How I Reduced My Aweber Complaints to .02%

by ukonline 3 replies
My Aweber complaint rate was hovering
around the .20 to .30% mark so I decided
to try something.

Having used Ezine Articles, and knowing
how particular they are, (and quite rightly
so IMHO), I decided to use their Editorial
Guidelines and apply them to my next
newsletter.

Okay, I didn't follow ALL the EA rules such
as article length and so forth.

But I realised that all of my emails were
self promotional, so I figured that was
the main problem.

There was absolutely no mention of my
product anywhere in the main body of my
latest mailing, I just wrote an original article,
related to my niche, that I thought my
subscribers would genuinely find useful.

A simple signature link was all I used
at the end.

What I plan to do now is probably write
more newsletters, but have the bulk
of them follow these simple rules, and
occasionally send a promotional newsletter
to generate sales if I feel it necessary.

This is a pattern I've noticed with the
newsletters that I receive and have
the highest regard for.

Should have twigged this earlier, I
suppose, but there you go.

:-)

Brian.
#main internet marketing discussion forum #02% #aweber #complaints #reduced
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Lockwood
    Originally Posted by ukonline View Post

    But I realised that all of my emails were
    self promotional, so I figured that was
    the main problem.

    That's not a problem. It's your list. I don't see what an article site's rules have to do with it.

    Is your goal to make sales or to get the lowest complaint rate?

    Here is a surefire way to get zero complaints: delete your list. That will also save you lots of time.
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    • Profile picture of the author garyv
      I think the op has a point. A list will become useless if you annoy it too much. They'll just start ignoring your emails, or unsubscribing. However if you provide some real value, and give the list something they'd like to read without being spammy all of the time, you'll get more eyes on all of your emails, including the ocassional spammy one.
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
    Brian, it's good to have a lower complaint percentage, but Chris does have a point. The ultimate purpose of marketing using emails is to make sales, measuring complaints is great but it's maybe not what you should focus on.

    Providing good content and reducing the amount of pitching within your emails may very well prove to be a great strategy for increasing sales. It doesn't matter really HOW you came to that conclusion - in your case the research into article sites was the catalyst. I'm sure you'll be keeping an eye on your conversions rates 'cos this is the figure that needs monitoring.

    Reduced complaints will just be a happy by-product of good marketing.

    Peter
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