Article Writing & Syndication Explained?

118 replies
So, I'm very interested in using my writing abilities to help create a passive income source for myself. Rather than slaving away for $10 an article in the Warrior For Hire section, I'm planning on going the article marketing/syndication route that has been so widely discussed on the Warrior Forum.

I've searched the forum and read through practically every thread on the subject (and have bookmarked numerous posts belonging to Alexa) but, unfortunately, I'm still a bit 'foggy' after piecing together all the snippets of information to be found 'here and there' throughout the various threads on the topic.

With that said, here is my plan and I absolutely welcome anybody with experience/knowledge in article syndication to tell me where I'm going wrong/right.

(i). Select a ClickBank product to promote. Not going to dwell on this too long here as Alexa and others have provided excellent information on how to do this in other thread.

(ii). Domain name. From what I gather, EMD or anything like that is not too big of a deal. Just get one that fits.

(iii). Keyword selection. I figure I can 'reverse engineer' the Clickbank product's website to assist with this. I'm not sure looking at the competition factor is a big deal. As far as I understand, getting my website as high up in Google's rankings isn't vital to the syndication process. High-quality articles will be syndicated onto other websites and I will get traffic and 'hops' from that -- not search results. Correct? Maybe?

(iv). Go through the whole WordPress setup. Am I supposed to put the banners of the product I am promoting on the sidebar? Additionally, I'll be putting an Aweber opt-in form prominently on the site. Should I promote a free report on the site's subject matter in turn for the opt-in? Or is that bad just like a Clickbank product providing a 'leak'?

(v). Write high-quality and relevant articles. Provide great information. After said task is complete, place articles on my OWN site first. Wait for Google to index them. In terms of articles, should I provide a link at the end to the ClickBank product?

(vi). Once articles is on my site and indexed, I submit the article to EZineArticles for (hopefully) syndication. In the resource box, I should put a link back to my homepage, correct? And, on my homepage, would be the information for the visitor to jump on over to CB through my hoplink?

(vii). Rinse and repeat. Create other blogs. Create various pen names to coincide with the various niches I will be working in. Make money. Retire.

So, there it is. That is what I have deduced from searching and pouring over all the various bits and pieces to be found on this subject throughout the Warrior Forum.

I'm just hoping that somebody (Alexa?) can simply pop in and say 'yes' or 'no' to this little blueprint of mine.
#article #explained #syndication #writing
  • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
    (vi). Once articles is on my site and indexed, I submit the article to EZineArticles for (hopefully) syndication. In the resource box, I should put a link back to my homepage, correct? And, on my homepage, would be the information for the visitor to jump on over to CB through my hoplink?
    You will entice more traffic to your blog/website if, in your resource box you provide them with a "too good to refuse" reason to click through. Offer them a free report / ebook / video ...something enticing.

    Then, as part of them downloading / viewing, capture their email addresses, and set up a sequence of informative, incredibly useful emails which expand upon the niche, and weave in links to buy whatever it is you are selling.

    Your article and your website need to be pre-selling, not selling. I love Paul Hancox' ebook, Presell Mastery, (not an affiliate link) which explains this exceptionally well.
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by AnniePot View Post

      You will entice more traffic to your blog/website if, in your resource box you provide them with a "too good to refuse" reason to click through. Offer them a free report / ebook / video ...something enticing.

      Then, as part of them downloading / viewing, capture their email addresses, and set up a sequence of informative, incredibly useful emails which expand upon the niche, and weave in links to buy whatever it is you are selling.

      Your article and your website need to be pre-selling, not selling. I love Paul Hanclock's ebook, Presell Mastery, (not an affiliate link) which explains this exceptionally well.
      Hey there. I've noticed you in quite a few of the threads I've searched through and I take your advice as gold, also.

      I understand what you are saying now.

      ... my website should really have no 'selling' done on it. Use the resource box on EZine to drive people to my site in order to get their free copy of a report.

      All the selling is done through my autoresponder.

      That process never registered in my mind, but it certainly makes more sense than the other way around.

      Thank you!
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      • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
        Hi Julia

        ... my website should really have no 'selling' done on it. Use the resource box on EZine to drive people to my site in order to get their free copy of a report.
        I'm not saying never have any selling on your website, there are instances when you can weave in, in a very low key manner. But, you primary goal should be to build trust and confidence, and establish yourself as the expert to whom they turn. Pack your website with highly credible information and they will trust you and buy from you when you suggest a product.
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        • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
          Originally Posted by AnniePot View Post

          Hi Julia



          I'm not saying never have any selling on your website, there are instances when you can weave in, in a very low key manner. But, you primary goal should be to build trust and confidence, and establish yourself as the expert to whom they turn. Pack your website with highly credible information and they will trust you and buy from you when you suggest a product.
          Got it.

          Thank you so much for what you've offered in not only this thread, but all the others I've poured over.

          You have already taught more than you know.
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    • Profile picture of the author reclark
      Originally Posted by AnniePot View Post

      You will entice more traffic to your blog/website if, in your resource box you provide them with a "too good to refuse" reason to click through. Offer them a free report / ebook / video ...something enticing.

      Then, as part of them downloading / viewing, capture their email addresses, and set up a sequence of informative, incredibly useful emails which expand upon the niche, and weave in links to buy whatever it is you are selling.

      Your article and your website need to be pre-selling, not selling. I love Paul Hancox' ebook, Presell Mastery, (not an affiliate link) which explains this exceptionally well.
      I just spent some time on your website. I like what I see and have bookmarked it. I wasn't sure what the term "syndication", as applied to IM meant, and you have a succinct writing style easily understood. Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author ronaldmd
    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    As far as I understand, getting my website as high up in Google's rankings isn't vital to the syndication process. High-quality articles will be syndicated onto other websites and I will get traffic and 'hops' from that -- not search results.
    You're 100% WRONG. All of my websites get 90% of the traffic from google from various countries. And SEO is probably the ultimate method to make money. Google ranking IS vital.
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

      You're 100% WRONG. All of my websites get 90% of the traffic from google from various countries. And SEO is probably the ultimate method to make money. Google ranking IS vital.
      Is it necessary to say 'wrong' in all capital letters? Turn down the machismo a bit.

      Are your websites built around article syndication? What is it exactly that you've built your websites to do?
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    • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
      Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

      You're 100% WRONG. All of my websites get 90% of the traffic from google from various countries. And SEO is probably the ultimate method to make money. Google ranking IS vital.
      Okay, so my many years of experience count for nothing. That's fine. :rolleyes:

      If you hope to establish a long term, trusted site you need to build a rapport with your audience. I can genuinely attest to this.
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    • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
      Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

      You're 100% WRONG.
      You're 100% wrong.

      Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

      All of my websites get 90% of the traffic from google from various countries.
      Could that be for the simple reason that you haven't syndicated your content? If it were of good enough quality and you did so, you might find that a significantly lower percentage of your traffic comes from SEO, and more as referral traffic from elsewhere.

      Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

      And SEO is probably the ultimate method to make money. Google ranking IS vital.
      Why is it?

      It's just another means of traffic generation.

      And it's not quite so special if you're "slapped" hard in the SERPs by an algorithm refinement when you're 90%+ reliant on your rankings for traffic, let me tell you. :p
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      • Profile picture of the author tpw
        Originally Posted by DireStraits View Post

        Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

        All of my websites get 90% of the traffic from google from various countries.

        Could that be for the simple reason that you haven't syndicated your content? If it were of good enough quality and you did so, you might find that a significantly lower percentage of your traffic comes from SEO, and more as referral traffic from elsewhere.


        Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

        And SEO is probably the ultimate method to make money. Google ranking IS vital.

        Why is it?

        It's just another means of traffic generation.

        And it's not quite so special if you're "slapped" hard in the SERPs by an algorithm refinement when you're 90%+ reliant on your rankings for traffic, let me tell you. :p

        Everyone who relies on Google for all of their traffic is only one algorithm change away from disaster.

        One of my websites gets 2,000 unique visitors per day. Yet only 35% of my traffic comes from Google with over 2000 page one search listings in Google.

        Most people inaccurately argue that the reason I only get 35% of my traffic from Google is due to my low rankings in Google. Not!! :rolleyes:

        My Google traffic remains higher than the traffic received at most other websites. But since I get my traffic from a multitude of sources, if Google were to kill me in a day, I would only lose 1-in-3 visitors to my website if I experienced a Google slap.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

      You're 100% WRONG. All of my websites get 90% of the traffic from google from various countries.
      Good for you.

      The rest of us, I imagine, are pretty pleased that our businesses are not so Google-dependent.

      I offer you the observation that one of the best established and most highly respected experts here, and highest earners, and regular contributor to all the article marketing threads, has websites which typically rank somewhere between the moon and Venus, and is perfectly happy with that. (The most recent update is that some of his are actually now entering a low Earth orbit, in SEO terms, but that's just from the enormous value of syndication to authority sites and isn't something you can altogether avoid, if you go on for long enough ).

      Originally Posted by ronaldmd View Post

      And SEO is probably the ultimate method to make money. Google ranking IS vital.
      I never quite know whether to be amused or horrified that people (a) believe such nonsense, and (b) are willing to say it in public.

      I seem to end up just being mildly frustrated that such misinformation is passed on to so many other people (just as it was to me, when I started: I used to believe that, too ) and that it so significantly reduces their chances of success. :rolleyes:

      Fortunately, this time, there are several other people here who can point out fairly firmly and clearly that what you're saying is completely wrong (and are doing so). It isn't always like that.
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      • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        Good for you.

        The rest of us, I imagine, are pretty pleased that our businesses are not so Google-dependent.

        I offer you the observation that one of the best established and most highly respected experts here, and highest earners, and regular contributor to all the article marketing threads, has websites which typically rank somewhere between the moon and Venus, and is perfectly happy with that. (The most recent update is that some of his are actually now entering a low Earth orbit, in SEO terms, but that's just from the enormous value of syndication to authority sites and isn't something you can altogether avoid, if you go on for long enough ).



        I never quite know whether to be amused or horrified that people (a) believe such nonsense, and (b) are willing to say it in public.

        I seem to end up just being mildly frustrated that such misinformation is passed on to so many other people (just as it was to me, when I started: I used to believe that, too ) and that it so significantly reduces their chances of success. :rolleyes:

        Fortunately, this time, there are several other people here who can point out fairly firmly and clearly that what you're saying is completely wrong (and are doing so). It isn't always like that.
        I love the fact that building a business around article syndication uses little, to any, SEO effort (aside from keywords within the articles).

        I don't know about you, but 'building and praying' that my site gets onto the first page of Google certainly isn't a party for me.

        I love that article syndication simply takes care of itself over time.
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      • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
        The rest of us, I imagine, are pretty pleased that our businesses are not so Google-dependent.
        You've hit that nail very firmly on the head. The way I see it, it's excellent if my quality content does produce a good position on Google, but I honestly don't go hell bent looking for it. As Alexa points out, Google is just too volatile.
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      • Profile picture of the author Britt Malka
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        Good for you.

        The rest of us, I imagine, are pretty pleased that our businesses are not so Google-dependent.
        Exactly.

        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        I seem to end up just being mildly frustrated that such misinformation is passed on to so many other people (just as it was to me, when I started: I used to believe that, too ) and that it so significantly reduces their chances of success. :rolleyes:

        Fortunately, this time, there are several other people here who can point out fairly firmly and clearly that what you're saying is completely wrong (and are doing so). It isn't always like that.
        And we are probably plenty others who just shake our heads and smiles.

        Well, he wasn't searching for information, so he probably would not listen to any. So if he wants to be dependent on Google who for no reason at all could remove his sites from their index tomorrow, let him.
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        • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
          Seeing as we're pointing people toward great material, I would like to say again, how good I think Paul Hancox' ebook, Presell Mastery, is.

          It's here on the Warrior Forum as a WSO, and worth every penny.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    From what I gather, EMD or anything like that is not too big of a deal. Just get one that fits.
    Fits the niche, yes; not "fits the product" (is my advice).

    EMD isn't a big deal (for me). But I want a major keyword at the start of the domain-name. "This-niche-xyz.com" is much better (with or without hyphens) than "Bestthisniche.com", which is a schmeckel domain-name. In my opinion. (And in Gene Pimentel's, but he says it more politely than I do ).

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    High-quality articles will be syndicated onto other websites and I will get traffic and 'hops' from that -- not search results. Correct? Maybe?
    You can get big rankings out of it as well, actually. Compared with the "spin your articles and mass submit them to article directories" approach, you can get enormous rankings because of your sydnication to relevant sites. Not immediately, but in the long run ... so it is worth identifying some long-tail keywords for which the currently top-ranked sites have poor quality SEO (sometimes quite easily done, too: some people still think SEO is about "page ranks" and "numbers of backlinks" :rolleyes: ).

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    Go through the whole WordPress setup.
    I don't use Wordpress, so no comment from me.

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    Am I supposed to put the banners of the product I am promoting on the sidebar?
    Sup chew ... I usually don't, but plenty of people do ... (no harm in it, anyway, as long as you don't make your landing page look like a sales page - so, don't overdo it, is my advice).

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    Should I promote a free report on the site's subject matter in turn for the opt-in?

    Definitely
    . Whether you call it a "free report" or some other name.

    The primary purpose of your website is for your visitors to opt in.

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    Or is that bad just like a Clickbank product providing a 'leak'?
    Noooo ... it's a "leak" (from your perspective) if it puts your customer, generated by your skills, time, attention, effort and energy, in direct contact with the vendor before you've been paid. This opt-in puts your potential customers in touch only with you. It turns them from visitors into "your potential customers". This is a good thing.

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    In terms of articles, should I provide a link at the end to the ClickBank product?
    Noooooooo ... nobody will ever syndicate an article with a link to a ClickBank product. (Well, almost nobody). You don't mention the product in your articles at all.

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    Once articles is on my site and indexed, I submit the article to EZineArticles for (hopefully) syndication.
    Yes, but don't rely solely on passive syndication from EZA.

    Try pro-actively to syndicate them yourself, too. As explained here.

    And here.

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    In the resource box, I should put a link back to my homepage, correct?
    Correct.

    And if you're allowed two links, you can use one of them to link to an internal page for which you want to do some SEO, too, if you like, sometimes. So that some of your site's other pages get a little bit of offpage SEO too. But predominantly to your home page (landing page).

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    And, on my homepage, would be the information for the visitor to jump on over to CB through my hoplink?
    It's not essential. I often do this, actually. I have a product review (usually, not always) on the home page and a masked hoplink, and I do occasionally make a sale to someone who really, really doesn't want to opt in to my list. But this is a bit of an afterthought. The primary purpose of my landing page (home page) is for people to opt in.

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    Create other blogs. Create various pen names to coincide with the various niches I will be working in. Make money. Retire.
    Agree with all this bit.

    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    I'm just hoping that somebody (Alexa?) can simply pop in and say 'yes' or 'no' to this little blueprint of mine.
    Ooh, it's not bad, at all, as blueprints go ... as long as you write for syndication.
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Fits the niche, yes; not "fits the product" (is my advice).

      EMD isn't a big deal (for me). But I want a major keyword at the start of the domain-name. "This-niche-xyz.com" is much better (with or without hyphens) than "Bestthisniche.com", which is a schmeckel domain-name. In my opinion. (And in Gene Pimentel's, but he says it more politely than I do ).



      You can get big rankings out of it as well, actually. Compared with the "spin your articles and mass submit them to article directories" approach, you can get enormous rankings because of your sydnication to relevant sites. Not immediately, but in the long run ... so it is worth identifying some long-tail keywords for which the currently top-ranked sites have poor quality SEO (sometimes quite easily done, too: some people still think SEO is about "page ranks" and "numbers of backlinks" :rolleyes: ).



      I don't use Wordpress, so no comment from me.



      Sup chew ... I usually don't, but plenty of people do ... (no harm in it, anyway, as long as you don't make your landing page look like a sales page - so, don't overdo it, is my advice).



      Definitely
      . Whether you call it a "free report" or some other name.

      The primary purpose of your website is for your visitors to opt in.



      Noooo ... it's a "leak" (from your perspective) if it puts your customer, generated by your skills, time, attention, effort and energy, in direct contact with the vendor before you've been paid. This opt-in puts your potential customers in touch only with you. It turns them from visitors into "your potential customers". This is a good thing.



      Noooooooo ... nobody will ever syndicate an article with a link to a ClickBank product. (Well, almost nobody). You don't mention the product in your articles at all.



      Yes, but don't rely solely on passive syndication from EZA.

      Try pro-actively to syndicate them yourself, too. As explained here.

      And here.



      Correct.

      And if you're allowed two links, you can use one of them to link to an internal page for which you want to do some SEO, too, if you like, sometimes. So that some of your site's other pages get a little bit of offpage SEO too. But predominantly to your home page (landing page).



      It's not essential. I often do this, actually. I have a product review (usually, not always) on the home page and a masked hoplink, and I do occasionally make a sale to someone who really, really doesn't want to opt in to my list. But this is a bit of an afterthought. The primary purpose of my landing page (home page) is for people to opt in.



      Agree with all this bit.



      Ooh, it's not bad, at all, as blueprints go ... as long as you write for syndication.
      It is posts like this that make the Warrior Forum such a great place.

      Thank you so much, Alexa. You have answered basically every question I had about the process.

      Now time to implement and report back with my story of massive success.
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    • Profile picture of the author zvous
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Noooooooo ... nobody will ever syndicate an article with a link to a ClickBank product. (Well, almost nobody). You don't mention the product in your articles at all.
      a question please. sorry if looks like a stupid question :confused:

      how we get the "sales" from those CB's products then, if we not include the product's link? our mission is driving our readers mind into buying state, right? you (personally) said no to banners, so how you "sell" the products, or maybe through "suggestion" to the list that you get from optin i assume, am i right?
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by zvous View Post

        how we get the "sales" from those CB's products then, if we not include the product's link?
        It's not a stupid question at all!

        You don't get sales from the articles. (And trying to do so is typically a huge mistake, because it actually prevents the articles from being syndicated and means that your potential customers don't get to read them, don't get to discover your site, your business and you, and that all means that you don't get to earn commissions on what they eventually buy from someone else's links).

        The primary purpose of the articles is to attract traffic to your website, but in a way in which others (who want to share the articles) are willing effectively to co-operate with that objective and not see you as "just a salesman".

        The primary purpose of your website is to opt visitors in to your subscriber-list so that you can send them pre-selling stuff by email (often using the same or very similar information as the information from which you write the articles, but sometimes presented differently).

        Originally Posted by zvous View Post

        our mission is driving our readers mind into buying state, right?
        That's not my mission when I'm writing articles, no. (Later, it is.) My mission when I'm writing articles is - in this order - (a) to get them as widely syndicated as possible by writing for syndication, (b) to draw as much highly targeted traffic as possible to my website, and (c) to start off a "credibility-establishing exercise" so that those people will come to trust me. I need to do all that without mentioning a product.

        Originally Posted by zvous View Post

        so how you "sell" the products, or maybe through "suggestion" to the list that you get from optin i assume, am i right?
        Yes, you're right, really. But it's easier than "suggestion" makes it sound, once they trust me. All I have to do is send them enough valuable content for them to rely on what I say. And then, when I do recommend something, a high proportion of them will buy it "on the strength of the recommendation". (Which is, of course, why it's so important that whatever they buy is high quality and lives up to whatever I've told them about it - otherwise they'll never buy the next product and the one after that: credibility and trust take a little while to build up, but they can be shattered in an instant).

        However you look at it, just like almost every other aspect of internet marketing, it's all about quality and relevance - and those two things inevitably turn out to be where most of the real money is. I've only been online since 2008, really, but I suspect that's always been so, and probably always will be.
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        • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          However you look at it, just like almost every other aspect of internet marketing, it's all about quality and relevance - and those two things inevitably turn out to be where most of the real money is. I've only been online since 2008, really, but I suspect that's always been so, and probably always will be.
          This is going to become more and more important to understand going forward. The glut of everything that's piling up on the internet makes it imperative to establish yourself as a trustworthy authority first and foremost in the minds of your potential customers - which comes down to, as you said, quality and relevance. If you can't separate yourself from the crowd in this way, earning a living online will become progressively more difficult.
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          • Profile picture of the author BudaBrit
            Originally Posted by Jon Patrick View Post

            This is going to become more and more important to understand going forward. The glut of everything that's piling up on the internet makes it imperative to establish yourself as a trustworthy authority first and foremost in the minds of your potential customers - which comes down to, as you said, quality and relevance. If you can't separate yourself from the crowd in this way, earning a living online will become progressively more difficult.
            Indeed. Just being able to provide your potential customers with a great selection of useful information is going to make them want to buy.

            We're just moving closer and closer towards an internet full of useful, informative and engaging content and who could possibly be against that!
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  • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
    Originally Posted by Danielle Clarke View Post

    Hi Julianna, thanks for starting this thread. Freelance writers need as many income streams as possible, especially those that give us more bang for our buck (ie. residual earnings for our own efforts!).

    I too have been doing my homework on article syndication for my own purposes, but here's where I'm getting stuck:



    While I've read a lot of the advice about how to select a product, I suspect there is almost an art to it.

    And unless/until that art has been mastered, the rest of the process could prove to be very difficult indeed.

    That said, I'm still going to give it a go - you don't know until you try! Maybe we can encourage each other.
    Hi Danielle!

    I certainly can agree with you that the process of picking the correct Clickbak product as I embark on this journey is causing a slight anxiety attack on my part.

    If I pick one that does not quite work, all of my hard work in the coming weeks is going to be moot. There are not enough tubs of ice cream in the world to ease the depression that would put me in. LOL.

    As far as I can tell, I'm going to stay away from the MMO niche. Not only is is uber-competitive, but the refunds rates are scary.

    Also, I'm planning on staying away from any ClickBank products that have 'leaks' on their sales pages (as Alexa as mentioned numerous times in other posts).

    Aside from those two factors, the field is wide open for me. Going to start wadding through various products this afternoon and see if I can find a good fit for both my interest and knowledge level (in terms of writing quality content for it).
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  • Profile picture of the author sylviad
    (iv). Go through the whole WordPress setup. Am I supposed to put the banners of the product I am promoting on the sidebar? Additionally, I'll be putting an Aweber opt-in form prominently on the site. Should I promote a free report on the site's subject matter in turn for the opt-in? Or is that bad just like a Clickbank product providing a 'leak'?
    Put together a short 5-10 page report that discusses some aspect of the problem addressed in the CB product. For example, if the product offers "10 Tips for Curing Acne", you could discuss one tip with a solution. This will give them confidence in the main product - namely, it promises some real answers that will help them. Some CB product vendors provide such free giveaway reports, so you might want to contact them to see what they have. If they have nothing, sometimes they will agree to put something together for you to use.

    (v). Write high-quality and relevant articles. Provide great information. After said task is complete, place articles on my OWN site first. Wait for Google to index them. In terms of articles, should I provide a link at the end to the ClickBank product?
    You want to make sure the links in your articles will always be relevant, even years down the road. You can never be sure that the product you're promoting today will still be valid in 2+ years. For this reason, you want to put a link in your resource box that redirects readers to the CB product.

    This does 2 things:

    1) your link is sure to be accepted, since some article directories will not allow affiliate links in the resource box, and

    2) you have full control of the link. You send people to your 'redirect page' which is simply a text file with a snippet of code pointing at the affiliate page that you upload into your site folder through your (host account) Control Panel. If the link ever changes or the product disappears, you can replace it with a better product.

    Recently, Ezine-Articles notified me that a link in about 10 of my articles was no longer relevant. I had to go into each article to change the link. The redirect option means you only have to change one link - in your redirect page which sits on your own site.

    Another alternative is to write a brief review of the affiliate product and post it on your own site. From there, add the link to the affiliate product. In the article, direct people to that review page. As in #2 above, if the product ever goes defunct, you can make the change on your review page. This will prevent you from losing those potential customers.

    Sylvia
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

      You want to make sure the links in your articles will always be relevant, even years down the road. You can never be sure that the product you're promoting today will still be valid in 2+ years. For this reason, you want to put a link in your resource box that redirects readers to the CB product.
      Sylvia
      Do you mean I want to have a link to my website? Just want to verify.

      Otherwise, excellent and incredibly helpful post.
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      • Profile picture of the author sylviad
        Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

        Do you mean I want to have a link to my website? Just want to verify.

        Otherwise, excellent and incredibly helpful post.
        Sorry, that was a bit vague. Also, I said a .txt file, but it should be a .php file (basically the same thing except the different extension.)

        Your article resource box link will go to your redirect link on your site. Some people like to create something that looks like this:
        www.mysite.com/recommends/
        Within that folder they have all of their redirect links in individual .php files. So you might have one file named /acme.php and another named /cureacme.php.

        So your article resource box link might be http://www.yoursite.com/recommends/acme.php

        Here's the script:
        <?php
        header('Location: YOUR AFFILIATE LINK HERE');
        ?>Perhaps a knowledgeable warrior can tell you if this is correct. I'm not exactly sure about the part in brackets.

        Sylvia
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        • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
          Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

          Sorry, that was a bit vague. Also, I said a .txt file, but it should be a .php file (basically the same thing except the different extension.)

          Your article resource box link will go to your redirect link on your site. Some people like to create something that looks like this:
          www.mysite.com/recommends/
          Within that folder they have all of their redirect links in individual .php files. So you might have one file named /acme.php and another named /cureacme.php.

          So your article resource box link might be http://www.yoursite.com/recommends/acme.php

          Here's the script:
          <?php
          header('Location: YOUR AFFILIATE LINK HERE');
          ?>Perhaps a knowledgeable warrior can tell you if this is correct. I'm not exactly sure about the part in brackets.

          Sylvia
          Okay, I understand now.

          However, inherently, you are approaching article marketing/syndication from a very different approach than Alexa.

          In your case, you are directing traffic straight to the CB offer through redirects (which means you are not directing them to your website where you can further pre-sell and potentially build a list).

          I can certainly see the positives of both methods.

          But, is there is a reason you've decided to send visitors straight to the CB product rather than attempt to build a list?

          I'm curious to learn about 'both sides of the coin.'
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          • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
            Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

            Okay, I understand now.

            However, inherently, you are approaching article marketing/syndication from a very different approach than Alexa.

            In your case, you are directing traffic straight to the CB offer through redirects (which means you are not directing them to your website where you can further pre-sell and potentially build a list).

            I can certainly see the positives of both methods.

            But, is there is a reason you've decided to send visitors straight to the CB product rather than attempt to build a list?

            I'm curious to learn about 'both sides of the coin.'
            Will all due respect, don't put CB links in your articles. Redirect or not, very few will syndicate them. You get no SEO benefit from a redirect, and the only people that might click that redirect are people that see your article in the directory.

            If anyone other than publishers are seeing your article instead of your site, you are losing a ton of traffic.
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            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
              Banned
              I firmly agree with RA (just above).

              (Almost) nobody's ever going to syndicate articles with direct links to ClickBank products.

              I haven't been able to earn money through ClickBank with direct linking. And I note that when people start off threads here asking "Why can't I earn any money from ClickBank" they're usually trying to do it with direct linking.

              However you look at it, after selecting the products wisely (discussed above), making money from ClickBank products is all about two further things ...

              (i) You have to pre-sell effectively (i.e. not just in an article!) to well-targeted traffic;

              (ii) You have to build a list and form relationships with the people on it, so that they'll buy on the strength of your recommendation. Without doing this, your conversion-rate will typically be somewhere between "very low indeed" and "non-existent".

              These things aren't optional: you really do need to do both of them.

              There's a huge turnover of affiliate marketers trying other ways and not being successful.

              The above overview - simplistic and superficial though it is - is representative of those who make a living from it, however we choose to attract our traffic (i.e. by article marketing or in other ways).

              You can't do either of those two things by direct linking. I can't, anyway.
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              • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
                Originally Posted by RAMarketing View Post

                Will all due respect, don't put CB links in your articles. Redirect or not, very few will syndicate them. You get no SEO benefit from a redirect, and the only people that might click that redirect are people that see your article in the directory.

                If anyone other than publishers are seeing your article instead of your site, you are losing a ton of traffic.
                Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                I firmly agree with RA (just above).

                (Almost) nobody's ever going to syndicate articles with direct links to ClickBank products.

                I haven't been able to earn money through ClickBank with direct linking. And I note that when people start off threads here asking "Why can't I earn any money from ClickBank" they're usually trying to do it with direct linking.

                However you look at it, after selecting the products wisely (discussed above), making money from ClickBank products is all about two further things ...

                (i) You have to pre-sell effectively (i.e. not just in an article!) to well-targeted traffic;

                (ii) You have to build a list and form relationships with the people on it, so that they'll buy on the strength of your recommendation. Without doing this, your conversion-rate will typically be somewhere between "very low indeed" and "non-existent".

                These things aren't optional: you really do need to do both of them.

                There's a huge turnover of affiliate marketers trying other ways and not being successful.

                The above overview - simplistic and superficial though it is - is representative of those who make a living from it, however we choose to attract our traffic (i.e. by article marketing or in other ways).

                You can't do either of those two things by direct linking. I can't, anyway.

                Thanks for clearing that up for me.

                Even if direct linking worked, I'd still prefer Alexa's method purely because it involves building a list.

                And, as the saying goes, 'the money is in the list.'
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                • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
                  Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

                  Thanks for clearing that up for me.

                  Even if direct linking worked, I'd still prefer Alexa's method purely because it involves building a list.

                  And, as the saying goes, 'the money is in the list.'
                  The money is in the PEOPLE on the list. You don't seem like the type to do this, but people tend to forget that all those number that we all painstakingly analyze are readers that trust you and value your content. The value is in the list of people that listen to you...

                  So great information and not letting it go stale are key! A list of 1500 people that have forgotten about you aren't as valuable as a list of 100 that check their inbox for your email specifically. Under promise, over deliver, and promote products that make sense for them, not you. It's very easy to find products that do both :-)
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                  • Profile picture of the author sylviad
                    Just a quick clarification before I go.

                    A perfect use for the redirect link is if you are mailing to your list. If they're on your list already, you might not need to have them sign up again. In this case, you refer them to an affiliate product (related to why they joined your list in the first place) and send them through the redirect - as I said, so you can change the link easily in the event it changes between the time you send the email and the time they click the affiliate link. Unless, of course, you want to send them to pre-sell them with your review of the product first.

                    Sylvia
                    Signature
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                    • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
                      Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

                      Just a quick clarification before I go.

                      A perfect use for the redirect link is if you are mailing to your list. If they're on your list already, you might not need to have them sign up again. In this case, you refer them to an affiliate product (related to why they joined your list in the first place) and send them through the redirect - as I said, so you can change the link easily in the event it changes between the time you send the email and the time they click the affiliate link. Unless, of course, you want to send them to pre-sell them with your review of the product first.

                      Sylvia
                      Definitely agree with masking the affiliate link whenever it is used, just not in articles that are for syndication. Making links prettier is always a good idea. For example, my squeeze pages for minisites are always website.com/freestuff
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                • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
                  Originally Posted by AnniePot View Post

                  Your article and your website need to be pre-selling, not selling. I love Paul Hanclock's ebook, Presell Mastery, (not an affiliate link) which explains this exceptionally well.
                  100% agree, both with the approach and the recommendation. BTW, it's actually Paul Hancox.

                  Originally Posted by RAMarketing View Post

                  Will all due respect, don't put CB links in your articles. Redirect or not, very few will syndicate them. You get no SEO benefit from a redirect, and the only people that might click that redirect are people that see your article in the directory.

                  If anyone other than publishers are seeing your article instead of your site, you are losing a ton of traffic.
                  As someone who works both sides of the fence, I have to get behind this one, too.

                  When I'm scouting for articles to publish, I'm looking for articles that a)engage, entertain and inform my readers and b) offer additional value. All I get, as a publisher, from direct linking is a link from my site that I can't control. If that redirect is changed to a location I don't want to link to, my only recourse is to remove the article.

                  As someone who syndicates articles for fun and profit, here's the order in which I'd like my articles discovered by searchers.

                  1. (With a bullet) On my own site.
                  2. On an authoritative, relevant site in the same niche.
                  3. Same as #2, except in a related niche.
                  4. On a directory or other non-relevant site.

                  Not mentioned, as they aren't really applied to 'searchers', but still ahead of being found on a directory, are email newsletters, autoresponder series, and physical (print) publications.

                  Even if a site doesn't use the whole article, I love to find relevant sites like niche blogs linking to an article with a note about why a reader should click to it. Salesy articles or poorly disguised ads don't get that treatment.
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          • Profile picture of the author sylviad
            Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

            Okay, I understand now.

            However, inherently, you are approaching article marketing/syndication from a very different approach than Alexa.

            In your case, you are directing traffic straight to the CB offer through redirects (which means you are not directing them to your website where you can further pre-sell and potentially build a list).

            I can certainly see the positives of both methods.

            But, is there is a reason you've decided to send visitors straight to the CB product rather than attempt to build a list?

            I'm curious to learn about 'both sides of the coin.'
            Actually, I DO send people to my own page - to read my review and/or opt in to a list. You can do both, depending on what you want to accomplish. You can test both methods to see which gets you more sales. Some people don't like to opt in for anything, which is why I send them to my review of the product with an opt-in for a special report - OR they can go to the affiliate sales page.

            I gave you the redirect option because that's what you were asking - about putting the CB affiliate link in your resource box, which is not allowed on some article sites. I've only used the redirect a few times and much prefer the review option.

            Some marketers prefer just redirecting them.

            Sylvia
            Signature
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  • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
    Finding a Clickbank product:

    1. Low gravity (gravity is essentially number of competitors)
    2. AT LEAST $20 per sale to you, the more the better (sorry for the all caps, but your time is valuable!)
    3. No optin form unless you want to check their AR (I dont, Alexa doesnt)
    4. No other links on sales page
    5. Not in Lose weight, MMO, or golf (go after the low hanging fruit first)
    6. Buy the product! Make sure that it's good
    7. Read through the sales page and turn each bulletpoint into an awesome email in your autoresponder that delivers a ton of info, promote the CB product every 4th email
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by RAMarketing View Post

      Finding a Clickbank product:

      1. Low gravity (gravity is essentially number of competitors)
      2. AT LEAST $20 per sale to you, the more the better (sorry for the all caps, but your time is valuable!)
      3. No optin form unless you want to check their AR (I dont, Alexa doesnt)
      4. No other links on sales page
      5. Not in Lose weight, MMO, or golf (go after the low hanging fruit first)
      6. Buy the product! Make sure that it's good
      7. Read through the sales page and turn each bulletpoint into an awesome email in your autoresponder that delivers a ton of info, promote the CB product every 4th email
      To add to this, I've dug up Alexa's post pertaining to her checklist for selecting a CB product.

      http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post2161932
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    To add to this, I've dug up Alexa's post pertaining to her checklist for selecting a CB product.

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post2161932
    Thanks very much. Yes, it was more or less applying those rules of product selection that took me from earning nothing to earning a real living from it.

    Originally Posted by Danielle Clarke View Post

    While I've read a lot of the advice about how to select a product, I suspect there is almost an art to it.
    LOL, I know what you mean, I think.

    But I also suspect that it's one of those "ars est celare artem" things: I sometimes make the mistake of making product selection sound easier than it really is. I actually put a lot of time and effort into it, because it's one of things that everything else depends on: if you get it wrong, then however well you do everything else, you're still not going to earn real money. I try to spend 20/25 minutes per day on "potential product selection" (admittedly I sometimes look through ClickBank's marketplace late at night, because not too much concentration's needed for it, once you "know the rules") ... and over 3 years, 20/25 minutes per day really does add up!
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Danielle Clarke View Post

      I'm off to commit myself to my first article marketing/syndication campaign.
      Good luck with that ... I'm just waiting to see whether you eventually decide to become "your own only writing client" and your writing website disappears from your sig-file (though it's such a good site that "they might never let you retire"!) ...
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    • Glad you made this thread, cleared up a lot of things.

      One thing I want to know is..

      Is it worth posting to article sites such as Articlesbase, GoArticles and other PR sites?

      Or is it best to just stick with Ezine?
      Signature

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      • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
        Originally Posted by GoodnightSweetRatRace View Post

        Glad you made this thread, cleared up a lot of things.

        One thing I want to know is..

        Is it worth posting to article sites such as Articlesbase, GoArticles and other PR sites?

        Or is it best to just stick with Ezine?
        It won't hurt you to post there because publisher's look different places, but any more than the top 5 really isn't worth doing.
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      • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
        Originally Posted by GoodnightSweetRatRace View Post

        Glad you made this thread, cleared up a lot of things.

        One thing I want to know is..

        Is it worth posting to article sites such as Articlesbase, GoArticles and other PR sites?

        Or is it best to just stick with Ezine?
        Oohhh, good question.

        That is something that slipped my mind too when I created my list of steps to take with each article.
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        • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
          Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

          Oohhh, good question.

          That is something that slipped my mind too when I created my list of steps to take with each article.
          Also post the m to doc sites as a pdf, doc, or powerpoint. Takes a little more conversion time, but the traffic and SEO benefits are great. BTW, I'm form Sligo :-) Good to see more Irish here :-p
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by GoodnightSweetRatRace View Post

            Glad you made this thread, cleared up a lot of things.

            One thing I want to know is..

            Is it worth posting to article sites such as Articlesbase, GoArticles and other PR sites?

            Or is it best to just stick with Ezine?
            Originally Posted by RAMarketing View Post

            It won't hurt you to post there because publisher's look different places, but any more than the top 5 really isn't worth doing.
            The exception to this would be if you find an active directory focused on your niche. If it's well run, such a directory can be worth the work (or luck) it takes to find it.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by GoodnightSweetRatRace View Post

        One thing I want to know is..
        Is it worth posting to article sites such as Articlesbase, GoArticles and other PR sites?
        Or is it best to just stick with Ezine?
        Well, it's up to you.

        I'll tell you what I do, and why: after doing everything else that I do with my articles I put them all in EZA and each one in either GoArticles or ArticlesBase, too (according to the niche). And that's it.

        I do read here that some Warriors occasionally get their articles syndicated from GoArticles and ArticlesBase, so I like to think there might sometimes be some value in it. It doesn't work out that way, for me, but I still do it anyway "just in case".

        (It's possible that the people here who do occasionally get one syndicated from one of those two directories aren't using EZA, and the people doing the syndicating have already looked at EZA before trying those two, which might explain why they occasionally get one syndicated from there and I don't?!).

        It might, potentially, help me to "have them all online in another directory" if EZA happens to go out of business and disappear tomorrow ... but I really can't see this happening.

        I spent over a year submitting to about 8/9 directories instead of my current 2, and it was a complete waste of time and never helped me at all.

        (And before that I spent a long time submitting to literally hundreds of article directories, and I even used to "spin" them at first, being at the time naive and ill-informed enough to imagine that it might have some value ... and this was in the pre-Panda "old days" before Google hammered the article directories, and of course that was an even bigger waste of time. But hey, nobody's born knowing how to do this stuff, and the world's full of people who want to sell you all sorts of things ... :rolleyes: ).
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        • Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          and the world's full of people who want to sell you all sorts of things ... :rolleyes: ).
          Indeed there are ... o:confused::rolleyes:i s:rolleyes:
          Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author drmani
    Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

    So, I'm very interested in using my writing abilities to help create a passive income source for myself. Rather than slaving away for $10 an article in the Warrior For Hire section, I'm planning on going the article marketing/syndication route that has been so widely discussed on the Warrior Forum.
    If you're just beginning, you *might* want to wait a bit longer until
    you can get your hands on Paul Myers' new ebook, CONTENT CASH.

    I believe it's in 'sneak preview' launch, though I could be wrong - and
    I got my copy yesterday, finished reading it around 1 a.m. and got
    many ideas to incorporate into my article syndication.

    Other than that, the outline you propose and the excellent advice you've
    received on this thread should set you firmly on the road to success

    All success
    Dr.Mani
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  • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
    Something worth mentioning if you want to go the syndication route: EZA is not the beginning and end of the world. The Driectory of Ezines will get you a ton of good contacts, and if your writing is very good you can use writer's market to get published offline. One article in a big magazine will not only get you quick $500, you'll find yourself with a few hundred (or thousand) new subs while that issue is on the shelves. Just don't focus exclusively on EZA :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
    Randomly remembered this. Easy way to find high traffic or high PR blogs that might syndicate your content: Download and install SEOquake for your browser, then use Google blogsearch. Sort by PR or Alexa (depending on what you're going for), then read 3-5 of their posts to get a feel for them.

    Comment on a few posts if you can, then email them and ask if they ever publish content. If they say no, ask if you can write a guest post for them. Even if you can only post it there, it's often worth the extra time :-). Even if you only find 1 a week that will publish your articles, that's 50 at the end of a year
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  • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
    Here is another question I just thought of:

    How many articles do you get indexed on your blog and placed on EZA before you move onto the next niche?

    If you find that you are in a profitable niche and are making money, do you continue to add to that blog? Make a new one in the same niche? Or just be happy with the money you are making and move onto the next niche/CB product?
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    • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      Here is another question I just thought of:

      How many articles do you get indexed on your blog and placed on EZA before you move onto the next niche?

      If you find that you are in a profitable niche and are making money, do you continue to add to that blog? Make a new one in the same niche? Or just be happy with the money you are making and move onto the next niche/CB product?
      Why move on? I believe Alexa writes one article per week per niche. That makes it VERY easy to keep up with several sites at once. My rule of thumb: keep doing something until it stop making money. If after 4 weeks of articles your traffic has stopped increasing, you've topped out that niche. However, that won't happen often. I personally do one article for every keyword that gets over 300 exact searches, then just write new articles on whatever keywords I'm not ranking for yet.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      How many articles do you get indexed on your blog and placed on EZA before you move onto the next niche?
      For me, that's varied enormously, to be honest.

      Depending partly on the size of the niche and how ambitious I want to get with it, and how quickly/slowly it's produced money for me, and its product-availability (i.e. to add a second and maybe even a third product to it), and on lots of other things, too.

      I can't say that "the number of articles" has ever been a factor for me, really. But I think I've never moved on to a new niche/site with fewer than about 15, and sometimes a lot more. (I normally have about 4 articles up before I even start, just so the site doesn't look too bare when the "first people" see it.)

      I haven't actually added a new niche for a year, but that's been purely through personal/health reasons and nothing to do with the business/niches at all. But I still write 25+ articles per month, divided between my existing 8 niches, so I'm updating each site 3 times per month (sometimes a little more) as well as writing more autoresponder emails for them all the time, so they're all still building.

      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      If you find that you are in a profitable niche and are making money, do you continue to add to that blog?
      I always have done so far. Not sure if I "always will". My oldest site isn't yet 3 years old, and my most recent one is about 1 year old.

      In theory I write 1 article per week per niche, as RA mentions above. In reality, I don't quite manage that. But it's always been a minimum of 3 per month, anyway.
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    • Profile picture of the author art72
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      Here is another question I just thought of:

      How many articles do you get indexed on your blog and placed on EZA before you move onto the next niche?

      If you find that you are in a profitable niche and are making money, do you continue to add to that blog? Make a new one in the same niche? Or just be happy with the money you are making and move onto the next niche/CB product?
      Kind of feel I've arrived a bit late to the dance here, but once again, some awesome advice revealed throughout this thread. It's like chocolate; this subject gets the blood pumping, and leaves you craving more!

      Kidding aside, the above question kept me awake for two days, as I too am just getting started with article syndication. After spending some time over the last few weeks reading through some brilliant threads, I started thinking long-term, and without revealing my niche, I see it like this...

      One website in a high demand broad niche, drilled down into various more refined sub-categories or more specifically targeted niches.

      The rough plan... is to build a site with 50-100 different targeted niches all housed under one 'umbrella' or main website. Naturally, write informative and quality articles for each specific niche/category.

      On the main site... no real selling at all... just an A-Z of articles, enticing opt-ins, and some quiet 'pre'-pre-selling... and a major test in my patience, no doubt.

      While, I don't recommend anyone be as 'crazy' as I aim to be, but, I plan to have 50-100+ sibling websites or "laser targeted" niche sites on separate domains - with content specific only to that niche. (Basically, what most would build first to get started)

      However, those 'sibling' websites will have pre-filtered traffic, and have already answered a great deal about what they (visitors) are looking for, and enables me to conveniently provide it!

      I think this may be beneficial to 3 elements:

      • Getting syndicated as there will be a lot of content in one place (Main Site)
      • Maintaining 'some' focus on SEO (for the Main Authority Site only)
      • Individual 'lists' on each sibling site... pointing "buyers" back to the "Main" site for future sales should they have already purchased their solution in one niche. (*not necessarily for SEO)


      This IMHO will work 10-fold, I will maintain basic SEO practices on the "Main Authority Site"... Yet the sibling sites will be strictly for sales pages, landing pages, opt-ins, and contain just enough articles, content, and information to 'pull them' into the value the product now has to offer them, as by this time, I will know exactly what it is they are searching for.

      I already have purchased several of the EMD's for the sibling sites, and am working on branding a 'feel' for the Authority Site.

      Being I am new to this, it appears; building a few small niche sites in my "broad" niche was always, and still is the priority, as either way; it was going to lead to this conclusion.

      I say this because, I feared if I was selling a solution to a specific "targeted" problem, and the product delivered the solution...I started 'thinking' ...OK, now what do I do with them?:confused:

      So, I've decided to reverse engineer the whole idea, and start by putting articles in the main site with different pen names and writing styles. Thus, ALL my articles will be on the main authority site for this "Broad" niche, housing potentially 100's of sub-niches! (*Never ending 'bait' with a hook to keep them swimming in my pond, so to speak.)

      Naturally, employing all white hat methods, although some question; if your 'not' using your real name it's not ethical... I say it is, so long as you (over) deliver on value! (Thank-you Dr. Mani)

      I feel this will either be a grand slam in delivering value, or a miserable swan dive into an empty pool of thought!

      In closing, this is actually one model I am working out the details on now, and by all means didn't mean to take away from the OP's question. -As this spawned from the same question she asked above.

      My thought was 100 targeted niches x 3-7 articles per niche, a variety of products, not just CB, some of which to become my own (branded to the authority site) and vended through CB, but not limited by a one sale site, and then starting all over.

      The way I see it is;

      You can obtain a hot dog cart and start small with a menu consisting of a hot dog, chips, and a drink...

      or

      If you're a nut like me, you can build a buffet, brand it, and franchise it into a product all it's own... (but that's a whole-nother topic...) Time will tell!

      Art
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      • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
        Originally Posted by art72 View Post


        [...]

        The way I see it is;

        You can obtain a hot dog cart and start small with a menu consisting of a hot dog, chips, and a drink...

        or

        If you're a nut like me, you can build a buffet, brand it, and franchise it into a product all it's own... (but that's a whole-nother topic...) Time will tell!

        Art
        Art,

        Nicely thought out.

        This is not a particularly common approach round here I think, but I remember coming across what looked to be a similar setup 2-3 years ago: a huge, broadly targeted authority site whose subsections filtered traffic away to relevant child sites, each with their own opt-ins, a narrower selection of articles, etc. All of which appeared, upon investigation, to belong to the same person. Unfortunately, I don't have the URL anymore.

        At risk of sounding negative, here are three potential drawbacks, as I see them:

        (1) Whether you use different pen-names or not for each sub-niche, anyone (other marketers) landing on your authority site (or reverse engineering your child sites' backlinks) will probably be able to tell quite easily that you're the owner of all sites. Only you can decide whether this is a bad thing, but I do know that many marketers (myself included) prefer to keep their niches secret and their sites well isolated from one another.

        (2) Although your child sites count as small assets, this way, you're probably not building the amount of value into them that they might otherwise have had: being somewhat neglected, they'd be reliant on your authority site for a lot of their traffic? They're not self-contained and might therefore sell for considerably less than if you'd spent more time working on them individually so that they're each capable of standing firmly on their own two feet?

        (3) The less diversified you are, the greater the potential negative effects of any search-engine algorithm update. Sure, with syndication you're not majorly reliant on SEO for traffic, and with high-quality content we'd like to imagine that we'd only benefit from future algorithm updates, but who knows? It's not forced to work out that way - there are nearly always innocent victims.

        Good luck and best wishes, whatever route you go down, anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
    First, I wish to thank everybody again for dropping into this thread and giving some awesome advice. Who needs the WSO section when you can get this kind of thread going, right?!

    Second, one last question before I officially embark on putting together my first campaign:

    For those that use WordPress (feel free to comment too, Alexa), is there any particular theme you find yourself using more often than others? Additionally, do you take time to make your site look 'pretty' or do you just do enough to make the site functional?
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    • Profile picture of the author AnniePot
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      First, I wish to thank everybody again for dropping into this thread and giving some awesome advice. Who needs the WSO section when you can get this kind of thread going, right?!

      Second, one last question before I officially embark on putting together my first campaign:

      For those that use WordPress (feel free to comment too, Alexa), is there any particular theme you find yourself using more often than others? Additionally, do you take time to make your site look 'pretty' or do you just do enough to make the site functional?
      For several years, I clung to just a couple of Wordpress themes: Arthemia2 and CTR Theme, but recently, I've been getting very seriously involved using Flexibility3 (you can see what I've done with on my own blog - see sig).

      It's way, way faster than its predecessor, Flexibility2, which I also liked, but I never used it for any blogs because of the speed issue.

      I recommend Flexibility3 highly.
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    • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      First, I wish to thank everybody again for dropping into this thread and giving some awesome advice. Who needs the WSO section when you can get this kind of thread going, right?!

      Second, one last question before I officially embark on putting together my first campaign:

      For those that use WordPress (feel free to comment too, Alexa), is there any particular theme you find yourself using more often than others? Additionally, do you take time to make your site look 'pretty' or do you just do enough to make the site functional?
      For myself, I have a "core theme" (self-made) that I use as the basis for all my Wordpress sites (each with further individual customisations), which greatly speeds up deployment.

      Typically, it's just a case of (1) add a background (usually little more than a simple colour gradient, sometimes a light pattern, or whatever), (2) edit a few colours in the stylesheet, and (3) add a header (and sometimes footer) graphic.

      I deliberately leave out anything bloggy and unncessary. No useless "widgets", no "archives" and anything else that people might be used to seeing on blogs. To all intents and purposes, my blogs appear to be regular static sites.

      That's just my preference, though.

      Your site doesn't necessarily need to win any design awards, for sure, but it helps to tailor the design at least a little bit to be relevant to the niche it serves, I think.

      Whatever route you go, you're probably going to want to test and tweak things over time anyway. You never quite know how small changes might affect your visitors' behaviour - lower/raise bounce rates, increase/decrease opt-ins, CTRs, etc. Though that only matters once you have traffic to your site, so for now I'd put something up and focus most heavily on getting to grips with writing syndication-worthy articles and building your syndication network(s).
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    • Profile picture of the author GIDEONCG
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      First, I wish to thank everybody again for dropping into this thread and giving some awesome advice. Who needs the WSO section when you can get this kind of thread going, right?!

      Second, one last question before I officially embark on putting together my first campaign:

      For those that use WordPress (feel free to comment too, Alexa), is there any particular theme you find yourself using more often than others? Additionally, do you take time to make your site look 'pretty' or do you just do enough to make the site functional?
      julianna

      thanks for starting this discussion it has been helpful and to smith and other contributors to this discussion very huge or you can say big thanks
      please dont mind my grammar
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  • Profile picture of the author danr62
    Thanks everyone for this great thread. I am in the process of getting my first "made for syndication" site up and running. I have my product selected (low gravity, no leaks) and a couple articles on my site.

    Now I need to get my landing page, signup form, free report, and product review page up to get it ready for traffic. Once those basic steps are taken care of I can start writing more articles and distribute the ones I already have to EZA for syndication.

    I also have a FB fan page set up which automatically adds a link to my articles when I hit publish (on my site). I'm looking to get twitter set up the same way too.

    My problem is that my time is severely limited because I work full time, go to school full time, and have a family that is jealous of my time when I am home, so making them a priority and also finding time to do all of these things is a real hassle.

    I suppose if I get my site ready as mentioned above and then write one article per week it's better than not taking action at all, but I have doubts as to whether such a long time in between publication of articles will bring any kind of significant results.

    At that rate, how long might it take to produce enough traffic to convert to sales?

    I suppose the best answer is to just try it and see what happens.
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

      Thanks everyone for this great thread. I am in the process of getting my first "made for syndication" site up and running. I have my product selected (low gravity, no leaks) and a couple articles on my site.

      Now I need to get my landing page, signup form, free report, and product review page up to get it ready for traffic. Once those basic steps are taken care of I can start writing more articles and distribute the ones I already have to EZA for syndication.

      I also have a FB fan page set up which automatically adds a link to my articles when I hit publish (on my site). I'm looking to get twitter set up the same way too.

      My problem is that my time is severely limited because I work full time, go to school full time, and have a family that is jealous of my time when I am home, so making them a priority and also finding time to do all of these things is a real hassle.

      I suppose if I get my site ready as mentioned above and then write one article per week it's better than not taking action at all, but I have doubts as to whether such a long time in between publication of articles will bring any kind of significant results.

      At that rate, how long might it take to produce enough traffic to convert to sales?

      I suppose the best answer is to just try it and see what happens.
      I'm certainly not in position to discuss the time constraints of this method, but something you mentioned did cause me to have another question:

      I was under the assumption the the link in our resource box which says something along the lines of: "Like this article? Get a free report from the author that goes even more in-depth here ..." and then it goes to our main website where the articles will be, along with a sidebar with an opt-in form.

      Would it be better for me to use OptimzePress to create a beautiful squeeze page to send these people to once they click on the link from the article directory?

      So, I would have a TLD where all of my articles go and then a site like: www.xxxxxx.com/squeeze where I would sent my traffic from the directories to? Does that make sense?

      Man, even though I feel like I know more about this process than ever before because of starting this thread, it just keeps on creating new questions in my head.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

        Would it be better for me to use OptimzePress to create a beautiful squeeze page to send these people to once they click on the link from the article directory?
        You can know the answer to this only by testing it for yourself.

        It depends on what sort of people your articles are attracting.

        But don't try to attract your traffic from article directories to your site. When a potential customer finds one of your articles by putting one of its keywords into a search engine, the last thing you want them to find is an article directory copy. Nobody's click-through rate is anywhere near 100% - we all lose most of that traffic.

        Article directories are not there as a source of traffic (nor as a source of backlinks) in their own right. They're a stepping-stone to getting your article published in other, better places which will bring you some traffic you can't reach any other way (and often some high-linkjuice backlinks, too).

        Two different sorts of people read articles published at EZA.

        The first group is people who use it as a directory, i.e. they go there specifically to look up articles on thyrotoxicosis because they have either a website or an ezine on thyroid disease and they want content for it (which is why article directories exist).

        These are the people for whom we're submitting our articles to EZA.

        They can re-publish our article, with our backlink(s) on their website or in their ezine. They get content without paying for it, and we get some targeted traffic and (if they have a website) a really valuable backlink on their site (it's really valuable because their site is relevant to ours: they have words like "thyroid hormone", "Graves Disease" and "Hashimoto's Thyroiditis" on their site, and we have all those words on ours, too, and Google loves that and it makes our site look really good to Google, as far as that backlink's concerned, so that gives the backlink real value to us, which the article directory backlink certainly didn't have).

        These people are not themselves customers.

        The second group is people who read our article in EZA because they originally put the word "thyrotoxicosis" into Google (as they do when the doctor's just told them they have an overactive thyroid and may end up having surgery for it), and up popped our EZA article in the SERP's.

        This is bad news for us: it means we screwed up. What we wanted to happen was that the copy of that article on our own website would pop up, not the EZA copy.

        The reason for that is that we have (let's say) a 25% click-through-rate from EZA. In simple English, that means that we lose three out of every four of those people. Only one in four of them ever gets to our own website. We're throwing away 75% of that traffic. It feeds on EZA's AdSense and EZA's "back button" and EZA's other articles (maybe) and EZA's other distractions.

        We could and should have had all that traffic at our own site instead. All those people were potential opt-ins and potential sales, but we lost three quarters of them.

        So we need to make sure that as few as possible of those people go to EZA (and as many as possible come directly to us without passing Go and without collecting $200). Fortunately for us, Google majorly helped us to achieve this, not so long ago, with their "Panda update" which devalued the article directories greatly (by their own admission), thus making it easier for us to rank our own sites.

        Regarding your question about squeeze pages, I don't use them, myself. I split-tested carefully, last year, in four different niches. And my findings (in each niche) were that with squeeze pages I built bigger lists but made less money from them over the following 6-month period. Squeeze pages are a tested, tried and proven business model and many people are very successful with them, and maybe you will be, too. But don't make the mistake of assuming that the biggest list necessarily leads to the biggest income, because it isn't so. I do better with my normal landing pages, in financial terms, than I do with squeeze pages, so I don't use them any more.

        Squeeze pages attract (some) different people from "niche site landing pages with a prominently incentivised opt-in".
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        • Profile picture of the author robfrancis
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post


          The second group is people who read our article in EZA because they originally put the word "thyrotoxicosis" into Google (as they do when the doctor's just told them they have an overactive thyroid and may end up having surgery for it), and up popped our EZA article in the SERP's.

          This is bad news for us: it means we screwed up. What we wanted to happen was that the copy of that article on our own website would pop up, not the EZA copy.
          Before I commence my post, I just wanted to say that this is really quite a refreshing thread indeed! My thanks to all of my fellow warriors that contributed.

          When it comes to SEO, nothing is set in stone so please take the following advice from someone that did SEO as part of their business with a grain of salt.

          If you plan on using the same article on your own site that you intend to submit to an article directory, such as EZA, then try the following steps:

          1. Adding the article to your own site first
          2. Placing an XML entry for it in your sitemap so that Google can pick it up
          3. Verify that Google has indexed the link/page
          - This can be done by using Google Webmaster Tools
          - This can also be done by typing site:yourdomain.com and seeing if the page is now listed
          4. Once Google has indexed your article you now submit it to the article directory for syndication

          The result of all this extra effort usually means that if the article is syndicated or searched for in Google the results should be more favorable to your site, as Google is aware that it was original and authoritative if you will.

          I'm not as active with article directories as I once was but if this helps any of you then it was worth it. Maybe Alexa or someone submitting to EZA more frequently could put this to the test for 2011 post-Panda.

          P.S. Off topic - JuliannaW, I came across an old post you made. I laughed so hard. Allow me to simply say, "Thank you." Brilliant! :p
          Originally Posted by JuliannaW

          ...I haven't been this excited since Bobby Jenkins left a love note in my locker in 4th grade.
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          • Profile picture of the author stong
            Hey guys,

            Firstly, thanks so much to JuliannaW for starting this thread, and the rest of you for providing some of the best IM advice I'll ever get.

            I've been inspired to give this strategy a try, and so far I have to say that even though I haven't got much in the way of traffic yet, I'm loving it! I'm finally writing for humans with actual, organic and squishy brains and not for the Googlebots, which is really a pleasure. I won't even mind if I get a luckluster CTR, but lucky for me it seems to be going the other way round.

            Anyway, this isn't why I'm posting in this thread. I, too, have a question in regards to article syndication:

            I recently had a bit of free time on my hands, so I went to search in Google to see if anyone had taken my articles from EZA and published it in their own websites. For a start, I searched using the exact title of my article, and it returned some results.

            I was pretty excited at this point, but that eventually turned into a little confusion and uncertainty. It appears that these sites, rather than posting the entire article, word for word as well as my resource box that gave a link to my website, simply posted a link to the EZA article that I submitted instead, along with the summary that I wrote.

            My question is this: Does this help me much in regards to driving traffic to my website? My brain says no, but I've been wrong lots of times before. I did note that the EzinePublisher count was way off from the number of sites that just published a link, too.

            Should I be concerned, or is this just another quirk of how EZA operates? Enlighten me!
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            • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
              Originally Posted by stong View Post

              My question is this: Does this help me much in regards to driving traffic to my website?
              No cause for concern, here. This is a pretty common occurrence, in my experience. It won't hurt, but you won't benefit from this in any of the ways we'd like, as article marketers.

              These are just "scraper sites", and are usually of such a low standard of quality that they have little or no traffic of their own to send you. Also, given the fact that the links point to EZA and not your own site, and your resource-box isn't present, you couldn't hope to receive any "direct referral-traffic" anyway. And it's the same story for deriving SEO advantages from the backlinks, more or less: there are none to be had.

              Bottom line: don't worry about it, but don't expect to receive any real benefits from this. Sorry.

              Keep at it, though. Hopefully your articles will be picked up properly and manually by high-quality outlets (whether they be sites, newsletters or whatever else) over time, and the benefits of syndication will quickly become apparent when that happens. And remember, for maximum leverage, don't rely solely on EZA or any other article directories for your syndication: go out there yourself and promote your articles directly to other webmasters, etc.

              Good luck.
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      • Profile picture of the author drmani
        Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

        Man, even though I feel like I know more about this process than ever before because of starting this thread, it just keeps on creating new questions in my head.
        Julianna, one of the 'rookie' mistakes I recently mentioned in my
        paid ezine is to want to know ALL the answers before getting started!

        Unfortunately, things don't work that way.

        You start doing something, run into an unforeseen obstacle, figure out
        a way around it, get moving again - until something ELSE stops you.

        That's the way you progress - in fits and starts, discovering new
        things along the way, facing and overcoming challenges, and sticking
        to your guns with your eye firmly on the goal.

        My suggestion - You've got enough knowledge to GET STARTED. So do it.

        Then, keep an open mind to learning, testing and growing.

        All success
        Dr.Mani
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      For those that use WordPress (feel free to comment too, Alexa), is there any particular theme you find yourself using more often than others? Additionally, do you take time to make your site look 'pretty' or do you just do enough to make the site functional?
      I've been pretty happy with the default theme (Twenty Ten) since it came out.

      I'll use some of the built-in options to clean it up a little (change the background color to help frame the content, make the header images relevant to the niche, maybe a custom menu). I want the focus to be on the content, not the design.

      I want the site functional, so I keep plugins to a minimum. If I can do something by creating a child theme and tweaking the code in the templates, I'll do that rather than adding another plugin. As an example, if I install Google Analytics, it will be by pasting the code in the footer theme rather than using a plugin.

      Another Warrior friend, Istvan Horvath, has some excellent reports on getting the most from WP. He's also quite generous with answers here and in the web design section.
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    • Profile picture of the author drmani
      Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

      Thanks everyone for this great thread. I am in the process of getting my first "made for syndication" site up and running. I have my product selected (low gravity, no leaks) and a couple articles on my site.

      Now I need to get my landing page, signup form, free report, and product review page up to get it ready for traffic. Once those basic steps are taken care of I can start writing more articles and distribute the ones I already have to EZA for syndication.
      ...
      I suppose the best answer is to just try it and see what happens.
      Here's a tip that could be very valuable in terms of 'time wasted'.

      Throw some paid traffic at the short-listed product to assess for
      yourself how well the sales page converts.

      You don't have to spend a fortune, just enough to send 100 to 200
      clicks at the page. If it converts well into sales, then you are
      on much firmer ground re article/content marketing.

      It can be heartbreaking to do all the other work only to discover
      the product or service you're promoting doesn't convert into sales!

      All success
      Dr.Mani
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      • Profile picture of the author danr62
        Originally Posted by drmani View Post

        Here's a tip that could be very valuable in terms of 'time wasted'.

        Throw some paid traffic at the short-listed product to assess for
        yourself how well the sales page converts.

        You don't have to spend a fortune, just enough to send 100 to 200
        clicks at the page. If it converts well into sales, then you are
        on much firmer ground re article/content marketing.

        It can be heartbreaking to do all the other work only to discover
        the product or service you're promoting doesn't convert into sales!

        All success
        Dr.Mani
        I've seen advice along these lines before and have considered it. However, I am under the impression that Adwords would be a bad option for this type of testing. Am I correct in understanding that I would be direct linking to the sales page for this test? Doesn't Google deny these kinds of ads and often shut down the accounts?

        If so, is there another platform you would recommend for this?
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        • Profile picture of the author art72
          Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

          I've seen advice along these lines before and have considered it. However, I am under the impression that Adwords would be a bad option for this type of testing. Am I correct in understanding that I would be direct linking to the sales page for this test? Doesn't Google deny these kinds of ads and often shut down the accounts?

          If so, is there another platform you would recommend for this?
          In my 1st attempt with AdWords, I foolishly linked to a CB landing page... none the wiser, "G" suspended my AdWords account for life!

          That being said, read the TOS... and always create a suitable landing page with more info, then link to the product. Really, you should try to "build your list" with an opt-in then provide links to the product.

          Much like article syndication, the rest of your answers can be found above or in similar threads.
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        • Profile picture of the author drmani
          Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

          I've seen advice along these lines before and have considered it. However, I am under the impression that Adwords would be a bad option for this type of testing. Am I correct in understanding that I would be direct linking to the sales page for this test? Doesn't Google deny these kinds of ads and often shut down the accounts?

          If so, is there another platform you would recommend for this?
          I intentionally said "paid traffic", and didn't refer to specific media or tools.

          There are unique features for each, and you may or may not be able to use
          all or some. Make do with the ones you have. The only reason is to QUICKLY
          test the niche/product BEFORE investing time and effort into building organic
          traffic systems and into creating content resources on the topic.

          Options include:

          * Facebook ads
          * ezine ads
          * solo ad buys
          * paid media traffic
          * ad banners
          * other PPC networks (I like Bidvertiser, & hear good things about Plenty of Fish)

          There are numerous options.

          And I've benefited a few times from discovering before too late that the niche
          or product wasn't as profitable or responsive as I thought initially.

          Hope this helps.

          All success
          Dr.Mani
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  • Profile picture of the author danr62
    Alexa,

    Could you please clarify on what the difference is between a "squeeze page" and a "landing pages with a prominently incentivised opt-in"?

    I understand that a squeeze page will have no leaks, i.e. no links to other pages (just the opt-in).

    Does that mean your landing pages do have links to other content on your site or social sharing buttons, etc.?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

      Could you please clarify on what the difference is between a "squeeze page" and a "landing pages with a prominently incentivised opt-in"?

      I understand that a squeeze page will have no leaks, i.e. no links to other pages (just the opt-in).
      A "squeeze page" is a page with an opt-in, something (typically text, but it can be video) explaining/promoting/incentivising the opt-in and no other content.

      A "landing page" is whatever page your traffic "lands" on when it clicks on your link: it can be absolutely any kind of page you like - a sales page, a squeeze page, an article page, a product review page, whatever you effectively direct the traffic to.

      Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

      Does that mean your landing pages do have links to other content on your site or social sharing buttons, etc.?
      I'm too antisocial for these sharing buttons ... I don't share needles or buttons with people ...

      My own "standard landing pages" have a prominently incentivised opt-in at the top, with an explanation about why they should get my "free report" (or whatever one calls it), and some further information by email, and so on. So the top part of the page looks a bit like a squeeze-page. But then there's also plenty of other content, a navigation system, a product review, links to articles and other information, an explanation of the other content on the site, and so on.

      I want people to get the "opt-in" bit (nearly) as prominently displayed as it would be on a squeeze page, but I want them to see a content-rich site as well, and to know that what they'll get from me by email, apart from the "free report" they're signing up for, is "more of the same". These are people who've been attracted to my site by an article of a certain type (i.e. "written for syndication") and I want them to know that my site matches that (and therefore matches them), and to expect that my "free report" and later emails will also match them (and suit them).

      I don't mind if fewer people sign up this way than would sign up through a squeeze page. What I want is for all the ones who like "that sort of content" to sign up, because I know those are the ones whom I can turn into customers.

      It's good, if you can, to try to match the style/presentation of the landing page to the demographics of the traffic you're expecting, in other words.

      I'm writing my articles (and sites) for a particular "type of customer" (almost regardless of what the niche is).

      It's a "type of customer" of whom I think there are huge numbers, and they're not particularly well catered to by "other marketers". So, in this way, I hope I can become the person from/through whom they're willing to buy. I'm not so naive that I imagine, when I send them to a ClickBank sales page, that it'll necessarily be the first time they've ever seen that page. Reality predicates that many of them have been or are on other people's lists, too, and have seen that product before and not bought it, typically because the strength/stlye of the recommendation wasn't appropriate for them when they saw it before, and I want to be the one whose recommendation means more to them. That's because I'm selling (mostly) ClickBank products and what sells ClickBank products is "the strength/style of the recommendation" and their identification with it. People buy ClickBank products (more or less) only when they trust the person recommending them (they don't know that I'm 21, and because I use pen-names they don't know that I'm also doing the same thing in 7/8 other niches under other names at the same time, both of which are things that might slightly reduce their trust, overall, I guess).
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      • Profile picture of the author danr62
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        I'm not so naive that I imagine, when I send them to a ClickBank sales page, that it'll necessarily be the first time they've ever seen that page. Reality predicates that many of them have been or are on other people's lists, too, and have seen that product before and not bought it, typically because the strength/stlye of the recommendation wasn't appropriate for them when they saw it before, and I want to be the one whose recommendation means more to them.
        Yes, I totally get this. I've bought IM products before that I had seen promoted in several places. When I decided I was ready to buy these products, I hunted down the affilate that did the best job of preselling me on and went through their link on purpose.

        Thank you for clarifying on your style of landing pages. Again, it has to do with preselling, I suppose.

        If you use a squeeze page and say "Either sign up or hit the back button" then you can lose many people to the back button. If you give them more of your juicy content to read, they can further sell themselves on your value and then decide to sign up after doing some more poking around.

        Have I got the right idea here?
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

          Have I got the right idea here?
          Exactly ... (and I think it applies especially when you write long articles, because you're attracting people who were willing to read them and wanted more. Those people are much more likely to become customers. And nobody much syndicates short articles, anyway).
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        • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
          Originally Posted by danr62 View Post

          Yes, I totally get this. I've bought IM products before that I had seen promoted in several places. When I decided I was ready to buy these products, I hunted down the affilate that did the best job of preselling me on and went through their link on purpose.

          Thank you for clarifying on your style of landing pages. Again, it has to do with preselling, I suppose.

          If you use a squeeze page and say "Either sign up or hit the back button" then you can lose many people to the back button. If you give them more of your juicy content to read, they can further sell themselves on your value and then decide to sign up after doing some more poking around.

          Have I got the right idea here?
          Yes and no. You'll probably get more subscribers with a squeeze page, but you'll get more readers with the 'highly incentivized optin' or whatever... basically it's a filter. I write short emails that link to other content, so a squeeze page does ok for me. Alexa writes long articles and long emails, so someone that signs up through a page with content on it is more likely to read her emails... You don't want subscribers, you want readers.

          And it's not just the writer, it's the niche as well. For example, people in the golf niche will read a 9 page article about how to putt, they love it. People that want to get rid of acne want to get rid of it now, in 5 paragraphs or less... You just have to test what works best.
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          • Profile picture of the author WhosGotMoves
            So much value in this post. Still mastering other IM methods, but I've been wanting to try my hand at article syndication for some time now. Thanks to the OP for creating this post and big Thanks to all the knowledgeable contributors as well.
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            • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
              The "match" Alexa is talking about acts as a filter. The folks she will connect best with respond to her style and opt-in. Others hit the back button.

              Another fantastic example of making your subscriber list self-selecting is Paul Myers. The sign up page for his TalkBiz News newsletter is a few thousand words, if I remember right. All plain text. The opt-in incentive is a 112 page ebook. Also plain text.

              People who respond to this get more of the same. The newsletter itself is delivered in plain text, and if you print it out, often runs into double digit pages.

              Yet people tend to stay subscribed for years, and they respond to his offers. (At least I usually do...).

              Constructing a content site such as Alexa describes would not work nearly as well for her if her emails were a rapid-fire succession of hardsell pitches.

              Match your horses to your course, and you'll win more often than you lose. And that's even more important if you use a service like Aweber which charges according to list size.
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              • Profile picture of the author drmani
                Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

                The "match" Alexa is talking about acts as a filter. The folks she will connect best with respond to her style and opt-in. Others hit the back button.

                Match your horses to your course, and you'll win more often than you lose.
                I focus on a concept I call "most valued/responsive subscribers" - and
                the focus of my marketing is to EXCLUDE the others.

                You'll NEVER appeal to everyone. The key is to correctly identify the
                kind of prospect who will resonate with you... and go hammer and tongs
                after them ONLY.

                The rest is, as John nicely puts it, a 'filtering process'

                All success
                Dr.Mani
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              • Profile picture of the author LilBlackDress
                Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

                Match your horses to your course, and you'll win more often than you lose. And that's even more important if you use a service like Aweber which charges according to list size.
                Love this way of looking at it. Also you can spin off lists according to who has responded to what and approach each list differently.
                Signature

                Pen Name + 8 eBooks + social media sites 4 SALE - PM me (evergreen beauty niche)

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  • Profile picture of the author EvolBaby
    Now this is a thread worth bookmarking and studying. I was just about to post about this subject.
    Signature
    Copywriting/Article Writing at $2 per 100 words! Cartoons, Comics, T-Shirt Designs!
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by EvolBaby View Post

      Now this is a thread worth bookmarking and studying. I was just about to post about this subject.
      Isn't it great?

      This is seriously a self-contained WSO for free.
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      • Profile picture of the author RAMarketing
        Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

        Isn't it great?

        This is seriously a self-contained WSO for free.
        Just much longer due to Alexa's verbosity :-p
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by RAMarketing View Post

          Just much longer due to Alexa's verbosity
          Exactly my point: you have to make it all match - the syndicated articles, the landing page, the site content, the free report, the autoresponder emails ... and the forum posts explaining them.
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  • Profile picture of the author art72
    Originally Posted by DireStraits View Post

    Art,

    Nicely thought out.

    This is not a particularly common approach round here I think, but I remember coming across what looked to be a similar setup 2-3 years ago: a huge, broadly targeted authority site whose subsections filtered traffic away to relevant child sites, each with their own opt-ins, a narrower selection of articles, etc. All of which appeared, upon investigation, to belong to the same person. Unfortunately, I don't have the URL anymore.

    At risk of sounding negative, here are three potential drawbacks, as I see them:

    (1) Whether you use different pen-names or not for each sub-niche, anyone (other marketers) landing on your authority site (or reverse engineering your child sites' backlinks) will probably be able to tell quite easily that you're the owner of all sites. Only you can decide whether this is a bad thing, but I do know that many marketers (myself included) prefer to keep their niches secret and their sites well isolated from one another.

    (2) Although your child sites count as small assets, this way, you're probably not building the amount of value into them that they might otherwise have had: being somewhat neglected, they'd be reliant on your authority site for a lot of their traffic? They're not self-contained and might therefore sell for considerably less than if you'd spent more time working on them individually so that they're each capable of standing firmly on their own two feet?

    (3) The less diversified you are, the greater the potential negative effects of any search-engine algorithm update. Sure, with syndication you're not majorly reliant on SEO for traffic, and with high-quality content we'd like to imagine that we'd only benefit from future algorithm updates, but who knows? It's not forced to work out that way - there are nearly always innocent victims.

    Good luck and best wishes, whatever route you go down, anyway.
    Thanks for the insight.

    1.) Good point. Not sure if I am too worried about keeping any secrets, as far as hiding from other marketers, though I am not aiming to be in any spotlight mind you.

    Yes, I was hopeful that there would be some SEO benefits to structuring the sites this way, but definitely not being fully dependent on it for traffic/revenues. As such, I gave little thought to remaining incognito.

    2.) Hmmmm... definitely appreciate your views here. I've only just started getting the pieces laid out, and it's true the 'siblings' would likely show less valuable, until I can reach a plateau, and devote proper time to expanding each, to be 'stand alone' sites. With time and effort, I was processing the thought; should I one day decide to sell the authority site at some point... it would almost need to be sold with the entire family as a unit, in order for a buyer to see any real value.

    The irony being the projected value in the authority site would be mainly traffic and content, and perhaps some future advertising revenue. (i.e. AdSense, banner ads, or ad space.) Preferably, the latter!

    The sibling sites could (with work) stand alone, but the only real value would be based on the revenue generated from each site, and mainly supported by the parent site. Again, I can see this being problematic if I decided to sell the business, or if I fail to reach a large enough audience.

    3.) Here's where the loss of sleep comes into play. Aside from the fact I would have a HUGE reliance on the function of the main site, I have several niche-specific templates for the siblings, whereby, they also will 'appear' as independent authority sites, in time. *Obviously, my undertaking is TOO much for a one man operation, hence, it will take time to generate revenue, reinvest and hire out some of these details.

    Then the 'branding' aspect comes into play, when I start creating eBooks, mini-courses, and publishing them on affiliate networks like CB, or using (RAP) whereby, the plethora of products can slowly be replaced with my own, and be highly sought after by independent publishers/affiliates.

    If, this process took a 3-5 year investment, the 'idea' was reliant also upon publishers (affiliates) who would be 'financially' encouraged to promote those products, each licensed for resale (or even offering 100% commissions), with permanent links back to both the main site and the specific 'sibling' sites, to which; the products expand upon the readers interests, solve their problem, or in the least suggest some viable options to locate the visitors remedy... ethically.

    The term; franchise was perhaps a bit bold, yet the concept was to not rely on "G", article syndication, or affiliates alone, but all 3, whereas, if "it" comes to fruition, the mechanics of it would become diverse enough to sustain, as it would supply quality information and feed mainly off the projection of syndicated expansion, both online and off. Add into the recipe some quality branded products beneficial to both visitors and affiliates, and lastly build equity in traffic, revenue, and maybe accrue some page rank value along the way... "The Buffet"

    How the hell it is my mind sees "all" businesses at this level is beyond me?:confused:

    The irony is, if more businesses concerned themselves with providing (or SHARING) the benefits to both the end user, and it's employees (partners, affiliates, etc...) instead of just focusing on the dollar amounts and greed factors... the economy (at least here in the US) wouldn't be in the toilet!

    Sadly, these approaches are often sandboxed, devoured, and outshined by greed, empowerment, and ego's as a result of those too blind to see beyond their own need, wants, and desires... for they want to chisel-down hours, payrolls, the number of employee's, and in essence, outsource any real security we once placed in standard employment, or conducting businesses beneficial to ALL thee involved!

    The hardest part is selling the truth, as many prefer to 'buy into' the lies, and promises of an easy fix, easy riches, or a piped-up dream.

    Challenging us all to endure the damages, and still maintain the simplicity of value, principle, and the interest we place in our personal and business affairs, alike.

    Sadly, those three words have a duel meaning!!!

    By placing the emphasis on posterity, as opposed to their monetary definition(s), I truly think one could achieve both; purpose and financial independence, in a manner befitting to our intelligence, and the next.

    At the end of the day, I like the OP will be working one article, one site, one product at a time, I just felt it might be beneficial to interpret the success I have seen, and been privileged to witness since finding this forum. To wit, I am keeping my eye on the long-term rewards, not the quick buck, and trying to structure that vision into a reality.

    Otherwise, I would be spending more time selling junk, and less time learning "How to" sell long term value. This is not to say, I haven't started building the foundation.

    Thank You JuliannaW for starting this thread, it by far exceeds any WSO out there!

    PS - I am leaning toward purchasing the DOE membership this week, as many seem to support it's value.

    PSS- I really only came here to see Alexa's new pic...

    All the Best,

    Art
    Signature
    Coming Soon... *Laser Targeted Lead Generation Services
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  • Profile picture of the author Henry White
    I skipped over this thread yesterday - I'm not doing article marketing and not terribly interested in learning about it. Then today, with it reaching well into the second page, I thought "something's happening here, better check it out."

    Wow! I'm going to have to include this in my "standard operating procedures" from now on!

    Thanks everyone! And especially JuliannaW for posting the original question and the follow ups!
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    • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
      Originally Posted by hwhite View Post

      I skipped over this thread yesterday - I'm not doing article marketing and not terribly interested in learning about it. Then today, with it reaching well into the second page, I thought "something's happening here, better check it out."

      Wow! I'm going to have to include this in my "standard operating procedures" from now on!

      Thanks everyone! And especially JuliannaW for posting the original question and the follow ups!
      I honestly was not expecting the response that I got when I started the thread. But, all the 'thank yous' in the world go out to the experts who contributed their knowledge and time.

      In the end, all I know is this: I now have my guidelines set on how to successfully start my Internet Marketing career because of this thread. Many have started elsewhere in this forum that article syndication is quite possibly the best route to go in IM ... and I'd have to agree with that.

      There is an absolute goldmine of information in this thread now. I just hope that anybody who comes across it immediately puts it into action like I have.

      I'm just amped to feel this confident heading into the process. For the first time since getting into Internet Marketing, I really feel like there is 'light at the end of the tunnel.'
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  • Profile picture of the author danr62
    In addition, I know that even if this product doesn't convert, the niche itself does convert. There are countless offline books on the subject, as well as many other different types of products, such as training DVDs, complete courses, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author JuliannaW
    I just want to provide a quick follow up to this thread, specifically for those people still on the fence about this method:

    My first article was published in the article directory 24 hours ago. It has ALREADY been syndicated by another blog in the niche, which has resulted in 14 opt-ins on my squeeze page.

    Now, time to start growing the relationship with my subscribers.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      My first article was published in the article directory 24 hours ago. It has ALREADY been syndicated by another blog in the niche, which has resulted in 14 opt-ins on my squeeze page.
      Well done! And many thanks for the update ... very good to see yet another person getting off so quickly to a promising start with article syndication. Good luck, and looking forward to hearing more ...
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    • Profile picture of the author Mahadevan
      Originally Posted by JuliannaW View Post

      I just want to provide a quick follow up to this thread, specifically for those people still on the fence about this method:

      My first article was published in the article directory 24 hours ago. It has ALREADY been syndicated by another blog in the niche, which has resulted in 14 opt-ins on my squeeze page.

      Now, time to start growing the relationship with my subscribers.
      Hi Julianna,

      Congrats and thank you not only for such an interesting and informative thread but also for the progress you have already made.

      I had two questions though and trust you and others in the forum can help me with this:

      a)Can you please tell me how did you organize the opt-in on your site - i mean what is the exact process to get this done and what does it cost?

      b)Do you always require an opt-in or can you just get visitors redirected to your article pages that have affiliate links and hope to get some sales? The reason is that is it always necessary to build a list? Somebody buying a jewellery product or a health care product may just want to buy the product you have recommended and leave.

      What is it that you can do opting them in and how are you going to sustain their interest in the days to come.

      Am I wrong in my understanding that many product purchases are one time only and there is possibly no need to build a list as having built one, what is it that you can provide them to keep them engaged and interested in your site for the future?

      I know this is possibly very niche centric and if it is indeed so, then can you and others in the forum advise what niches will do well with opt in lists?

      Thanks

      Mahadevan
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Mahadevan View Post

        I know this is possibly very niche centric
        Not so much, IMHO. If you're talking about affiliate sales (rather than CPA offers), there are very, very few (if any) niches where you wouldn't want to build a list.

        Originally Posted by Mahadevan View Post

        Somebody buying a jewellery product or a health care product may just want to buy the product you have recommended and leave.
        The idea of the list isn't just "to sell them other products in future". It's also to sell ten times as many of the originally promoted product, in the first place.

        I'm not exaggerating. Typically, not building a list is chasing only 10% of the available money from the "first product" at the expense of the other 90%.

        Originally Posted by Mahadevan View Post

        What is it that you can do opting them in and how are you going to sustain their interest in the days to come.
        By sending them valuable information, by establishing a relationship with them so that they come to respect and trust you. "Trust" is what makes most affiliate sales. People buy "on the strength of the recommendation", and what determines the strength of the recommendation is the strength of the relationship, and what determines that is what you send subscribers by email, and the extent to which you establish such a process of continuity that "making the purchase" just becomes one of the inevitable steps within that process.

        Here are two posts, parts of which may clarify different components what I'm saying ...

        http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post5210243

        http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post5791851

        And something to observe: have a look at all the threads here on subjects like "What's the one thing you'd do differently if you were starting again?" There are plenty of them. They're all full of posts from experienced, successful Warriors explaining all their shared reasons why "Starting to build a list right at the beginning" would be the single most productive, most important and most helpful thing they could possibly do, given everything they've learned, over the years. There are reasons for that. In this business, failure to start off by building a list really is one of the bigger and more significant mistakes that people make.

        Hope it helps ...
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        • Profile picture of the author Mahadevan
          Thanks for your response Alexa. Have gone through the two link threads you have mentioned but could not find answers to two things:

          a)What is the expense involved in building a list?

          b)What is the exact process of developing a squeeze page/landing page with an optin box?

          I know the the two are interrelated but just wanted to be as specific as possible.

          Kindly help with your thoughts on the above and anything else I may have missed for the above to be set up professionally.

          Mahadevan
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by Mahadevan View Post

            Thanks for your response Alexa. Have gone through the two link threads you have mentioned but could not find answers to two things:

            a)What is the expense involved in building a list?
            Depending on the solution you choose, it can be almost free, but those solutions have very significant downsides. There are free autoresponders out there, but those outfits have to pay the bills somehow. They do it by inserting ads into each message that goes out. You have zero control over the content of those ads, they look unprofessional, and they make it hard for list members to take you seriously.

            There are self-hosted solutions, but those present their own challenges. This has been beaten to death in this forum, so rather than go into it here, I'll just advise you to search around for threads on paid vs. self-hosted autoresponders.

            For most beginners, especially those on the fence about list building, a third party service like aweber is the best solution. There are a handful of services worth looking at, but that's another subject that's been endlessly discussed here.

            Ballpark, you can get a very professional set of tools for ~$20 per month.

            Originally Posted by Mahadevan View Post

            b)What is the exact process of developing a squeeze page/landing page with an optin box?

            I know the the two are interrelated but just wanted to be as specific as possible.
            A squeeze page is just a web page with some content and an opt-in form. If you can create a web page, you have the mechanics to develop a squeeze page.

            The term was coined to describe one way of building a list. The classic example is Eben Pagan's "Double Your Dating" site. One of his squeeze pages may be the most copied ever.

            On the initial page, you had a question someone in the niche would be very interested in getting an answer to. On the example I remember, the question was "how do you know if she wants you to kiss her?" If you wanted the answer, you had to enter your email address. No other choices - either enter the email to continue, or leave. Hence the "squeeze".

            After submitting the email address, the visitor is redirected (don't worry, the AR software handles the details) to a success page, often called a 'thank you' page. In Pagan's case, you got his answer to the question posed. You were also informed that he had a lot more information to share, but to get it, you had to confirm your email subscription.

            That's the basics. There are a ton of threads that go into more details, so a little time spent searching will prove profitable. There are also some really excellent threads in the Copywriting section on crafting effective squeeze pages.
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            • Profile picture of the author Mahadevan
              Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

              Depending on the solution you choose, it can be almost free, but those solutions have very significant downsides. There are free autoresponders out there, but those outfits have to pay the bills somehow. They do it by inserting ads into each message that goes out. You have zero control over the content of those ads, they look unprofessional, and they make it hard for list members to take you seriously.

              There are self-hosted solutions, but those present their own challenges. This has been beaten to death in this forum, so rather than go into it here, I'll just advise you to search around for threads on paid vs. self-hosted autoresponders.

              For most beginners, especially those on the fence about list building, a third party service like aweber is the best solution. There are a handful of services worth looking at, but that's another subject that's been endlessly discussed here.

              Ballpark, you can get a very professional set of tools for ~$20 per month.



              A squeeze page is just a web page with some content and an opt-in form. If you can create a web page, you have the mechanics to develop a squeeze page.

              The term was coined to describe one way of building a list. The classic example is Eben Pagan's "Double Your Dating" site. One of his squeeze pages may be the most copied ever.

              On the initial page, you had a question someone in the niche would be very interested in getting an answer to. On the example I remember, the question was "how do you know if she wants you to kiss her?" If you wanted the answer, you had to enter your email address. No other choices - either enter the email to continue, or leave. Hence the "squeeze".

              After submitting the email address, the visitor is redirected (don't worry, the AR software handles the details) to a success page, often called a 'thank you' page. In Pagan's case, you got his answer to the question posed. You were also informed that he had a lot more information to share, but to get it, you had to confirm your email subscription.

              That's the basics. There are a ton of threads that go into more details, so a little time spent searching will prove profitable. There are also some really excellent threads in the Copywriting section on crafting effective squeeze pages.
              Thanks so much John for the above and in particular the brief history of the 'squeeze page'.

              While on the subject of engaging the people in the list with useful information, would it be okay if you sent them affiliate offers that are totally different to the niche after you build some trust with them. This is probably a premature question but just wanted clarity for the future.

              Mahadevan
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              • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                Banned
                Originally Posted by Mahadevan View Post

                would it be okay if you sent them affiliate offers that are totally different to the niche after you build some trust with them.
                "Totally" different is probably not such a good idea - you'll get some unsubscriptions and lose some of the trust you've established, perhaps?

                The ideal is to choose niches in which there are plenty of other products to promote, and then after those some in pretty related niches, in which some of those people are likely also to be interested, and to which nobody will object.

                Your conversion-rates for something "totally different" are going to be really low, by comparison ...
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                • Profile picture of the author Mahadevan
                  Got it thanks.

                  Mahadevan
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  • Profile picture of the author danr62
    Good work. I hope to be able to add my own success story soon. Still need to get that opt-in and other stuff done before I start trying to drive traffic...

    In the process of moving now so busy busy busy.

    I think I'll test it by doing some FB advertising once I get my opt-in setup and a couple autoresponder messages written.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Kage
    Article Marketing will never die(at least for awhile or when the internet collapses). I write about one article per day in a niche, sometimes two and syndicate it to the primary spots. Easy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rockerpreneur
    I just drop in to say thank you for this thread,as i learn many things to read the whole post on this thread

    Thank you,
    Ady
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    Do you want Safe and High Quality INSTANT Traffics to your site for any keywords you want? Try THIS ONE!

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  • Profile picture of the author TaylorBauman
    Julianna--

    As the initiator of this thread, just wondering if you've been able to successfully leverage the concepts presented here?
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    • Hey...wait a minute!! Where's the end of the story??

      what happened to JuliannaW?

      Did she just disappear??

      Was she kidnapped by an Eastern European PLR syndicate??

      Did she amass a fortune by using the incredible amount of information packed in this awesome thread and retired on a Pacific island of her own??

      Was she even real to begin with??

      Signature
      Great content can turn your website into a GOLDMINE.

      So why are you are paying for lame copy that just lays there?
      Get noticed with content that gets ATTENTION.
      PM me to get content that gets you NOTICED.
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      • Profile picture of the author andrewm
        Seems like JuliannaW last visited the forum sometime last year. I hope she is still around. Pretty good information in this thread that she started.

        Andrew

        Originally Posted by Blame It On The Caffeine View Post

        Hey...wait a minute!! Where's the end of the story??

        what happened to JuliannaW?

        Did she just disappear??

        Was she kidnapped by an Eastern European PLR syndicate??

        Did she amass a fortune by using the incredible amount of information packed in this awesome thread and retired on a Pacific island of her own??

        Was she even real to begin with??
        Signature
        start affiliate marketing business.
        More Information ?
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  • Profile picture of the author TorinoGray
    POOOOO, I love a good before and after story!
    Maybe Alexa's advice worked so well, she has already jumped to the
    "Make Money, Retire" step.

    EXCELLENT THREAD, great links that bounced me all over WF for MORE great info.
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  • Profile picture of the author missmystery
    I just have a question for the article gurus here - If you don't include a link to your product in the articles to be syndicated, how will the customers get them? Is it purely due to mail outs on an opt in list?
    Signature
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by missmystery View Post

      I just have a question for the article gurus here - If you don't include a link to your product in the articles to be syndicated, how will the customers get them? Is it purely due to mail outs on an opt in list?
      In a nutshell, the idea behind syndicating content is to convert someone else's audience into your audience. You want highly targeted readers (for written articles) to engage with you so that you can have multiple contacts over time.

      That way, you may be able to sell them (or get them ready to buy - pre-sell) multiple products.

      That was always the big shortcoming of the bum marketing approach - get'em on a search, then send them directly to a sales page. Trouble is, you only get one shot, and over the last several search updates it has become pretty much impossible to overcome this weakness with pure numbers of exposures.

      It could be via an opt-in list. Or a blog subscription. Or a Facebook 'like' or Twitter 'follow'. However you do it, the idea is to build a long-term relationship over time, encompassing multiple win-win transactions.

      Is this system perfect for every market and business model? Nope. Some products in some models are one-shot deals. If you've ever been to one of those shows/fairs/boardwalks where people sell from little booths, you've seen a one-shot approach. The pitchman (and I use that term with respect) gathers a crowd, dazzles them with his demo and his spiel, harvests the buyers and starts over again. Syndication might help draw people to such a demo (lately, it will be a 'webinar'), but there are probably more effective means.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        In a nutshell, the idea behind syndicating content is to convert someone else's audience into your audience. You want highly targeted readers (for written articles) to engage with you so that you can have multiple contacts over time.

        That way, you may be able to sell them (or get them ready to buy - pre-sell) multiple products.

        That was always the big shortcoming of the bum marketing approach - get'em on a search, then send them directly to a sales page. Trouble is, you only get one shot, and over the last several search updates it has become pretty much impossible to overcome this weakness with pure numbers of exposures.

        It could be via an opt-in list. Or a blog subscription. Or a Facebook 'like' or Twitter 'follow'. However you do it, the idea is to build a long-term relationship over time, encompassing multiple win-win transactions.

        Is this system perfect for every market and business model? Nope. Some products in some models are one-shot deals. If you've ever been to one of those shows/fairs/boardwalks where people sell from little booths, you've seen a one-shot approach. The pitchman (and I use that term with respect) gathers a crowd, dazzles them with his demo and his spiel, harvests the buyers and starts over again. Syndication might help draw people to such a demo (lately, it will be a 'webinar'), but there are probably more effective means.
        I don't mean to sound immodest, but this strategy will always work.

        Some of the tactics change over time. For example, the search engine updates pretty much closed the loopholes on getting traffic directly from article directories and on using spun digital garbage to inflate one's link profile.

        But finding ways to put your message in front of people open to and looking for that message will always be a winner.
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  • Profile picture of the author missmystery
    I see. So you don't even include your website name on the article to be syndicated.. I mean, how will they know to come to your site?

    (n00b question)

    Also, how to you find people to syndicate your stuff. Do you just email blog owners in your niche?
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Publishers will generally allow a short ad or "resource box" at the end of your article. To encourage wide syndication, it's important to write articles that are not blatantly promotional or appear to be "salesy". The articles I write never even mention a specific product, but rather focus on a specific problem, weakness, hazard, liability, industry legislation, or events affecting bottom line profit which can be remedied or optimized with a particular course of action.

      This marketing subtlety is extremely powerful. Before you attempt to sell a product, first sell yourself to your target market. For example, if you sell security or alarm systems, position yourself as a security specialist by writing generic articles for businesses on crime statistics, how to secure their premises, protect their employees, internal procedures, community resources, etc.

      Having demonstrated your knowlege within this niche, you may be conferred by implication the title "security specialist", with subtle but very powerful credentials to your website for additional resources, tips, product reviews, etc. If done in a non-salesy approach, it will happen frequently that readers will visit your website through the link in the "resource box", read and/or optin for product reviews, and even sell themselves through your affiliate links.

      This marketing model has been effective long before the internet, and has become ever more relevant with Google's frequent updates and on-going algorithm changes. An excellent ebook I often recommend is this timely classic, Turn Words Into Traffic, by Jim and Dallas Edwards.
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      “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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      • Profile picture of the author missmystery
        Originally Posted by myob View Post

        Publishers will generally allow a short ad or "resource box" at the end of your article. To encourage wide syndication, it's important to write articles that are not blatantly promotional or appear to be "salesy". The articles I write never even mention a specific product, but rather focus on a specific problem, weakness, hazard, liability, industry legislation, or events affecting bottom line profit which can be remedied or optimized with a particular course of action.

        This marketing subtlety is extremely powerful. Before you attempt to sell a product, first sell yourself to your target market. For example, if you sell security or alarm systems, position yourself as a security specialist by writing generic articles for businesses on crime statistics, how to secure their premises, protect their employees, internal procedures, community resources, etc.

        Having demonstrated your knowlege within this niche, you may be conferred by implication the title "security specialist", with subtle but very powerful credentials to your website for additional resources, tips, product reviews, etc. If done in a non-salesy approach, it will happen frequently that readers will visit your website through the link in the "resource box", read and/or optin for product reviews, and even sell themselves through your affiliate links.

        This marketing model has been effective long before the internet, and has become ever more relevant with Google's frequent updates and on-going algorithm changes. An excellent ebook I often recommend is this timely classic, Turn Words Into Traffic, by Jim and Dallas Edwards.
        Thanks, myob. That's some great information. As for finding syndicators, someone mentioned directory of ezines. What is the overall opinion of that?
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Originally Posted by missmystery View Post

          Thanks, myob. That's some great information. As for finding syndicators, someone mentioned directory of ezines. What is the overall opinion of that?
          First of all, understand that the intended purpose of the directory of ezines is not article syndication. Although ezine publishers do indicate whether or not they will accept articles, the main reasons for listing in this directory is to sell their advertising space and obtain new subscribers.

          Personally, I use the DOE almost daily, and have for over a decade as one of several marketing resources. If you choose to purchase a membership (which in itself is a bargain with all the extra benefits), realize it's effectiveness as a marketing tool depends upon your ability as a writer to meet the expectations of not only the ezine publishers, but also of your targeted audience.

          Consider also some of the other resources, references, and outlets mentioned and hyperlinked in this thread. If you haven't published articles before, getting started with EZA will be helpful in establishing a portfolio for use in querying publishers for syndication.
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          “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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  • Profile picture of the author vlada111
    Here is the great IM guru sales page. I just love that site make me laugh everytime I see it

    Buy My Stupid Ebook, Overly SEO d Title, Keywords Crammed like Make Money Online Make Money Online Make Money Online
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  • Profile picture of the author fatcitygirl
    Looks like a great plan to me. I keep seeing how article syndication is still a viable way to get traffic even with all the Google updates. I'm hoping this is still true.
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  • Profile picture of the author everyonewins
    The last post on this thread was over a year ago. Is this information still valid or have things changed since then?
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