                • Profile picture of the author ExRat
                  Hi Mike,
                  I'm about halfway through reading Career Renegade: How To Make A Great Living Doing What You Love, by Jonathan Fields. I highly recommend it, especially to Roger and Mike. Extremely relevant to this discussion, and a great read to boot.
                  Thanks. Added to wish list.

                  I can't remember who recommended them recently, but someone mentioned on here -

                  Irrationality - Stuart Sutherland, and
                  Predictably Irrational - Dan Ariely

                  I got them and am well into the first one - excellent! Nothing to do with this subject, but I just thought I'd mention it.:rolleyes:
                  Signature


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                  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
                    But it still all comes back to one thing...I'm just not that good and I'm intelligent enough to know it.
                    But - you are good enough to thoroughly enjoy your music and give it a solid place in your daily activities.

                    I understand what you mean. I can easily sight read music and "hear" the song in my head - I can sit down and play it because reading music to me is like reading a book. However, I don't have the talent to sit down and play without music unless I've memorized the score. I can't write music

                    Passion for some may not be about our hobbies or talents or apply to what might be "a niche". Way back in this thread, Mike posted that he didn't have any passions that he could find - and I used to feel the same way. But the passion may be for privacy, or space or living where you can look out and see trees and nature - so indulging our passion may mean working effectively to afford that indulgence.

                    For some, it's doing what you love to do even though you do it as a supplemental business. For others, it's doing what you can to allow yourself the time/money to peacefully watch nature for hours on end.

                    Isn't the point of finding a passion - finding motivation?

                    kay
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                    Saving one dog will not save the world....but will forever change the world for one dog.
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                    • Profile picture of the author Nick Garcia
                      Kay,

                      Very well said, in my opinion. You hit it right on the spot. I'm passionate about computers, Internet Security, programming, business, and marketing. That's what I'm basing my business off of. My business will hopefully enable me to enjoy my passion for music. It's a win-win situation no matter which route I take. I could either be a successful entrepreneur, or I could be a successful musician. Either way, music will always be a part of my life, which is what I want in the end.

                      It's my wish that others can accomplish lifestyles such as that. If you're lucky enough to have Internet Marketing as your passion, you're just set for life!

                      -Nick Garcia
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            • Profile picture of the author ExRat
              Hi Mike,
              Is there an option to automatically subscribe to all threads that I post in, so I can more easily remember to come back to them?
              Go to user cp>edit options (near the top, at the left side of the red menu bar)

              Then on that page, in the second red 'box' down, (messaging & notifications) - in the second 'box' down in that section, set the setting to 'instant email notification.'
              Signature


              Roger Davis

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  • Profile picture of the author Dayne Dylan
    Banned
    Nice spam.
    Signature
    Create and Differentiate. Illuminate Your Buyers Need or Wants. Grow Rich.
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    • Profile picture of the author jmidas
      I see nothing spammy about it.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dayne Dylan
        Banned
        Originally Posted by jmidas View Post

        I see nothing spammy about it.
        You aren't looking close enough.
        Signature
        Create and Differentiate. Illuminate Your Buyers Need or Wants. Grow Rich.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bryan Kumar
    Maybe it is spam. And if so, it'll get deleted. (If you feel like reporting it, go ahead...and then move on.)

    Meanwhile, there's some good info in the thread, as a whole.

    Maybe focusing more on that would be more productive. Just a thought...
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  • Profile picture of the author Bryan Kumar
    Thanks for mentioning Barbara Sher, kf. Her name darted through my mind, for a second, when I was responding to Mike's post above.

    You're right, she's great at explaining this subject in her own cool way. And pretty funny too.
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    • Profile picture of the author kf
      NP Bryan. I had a chance to see her speak in a very small setting. She is as warm and genuine in person as you might expect reading her books. not to mention incredibly intuitive and quick.

      .
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  • Profile picture of the author admin
    Administrator
    I banned the user and left the post...
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  • Profile picture of the author FoodForThought
    Success Is not a destination its a journey. Greatest gift god give us is the ability to choose. What comes with that is to be accountable and responsible.

    Your Passion obviously gives you hunger for more its infact a feeling of emotion that drives you toward your goal. Everyday is exciting enough to jump out of bed everyday and get going andddddd get paid for it.

    Theres a lot of people whom focus on success. But with success comes failure. But when you think like Einstein
    You can either see everything as success or failure.

    Become a person whom GIVES VALUE.
    Instead of focus on success focus on VALUE.
    Look at VALUE instead of success or failure.
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    • Profile picture of the author sevenish
      Originally Posted by FoodForThought View Post

      Become a person whom GIVES VALUE.
      Instead of focus on success focus on VALUE.
      Look at VALUE instead of success or failure.
      Yeah, quite agreed.

      I have started offering a new service line. Since much of what I offer are actions my clients could easily undertake themselves with their existing resources if they have the expertise, I include a list of recommendations based upon my initial analysis of their situation free of charge in my first exploratory email after I've been asked to submit a proposal. (sorry for the long sentence, I'm a bit bleary-eyed. I probably need a glass of wine.)

      In any case, they're appreciative of that. I'm hoping to get some contracts signed this week, but just demystifying some of the mechanics of how it's done for them helps me help them and helps to hone my proposals and articulate the value that I can offer.

      I think Truman Capote would agree that the above wasn't so much "writing" as it was "typing". Apologies for the incoherence.
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  • Profile picture of the author sevenish
    Roger,

    Thanks for the SovereignLife.com link. It appears most worthwhile.
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  • Profile picture of the author sevenish
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    My passion is my music. Always has been.
    My bachelors degree is in music composition and music was always my passion.

    Since I recognized early that I actually disliked performance, I went into production. I became a very successful producer and engineer in the NYC market with several profiles and interviews over more than a decade in what was once a hot, hard copy magazine that catered to the production and engineering professionals community known as "Mix".

    Won some Clios, a Peabody, an "aggregate "Grammy" and lots of Grammy nominations for the production and engineering work.

    I retired that career in '95 to go fulltime into what was then known as "interactive media" and I've never looked back. I and my partner at the time were unsuccessful in convincing our record company clients to even allow 16 bit audio for play on CDROM or online back then, let alone distribution, so we moved on because we had bills to pay. That partner and I still work together and collaborate on projects. Let's just say the record companies have [finally] come around, albeit much too late for us to be able to help them with our resources NOW.

    Meanwhile, my former partner and I have found that we can add value in ways we never imagined back in the '90's, and in ways we never imagined we would care. Hmmph. Imagine our surprise to find that we are veterans of user experience and internet marketing for brick and mortar and traditional media companies. Of course I'm paying great attention to the "offline" threads here and learning how I can offer more value to my current clients.

    Ah! I know the OP was spamming, but this thread has been very helpful for me. I hope others have enjoyed the same benefit.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ken Preuss
      Originally Posted by sevenish View Post

      My bachelors degree is in music composition and music was always my passion.
      Wow, there's a lot of musical background represented here.

      Me - bachelors in music performance (trombone) and masters in music education.

      Now look at all of us - doing internet marketing. Go figure.

      Actually I do still play quite a bit. My wife kicked my butt back into it after I had put the horn down for a while.

      Ken
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      • Profile picture of the author sevenish
        Originally Posted by Ken Preuss View Post

        Me - bachelors in music performance (trombone) and masters in music education.
        Piano here. But look: Where in the hell were you when I needed to put together a brass ensemble for my recital?

        Seriously though, from a production perspective, finding a good trombone player is difficult. Finding a good trombone player who is available for work is impossible.

        Hell, finding a trombonist with whom I can even work is even rarer still.

        The brass cats were always the most difficult for me to work with. They also taught me waaay more than I wanted to know about myself and what I needed to learn in order to get the best results from the performers. Many scrappy, but fond, amusing and appreciative memories there.

        Thanks for reminding me of those lessons.
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    • Profile picture of the author sevenish
      Originally Posted by Bryan Kumar View Post

      sevenish,
      Wow, you've got some heavy duty music background. Good for you.
      Perhaps, but your posts are more on topic and actionable in the context of this thread.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike McBride
    This forum is a great place, and discussions like this make it really cool.

    I'm about halfway through reading Career Renegade: How To Make A Great Living Doing What You Love, by Jonathan Fields. I highly recommend it, especially to Roger and Mike. Extremely relevant to this discussion, and a great read to boot.
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  • Profile picture of the author Allen Graves
    Kay,

    Let me just say that you are an absolute GENIOUS!

    Loved it.

    AL
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  • Profile picture of the author moneymaker8
    My passion is to help people in any way I possibly can. I hope to learn enouigh here to eventually help as many people as I can.
    David
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    • Profile picture of the author Ram
      I am passionate about business. I am building what will be the largest direct marketing firm on the globe. But we market in a lot of niches I have absolutely no interest in beyond selling.

      Passion can be anything. You can build a business around things you have no passion for as long as you have a passion for your business.

      Or your passion can be unrelated to business, such as traveling or bird watching or building houses for the poor, and you can build a business around something completely different that gives you the cash to live your passion.

      Or you can build a business around your passion.

      Of any combination or something different I may have left out.

      Can you be successful without passion? sure. Many people rise near, even all the way to, the top of companies without real passion. People would call them successful. But I think you need passion to be successful on your own. Something to drive you beyond the norm. But , for some super dedicated people, that can something as basic as providing the best life for your family. Lots of immigrants to the U.S. do very well with that passion.

      You get to decide what you want to do if you are willing to do so. There are no absolutes. No "musts." Don't let many in the self-help crowd tell you otherwise.

      Ram
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  • Profile picture of the author clarissa25
    Banned
    Moving out of the country in these dismal economic times does seem like a lovely ideea.
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  • Profile picture of the author Li Weng
    Don't forget there's a difference between being passionate
    about something to being actually talented at it.

    You could be very passionate about golf, but you won't get
    anywhere if you don't have some 'natural talent'.

    You can be passionate about playing basketball, but if you're 5'4
    then there's no way that you can translate this passion into success.

    It's a fact of life.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Long
    I hate to dig this thread back up, but I REALLY need to learn to start subscribing to threads that I post in so I could keep track of them. Is there an option to automatically subscribe to all threads that I post in, so I can more easily remember to come back to them?

    Anyway, thank you to everyone who shared their thoughts with me in this thread. I really appreciate it!

    Too many good responses to quote them all, so I'll just ramble here and hope that I cover all the bases.

    Kay, you actually hit the nail on the head, as I am fiercely private by nature and crave alone time. When asked "if you could do anything on earth, anything at all, what would it be?" my mind *always* flashes to an image of me, walking alone in the redwoods near the ocean, on a wide trail with no one around, and nothing but the sound of the birds and the breeze around me.

    It's that same vision, every time, and has been since I was at least 14 years old.

    Unfortunately, that great desire to remain alone, private, and in the background runs in direct opposition to another thing that I do believe I love to do.

    Teach.

    I came into IM almost 10 years ago and knew almost immediately that my goal needed to be:

    1) Learn as much as I can as fast as I can
    2) Teach it to others, as I really don't care for actually doing it myself.

    So I learned it, and have been fortunate enough to have a lot of success over the years.

    But I never started teaching it.

    Part of the reason was due to that fiercely private nature, and not wanting to engage with people and let them get too close. Part of it was the fact that I never achieved "guru" status, which I mistakenly believed was required of me to become a full-time IM coach.

    I now find myself with no desire whatsoever to continue to *do* IM for myself (and my current income reflects this) but a tremendous desire to help, coach and teach others to do it.

    I certainly have the knowledge and experience. I have earned nearly $500K online over the years and never really enjoyed it. Think what I could have done if IM were my passion!!

    But even with that, I've never quite felt as though I would be taken seriously as a teacher without that "well known" pedigree.

    I could move into other forms of teaching. I've long thought I would make a great history professor. But it would take me close to a decade to get there.

    I've realized that the subject I teach isn't really important. What is important to me is that I impart what I've learned to others, so that they may use it and hopefully do better then I ever did.

    What do you guys think? Can someone who quietly made good money in IM in at least a half-dozen different ways over the years, but who is virtually unknown in the IM community, make it as an IM coach?

    Years ago, I attended a seminar that Jim Edwards did on a cruise ship. I was only 2 weeks from launching Article Lightning at the time, and I wanted to see how the "gurus" did things.

    I came away from that experience with the realization that I had plenty of knowledge to do what he did, but I lacked the "self promoting" personality that he had. It hurt me while running AL, as I could never quite "put myself out there" to a group of 300 people.

    But for whatever reason, I have no problem giving everything I have of myself to people in a 1-on-1 situation.

    I asked it earlier, before I started rambling again, but I'll ask it one more time, and hope to get some thoughtful, honest responses.

    If you were a newbie (or even a not-so-newbie), and wanted help and 1-on-1 coaching, would you feel comfortable receiving it from a guy like me?

    If so, how does a non self-promoting personality put himself out there to get clients?

    Thanks for listening,
    ~Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author Dave Allen
    This thread is a great source of information and inspiration. Thanks to everyone!

    Also, here is the link to Barbara Sher's WishCraft...

    Welcome to the home of Barbara Sher's WISHCRAFT!
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  • Profile picture of the author Matias1021
    money is what allows me to be able to pursue my passions...
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