32 replies
Hi Warriors!

Today I got a customer who was extremely rude, and at times quite profane.

He was unhappy that I sent him three emails in one day.

Now, here's why that happened. I have my welcome message of course, then I have 8 straight days where I send one email per day with a freebie or two or a tip. After that I send out only a weekly broadcast or two.

This is all explained on my squeeze page, people know what they're signing up for before they opt in.

I made some changes to my squeeze page + download page, but forgot to update the link in the welcome email. I then got a few emails saying the link didn't work. So, I had to send out a broadcast to those on my list explaining about the broken link and with an updated link.

I also had a giveaway event broadcast scheduled. So on this one occasion and this one occasion only, I sent out 3 in one day. My own policy is to try not to send out more than two a day, and even that is to only be on the rare occasion.

I got a couple of unsubscribes, unsurprisingly.

But, I got one guy in my inbox who was adamant that I was "spamming him", and that "that's not what he signed up for" he even called me a prick in the final email and that I'm arrogant.

He even gave me a "free lesson" in marketing (who's the arrogant one?), by saying that "even if someone subscribes to 'one email per day for 8 days and that they know they might get more than one email on occasion after that' they don't want it, even if that's what they're signing up for". Is he on to something there? I'd like your thoughts on that one. Maybe he's right. But then I only got a 2 unsubscribes.

Now, in honesty, I'm quite inexperienced in email marketing. In fact this is my first time building a proper list. I just want to know other people's views on this.

I tried my best to stay gracious in my answers and not be a bit of a douche and I even wished him good luck (though he probably put his own negative tone into that line rather than my sincere tone), but I think that my attempt at not reacting to his behavior made him think I was being arrogant or something like that.

I just want to know how the more experienced marketer (and email marketer in particular) would have dealt with it, and if there are any general tips on how to handle overly aggressive complaints.

I have a pretty thick skin I like to think, so I can take criticism even if it's not constructive, but to have abuse hurled at me for sending a few emails is bad crack. I don't take it personally, however.

Any help on this one?
#complaints #customers
  • Profile picture of the author Scott Henderson
    Building a relation with your list is crucial but just like your day to day interaction with people on the street or wherever, there are always going to be those whom you are not going to get along with.

    The big difference between live interaction and written word is that so many times people will and can interpret your words into something completely different. For example take the phrase "I didn't say she stole the money". Speak it aloud 5 times, each time putting extra emphasis on each word(s) ,"I", "didn't say", "she", "stole", "the money". You will have 5 different meanings of the sentence.


    That being said, yes you are always going to get these type of people at some point and you are not going to satisfy everyone. I look at it like this, if I am not at least getting someone who is not satisfied then I'm not trying hard enough,,no one has 100% success. To me success is built off of how many times I fail.

    Take the high road, just like you did, don't dwell on it, see it as a positive experience,,you are in the game and you will take a shot every now and then.
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    • Profile picture of the author JRCarson
      Yeah, take the high road and don't worry about it.

      Personally, I would email him and admit my mistake and explain the entire situation in detail, and how you screwed up.

      He'll then feel like an idiot for being so rude...and perhaps become your best customer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Warrior X
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  • Profile picture of the author ephame
    Surely your e-mails explained what you were e-mailing about. I.e- Welcome to my program etc... then the one about "perhaps the link isn't working" and whatever the other one was. But i'm sure you would've been explaining in the e-mail what each one was about. He's probably just expecting the worst and looking to be pessimistic about the whole situation, I wouldn't stress about it if I were you.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
      Originally Posted by ephame View Post

      Surely your e-mails explained what you were e-mailing about. I.e- Welcome to my program etc... then the one about "perhaps the link isn't working" and whatever the other one was. But i'm sure you would've been explaining in the e-mail what each one was about. He's probably just expecting the worst and looking to be pessimistic about the whole situation, I wouldn't stress about it if I were you.
      Yeah, for sure. my broadcast explained that the link wasn't working, hence the extra email, and in the email I even apologized for the excessive emailing. But I guess if people are hellbent on being the "complainer", then they don't even open the emails to see what they're about.

      I guess I just need to get on with it. If I'm honest, I really don't think I want to have guys like that around anyway. They probably wouldn't see the positive side to anything I try to do.

      Anyway, it's late here and I need to get up early-ish so I don't miss the Sunday afternoon sports TV. I'll check out any replies tomorrow.

      By, for now.
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      • Profile picture of the author kenmichaels
        Like everyone is saying, building your relationship is important,
        and just like in the real world people change, so you have to ditch
        ones that you used to call friends.

        Same with your list.

        If he is no longer in it chances are, that in the long run your list will benefit from it.

        I know this goes agianst conventional thinking but you really
        do need to piss your list off every now and then,

        just think of it like culling the herd

        just my 2 cents
        Signature

        Selling Ain't for Sissies
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  • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
    I do reckon it could be the fact that it was written word and not speech, that what I was saying was misread. I knew that I could please everyone, but I guess I was being naive in thinking that no-one would want to throw verbal at me. Ha!

    ---

    I actually blocked him and said I wouldn't waste anymore time on him than the two emails I sent. Now I'm thinking about just emailing him explaining the whole situation and admitting my mistake, as you mentioned.

    I'm not sure if it'd just be an attempt to nurse my ego though, or if it's to actually try and rebuild a burnt bridge. I guess it'd need to be in the right intentions.
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    While I wouldn't have called you bad names, I certainly would have unsubscribed also. There isn't anything .... and I mean anything ... that I want to hear from a list that I subscribe to 2 or 3 times a day. In fact, if you send an email every day, I'm gone.
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    • Profile picture of the author wtatlas
      I think you've already done all you need to do by explaining the stuation and staying calm and polite in the process. You've admitted your mistake and apologised - I don't think you can do any more.
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      • Profile picture of the author ExRat
        Hi JamieD87,

        Imagine this scenario -

        Your wife/girlfriend goes to her mothers before work, but her mother does something a bit selfish and riles your wife.

        Your wife goes to work, and her boss is having a bad day and gives her a hard time, which she has to take on the chin, because she wants to get paid.

        On the way home in the car, some idiot cuts your wife up, but then he verbally abuses her for 'getting in his way.'

        She comes home after a bad day, unfortunately on the same day that you bring something up that you wanted to discuss with her, which involves suggesting that she could do something better.

        You approach the subject amicably and diplomatically, but no matter - due to the build up of stress throughout the day she gives you both barrels, calls you a lot of names, feeds your dinner to the dog, spurns your advances later on and your attempt to make up etc...

        My point here is that sometimes we are on the receiving end of grief from people who deep down mean us no real harm, but perhaps they have been pushed too far in situations where they can't take out that frustration on the person who caused it. So we get it in the ear.

        You did the right thing by not reacting to provocation.

        All it takes to be professional in these situations is to be philosophical and realise that it's not you personally that they are attacking - it's an outpouring of frustration from the build up of tension that life accumulates.

        This subscriber may have been bombarded with real spam, poor marketing etc just prior to your emails....they could have been ripped off last week and trodden in dog litter when they stepped outside of their front door this morning.

        It's the price of success - you have to be able to accept that communication sometimes fails and good prospects are sometimes lost to good sellers just because it's the price of doing business.

        Learn the lessons, improve, make adjustments and become more philosophical. That's the best that you can do.
        Signature


        Roger Davis

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        • Profile picture of the author Sandor Verebi
          Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

          ...My point here is that sometimes we are on the receiving end of grief from people who deep down mean us no real harm, but perhaps they have been pushed too far in situations where they can't take out that frustration on the person who caused it. So we get it in the ear.

          You did the right thing by not reacting to provocation.

          All it takes to be professional in these situations is to be philosophical and realise that it's not you personally that they are attacking - it's an outpouring of frustration from the build up of tension that life accumulates.

          This subscriber may have been bombarded with real spam, poor marketing etc just prior to your emails....they could have been ripped off last week and trodden in dog litter when they stepped outside of their front door this morning.

          It's the price of success - you have to be able to accept that communication sometimes fails and good prospects are sometimes lost to good sellers just because it's the price of doing business.

          Learn the lessons, improve, make adjustments and become more philosophical. That's the best that you can do.
          Hi Roger,

          Excellent assessment of a situation. Thanks.

          Things are never just black or just white. There are shader factors always. You can find them with a little EMPATHY.

          The problem seems to me that if you are too close to some problem (involved), then you cannot always see through the situation properly and you may act according to your first feeling.

          And it is not always good. It is easy to say or do something that both parties may regret later.

          In this case you should not react immediately, but wait a bit to answer. In the meantime, the other would be somewhat sober. You as well.

          So, you'll be able to come to terms with your partner much easily.

          It worked for me.

          Cheers,

          Sandor
          Signature

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        • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
          Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

          Hi JamieD87,

          Imagine this scenario -

          Your wife/girlfriend goes to her mothers before work, but her mother does something a bit selfish and riles your wife.

          Your wife goes to work, and her boss is having a bad day and gives her a hard time, which she has to take on the chin, because she wants to get paid.

          On the way home in the car, some idiot cuts your wife up, but then he verbally abuses her for 'getting in his way.'

          She comes home after a bad day, unfortunately on the same day that you bring something up that you wanted to discuss with her, which involves suggesting that she could do something better.

          You approach the subject amicably and diplomatically, but no matter - due to the build up of stress throughout the day she gives you both barrels, calls you a lot of names, feeds your dinner to the dog, spurns your advances later on and your attempt to make up etc...

          My point here is that sometimes we are on the receiving end of grief from people who deep down mean us no real harm, but perhaps they have been pushed too far in situations where they can't take out that frustration on the person who caused it. So we get it in the ear.

          You did the right thing by not reacting to provocation.

          All it takes to be professional in these situations is to be philosophical and realise that it's not you personally that they are attacking - it's an outpouring of frustration from the build up of tension that life accumulates.

          This subscriber may have been bombarded with real spam, poor marketing etc just prior to your emails....they could have been ripped off last week and trodden in dog litter when they stepped outside of their front door this morning.

          It's the price of success - you have to be able to accept that communication sometimes fails and good prospects are sometimes lost to good sellers just because it's the price of doing business.

          Learn the lessons, improve, make adjustments and become more philosophical. That's the best that you can do.
          I guess that's a good way to look at it. It's not personal and they could be having a bad day/week.

          Look from a different angle before making my decision on my reply.

          I like that.
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        • Profile picture of the author TeamGlobal
          Nicely said, Roger....and a good way of looking at things when a client or potential client is rude to you.

          Re: "All it takes to be professional in these situations is to be philosophical and realise that it's not you personally that they are attacking - it's an outpouring of frustration from the build up of tension that life accumulates."
          I believe I've seen this referred to as "displaced aggression", when the outpouring of frustration or aggression is directed at someone or something other than the original source of the frustration or aggression.

          I'm still working on always taking the high road in those situations, but quite honestly that is a work in progress.

          All The Very Best,


          Tony

          Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

          Hi JamieD87,

          Imagine this scenario -

          Your wife/girlfriend goes to her mothers before work, but her mother does something a bit selfish and riles your wife.

          Your wife goes to work, and her boss is having a bad day and gives her a hard time, which she has to take on the chin, because she wants to get paid.

          On the way home in the car, some idiot cuts your wife up, but then he verbally abuses her for 'getting in his way.'

          She comes home after a bad day, unfortunately on the same day that you bring something up that you wanted to discuss with her, which involves suggesting that she could do something better.

          You approach the subject amicably and diplomatically, but no matter - due to the build up of stress throughout the day she gives you both barrels, calls you a lot of names, feeds your dinner to the dog, spurns your advances later on and your attempt to make up etc...

          My point here is that sometimes we are on the receiving end of grief from people who deep down mean us no real harm, but perhaps they have been pushed too far in situations where they can't take out that frustration on the person who caused it. So we get it in the ear.

          You did the right thing by not reacting to provocation.

          All it takes to be professional in these situations is to be philosophical and realise that it's not you personally that they are attacking - it's an outpouring of frustration from the build up of tension that life accumulates.

          This subscriber may have been bombarded with real spam, poor marketing etc just prior to your emails....they could have been ripped off last week and trodden in dog litter when they stepped outside of their front door this morning.

          It's the price of success - you have to be able to accept that communication sometimes fails and good prospects are sometimes lost to good sellers just because it's the price of doing business.

          Learn the lessons, improve, make adjustments and become more philosophical. That's the best that you can do.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

      In fact, if you send an email every day, I'm gone.
      But then you would have read this on the squeeze page, and never subscribed anyway. Or subscribed, took your freebie and bolted from my list.

      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

      While I wouldn't have called you bad names, I certainly would have unsubscribed also. There isn't anything .... and I mean anything ... that I want to hear from a list that I subscribe to 2 or 3 times a day.
      However, I do now realize there's a lesson to not bombard people with emails, even if it is offering good value. People just don't want "loads" of emails I guess.
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      • Profile picture of the author larkykid
        Jamie, it's a pity that this type of marketing (email marketing) only involves written communication as opposed to talking to people directly. Because in that case, you could use the ole Glaswegian wit and charm... gets them every time
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  • Profile picture of the author helisell
    "Dear subscriber,

    I'm really really sorry for that little spate
    of emails. It was entirely my fault and I apologise.

    I can assure you it wont happen again."

    If that prompts any kind of negative response
    we simple unsubscribe them from all our lists.

    Always say sorry up front every time.

    This way your conscience is clear and they
    have a chance to be polite again.....just
    ONE chance however...we simply don't deal
    with rude people.
    Signature

    Making Calls To Sell Something? What are you actually saying?
    Is there any room for improvement? Want to find out?

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  • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
    Originally Posted by JamieD87 View Post

    I just want to know how the more experienced marketer (and email marketer in particular) would have dealt with it, and if there are any general tips on how to handle overly aggressive complaints.
    Whatever you do, you'll get some people on your list who
    will complain (they're unlikely to turn into your customers
    either).

    You can't please everyone.

    If someone responds with an aggressive e-mail, the first
    thing to do is to ask yourself if they have a point.

    Put yourself in their shoes and think about how they are
    perceiving the situation.

    If you think that they're being unreasonable, then I think
    the best thing to do is to unsubscribe them from the list
    yourself (usually people reply with the e-mail that caused
    some of the offence and the unsubscribe link is at the
    bottom).

    If they are being reasonable and they have some grounds
    for complaint, then reply in a professional manner and
    empathize in the e-mail that you can understand where
    they're coming from and if you'll do anything differently.

    Regarding your specific situation, it was avoidable IMO:

    1. Triple Check Links

    For example, ALWAYS triple-check any links you include
    in your e-mails so you know they work. If you change the
    link, then triple check the new e-mail link again too.

    2. Don't Broadcast to the 'Newest' Subscribers

    I set-up my lists so that subscribers get a set autoresponder
    sequence over the course of their first 30-days on my list.

    This has been carefully structured to take them from being a
    stranger to getting to know me better, what I offer and then
    help them decide if they want to stay on my list.

    I don't send any broadcasts to subscribers within their first
    30-days - just autoresponders. This avoids things like launch
    e-mails, special offers, etc interferring with the first 30-days
    sequence.

    I also don't think it's a good idea to do things like giveaways
    for new subscribers either because I want them bonding to
    me - not someone else.

    You did the right thing though by remaining professional and
    being open to feedback.

    Good luck.

    Dedicated to mutual success,

    Shaun
    Signature

    .

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    • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
      Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

      Whatever you do, you'll get some people on your list who
      will complain (they're unlikely to turn into your customers
      either).

      You can't please everyone.

      If someone responds with an aggressive e-mail, the first
      thing to do is to ask yourself if they have a point.

      Put yourself in their shoes and think about how they are
      perceiving the situation.

      If you think that they're being unreasonable, then I think
      the best thing to do is to unsubscribe them from the list
      yourself (usually people reply with the e-mail that caused
      some of the offence and the unsubscribe link is at the
      bottom).

      If they are being reasonable and they have some grounds
      for complaint, then reply in a professional manner and
      empathize in the e-mail that you can understand where
      they're coming from and if you'll do anything differently.

      Regarding your specific situation, it was avoidable IMO:

      1. Triple Check Links

      For example, ALWAYS triple-check any links you include
      in your e-mails so you know they work. If you change the
      link, then triple check the new e-mail link again too.

      2. Don't Broadcast to the 'Newest' Subscribers

      I set-up my lists so that subscribers get a set autoresponder
      sequence over the course of their first 30-days on my list.

      This has been carefully structured to take them from being a
      stranger to getting to know me better, what I offer and then
      help them decide if they want to stay on my list.

      I don't send any broadcasts to subscribers within their first
      30-days - just autoresponders. This avoids things like launch
      e-mails, special offers, etc interferring with the first 30-days
      sequence.

      I also don't think it's a good idea to do things like giveaways
      for new subscribers either because I want them bonding to
      me - not someone else.

      You did the right thing though by remaining professional and
      being open to feedback.

      Good luck.

      Dedicated to mutual success,

      Shaun
      I like this response.

      I realize it was avoidable. I actually made a blog post talking about checking your links immediately after the first complaint email I received from him.

      I didn't actually think I could exclude the broadcasts from the people in the first week of my AR sequence. I'll need to figure out how to do that, it could save me some bother and unsubs in the future. Thanks for that!

      To be honest, I've not really seen any results from the giveaway event that I mentioned, so that's probably been a waste of my time in itself and the extra email I sent as a result cost me. So, it's done me more harm than good. (Perhaps a blog post on it's own)

      Thank you for the in depth and helpful answer Shaun.

      All the best.
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      • Profile picture of the author Sandor Verebi
        Originally Posted by Jamie Drew View Post

        ...
        To be honest, I've not really seen any results from the giveaway event that I mentioned, so that's probably been a waste of my time in itself...
        Hi Jamie,

        To be a partaker in giveaways can be profitable if you consider some aspects:

        * adding your gift to such event is your first step in building good relationship with your JV partners. But this gift must be as good enough that if you could ask money for it and wanted, people would pay that amount for it.

        * another thing is the reputation of that event. Perhaps, you don't want to be associated with a weak event, so only join to that kind of giveaways, where the quality of offered gifts is monitored.

        * also it is important, that every partaker must promote the event. Delete those who don't promote it. He is not entitled to receive the result. I saw giveawys, where people gave outdated product, then just waiting for the results without promoting the event.

        All the best,

        Sandor
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  • Profile picture of the author Zaheera
    Hi,

    Forgive him, and as an advertiser I say you that never ever do more than one e-mail to any client in one day.

    Its my personal experience that whenever we address one person more than one time in one day, he/she must give us aggressive and negative response.

    How it will done?
    1. Be focus on your First E-mail and make it more impressive with images and different text tools of bold and different colours. Because the first impression is the last impression.

    2. Now before send it to particular address. Be sure that the message you write is Concise and End with Curtsy Closing. Here all 7C's of communication must be followed. [i.e Concise, Concreteness, Clear, Correct, Completeness, Consideration and Curtsy ].

    The message composed on these 7C's of communication must have a positive effect over the reader.

    3. Do impressive promotion first time and wait for their replies, If they give response than give them time to discuss the services and then finalize this deals.

    Because we can promote business and inform well to others but we can't emphasis or even convince anybody to buy our products, forcefully. Its the first rule of promotion and sales.

    Hope this help you!

    Best Regards,
    Zaheera
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  • Profile picture of the author kaizerinfo
    You need to read the book, with the title "the best book ever", I guess it's somewhere here.
    By Eric Louviere
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    • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
      Originally Posted by kaizerinfo View Post

      You need to read the book, with the title "the best book ever", I guess it's somewhere here.
      By Eric Louviere
      Where can I find this book? I've tried Google, but can't find it.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Jamie, I think that, although you brought the situation on yourself, your subscriber didn't handle things well either.

        If you look back through the archives here, you'll find periodic threads on whether or not the 'broken link' email is an honest mistake or a ploy to give the marketer an excuse to email extra times. Sounds like your subscriber took it as the latter.

        Add the giveaway email, and anyone who did not know you might suspect that you and they have differing definitions of 'occasional'.

        "Keep your words soft and sweet, for someday you may have to eat them" is not bad advice when you are running a list, especially when your own behavior is suspect.
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  • Profile picture of the author skyseer
    I would say forgive and forget. Forgive yourself for the error which is really not your fault, and forget the rude bloke. ;-) There are much nicer people out there whom you would rather have on your list.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      Let me get this straight.

      You emailed him more than once about his complaint - could it be arguing the definition of "spam"? That would escalate the problem.

      You promised your list one email a day - and broke the promise. The second email was a correction but the third email should have been delayed. Apparently you planned to break the one-a-day when you scheduled that third email.

      The customer was angry because he didn't get what you promised. Your response was

      I actually blocked him and said I wouldn't waste anymore time on him than the two emails I sent.
      You told a customer HE was wasting YOUR time? No, I wouldn't be emailing him again!

      There's a lesson here - or you can blame the incident on a "bad customer" and go on your merry way. It's your list.

      kay
      Signature
      Every child needs a pet because every family needs an optimist

      Saving one dog will not save the world....but will forever change the world for one dog.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
        Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

        Let me get this straight.

        You emailed him more than once about his complaint - could it be arguing the definition of "spam"? That would escalate the problem.

        You promised your list one email a day - and broke the promise. The second email was a correction but the third email should have been delayed. Apparently you planned to break the one-a-day when you scheduled that third email.

        The customer was angry because he didn't get what you promised. Your response was



        You told a customer HE was wasting YOUR time? No, I wouldn't be emailing him again!

        There's a lesson here - or you can blame the incident on a "bad customer" and go on your merry way. It's your list.

        kay
        Yes, I broke that promise. It was unintentional, but I still done it. I guess you're right on that.

        However, I did NOT say HE was wasting MY time. I said that I was wasting MY OWN time. He was a lost subscriber, and as Shaun already mentioned "he probably wouldn't end up turning into my customer anyway", so I decided I was wasting my own time and not to continue the issue further.

        So, I'm not saying that he was wasting my time, but that the time I was spending on trying to reason with him wasn't being spent well.

        I allowed him to have the last word and said no more to him.

        I'm not saying I'm not at fault here. I realize I had broken the promise of one email per day(only for the first week), even though it says that on occasion there could be two.

        I guess the lesson is to keep my promises and just try and stay professional and graceful in these situations, realize when I've made a mistake and admit to it and make a sincere apology.

        My only gripe is with people being unnecessarily nasty and bad-natured.
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  • Profile picture of the author roboh
    Sometimes I get so caught up in the process of marketing and doing things the way I think they should. That I forget that it is really a numbers game. If I always try to do my best to do things the right way every time with every thing. Not everybody I talk to is going to like my methods. I cannot change that. In sales not everyone I talk to is going to want to buy my product. It applies to anything. I am not a failure or even wrong necessarily just because someone doesn't see things my way or don't want to hear my justification or apology. It just happens, those people are just a number in a demographic. They just don't want to participate some are vocal some are not. You only hear from the vocal ones. The others just go away quietly. The rest sign up or buy your product or both. No need to waste your time, energy or peace of mind on the ones who just aren't interested. You did a good job all the way down the line and now it is time to go on to service your customers. I need to post this somewhere conspicuous for my self I have a tendency to fall in to this mode myself. Thanks for reminding me.
    Signature

    Just Click Above
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  • Profile picture of the author Jamie Drew
    I like the different angles that are coming in, makes you think a lot more about what, how and when to send a message to your subscribers.

    And I guess you're right larkykid, the spoken word would have come in more handy in this case. Perhaps and argument for video response to customer complaints rather than a written email?

    Sounds like you've fallen for the Glaswegian wit and charm before my friend
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    Jamie -

    Apparently I misinterpreted something you wrote above - I thought you had said it TO him..."I actually blocked him and said I wouldn't waste anymore time on him than the two emails I sent."

    Building a responsive list means meeting the expectations of those signing up. It builds credibility. You didn't meant to make a mistake but it happened.

    An "oops, my bad" on your end can, as you have seen, be a "grrr" on the other end
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    Every child needs a pet because every family needs an optimist

    Saving one dog will not save the world....but will forever change the world for one dog.
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  • Profile picture of the author jasonl70
    Just remove him and move on.. seriously.

    Spend your time and energy on the people who don't get bent out of shape over emailing them. This person did you a favor by identifying himself to you

    Don't waste time catering to one "possible sale... maybe... down the the road... if you treat me with kid gloves", at the expense of the many sales you could get RIGHT NOW by sending that email.

    I personaly feel it is a rookie mistake to concentrate on the fence sitters & freebie seekers at the expense of the buyers.

    You may hear people take issue with this, but in my opinion they are often either:

    - chronic consumers
    - high maint, low return customers
    - freebie seekers
    - never ran a successfull business around email marketing
    - or worse, have no list of their own (or a very small one)
    - marketing their services and want to get you on their list..

    disclaimer: yes, there are exceptions.. no, this is not endorsing 'abusing your list'. I'm saying 2 in the hand beats 1 in the bush..
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    -Jason

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