Are You Spoiled Rotten? Sorry to Say that Many of You Are

48 replies
I came across an awesome offer in the WSO section today. The product started out at a $50 discount from its ultimate price point and went up ten bucks every few sales.

Really, it's one of the better offers I have seen in a while, but there were people bitching and moaning about how the price was too high for it to be a "Warrior Special Offer". One guy wrote that it was "a shame" that the seller is doing this to the members.

Doing what? Selling an awesome product at a discount? Isn't that what the WSO forum is all about?

The only shame here is that so many sellers are undervaluing their products and services to the extent that they have brought the expectations to ridiculous levels.

The ironic part is that most of the sellers in the WSO forum are selling products that teach people how to be marketers. How can you teach somebody to be a marketer when you can't even price your own products to where they are making you a decent return?
#rotten #spiled #spoiled
  • Profile picture of the author MaverickUK
    People will always find something to complain about. I'm sure the seller will get over it in a few minutes and continue to make sales, let the complainers complain, it's hardly the end of the world.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    If some one posted on my wso that, "its a shame" that my price is to high I'd just have the post deleted. They have ZERO business posting anything like that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      A truly time limited offer - just like so many USED to be.

      What I noticed is those posting the useless comments only comment in WSO threads. I doubt they buy much without refunding
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  • Profile picture of the author ZachWaldman
    The OP is exactly right. If you're selling a product that is normally $997 for $597, that's a HUGE discount and that's the point of the WSO section.

    Although it can be frustrating to see people selling products of high value for ridiculously low prices, it doesn't bother me because I'm not competing with them.

    For example, I hear magicians complain all of the time that their competitors are costing them gigs because they're charging so little.

    Well, don't compete against them! Create a higher value proposition, target a market with more money to spend, and charge a premium.

    A friend of mine does a lecture where he makes this point brilliantly. He talks about pomegranate juice and shows how he bought two different brands of juice from the same grocery store.

    One brand cost twice as much as the other and had less juice but if you read the ingredients, they were EXACTLY the same. Do you think the "premium" juice cares what the cheap juice is doing? Nope, they don't see the other brand as a competitor.

    Instead, they target affluent people and create a better value proposition.

    One of the best eye-openers on this subject is No BS Marketing to The Affluent by Dan Kennedy.

    Also, Paul Lemberg, in Formula Five, showed mathematically how big of a mistake it is to compete on price. You're almost always better off charging a premium than you are trying to be the cheapest.

    For example, people think by being cheap, they're going to sell a ton more of their product. The reality is, these people don't realize how much more they have to sell and how little people care that they dropped their price by a couple of dollars.

    One of the reasons people don't charge more is because they have very few leads coming in and don't want to scare the few prospects they have with high prices. However, you don't fix this problem by lowering your prices, you fix it by increasing the number of leads you have coming in.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Yep Brian I agree. People are seriously under valuing their products on here and in the process creates a market place where everyone demands the best info for $10. Crazy!
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      • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
        Originally Posted by jan roos View Post

        Yep Brian I agree. People are seriously under valuing their products on here and in the process creates a market place where everyone demands the best info for $10. Crazy!
        Well, this could be attributed to the many WSO sellers who are selling awesome info products for less than $10. I have bought several.

        For instance, if lets say, a new mobile phone comes out and is being sold for $100 and then several folks start selling the same phone for $25, when a potential customer sees the phone for $100 somewhere, they will think it's price gouging because they have become accustomed to seeing it for $25 elsewhere. $100 may in fact be a very reasonable price for the product, but if it's sold cheaper elsewhere, then that's where the customers will go, especially in the present economy.

        I think it's the same with WSO's. Personally, if a WSO is really good and shows me something special, I have no problem paying $30 or $40 for it.

        On the flip side, I have purchase several WSO's that were awesome in the past week or so for under $10. So, I guess the buyer is not all to blame. Maybe the sellers should charge a little more for quality info consisitently, and I think you would see that stigma disappear.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Howard
    I've learned that the hard way - and you know what my strategy is now?

    Don't change the price - change the product.

    No more giving away 20 videos with marketing info worth 100+ bucks for 7. Instead, short 10 to 40 page reports that cover a small but actionable idea, plan or process.

    Then have a slightly higher priced product as an upsell with more details.

    The small report is priced at small report price.

    Since doing this, the time it takes for me to create a WSO and get it to market is only 2 hours. Yes, 2 hours. And I'm making just as much as I was before AND the customers seem to be MUCH happier. (because they can instantly download, read it in a few minutes, and then report back to thread there thoughts)

    It used to take me 4 or 5 days to put one together. (About 20 hours total) So in essence, I've increased the money I make per hour by 10 times or something like that. Much much better

    Rob
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    • Profile picture of the author MarkusD
      Originally Posted by ccmusicman View Post

      I've learned that the hard way - and you know what my strategy is now?

      Don't change the price - change the product.

      No more giving away 20 videos with marketing info worth 100+ bucks for 7. Instead, short 10 to 40 page reports that cover a small but actionable idea, plan or process.

      Then have a slightly higher priced product as an upsell with more details.

      The small report is priced at small report price.

      Since doing this, the time it takes for me to create a WSO and get it to market is only 2 hours. Yes, 2 hours. And I'm making just as much as I was before AND the customers seem to be MUCH happier. (because they can instantly download, read it in a few minutes, and then report back to thread there thoughts)

      It used to take me 4 or 5 days to put one together. (About 20 hours total) So in essence, I've increased the money I make per hour by 10 times or something like that. Much much better

      Rob
      Great advice Rob. People get ideas stuck in their heads, get frustrated that what they are doing is not working, but they just need to shift their idea to better suit their customer base they are advertising to.

      Square pegs will never fit into a round hole, no matter how hard you push.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
        Originally Posted by E. Brian Rose View Post

        The only shame here is that so many sellers are undervaluing their products and services to the extent that they have brought the expectations to ridiculous levels.
        What seems a shame to me is that so many people seem to place so little value on investing in their mind. They want all the answers in a nutshell and don't want to pay for it.

        Complaining about high prices is really telling their subconscious that they aren't worth much. If you've studied psychology and mind programming very much, you know that's a bad signal to repeatedly send to your hidden control center.

        We will only go as far as our thoughts take us, and the more knowledge we take in, and the better that knowledge is, the better our own thoughts will be. An investment in our mind always pays dividends.
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        • Profile picture of the author tpw
          Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

          What seems a shame to me is that so many people seem to place so little value on investing in their mind. They want all the answers in a nutshell and don't want to pay for it.

          Complaining about high prices is really telling their subconscious that they aren't worth much. If you've studied psychology and mind programming very much, you know that's a bad signal to repeatedly send to your hidden control center.

          We will only go as far as our thoughts take us, and the more knowledge we take in, and the better that knowledge is, the better our own thoughts will be. An investment in our mind always pays dividends.

          Good point.

          I hate to admit that I used to let the negative pervade my mind and it hurt my potential.

          Then I realized there was something to all that mumbo jumbo pseudo psychology, and I have done extraordinarily better for adopting it since.

          I lost the negatives in my early 30's, and it forever changed my life for the better.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Keith
    i totally agree with the OP

    special offer does not mean cheap, it means cheaper than normal retail price.

    sellers in the WSO section have behaviorally trained the wso buyers to think wso means cheap price.

    it just shows you how much many of the wso sellers know about marketing. they all try to complete mostly on price. thats a very hard way to make a consistent living.
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  • Profile picture of the author DonDavis
    Why is producing a higher caliber product at the same price of your competitors lesser product a bad strategy?

    I understand the OP's point. However the WSO thread is a shining example of a free marketplace. Fight it out. The cream will rise.
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  • Profile picture of the author uebomoyi
    Finding the right pricing point is a little hard to do at times since you don't want people to be pushed away by a high price or perhaps de-value your product because it's too low. I think the best price point ranges from $27-$47. Anything lower or higher usually may cause either frustration or not enough desire.
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    • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
      Originally Posted by uebomoyi View Post

      Finding the right pricing point is a little hard to do at times since you don't want people to be pushed away by a high price or perhaps de-value your product because it's too low. I think the best price point ranges from $27-$47. Anything lower or higher usually may cause either frustration or not enough desire.
      The best price point range for what? How can you clump every product into one price range? Imagine if Walmart executives thought that! They didn't and that is why they have products ranging from a dime to several thousand dollars.

      A smart business man will test his elasticity. That means he will find out how much the market will bear for his particular product, not how little he can charge.
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  • Profile picture of the author braincandy7
    It seems to be our social conditioning and appears throughout all aspects ofdaily life.

    People are always ready to complain but almost never bother to commend, even if the service/product is fantastic.

    I try to make a point of recommending people if they have done a good job for me and also thanking them. It's something we should all do because it not only helps the people who do things well but it also helps others not get ripped off by people who will try to take advantage.
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    • Profile picture of the author JosephTate
      Banned
      Although I agree that most sellers are under pricing their WSOs here, I have had great deals buying WSOs. This is why the WSO will always be the best online marketplace ever.
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  • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
    I've made many many sales at $97.

    Even though I could virtually get away with never 'bumping' a WSO again, because I have it linked out to from hundreds of my articles across cyberspace, I still test different price points....as far as I'm concerned, with the history of sales at a high price point in context, I think that anything between $0 and $96 still qualifies as a WSO....plus, I have a separate sales page that displays the $97 price point....

    People should definitely not being saying "it's a shame" that a product is priced what it is....if you have solid pages of social proof, and you display an outside sales page apart from the WSO page, I believe that anything from $0 to your price would justify selling a WSO. As for those comments.....they shouldn't be made....

    P.s. there are some people out there who are adamantly opposed to spending any money for anything. The same product that some have said they would pay multiples of $97 for, others have said that a $5 price point would be a stretch. Everything is subjective. Study the market....take feedback from customers....and, price your product what you feel is fair. Outside of being free, there is always someone who will complain about your price. It's best just do your best to do right by people and drive on.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rocket Media
    It's a shame that people think there gonna buy a $10 product and be rich the next morning?

    **** takes work.
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  • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
    Originally Posted by E. Brian Rose View Post

    Really, it's one of the better offers I have seen in a while, but there were people bitching and moaning about how the price was too high for it to be a "Warrior Special Offer". One guy wrote that it was "a shame" that the seller is doing this to the members.

    Doing what? Selling an awesome product at a discount? Isn't that what the WSO forum is all about?
    Yup.

    I've seen people saying $12 is too much when they don't even know what they're getting, it's also why you get so many ponces running round asking for review copies - It's also probably the reason you get so many sob stories from failed "marketers" that whinge the book didn't work when it's them that didn't make it work, mainly because their deluded minds thought getting something for $7 and doing bugger all would allow them to quit work...and finally it's probably the reason most people fail at this....because they've no idea what it actually is, a business.

    It's funny how people can't see the connection between running a business in the online and offline world.

    Anyway I'm off to see if I can find a $7 franchise business and if I find one, the first thing I'll do is ask if I can have a review copy and in return I'll give them a testimonial, then I'm going to pop down my local book store and see what they're giving away for free and I'll have a little moan that some of the books are expensive, for books. :rolleyes:

    ....Then I'll probably go home and whinge nothing works.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
      Originally Posted by Richard Van View Post

      Anyway I'm off to see if I can find a $7 franchise business and if I find one...
      That's a lot of money just for a franchise. You should get a good location and nice building for that price. Don't let them scam you, Richard!
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      • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
        Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

        That's a lot of money just for a franchise. You should get a good location and nice building for that price. Don't let them scam you, Richard!
        Don't worry Dennis, I'll ask for a review copy by email first. Do you think this will work as an email?

        Hey - Any chance of a review copy?
        I think that should do it. Professional and highly persuasive.
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  • Profile picture of the author jacksonlin
    I have to agree. It seems that the more advanced you become at internet marketing (or any understanding of any topic for that matter) the less you want to pay, but the more you expect to be GIVEN to you.

    I must admit it happens to me too.

    But that's just human nature.
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  • Profile picture of the author ClementChee
    I have been thinking if I sell my WSO at the price of $47/copy (now selling at $9.90), there would still be people who buy it because I believe in its quality.

    My upcoming free gift for warriors cost me $120 (matters to me a lot) but I believe this investment is going to bring back even more in the future.

    Warriors who posted DO UNDERSTAND the law and power of sowing and reaping.

    Now sowing, no reaping.
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  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    Yep, this is why I have this image on my server.


    That's pretty much what I hear all day long from WSO buyers and what I call "perpetual customers." They get all kinds of free and cheap information all day long from top marketers, and they stomp around bitching about how they still don't have "the secret."

    Meanwhile, WSO vendors think more like this.

    Now, here's where your mindset needs to change if you're that princess in the top picture.

    If you're reading someone's product and thinking about whether they deserve your money for making the product, you're an idiot.

    You need to think about whether you are going to get your money's worth from that product's instructions.

    Let's say you buy a product for $47, and it takes you three hours to go through it all. You're now about ten hours in the hole, so even at minimum wage that product just has to save you ten hours of time and you have recouped your investment.

    And if you can't seem to think about things that way, maybe running your own business and being your own boss is not in your future.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Howard
    Damn good xkcd there Caliban, and it's right on the "money".

    Rob
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by ZachWaldman View Post

      A friend of mine does a lecture where he makes this point brilliantly. He talks about pomegranate juice and shows how he bought two different brands of juice from the same grocery store.

      One brand cost twice as much as the other and had less juice but if you read the ingredients, they were EXACTLY the same. Do you think the "premium" juice cares what the cheap juice is doing? Nope, they don't see the other brand as a competitor.
      Sorry, I'm not buying this illustration...

      From back here in the cheap seats, it looks like the premium brand definitely sees the budget brand as a competitor.

      They are simply choosing to compete on something besides price. They are choosing to compete on perceived value.

      Switching gears, let's look at two brands of orange juice (hey, I am in Florida, you know... ):

      Brand A's value proposition is that it is 100% juice straight from the tree, not from concentrate. They never tell you WHY that's better, they just imply that it IS better, and they have it.

      Brand B's value proposition is that it is 100% juice at a value price. They know that juice concentrate is juice with water removed. Replace the water, and the product is chemically indistinguishable from Product A.

      Both Brand A and Brand B are competing on value. They are simply aiming at different segments of the market.

      Brand C's sole claim to fame is that they are cheaper than A or B. And you have to add your own water. Yet another market segment served.

      If the market ever saw A, B and C as viable substitutes (in economic terms), they'd have to compete differently, as interchangeable commodities. The race to the bottom begins...

      Coming full circle, back to the WSO forum, too many buyers see the various products as interchangeable commodities. It's not that the WSO shoppers are spoiled, it's that they don't have the product knowledge to differentiate between offers. And most of the time, that can be laid at the feet of the sellers...
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      • Profile picture of the author Ryan David
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        Coming full circle, back to the WSO forum, too many buyers see the various products as interchangeable commodities. It's not that the WSO shoppers are spoiled, it's that they don't have the product knowledge to differentiate between offers. And most of the time, that can be laid at the feet of the sellers...
        I agree 100%. It reminds me of when I moved into a new house in an area that had hard water. A guy dropped by when my wife was home and told her about the water softener systems they install, she told him to come back when I was home. In the meantime, I was also checking out Sears and looking at their softeners.

        Anyways, the guy comes to the house when I'm there and makes the pitch. His prices were about 30-40% higher for the actual softener. I kept asking him in different ways why his system was better than Sears and he kept telling me things that both systems would solve (no marks from water or whatever). Finally I was getting tired of his blabbing and said "I'm not going to pay your higher price unless you can tell me the difference between your softener and the sears one". Instead of having a rebuttal, he just said "Well, if you want your system to break down in 3 years then be my guest". And ended up leaving.

        Kind of the funny thing about the whole exchange was that I was comparing his unit against the low level unit and he was aware of that. When I went into Sears, the guy there quickly told me that the low-level unit won't do the trick and then upsold me into the next level one.

        The reason? The low-level unit does set-scheduled recharges of minimum once per week. The recharges are what uses the salt bags ($5/piece). The next level up does the recharges based on a set water usage. With only 2 people in the house (both working), we could go much longer between recharges and use less salt.

        See? That wasn't so hard. I didn't think it was MY fault that the first guy didn't explain that simple fact to me.

        So my suggestion for WSO sellers:

        1. Use correct comparisons--Maybe this works on people, but I kinda get annoyed when salesman try to pull this on me. I don't like when people try to justify their high price by using my hourly rate as the basis. That might be part of the argument to convince me to use a lawn service, but it doesn't explain why your service is 2x as much as the next guy.. Don't assume I know the reason for this.

        2. Realize that buyers don't know everything that goes on in your brain and why you're the best, so you should tell them. Just don't get insulted that you're not getting the respect you think you deserve.


        My 2cents.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
    It's Pavlovian conditioning from WSO sellers themselves and now folks seem surprised at the effect it's had?
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Wells
    WSO does not mean, you are going to get a price point of $7 to $12 dollars.

    It just means that your product will be priced lower than what you are currently selling it to the public........... simple as that.

    If you believe your product is valued at $500 and are selling it to the public at that price and you offer it for $450.00 on the WF that is still a WSO............
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    • Profile picture of the author Espen Samuelsen
      I totally agree, and I have to admit, as someone who has not frequented the WSO subforum often for more than a year, I have been conditioned to think that the WSO subforum is for selling very cheap products.

      Yet I've read about this "problem" and thought about it a lot these past days, and it's absolutely true that this isn't what the WSO subforum is about, it's about offering value to fellow Warriors.

      The price shouldn't really matter, but I think the buyers (which includes ourselves) have been conditioned that WSOs should be low-priced. So I think what Rob says makes a lot of sense, to cope with this, one should release only reports and eBooks for a low price, and then perhaps keep an upsell that might include videos and audio for a higher price.

      Yet I still think some products do not fit into this category, and such higher-prices products should also be welcomed in the WSO subforum. To me, I actually get more interested when I see such a high priced product in the WSO subforum, as I think "this must REALLY provide value if the author has "the guts" to put it up on the WSO subforum for such a high price"... Might be others think like this too? Even if you don't sell that many copies, maybe you will still make more since the price is higher?

      Espen
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  • Profile picture of the author LB
    Originally Posted by E. Brian Rose View Post

    Really, it's one of the better offers I have seen in a while, but there were people bitching and moaning about how the price was too high for it to be a "Warrior Special Offer". One guy wrote that it was "a shame" that the seller is doing this to the members.
    I hope anyone bitching in the thread about the price received a forum vacation...

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ds-please.html
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    • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      Good point.

      I hate to admit that I used to let the negative pervade my mind and it hurt my potential.

      Then I realized there was something to all that mumbo jumbo pseudo psychology, and I have done extraordinarily better for adopting it since.

      I lost the negatives in my early 30's, and it forever changed my life for the better.
      Your admission only means you are wiser now than you were then.

      There's a reason a lot of my posts have elements of mindset, attitude, and/or even beliefs ... I used to be negative as well, and for good reason I might add, but it wasn't getting me anywhere. I intentionally evolved, and with that, so did my fortunes.

      It's not hard to look at some of the attitudes people embrace here and to know what one thing is holding them back more than anything else. Getting through to them is another matter.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tina Golden
        Originally Posted by jacksonlin View Post

        I have to agree. It seems that the more advanced you become at internet marketing (or any understanding of any topic for that matter) the less you want to pay, but the more you expect to be GIVEN to you.
        Funny, I think the exact opposite way and so do most of my customers.

        It's the low-end buyers that expect the sun, moon and stars on a platter, in my experience. Those are also the same people who say that you can find whatever you want on Google, because they don't value the 10 hours of research time they'll have to do.

        Those that have seen success KNOW what high quality work and information is worth. The successful marketer values his time much more highly and will gladly pay to have someone else spend that 10 hours.
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        • Profile picture of the author DaveHughes
          I've worked in broadcast radio for 25 years, and have literally dealt with thousands of advertisers in that time.

          There is a truism about clients in radio...the less they spend, the more of a pain in the asteroid they will be.

          Someone that drops a couple thousand dollars on a campaign writes the check, turns in their copy points (or already-produced commercial) and then counts their profits from their marketing campaign with us.

          However...I dread to the depths of my soul the sight of a local business owner that turns up and spends $50. They are an endless fountain of demands.

          • "I want a female voice for my commercial."
          • "Can I get four or five different commercials done and just rotate them during my schedule?"
          • "Now, these commercials have to run during the best parts of the day; I've got to see some results!"
          • "No, not that female; one that sounds...less female, y'know?"

          And on and on and on...

          From my experience, this behavior is based on mindset:

          For those with limited success, money is a goal.

          For those that have experienced success, money is a tool used to get even more money.

          Therefore:

          Originally Posted by Tina Golden View Post

          It's the low-end buyers that expect the sun, moon and stars on a platter, in my experience. Those are also the same people who say that you can find whatever you want on Google, because they don't value the 10 hours of research time they'll have to do.

          Those that have seen success KNOW what high quality work and information is worth. The successful marketer values his time much more highly and will gladly pay to have someone else spend that 10 hours.
          This, a million times over.

          The people that expect a million percent return on their investment handed to them on a silver platter will always exist; it's a pretty prevalent mindset.

          The choice to be made is whether or not to cater to them. (This is always a mistake, by the way, because if they're not wildly successful after spending their money with you, they're not happy...and a budget of $50 won't do diddly-squat for you in terms of results in radio advertising.)

          Back in the dark ages (the early '90s), a new "dollar store" opened in our town, right at the beginning of December. They paid for a live remote broadcast on our station at their grand opening and requested that I do it.

          This was a smallish store, with not much room. By the start of the second hour, they literally had people standing in line on the sidewalk to go in. At this point, the manager accosted me.

          "Look at this!!! This is a waste of a lot of my money!"

          Completely puzzled, I replied "Ummm...how so? There are more customers here than you have room for; I think a line of people waiting to get in is a success."

          She glowered and said "Yes...BUT THEY'RE NOT BUYING ANYTHING!!! I want my money back; I'm going to get another station out here to do this...they're a lot cheaper, anyway. I should have known you were a rip-off."

          I explained that it wasn't our job to make them purchase anything; our job was promotional...the money was spent so that we would generate interest and excitement about their grand opening, and get customers in the door.

          She never understood what I was saying. They were literally in violation of the fire code due to the number of people in the store, but her advertising was a failure because they didn't do anything with the attention they received.

          Sure enough...the next week, one of our competitors were there, drew a decent crowd of (as it turns out) non-buyers, and she was still unhappy.

          Before summer came around, the store was closed.

          The moral of this story?

          People are stupid. They expect miraculous results from minimal effort, and it's always someone else's fault when they don't get the results they fantasized over. And the more they're concerned about the price...the less likely they are to succeed.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdwordsMogul
    You have to consider that a huge number of WSO buyers is made up of "collectors". They probably know deep inside that they won't implement anything - they just like to own the products.

    Even thought they may read them, the value they get is not from the money they can make, but from the entertainment, and the fantasy of building an online business.#

    From that stand point, they may not be able to justify the price to themselves.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Ashwood
      One of the sectors I am working in is for people trying to make a new start, running on vapours. I've been told countless times by friends, that if they haven't got any money, I'll never make a living.
      However, I see it as one of my duties, as a responsible parent, to find valuable deals; both for myself, and my readers.
      I know they can't afford Chris Farrell's MentorME, at nearly $1000, although I would advise many of them to buy into it, if they could afford it.
      But I am also able to point them towards WSOs which offer value for money.
      There was one this week, which, because of the creators/vendors, I knew would be excellent info at a special knock down price. ( Yes, I bought it myself).
      My recommendation clearly states that this really is worth a whole lot more, but put my neck on the line recommending it (I am not an affiliate either).

      I often hear the term, "It's too expensive".
      Is that, too expensive for what it is; or too expensive for my budget?

      It's all relative to the individual's personal circumstances.

      From the point of view of the vendor, you should be able to charge what you feel is fair. If you product's sound, you have every right to make a living from it.

      Cheers

      Alan

      .
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by Alan Ashwood View Post

        I often hear the term, "It's too expensive".
        Is that, too expensive for what it is; or too expensive for my budget?
        This is a very important distinction, one that many fail to make.

        There's a humongous difference between "it's too expensive" and "right now, it's beyond the budget."

        One of the most beneficial uses for low-end products, at least in the MMO arena, is helping people make the jump from "I don't have enough money to buy the one I want" to "I could buy it, but it isn't worth the price to me." (cue rimshot :p).

        The first is what it is, and the only way to fix it is to lower the price to silly levels. And open yourself to those folks who do want the sun, moon and stars on a platter; many of them also want you to throw in the platter.

        The second can be fixed by upping the perceived value of the product.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marvin Johnston
    I think all of the WSOs should be priced at maybe $3.00 each. After all, I never read or do anything with them .

    Marvin
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  • Profile picture of the author Martin Lee Jr
    Unfortunately because of undervalued WSO's and sites like fiverr, everybody expects things over the internet, to come to them at a cheap price
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    "I want to make $1,000 a day, but only want to spend $5 learning how to do it.."

    Idiots.
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  • Profile picture of the author LB
    The mentality is, "Everything should be free or dirt cheap"*




    *Except what I'm selling
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    • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
      Originally Posted by LB View Post

      The mentality is, "Everything should be free or dirt cheap"*
      Surely, people do not expect to walk into a mall and get things for free. However, if the mall had certain days where everything was on the house, then people would only shop on those days. The mall has the ability to make people expect everything for free, but they don't and neither should you.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tina Golden
        Originally Posted by mlj2577 View Post

        Unfortunately because of undervalued WSO's and sites like fiverr, everybody expects things over the internet, to come to them at a cheap price
        Let me tell you that this mindset was around LONG before Fiverr went live and long before WSO price averages plummeted. The people with this type of mindset existed long before the internet, for that matter, and ALWAYS WILL.

        We've just experienced a massive influx of people with this mindset over the past couple years so suddenly it seems like EVERYONE is like this. They're not.

        The solution is simple but it scares people. Don't cater to the lowest common denominator. Put the real value on your product and cheapskates be damned.

        What's the difference between this discussion and the ones that always happen about prices for writing?

        In the writing threads, people always chip in and say target a different market segment and learn to market yourself properly.

        Wouldn't that be the same solution for WSO sellers or any product sellers?
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        • Profile picture of the author FredJones
          Healthy discussion, great topic by EBR.

          Let me tell you what I do with one of my favorite physical products (affiliate). The bare minimum ("portable") version of it starts at sub-100 when Amazon has those discounts going. The regular one also starts below $1000, in fact I have seen the regular one sell down to $500-$600 etc.

          Guess the price of the models that I sell? $2000-$4000. And people buy them and if human beings had tails then they would not stop wagging them.

          Because, the higher ones have a very clear value that I bring out in my sales process for this item. I have to present the pros and cons of each in a language that the customer understands.

          So, this essentially mean, I have stoppedd a huge number of buyers from buy from underpriced and/or under-quality seller (mostly under-quality) and even made them not buy rather than trying to sell them at the cheapest.

          At WF, yes, people have got too habituated to prices - almost to a point where maybe some of them don't even try to understand the fact that there could be differences in product quality...

          I love what Rob (CCMusicMan) says - if your option is to restrict price then be smart and target the bird's eye rather than the whole bird with your product. Target the bird's ear in your next product and the bird's feathers in yet another product. It solves both ways. The seller needs to only write about the eyes and not the ears or feathers this time, so the efforts are targeted. And the buyer has the option to pick up only the text s/he needs about the bird's eyes, and doesn't feel that s/he is paying for the bird's feathers too in spite of knowing about the feathers already. If the buyer also wants to understand the feathers and ears of the bird then great - let him/her pick up the appropriate volumes. And then, I would go and also say that sell the whole set of books as a bundle to places where people would buy them, but as appropriately priced products (price being high enough).

          In a way, this is like selling Shakespeare's works in parts rather than trying to sell the entire set of works in one bundle. The market segments are just different.
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  • Profile picture of the author onegoodman
    Guys, first, let us agree that a product worth to someone the price he is welling to pay.

    A product may worth $1000 to someone may worth $10 for someone else. It is always about who you are and what you can do about it

    I don't go much to WSO, I am sorry but as much as their is good offer, there are offer that doesn't worth to be look at.

    True there is product less than half price but on the other hand their are products which are 3 times than other places (I can bring and comment about each WSO in here, but would just make a mess).

    All I say be patient and understand the new warriors are not as pro as the old one
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Perhaps more consideration should be given to the profile of the customer, rather than focusing so much attention to the product and or price.

    My thinking is - you're probably much more likely to make good solid consistent sales at a high end dealing with business professionals selling training or educational materials, than you are selling a $5 ebook on how to bake cup cakes.
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  • Profile picture of the author HawkPrecision
    That's what I learned about IM a year ago. Never undervalue your time, or your need to make a living. However, if it's being offered in the discount forum area it really should be offered at a discount.
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