Internet Marketing - Which Mentality Do You Side With?

86 replies
Some marketers say, "Build a ton of different niche sites and really diversify and just dip a little bit into a bit of everything."


...but then some other internet marketers will tell you "Focus on one niche you're passionate about, and ONLY focus on dominating that."


As you can see, these certainly are two different type of mindsets when it comes to internet marketing, and I've posted the video of this question below as well.


Thoughts from both seasoned IM'ers and newbies alike are welcome to voice their feelings on this interesting topic.
#how to start #internet #marketing #marketing mindset #mentality #picking niche #side #where to start
  • Profile picture of the author valerieSONORA
    Take the middle road.

    Don't have too many that you can't keep up, but don't put all your eggs in one basket either.

    Instead of focusing on just one or having a ton, have as much as you can that you can put good effort and content in.
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi,

      Interesting question. I think it's good to diversify a little early on, because by using different techniques and experiencing different types of market/prospect, you can get a feel for -

      a) where your talents lie

      b) what you enjoy

      ...with a view to finding what makes you the most money.

      The time to develop a narrower focus is when you are not seeing things through and don't have the capability to outsource that aspect. 100 unfinished projects 'gather no moss.'

      Plus you avoid the 'eggs in one basket' trap.

      As well as deciding whether to focus on one niche or many, one also must make a similar decision even if they are only in one niche. Should you focus your promotions on one area that provides the most return, or spread your net wide to reach the most prospects possible? Obviously that depends somewhat on the market/product and whether it has broad appeal.

      Should you also have only one primary site? Or should you split your efforts into multiple sites in the same niche, but all focused on one sub-niche of that niche.

      As Valerie pointed out, if you only test one approach, you will never know which one is more suitable.
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      Roger Davis

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    • Profile picture of the author mikecowles
      Originally Posted by valerieSONORA View Post

      Take the middle road.

      Don't have too many that you can't keep up, but don't put all your eggs in one basket either.

      Instead of focusing on just one or having a ton, have as much as you can that you can put good effort and content in.
      Well said Vallerie!

      ~Mike Cowles. <><
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    • Profile picture of the author Kenneth Fox
      I remember when 40 or 50% of the threads on this forum
      were this engaging and bursting with great views and info.

      I think this thread should be a sticky for any newbie to
      view when they first hit the forum. It answers quite a
      few of those same ole questions we see posted here day
      in and day out.

      Thanks to the OP for this one


      .
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    • Profile picture of the author bgmacaw
      Originally Posted by Richard Odell View Post

      How the hell can you do that when all your efforts are spread over thin ground.
      You don't understand the business model of niche site building. To once again quote Bruce Lee, "It is like a finger pointing away to the moon. Do not concentrate on the finger or you will miss all that heavenly glory."
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  • Profile picture of the author Charles Butler
    Hopefully this helps, while I'm on my 48 Laws of Power rants, lol.

    Law 23
    Concentrate Your Forces
    Conserve your forces and energies by keeping them concentrated at their strongest point. You gain more by finding a rich mine and mining it deeper, than by flitting from one shallow mine to another - intensity defeats extensity every time. When looking for sources of power to elevate you, find the one key patron, the fat cow who will give you milk for a long time to come.
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    “First, say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do.” -Epictetus

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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Charles,

      Hopefully this helps, while I'm on my 48 Laws of Power rants, lol.

      Law 23
      Concentrate Your Forces
      Conserve your forces and energies by keeping them concentrated at their strongest point. You gain more by finding a rich mine and mining it deeper, than by flitting from one shallow mine to another - intensity defeats extensity every time. When looking for sources of power to elevate you, find the one key patron, the fat cow who will give you milk for a long time to come.
      As you know, I've got the book

      But this demonstrates the problems that can sometimes arise from trying to asign laws to things, and then applying them to every context that one encounters.

      Robert Greene and his 48 laws does a particularly good job of avoiding this (and it's worth noting that there are good reasons to package things in neat packages - EG - you can create great titles).

      But here's an example. Let's say you find a way to produce Amazon affiliate sites, and you create a system to create them quickly and have them produce income.

      And let's say you do some tests and discover that it's almost pointless expanding the sites and spending time on promotion of a single site. The real value is to be found in deploying masses of these sites which are all (individually) focused on a single niche, a range of products - set and forget style, with minimal promotion.

      You can still twist it to say that you are focusing and 'concentrating your forces' on the system itself, but in truth the profit lies in not focusing on one site or one niche - the profit lies in mass deployment (proven by tests) and therefore in this instance, the rule is invalid and inappropriate.

      Just a thought.
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      Roger Davis

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      • Profile picture of the author Charles Butler
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post


        You can still twist it to say that you are focusing and 'concentrating your forces' on the system itself, but in truth the profit lies in not focusing on one site or one niche - the profit lies in mass deployment (proven by tests) and therefore in this instance, the rule is invalid and inappropriate.
        Yeah, I see where you are coming from. I just interpreted the law my way and forgot to explain my reasoning, expecting everyone to see it how I see it right off the bat. My mistake.

        Naturally, the law cannot be applied in the literal sense in this day and age since the internet provides information at your fingertips. You can acquire many "cows" and "mines" that will eventually feed you, after proven tests, like you explained. It's just that how I see it is that when you find a niche, it's like getting a baby cow, or finding a mine. It takes time and care to nurture the cow to the point where it will give you milk and feed you, or digging the mine until you find a vein to extract gold from.

        However, the point I'm trying to make with that law is this: If you try to take care of too many baby cows at once, or "flitting from one mine to the other" before you find a vein, you risk spreading yourself too thin and wearing yourself out. Raise as many cows, or dig as many mines as you can comfortably, keep the ones that give you milk and gold and abandon the ones that are dead weight while finding new ones to replace them.

        You can raise or find a fat cow to give you milk for a long time to come, but at the risk of sounding redundant, it takes time. But the law never said you can only have one

        I hope that wasn't too confusing and makes sense. It's almost 2 o'clock in the morning where I'm at and I've been up for a really long time doing research, lol
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        • Profile picture of the author Hamida Harland
          When I first started out in IM and spent alot of my time on article marketing I was in quite a few niches (and still am). However after watching this John Reese video It's All About Authority I saw sense, and I'm now scaling down to focus most of my efforts on two main niches. I believe that doing this will increase my 2009 profits exponentially.

          I've sold quite a few of my random niche sites already, and those that are doing really well I'll keep, but outsource maintenance.

          "If you want to make alot of money the key is to find one niche and do really well, not to be in 4, 5 or 6 niches."
          John Reese in It's All About Authority
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          • Profile picture of the author Michelle Adams
            Originally Posted by Hamida Harland View Post

            When I first started out in IM and spent alot of my time on article marketing I was in quite a few niches (and still am). However after watching this John Reese video It's All About Authority I saw sense, and I'm now scaling down to focus most of my efforts on two main niches. I believe that doing this will increase my 2009 profits exponentially.
            That's a great video, thanks for the link!

            I'm focusing on narrowing down my online activity after realizing that I can't really work any of my sites to their full potential whilst I'm spreading myself so thin across so many. I wouldn't go as far as cutting back to only ONE site and putting all my eggs in one basket though.

            In terms of following a passion; I think that's an important key to success.
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            • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
              I believe in focusing all your energy on one niche, until you have built up a solid business. Later, you can diversify into another - but only if it doesn't take away from your making the most of that initial niche.

              If you are "dipping" into many niches, how can you effectively monetize any of them. Your energies are split. You aren't making the best use of your mailing list - as you'll have a number of unrelated lists.
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          • Profile picture of the author tommygadget
            Originally Posted by Hamida Harland View Post

            When I first started out in IM and spent alot of my time on article marketing I was in quite a few niches (and still am). However after watching this John Reese video It's All About Authority I saw sense, and I'm now scaling down to focus most of my efforts on two main niches. I believe that doing this will increase my 2009 profits exponentially.

            I've sold quite a few of my random niche sites already, and those that are doing really well I'll keep, but outsource maintenance.

            "If you want to make alot of money the key is to find one niche and do really well, not to be in 4, 5 or 6 niches."
            John Reese in It's All About Authority
            Uh Oh, I have 200 niches, I guess I'd better start getting rid of them

            TomG.
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  • Profile picture of the author nicholasb
    I have about 5 niche sites, that earn nice steady profits. But I am also going head on in the home business market.

    I like having 5 niche sites up at a time so I can continue to earn profit, and that way if something happens to one of the sites I will have a back up.

    The home business market is my true passion, because I always have wanted to help others make money, now I have found a way to do that.

    I will always keep up at least 5 niche sites at a time, and focus mainly on the home business market, because this is the market I want to earn most of my income from
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  • Profile picture of the author Emmanuel Betinis
    Roger & Charles...

    you both bring up some very interesting points...I'm DEFINITELY coming back to read them when my mind is clearer in the morning because this is a topic I'd like to discuss further (almost 4AM here) - I feel it's one that can really start you off in the right or wrong direction right off the bat in IM and has probably been responsible for many new IM'ers to fail because of one of the two choices they made regarding the OP.
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  • Profile picture of the author fullmatrix
    My passion is on the money, so I follow where the money go.

    I have more than 25 sites. I build, optimize it, market it, leave it to mature for 2-3 month, come back and see the result. If it has potential, I'll continue to market, if its not I sell it. Rinse and repeat.

    So I guess I'm on side one.
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  • Profile picture of the author yuyuan
    For me, I will usually try to dominate as much as I can in a niche before I move on to other niches. However, I do build some review sites and run PPC ads to test out the new niche at the same time... just in case there are money left untap in there
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  • Profile picture of the author MaskedMarketer
    Originally Posted by anapest View Post

    Some marketers say, "Build a ton of different niche sites and really diversify and just dip a little bit into a bit of everything."
    Building a ton of niche sites selling a cheap ebook may not be the best long term strategy. Depends on the exact strategy being used.

    Many factors involved.

    Direct Response Marketing is not new and if you follow the proven strategies of getting into a niche your passionate about (thats profitable) and creating a backend around it, it may be more profitable for you and for the long term.

    While you can make money with 25-50+ different niche sites, who knows if that is really long term? I prefer getting into niches and building backends than building a quick niche site and moving to the next one.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      I'm with Valerie. I like to spread the love around. I like having multiple income streams coming in.

      Passion is great but it's also important that there is a market for it. There are a lot of sites out there that are authority sites but they're also just hobby sites. So if you're trying to make a living at it you need to make sure there is a market for your passion first.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    Chicken Soup For The Soul...

    Chicken Soup For The Student's Soul, Chicken Soup For The Bachelor's Soul...

    If you find a market that buys and you have a product that sells then you re-purpose the product to target niches within the market.

    Matt
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  • Profile picture of the author Scott Million
    Originally Posted by anapest View Post

    Some marketers say, "Build a ton of different niche sites and really diversify and just dip a little bit into a bit of everything."


    ...but then some other internet marketers will tell you "Focus on one niche you're passionate about, and ONLY focus on dominating that."


    As you can see, these certainly are two different type of mindsets when it comes to internet marketing, and I've posted the video of this question below as well.


    Thoughts from both seasoned IM'ers and newbies alike are welcome to voice their feelings on this interesting topic.
    1. "Build a ton of different niche sites and really diversify and just dip a little bit into a bit of everything."

    2. Analyze, see what niches are making you the most money.

    3. Focus on building an authority site (or a few) on the niches that are making you the most money. If passion is an issue, choose the highest money maker that you're passionate about.

    4. Put 80% of your efforts into the 'winners' and 20% of your effort into more market feeler minisites...

    5. Outsource, automate (you can and should start this at step 1).

    6. Hit the beach plaaayer.
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    • Profile picture of the author Lucas Adamski
      Originally Posted by Scott Million View Post

      1. "Build a ton of different niche sites and really diversify and just dip a little bit into a bit of everything."

      2. Analyze, see what niches are making you the most money.

      3. Focus on building an authority site (or a few) on the niches that are making you the most money. If passion is an issue, choose the highest money maker that you're passionate about.

      4. Put 80% of your efforts into the 'winners' and 20% of your effort into more market feeler minisites...

      5. Outsource, automate (you can and should start this at step 1).

      6. Hit the beach plaaayer.
      I agree with you. There is no way you are goign to predict which niche will perform best for you. This kind of test will save you a lot of time and money because you won't focus on low profitable niche but the best you've found.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Sol
    Back in March 2008 I concentrated on a hot niche... it was a Clickbank product and it got me earning $10k a month in NO time, only free advertising, the fun continued for 4-5 months then it just died. The niche died, I think most of you know what product I am talking about...

    Well, I learned my lesson and will never try to DOMINATE one niche but rather have "Online Real Estate" in a few different niche.

    So, unless you succeed to dominate some IM niches or the Weight Loss niche - then I'd suggest to be at least in 4-5 different industries...

    Alex
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    • Profile picture of the author MaskedMarketer
      Originally Posted by Alex Sol View Post

      Back in March 2008 I concentrated on a hot niche... it was a Clickbank product and it got me earning $10k a month in NO time, only free advertising, the fun continued for 4-5 months then it just died. The niche died, I think most of you know what product I am talking about...
      I'm not familiar with the niche, what was it?

      If your hopping on "hot" trends, I see how it can die... I normally just look in the book store or amazon.com for niches. Some of those niches have been around for decades, if not longer... They aren't going anywhere anytime soon.
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  • Profile picture of the author perfecthomebuz
    For every product, there is a life cycle, just as it happens to man. If you specialize in one and that product fulfils it life cycle and die, you will have to start all over with a new product. Having say 4 or 5 is good and if one dies the remaining 3 or 4 will keep getting you money till you find a replacement for the dead one.

    I believe in diversification. it is simply the best.

    Cheers.

    Taiwo.
    http://pluginprofitsite.com/main-25325
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    • Profile picture of the author MaskedMarketer
      Originally Posted by perfecthomebuz View Post

      I believe in diversification. it is simply the best.
      Diversifiaction is great, but depends on how you're doing it. I can diversivy myself in many different broad, horizontal niches...

      Or I can focus on ONE horizontal niche and diversify myself in many sub, vertical, niches..

      If your doing broad niches like "make money" "personal development" and "dating" or whatever else its sometimes harder to spread yourself out and become a strong authority on each.

      Lets say you take one proven niche, that's not going to disappear overnight, like "Personal Development".

      You can easily diversify yourself within that one horizontal niche and create many vertical niches like "Law of attraction", "NLP", "Hypnosis programs", "Self Confidence/esteem", "being a leader" " being a coach" "discovering yourself".... All these little vertical niches combined can make you appear as an authority within your niche.

      You want to be the authority in your niche.

      And you don't need to create a website and test a niche always- because testing has already been done in the real world. Getting a book published in the real world means theres probably a market for it. And if there is a market offline- it can more than likely be transferred online.
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  • Profile picture of the author derekwong28
    I side with this

    "Focus on one niche you're passionate about, and ONLY focus on dominating that."

    But I practice that

    "Build a ton of different niche sites and really diversify and just dip a little bit into a bit of everything."
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  • Profile picture of the author Ken Preuss
    Great thread. I believe it comes down to a number of personal factors, including your own skill sets, interests and in what ways you are personally inclined to take the most action.

    For me I have found my largest monthly income happening when I'm going deep into one or maybe two niches, not wide into many different niches. The most successful marketers I know take a similar approach.

    I am not suggesting this is the only way to be successful. I can only speak to my own experience and that of others I know - there are many I don't know doing things differently.

    However a lot of factors play into why this approach can be extremely successful, namely:

    - Going deep lends itself to providing more value
    - Going deep lends itself to building a brand
    - Going deep lends itself to stronger positioning in the market
    - Going deep lends itself to broader product offerings
    - Going deep lends itself to maximizing your prices
    - Going deep lends itself to attracting JV and affiliate partners

    Most of all what I've found is this:

    Going deep is what your customer wants.

    They want to know you aren't just scratching the surface to solve their problem. They want to know you are fully invested in them and their success. When they can see this is the case they tend to spend a lot more money with you.

    I should qualify all of this by saying my frame of reference is inside hugely competitive "make money" niches - specifically real estate and IM. But what I'm talking about can be applied to any niche where there is a lot of proven buyer demand.

    That is my own experience. Take whatever makes sense for you and apply it. If it doesn't make sense for you, don't apply any of it.

    One of the keys to success is having a larger list of "don't do's" than "to do's".

    Ken
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    A Secret to Success: Making serious money online or offline is not complex unto itself - we're the ones who complicate it. Simply sell them what they are already buying.

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  • Profile picture of the author Nathan Hangen
    Well, short term you should do whatever makes you money, but long term I say do what you are passionate about.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Gentry
    Either mind set is find as long as you always thinking progressive.
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  • Profile picture of the author axeray
    I'm diversifying as much as I can. I have the skills and time to do it so it isn't spreading me to thin.

    If a couple of these niches hit the big time surely it is better than one. What if that one dries up, what do you do then? Start from scratch again...fantastic.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Buckley
    Concentrate your effort on developing ONE niche into a viable business and THEN start diversifying and replicating your success.
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    "Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something." -Plato

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  • Profile picture of the author PassiveCashGal
    There are different types of people. Some people are great at multi-tasking and there are people that aren't. So if you are great at multi-tasking then here are my thoughts: which is a copy with a twist of Kevin Riley's input:

    I believe in focusing all your energy on one or two niches, until you have built up a solid business. Later, you can diversify into another - but only if it doesn't take away from your making the most of those initial niches.

    If you are "dipping" into many niches, how can you effectively monetize any of them. Your energies are split. You aren't making the best use of your mailing list - as you'll have a number of unrelated lists.

    This is what my hubbie and I have done over the past 9 years. We've built up different businesses over the years but we focused on 1 or 2 at a time. At the 3-4 yr mark or so we dived into another arena of interest for us, hence my name PassiveCashGal! LOL
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  • Profile picture of the author Eziseo
    I was initially mentored in IM by Derek Gehl and Cory Rudl's Internet Marketing center. They, like most other experts and in fact practically everyone that I have gathered information from over the years, are of the same opinion. You do one niche and do it as well as you possibly can!! and then a second niche and do that one as well as you can...and so on.

    Diversity can exist in time, but the key is to be complete and thorough with each niche to maximize its potential.
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  • Profile picture of the author Emmanuel Betinis
    This thread has matured into one of value. I not only absolutely LOVE hearing from folks who have been around the IM block, I also truly APPRECIATE having the opportunity to access this information due to everyone's willingness to contribute their feelings about this topic (along with many others here at this forum)!
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    • Profile picture of the author davebo
      Banned
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      • Profile picture of the author Steve Steinitz
        Barbara Sher's Refuse to Choose discusses people's varying need for diversity. Some want to be a doctor at age 5, become a doctor and remain a doctor. Others, like DaVinci, pursue many things.

        Ms Sher offers techniques to identify one's own need for multiple pursuits and offers clever strategies to make the most of it. She intelligently and joyfully topples (finally) the overwhelming and destructive power of the old saying 'jack of all trades master of none'.

        A friend (tough guy) phoned me from Borders with the book in his hands and confessed his eyes welling up at the feeling of liberation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy1750
    If I had continued to focus on dominating my first Niche I would still be broke. Test several niches in parallel and then focus on the most successful project. Then start the process again.

    Andy
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    Not trying to sell you anything :-)

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  • Profile picture of the author Emmanuel Betinis
    Roger, yeah, I agree too...

    Everyone here is great, aren't they?! I love it...

    Now it'll be interesting to see what folks have to say @ http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...-question.html
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  • Profile picture of the author twannahiga
    I think its comes down to people, some are great at multi-tasking and others prefer to focus on one task at a time. If you have a talent for multi-tasking I think its best to dominate a niche fully before moving on to other niches. At this same time you will want to monitor other niches by building review sites and run PPC ads to test and see if its a viable money making source! Hope this assists...
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  • Profile picture of the author Consof
    Dominate that niche baby! If you love your product then people will love hearing you go on about what you love. Snappy!
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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin Koop
    Originally Posted by Emmanuel Betinis View Post

    Some marketers say, "Build a ton of different niche sites and really diversify and just dip a little bit into a bit of everything."

    ...but then some other internet marketers will tell you "Focus on one niche you're passionate about, and ONLY focus on dominating that."
    And some marketers say...

    *Adsense is dead
    *Affiliate marketing is the "perfect" business model
    *You MUST have your own products to make any real money
    *And on and on and on.

    This is why so many "newbies" go eight steps back for every nine they go forward... so much conflicting information.

    The truth is, much of the info is neither right nor wrong. It's just that we're each unique and have different interests and skillsets.

    The best advice I can give comes from author Stephen Covey...

    "Begin with the end in mind."

    and

    "The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing."

    Figure out which business model suits your personality type and your skillset and then persevere until you get the results you're after!
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  • Profile picture of the author Anna Johnson
    To me, it's not a question of 'which niche?' or 'should I focus on one niche or diversify into lots of different niches?'... it's a question of doing those activities that generate the most value.

    So, rather than approach our business from the perspective of 'should we focus on one niche?' or 'should we diversify into lots of niches?' we approach it from the perspective of what can we do that will generate the most value for us, based on our interests, strengths, skills, resources, opportunities, etc.

    The result is that we have several niche info product sites, a growing portfolio of parked domains, another host of affiliate websites, a site highly focused on domaining (not finished yet) and a site highly focused on Internet marketing news, etc... and no self-imposed limit as to what we might do next...

    Granted, we now have a team of programmers, researchers, writers working for us, so we have the resources to do more than if it was just me. But that just goes back to the question of making choices based on resources as well as interests, skills, strengths, opportunities, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author james_deo
    "Many Streams Make A River"

    one of my favourite quotes and how I like to run my online business
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    • Profile picture of the author Mike Shain
      This is a good thread!

      I am simplifying greatly here but take McDonalds... they do one thing well - sell average (sometimes below average) hamburgers profitably through systems. Anyone can cook a better burger (I know my kids could) but doing it on a mass scale profitably with low paid employees is a whole nuther story.

      Something people do not realize is McDonalds is one of the largest private owners of realestate in the world. Now who is diversifying? They could lose dozens of stores and it would not only not make a blip on the big picture but they have the realestate as their safety net to cover loses.

      I think when you are new you naturally are going to try many things just because that is what new people do. You do a number of things until you find something that works (or most newbies just keep trying everything they read about). It might be something you love - it might be something you have zero interest in - but its the sales that are the bottom line.

      I believe you should start with what you know and love - but if there is no interest/profit in it you better be ready to ditch that sucker in favor of something that can make you money each month no matter how big or small.

      Then you can move on until you have many members in your army (your sites) bringing you cash each month like clock work.

      People like John Reese (whom I respect) are naturally going to say stick with one thing because that is what is making him and the other gurus their huge paychecks - selling to us over and over again...

      Just my 2 cents.
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        I don't know how I missed this thread the first time around, but I'm glad it got pulled back up.

        There is some really first rate thinking and commentary in this. I believe there's something being hinted at, but not directly addressed, that's also important.

        Depth in a niche is only relevant if you're working a content model.

        Roger's example of Amazon sites involves a business model, but not a content model. The focus there is on the process rather than the topic. The same is true of CPA businesses, many services (ie, web hosting and autoresponders), traffic arbitrage and the like.

        The value in any of these lies in having an effective process. If you don't have a system that converts interest to action, you're going to fail in any niche. If you learn how to motivate action, you can succeed in any viable niche.


        Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Emmanuel Betinis
    It's very interesting to see this thread go
    untouched for nearly 5 months only to see it
    spark back up again with more great input!

    And by the way, for anyone wondering who "Anapest" is/was...
    That was my original profile name here
    before I changed it to my real name.

    (Anapest was a band I was in for 9 years).
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    • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
      For most people starting out you need to focus on doing ONE thing until it makes you a profit THEN think about diversifying into others.

      That tight focus is important.

      It's very difficult to become successful online with your attention spraying across different niches and different skills.

      Start small then think about diversifying once you're actually making some money.

      Kindest regards,
      Andrew Cavanagh
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      • Profile picture of the author bgmacaw
        Originally Posted by AndrewCavanagh View Post

        For most people starting out you need to focus on doing ONE thing until it makes you a profit THEN think about diversifying into others.
        That 'ONE thing' can be building a large network of niche sites.

        The mistake I see a lot of people make in niche marketing sites is sitting still, 'tweaking' a site for 'perfect' SEO, carefully adding content, checking stats every hour in detail and so forth, essentially sitting there babying a site for months, hoping it will be their big winner. Then they wonder why they don't make any money.
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    • Profile picture of the author EmmaJames
      This is a good thread that really makes you
      think about how you want to tackle your business.

      Personally, I'm doing both because I believe everybody
      has the right mentality on this.

      The key is finding the one best way that works for me
      and that I can easily maintain.

      I refuse to put all my eggs in one basket. I watch what
      others are doing and then learn from the best.

      I won't know if a method will work for me if I don't try it.
      And I never bite off more than I can chew.
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    • Profile picture of the author gianne2705
      It depends on the type of niche you're working on.You can use both technique as long as it will make your niche or site more effective and successful.
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    • Profile picture of the author JaneBY
      You should go there, where you feel your succcess=)))
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      • I'm a newbie, so what do I know, right?

        But personally, I have found that for me to be successful at anything in life, I have to focus on one thing at a time, instead of going all over the place.

        As a newbie, I am not yet aiming to DOMINATE one niche market, but I will concentrate on one niche or one product and get as much as I can out of it. Then, if I feel the need, I will move to other niches once I have gained experience with one niche.

        I think our society is built on SPECIALIZATION. Sure, I have a lot of interests, and I would like to be a Renaissance man, but think about it, the greatest in any field have been those who have focused all their attention on one thing.

        In the realm of athletics, for instance, you can be a great decathlete, but you will never break the 100m world record. On the other hand, Usain Bolt might not be a well-rounded athlete, but now he is known all over the world as the fastest man on earth.

        The same goes for success in academics. To get a PhD, you have to focus on one specialized topic and become an expert at it. Your general knowledge will suffer, but you will be able to know one topic in so much depth that nobody else in the world will match you.
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        • Another thing that I have struggled with lately and that has popped in this thread is the following dilemma:

          Should I follow my passion or go where the money is?

          The ideal would be for passion and money to go together, but I am unfortunate to be passionate about things that are not lucrative at all!

          So now I have decided to go where the money is, and wait for the passion to spring up at some point.
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        • Profile picture of the author bgmacaw
          Originally Posted by Planetpeoplefinder View Post

          I think our society is built on SPECIALIZATION.
          I guess I've read too much classic science fiction...

          "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."

          - Lazarus Long (Robert A. Heinlein)

          "Above all else, the mentat must be a generalist, not a specialist. It is wise to have decisions of great moment monitored by generalists. Experts and specialists lead you quickly into chaos. They are a source of useless nit-picking, the ferocious quibble over a comma. The mentat-generalist, on the other hand, should bring to decision-making a healthy common sense. He must not cut himself off from the broad sweep of what is happening in his universe. He must remain capable of saying: "There's no real mystery about this at the moment. This is what we want now. It may prove wrong later, but we'll correct that when we come to it." The mentat-generalist must understand that anything which we can identify as our universe is merely a part of larger phenomena. But the expert looks backward; he looks into the narrow standards of his own specialty. The generalist looks outward; he looks for living principles, knowing full well that such principles change, that they develop. It is to the characteristics of change itself that the mentat-generalist must look. There can be no permanent catalogue of such change, no handbook or manual. You must look at it with as few preconceptions as possible, asking yourself: "Now what is this thing doing?"

          - The Mentat Handbook - Children of Dune - Frank Herbert
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          • Profile picture of the author ExRat
            Hi Jason,

            I can do one-handed push-ups, but I use all 5 fingers - lol
            I must admit I haven't mastered the one handed push-up yet. But I've done a variety of variations with small gym balls, and also a two handed one using three fingers (2 & thumb) on each hand - so like you, I noticed the push-up on the video and felt slightly deflated too, but full of admiration and awe.
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            • Profile picture of the author jasondinner
              Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

              Hi Jason,

              I must admit I haven't mastered the one handed push-up yet. But I've done a variety of variations with small gym balls, and also a two handed one using three fingers (2 & thumb) on each hand - so like you, I noticed the push-up on the video and felt slightly deflated too, but full of admiration and awe.
              LOL

              Think it about it though.

              Our ability to do any advanced type of push up would make the average Joe feel deflated.

              We're comparing ourselves to Bruce Lee. Not many people can do 2% of the stuff he did
              with ease.

              But now I want to try
              Signature

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              • Profile picture of the author ExRat
                Hi Jason,

                Our ability to do any advanced type of push up would make the average Joe feel deflated
                True. One of the trainers I talked to at my old gym reckoned you could do away with all the gear and get fitter than anyone just using body weight for - push-ups, and also that multi-purpose frame thing where you can do wide-armed pull-ups, close-armed reverse-grip chin-ups and dips.

                And he reckoned the other version of that frame that has weight assistance for those moves is a joke. He reckoned it was better to do half a rep without assistance, then one rep the next day, two the next etc and build up.

                I haven't mastered them yet, but I'm inclined to agree with him.

                Sorry to go miles off topic - normal service may be resumed.
                Signature


                Roger Davis

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  • Profile picture of the author Tizzy Dupont
    Confucius say "Take middle road."

    Someone just starting out needs to focus on finding what works for them, and so should focus on a good niche that is bringing in some money.

    But eventually, he or she will need to branch out to keep learning and earning. Just keep in mind that if you spread yourself too thin, then you aren't really being honest with your customers.

    All the best,

    Tizzy
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    I don't like to put all of my eggs in one basket. I can get a lot more organic traffic from a good keyword domain than I can from a more general promotion. I have a lot of niches.
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  • Profile picture of the author riveradjr
    good to see this thread. it's providing me informative insights to plan my online quest.

    I did a lot of multi-tasking in my job (still working though but have the plans to quits in few months) but i guess i can't apply them in online world. it's so different that i lose focus on a lot of occasions trying to start an online business that offers free time and independence.

    I like the idea to start to focus on one thing and make it to profit before jumping to another related niche and build an empire. for me as a starter in the online world, i think this is a good business model. I am doing it all by myself at the moment but planning to outsource most of the works later on.
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  • Profile picture of the author JeffLam
    This post is indeed valuable!

    From a newbie IMer perspective: I believe in the power of focusing.

    From the replies, there is indeed mixed reviews. But the concept of focus is still there..

    Many hot niches have come and go. Money made and then stopped. What to do?

    Back to the old adage of knowledge is power. The fact that you have the skills to be able to dominate a niche when it is still hot will remain with you. Focus on that ability, and use it to dominate other niches when one dies!

    On the topic of focus, to do the above it depends on each person's ability to cope, especially if you work alone. If you can cope with several sites for several niches, then why not? The key here is to focus on your ability to dominate the niches, not diversify your attention to various other methods or anything else that will reduce your effiiency.

    Hope I made some sense!

    Jeff
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  • Profile picture of the author Tyrus Antas
    If you can create multiple successful businesses then by all means do it. The question is, can you REALLY turn those 50 sites in successful businesses or they'll just be crappy sites?

    Most people will just create crappy sites.

    Tyrus
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  • Profile picture of the author Amy Bass
    I lean more towards diversification. I think of my niche blogs as an investment portfolio. I would not put all my money into one stock, nor would I put all my time and effort into one blog.

    Diversification into different markets is good especially during a rocky economy because some do well and some don't.

    If I had only stuck with the ones that are not performing as well my income would be lower.

    I do however, look at my blogs that perform the best and pay extra special attention to those ones.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dally137
    How about, I give another option that says, you chose one niche at the first time. So that you can do better and learn faster. And when you got better you can concentrate more on the matter and be more competent to handle the principle of diversity. In here you share between your risks and don't loose everything on one bad deal.

    I hope you know what I mean???
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  • Profile picture of the author drewjones
    Banned
    Anyone can be an expert at anything, granted they study the niche they are marketing.

    The bottom line is what makes money consistently.

    So If I have only 1 niche that only making so much, maybe another niche can bring in the same or more.

    Then you've got 2 niches working for you instead of 1.

    I liked the guy with 200 niches post, whatever it takes to make money.

    Think, Plan, Build, Achieve...

    Think - Keyword research for long term SEO.

    Plan - Figuring out the business model, how you want the site to look.

    Build - Creating the storefront, Writing unique content in whatever means possible, testing to get the results you want. Moving on to the next niche.

    Achieve - collecting the checks. Wash & Rinse. Moving on to the next.

    Only then can you move on to the next niche to market.

    One step at a time.

    I know plenty of people where that is all they do all day. Outsourcing their weak skills so they can focus on what they do best by building 10 or so niches per day.

    When you get to this point, you will see how quickly the money starts coming in.

    Creating multiple streams of income.

    Not reading about it, doing it.
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  • Profile picture of the author RentItNow
    For me the best method is to focus on one passionate niche and if its not working adjust what you are doing till you hit it out of the park. You will spend the same time refining your niche as finding other niches you are less passionate about.

    However, I am very guilty myself of jumping around and have to discipline myself constantly to not look at the other things out there. It usually involves having to pay the bills at the end of the month as opposed to pursuing your passion.
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    I have no agenda but to help those in the same situation. This I feel will pay the bills.
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    • Profile picture of the author bgmacaw
      Originally Posted by RentItNow View Post

      For me the best method is to focus on one passionate niche and if its not working adjust what you are doing till you hit it out of the park. You will spend the same time refining your niche as finding other niches you are less passionate about.
      It's fine to be passionate about a niche if that's what you like. I'm passionate about guitars. A guitar site was one of my first sites and that site makes decent money every month, usually between $300-500, more before the holidays. But, if I had just stuck with it alone that's about all I would have made on it no matter how passionate I was about guitars.

      I decided instead to find niches that other people were passionate about or had a desperate need and figured out what they wanted to buy. That became my new passion.
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  • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
    People say it is bad to have "many projects and plans", and then work on all them and in reality not finish ANY of them.

    This is certainly true. But it is not easy to make a plan or have an idea what is going well *without* a big array of trial and error projects.

    I have to admit that actually a major part of my income is from a "sum" of many different things, different sites, different techniques. Often its impossible to say beforehand what works, and often results can be surprising. Things you think they're not worth putting work into it all of a sudden surprise you being the big money makers - and other things you planned out well and thought might be killer turn out duds

    Same with niches. At the beginning there is always a "try and observe" period...and then time will tell whether something works or not, and THEN you can focus on the one which works. Diversity is always good tho, never depend on ONE thing as being your money maker.
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  • Profile picture of the author tommygadget
    You know, I looked at Paul's remarks and went back to the OP. The original post asked about niches and the approach of one giant all out effort on a single site VS. many small sites.

    Paul's comments are quite valid and relevant here. You should have a process in place to implement your niche site's development and promotion. Without it, you will be lost. Let's say that you have a process in place (if not, read all the threads about site promotion, bum marketing, etc.). Now you have chosen to build a niche site. My advice at this juncture would be to create your dream blog but spend some time creating very small niche blogs with 3-5 articles each to test different niches.

    Monitor the progress of all your sites. One day, you might find that all the seeds you planted will become giant trees. You might also find that your dream blog was not the thing you thought it would be.

    TomG.
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  • Profile picture of the author brixxyx
    yeah i'm a fan of specified effort. The 80/20 rule gave me a better understanding of why it works so much as opposed to diversifying. You get better quicker, and your results seem to prove it.
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  • Profile picture of the author kimothy777
    Both are great ways to start off. But you should probably begin with something that you are pssionate about. That will give you momentum forward. You are less likely to give up prematurely if you have a passion for it.
    You want the easy successes first, to give you encouragement to move forward.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mukul Verma
    What a great thread to read, wow!!!

    There are benefits to both, I choose pick 1 niche, 100% focused on it for about a years and super build it to the point where it will hold you up (You dont need that long, but it was worth the solid returns month after month). Then look at getting into another niche.

    If you choose one niche to start and focus all your energy on it, you will find new ways to break the barrier in getting more traffic and business (Example no one in my niche was doing eBooks, automation, BBB, video instructions), maybe that is because I hangout here , the point is that focus 100% will let you grow bigger to expand. Learn from others outside your niche more then inside to expand.

    Next, once you have that niche 100% running with minimal involvement by you, move into the next niche as long as its not impacting your original niche (what I did was get a marketing company so it would keep marketing going).
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  • Profile picture of the author wbakhos
    I guess I'm a little bit of both.

    I take a niche... set myself a daily target.. once I hit it on an automated level I outsource the basic duties and find something else and keep the original running.

    I don't try to run them by myself because I'll lose control. My aim is to have a structured system I can use as leverage and then get someone else do to it.. while I move on to build something new.
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    • Profile picture of the author jasondinner
      Richard Odell, that Bruce Lee video was awesome.

      I can do one-handed push-ups, but I use all 5 fingers - lol

      That dude was no joke. Another legend taken from us way too early.

      Anyway, back to the thread.

      For me personally I was just throwing stuff up against the wall until something would stick.

      But now, the many sites I plan on putting out there will all end up sending people to my
      coaching program.

      I have a friend that makes a great living online mostly from 2 sites.

      He literally makes 80% of his income from 2 butterfly sites and then the other
      20% comes from affiliate promotions.

      So I guess it's just a matter of preference.

      I always try to teach anyone who cares to learn from me to focus on one thing
      at a time until you get good at it or to a point where you can automate it.

      Then move on to the next thing.

      Another model I like is Ryan Deiss's Publisher Model which I will be following
      in a new niche I know very little about, but have a friend who knows a ton
      about it.

      I liked what ExRat said in the beginning of the thread when he said something
      about 100 un-finished projects gather no moss.

      I couldn't agree with him more.

      If you have a ton of great projects you started working on, focus on finishing
      one of them so you start seeing money before you finish the next one.

      Hope this helps
      Jason
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  • Profile picture of the author Slyknight
    Originally Posted by Emmanuel Betinis View Post


    ...but then some other internet marketers will tell you "Focus on one niche you're passionate about, and ONLY focus on dominating that."
    This sounds like a smarter method. Imagine a beginner trying to manage multiple niche at once. He'll just end up confusing himself.

    But..If you have sites on a niche that's on autopilot - meaning you get traffic (then sales) without doing much then it would be a good idea to let it make you easy money and move to another niche.
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  • Profile picture of the author scorpions84
    Maybe I can say focus in "FEW" niches.

    Is that the middle road?
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  • Profile picture of the author GetStreetSmart
    I really think it depends on the niche - a nicher by definition is small and might not normally need sub sites, but a nicher like dogs that has multiple breeds certainly has room for sub niches of many kinds

    Hope this helps

    Dave
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  • Profile picture of the author Nigel Greaves
    If you had asked me a year ago I would have said to go for multiple niches and avoid having all your eggs in one basket. But today I have to admit I have found far greater success by focusing all my resources in one direction.

    Nigel
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  • Fantastic thread.

    As was already mentioned here, we're big fans of our customers and clients starting out with one niche that they're passionate about, and doing their very best to make it a success. If you're just starting out, trying to achieve success in too many directions often results in an inability to make a real go of any particular thing you're doing.

    The key is to test everything and track everything -- that's the only way to know what works and what doesn't. After all, it doesn't matter if you succeed (or fail!) if you don't know WHY you succeeded... because then you can't duplicate that success.

    Learn from your failures and your successes with each niche, and apply those lessons to everything else you do.

    One more thing: overnight success with a niche happens sometimes, but slow burns generally pan out into more profits.
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