Does the product even matter?

14 replies
I've had people ask me this question and there's some validity to it. Obviously, product quality matters, but when you look at a successful launch, quality of the product seems like the last thing you have to worry about.

If the pitch is amazing, the graphics eye catching, and the promises irresistible... The product's quality is just assumed to be awesome.

You can sell a lousy product with a great pitch but you cannot sell a great product with a lousy pitch.

So how much time do you spend on quality products vs marketing those products? That's what the question is implying.

My advice? Build a relationship with your audience and you'll sell anything well.
#matter #product
  • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
    Originally Posted by Chris The Traffic Blogger View Post

    Build a relationship with your audience and you'll sell anything well.
    If you sell low quality products then the relationship
    with your customers will be harmed and you'll make
    fewer repeat sales over the long-term.

    Some sellers choose to take shortcuts and use good
    copy to sell inferior products, but that's a DUMB move
    IMO.

    Personally, I focus on creating quality products and
    use good marketing to maximize the lifetime customer
    value.

    Why have just one, when you can CHOOSE to have both?

    And just because you can sell a lousy product with great
    copy does NOT mean that you should.

    Why not provide customers with quality products that
    serve them well so they come back for more?

    Dedicated to mutual success,

    Shaun
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  • Profile picture of the author Coby
    Originally Posted by Chris The Traffic Blogger View Post

    Does the product even matter?
    Only if you plan to sell to that person again...
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  • Profile picture of the author Christophe Young
    Yes, having quality products matters to those of us who want to have repeat customers and a successful business.

    It doesn't matter to those who want to sell polished turds, cash in and run.
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  • Profile picture of the author blillard
    What is a quality product these days? Something with nice graphics fancy wording and all the bells and whistles? I for one can care less on how the product is delivered as long as it delivers on what it is that I am paying for. I have seen tons of great courses and reports that looked like 10 year old created them and they were worth every penny to me. I also paid for products done by top level guru's and felt only pissed after purchase.

    I'm working on my first product and it is taking me forever because I'm am so anal about the quality and only want to deliver the best. Some don't care for their reputation or the things they slap their name on just for the buck. Like said above you may only get that one off sale if they don't refund but you can forget about any affiliate earnings you would of gotten if you just took the time to offer nothing but value from the gate.
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  • Profile picture of the author Danielle Lynn
    Originally Posted by Chris The Traffic Blogger View Post

    I've had people ask me this question and there's some validity to it. Obviously, product quality matters, but when you look at a successful launch, quality of the product seems like the last thing you have to worry about.

    If the pitch is amazing, the graphics eye catching, and the promises irresistible... The product's quality is just assumed to be awesome.

    You can sell a lousy product with a great pitch but you cannot sell a great product with a lousy pitch.

    So how much time do you spend on quality products vs marketing those products? That's what the question is implying.

    My advice? Build a relationship with your audience and you'll sell anything well.
    Chris, even the best copy in the world can't hit a homerun with a garbage product.

    Great sales pitches come from bringing out -and positioning- the natural benefits already found in a product. If your product offers nothing of value, then it won't sell well. (Unless you decide to outright lie.)

    Then at that point, you can kiss all your future product launches 'goodbye!'
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  • Profile picture of the author mosthost
    Quality matters because chargebacks matter.
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    • Profile picture of the author Adam Richards
      Originally Posted by mosthost View Post

      Quality matters because chargebacks matter.
      Not to be nit-picky, but even if your product is 100% garbage, you can count on at least a small percentage to not ask for a refund either because:

      1) they don't know how
      or
      2) are too lazy

      That being said, if you just want to make a quick buck, then no, not really. Product quality doesn't matter. Of course, like mosthost said, you will get refunds, the you probably won't be making much, which means that the time and effort that you put into your copy would be all for naught. After adjusting for all the refunds, you probably would just be better off making a legit product.

      Unless, of course, you choose not to actually refund your product, which is not only illegally, but morally deplorable.

      But if you are in it for the long haul, and if you want to make the most out of IM in general, then it would be wise to make something that someone won't regret buying.
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  • Profile picture of the author Azarna
    Sadly, for many the product is clearly not important.

    I used to be a member of a site which supplied PLR and other 'resellables' for a monthly cost. They were mainly eBooks and reports. Most came with a sales-letter.

    I was beyond shocked to be honest. Most the eBooks were very short, padded with junk, full of typos and other errors, factually wrong, not properly formatted and basically cr*p.

    Some of the sales-letters for them were such total rubbish. In particular I was shocked at the ones claiming the letter writer had written the product themselves, and going on about how they had worked on it, and their friends had helped, and how wonderful it now was. The product? A hundred year old book from the public domain.

    Or the ones that claim the eBook contains 'everything you could want to know about health' or whatever. Yeah, right, a 15 page typo-ridden double-spaced pdf is going to contain everything. And well worth $47. Not.

    And yes, I googled, there were countless people selling these things - with those very sales letters.

    Sadly I am very very cynical. I have seen so many products that are so singularly substandard for anything, even as freebies due to their inaccuracies. I know there must be good stuff out there too, but for loads of people product quality is clearly not important.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zeus66
    In this niche, it's not the popular thing to say but it's the truth.... here goes:

    Too many buyers expect to buy that magic money maker that requires no real work or any sort of risk. And they want the money right freaking NOW! Not in a few months.

    As long as that's the case, there will be buyers whining about "crappy" products when a lot of them are actually very good, down-to-earth, workable ideas.

    I'm not saying there aren't a lot of truly shi&&y products being sold. But that evaluation is too often made by lazy buyers (or at least buyers with ridiculous expectations).

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author Scott Skinner
    I agree "almost" with the statement, "My advice? Build a relationship with your audience and you'll sell anything well"

    Because if what you sold them is junk, the reputation you get will sour that relationship and it will turn negative, ruining your chances of future success. People never forget that.

    Quality ALWAYS pays big dividends in the long run. Build slow, build solid, solve problems, help people, under promise, over deliver. Then over time, success will beat a pathway to your door.
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  • Profile picture of the author WebPen
    Originally Posted by Chris The Traffic Blogger View Post

    You can sell a lousy product with a great pitch but you cannot sell a great product with a lousy pitch.
    That's definitely true, but look at all of theClickbank products with really high refund rates.

    That goes to show that the product can't be complete garbage, otherwise you're gonna get tons of refund requests.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marcus Demanse
    If you want repeat business/customers and to develop a following, you might want to spend a little more time in creating "quality" in your product. Otherwise, word spreads. And so does refunds.
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