I just saw 3 WSO's with major misspellings ... Why?

88 replies
This is a word to anyone who is planning on doing a WSO or has one currently ... Fix your spelling errors!

You are losing sales with improper spelling, that I can guarantee.

Plus, it just looks bad. Why would I or anyone purchase something from you where you can't even spell your sales page right? Come on ...

... you won't see me start many threads, but this one I just had to get off my chest. Spelling is kind of one of my pet peeves I guess.
#major #misspellings #wso
  • Profile picture of the author businessmentor
    True.
    (At the same time, many marketers misspell. If you are established, you can get away with it, most of the time.)
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    • Profile picture of the author Todd Lamb
      Originally Posted by businessmentor View Post

      True.
      (At the same time, many marketers misspell. If you are established, you can get away with it, most of the time.)
      Here's the thing with that....(I agree spelling is critical) but sometimes you can read your work over and over and just plain miss it.
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      • Profile picture of the author businessmentor
        That happens a lot, especially when you don't give it to someone else for proof reading.
        Unless it is a sales page for copy writing or article writing, I don't mind a couple of you're/your typos.

        Originally Posted by Todd Lamb View Post

        Here's the thing with that....(I agree spelling is critical) but sometimes you can read your work over and over and just plain miss it.
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        • Profile picture of the author Capone
          If the offer is good then it doesn't matter. I want great content, not perfect grammar...although you should try spell check
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          • Profile picture of the author ShayB
            Originally Posted by Capone View Post

            If the offer is good then it doesn't matter. I want great content, not perfect grammar...although you should try spell check
            Dew knot trussed speel cheque two ketch awl yore miss takes. :rolleyes:
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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            Speling misteaks can get more atention and bumps cuz peoples points theses out.
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      • Profile picture of the author Christie Love
        Originally Posted by Todd Lamb View Post

        Here's the thing with that....(I agree spelling is critical) but sometimes you can read your work over and over and just plain miss it.
        Yep, this has happened to me on a few occasions, even after reading something over and over again.

        We are all humans and we make mistakes. Tell me one person you know that's never made boo boo before.

        Sometimes, a helpful Warrior will inform me that I misspelled a word and visa versa. We are all apart of a team and not here to bash people for making a little mishap.
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        • Profile picture of the author my_addict_mind
          what's with the spelling. i've seen a lot of crap with perfect english. i've seen wsos produced by asians which made a lot of sense to me but are in 'broken' english.

          as you see as long as the main message or technique is communicated, it is fine.

          a wso is judge based on its profitability and potential for earnings and not on its grammar or misspellings. think like the japanese, germans & french - but they produce wonderful and profitable technologies.
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        • Profile picture of the author John Taylor
          Originally Posted by Christie Love View Post

          Tell me one person you know that's never made boo boo before.
          Check out Jellystone Park.

          John
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          • Profile picture of the author Mike McBride
            Originally Posted by John Taylor View Post

            Check out Jellystone Park.

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        • Profile picture of the author Raydal
          Originally Posted by Christie Love View Post

          Yep, this has happened to me on a few occasions, even after reading something over and over again.

          We are all humans and we make mistakes. Tell me one person you know that's never made boo boo before.

          Sometimes, a helpful Warrior will inform me that I misspelled a word and visa versa. We are all apart of a team and not here to bash people for making a little mishap.
          ==> vice-versa, part

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      • Profile picture of the author Lewis Turner
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        • Profile picture of the author askloz
          Even that isn't correct... and the spell checker has been in firefox since FF1. FF2 was better, but FF3 library is awful.

          Originally Posted by zxlewi View Post

          That's why firefox now has a built in spell checker but then sometimes with complicated words and product names it does not show the correct result. Not like word which helps with grammar and everything.
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    • Profile picture of the author askloz
      yeah, we in the UK spell things correctly.

      I mean, what's the deal with "color" - "colour", "neighbor" - "Neighbour", "realize" - "realise", "optimization" - "Optimisation", etc...lol

      Originally Posted by Bev Clement View Post

      and some spelling mistakes aren't really because we spell words differently in the UK to the US
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  • Originally Posted by Kyle L Hannah View Post

    You are losing sales with improper spelling, that I can guarantee.
    they could also be gaining sales by picking up the google typo traffic for the words they are misspelling

    I would never let a typo prevent me from buying a product, unless the product claimed to prevent typos.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tom B
      Banned
      Ohh Paul.... We have another spell cop on the forum.

      What do I hear, is it, is it Mrs Wombat?


      I think you are concentrating on the wrong things. You can sit there and make sure your grammar and spelling is perfect while I am out there selling more products before you even get your sales page up.
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        What do I hear, is it, is it Mrs Wombat?
        I hear it. Off in the distance...

        Dum diddy dum diddy dum diddy dum diddy dah dah...
        Dum diddy dum diddy dum diddy dum diddy dah dah dah...
        Well, I walked into the room, passin' out hundred dollar bills,
        And it kills, and it thrills, like the horns on my Silverado grill..
        An' I buy the bar a double round of Crown,
        And everybody's gettin' down, an' this town,
        Ain't never gonna be the same!

        Ooops. Wrong sound track...

        Cue the wombateers...

        Read and be enlightened!


        Paul
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      • Profile picture of the author HeySal
        Originally Posted by Thomas Belknap View Post

        Ohh Paul.... We have another spell cop on the forum.

        What do I hear, is it, is it Mrs Wombat?


        I think you are concentrating on the wrong things. You can sit there and make sure your grammar and spelling is perfect while I am out there selling more products before you even get your sales page up.
        Uh...okay. Um...Well, we can still look at that gorgeous avatar pic of yours, I guess.


        Kevin is right (OMG, did I say that outloud?).

        This is from the point of view of psycholinguistics:

        In the forum, people who carp at us about misspellings in posts can be a pain in the pitooty. This is supposed to be a gathering where we converse. Even if the conversation is extremely important information, we are amongst friends and peers and just talking. It is obsessive to expect people to spellcheck a conversation. Nit picky - diversionary - and just plain annoying.

        But - when you put up a salespage, those incidental little misspellings and other mistakes can cost you. When you have a sales page, you want people's eyes to follow along your literature smoothly. If you make a mistake it will stop their eye. What then happens is like a car - you are tooling along in overdrive and suddenly you are thrown out of gear into neutral -- translation: you lose a dab of credibility even if only on the reader's subconscious level. They are in neutral now and have a choice to shift back into gear or into reverse. So they finally decide to shift back into gear - suddenly they meet up with another mistake and they are thrown into neutral again where they make their decisions to turn around. Okay - your sales page is now on shaky ground, the road is getting a bit rough to travel. Wow - here comes the third eye stopping mistake and, boom, back in neutral - and one too many times. The customer is now subconsciously doubting everything on the page - and deciding the road is a bit rough for the vehicle so they shift into reverse - translation: they click off.

        Your job on a salespage is to keep people positively reacting to what you are saying. THey will continue to nod "yes" until you give them a reason not to - a decision they make when you throw them from positive into neutral. Never, never, NEVER let your reader's mind go into neutral -- check your spelling, it will stop the eye.
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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          Sal,

          That sounds good, in theory. If the number of mistakes is large, it also happens to be true.

          However, mistakes can actually be helpful. You'd be surprised at the number of people who've told me over the years about letters that performed less well when mistakes were corrected than when they were present.

          Know what affects things much more than a few typos, and is far more frequent? Misuse of commas.

          Yeah. Really.


          Paul
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          • Profile picture of the author HeySal
            Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

            Sal,

            That sounds good, in theory. If the number of mistakes is large, it also happens to be true.

            However, mistakes can actually be helpful. You'd be surprised at the number of people who've told me over the years about letters that performed less well when mistakes were corrected than when they were present.

            Know what affects things much more than a few typos, and is far more frequent? Misuse of commas.

            Yeah. Really.


            Paul

            Talking about ALL mistakes, Paul - misspellings, punctuation, etc. And what I am giving is basic rules - can't teach a whole subject in a paragraph. Once you know the rules you can learn some pretty crafty ways to violate them, for benefit.

            IF a misspelling actually helped - it either worked because of an accidental placement emphasis created. It can also have the affect that someone would contact the writer just to warn them and it results in a feeling of personal relationship with the producer. Could actually be that some people didn't even KNOW the difference. Roll the dice.

            Comma errors work on a whole other level - extremely intricate and multi level - such as faulty equivocations and categorization, or just as loose of a matter of creating faulty flow at bad times.

            All in all though - if you don't know ALL of the rules, you're taking chances when you break them.
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        • Profile picture of the author Tom B
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          Originally Posted by HeySal View Post

          Uh...okay. Um...Well, we can still look at that gorgeous avatar pic of yours, I guess.
          I always knew I liked you the most Sal. The check is in the mail for that (lie) comment. hehe


          I don't write as well as Paul and a lot of other people on here. But I do get my point across most times. I have always been taught to write like I am talking to a child. It works. I can't tell you how many times I tried to write the perfect sales page or letter only to confuse the heck out of someone who later walks away without purchasing anything. The minute I write more direct and focus on getting my point across, the more sales I make.


          Personally, I feel that a lot of people that put so much emphasis on these types of things are just keeping themselves from actually putting up a sales page. Maybe they are scared their sales page won't work. So instead of getting it up there and start testing they would rather sweat the smaller stuff.


          I haven't seen many sales pages that were incredibly bad to the point where I couldn't read them. I think most of the "Wombats" PTM (Paul Trade Mark) are complaining about a few problems which do not take away from the overall message that is being communicated.


          People sweat the small things way too much. I know I have to keep myself in check when it comes to this as well.


          My original point is to get something out there because you won't be making any sales if you are too worried about being perfect. It lets people know you are human which isn't a bad thing.
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          • Profile picture of the author Tom B
            Banned
            I hope posts like this don't scare the new people. There is a lot to worry about and you should just do your best. You will always get people that complain about one thing or another. Don't worry about them and just keep following your plan. You can always go back and tweak things. Just get something up and start your testing.

            If people don't purchase from you simply because of a few misspellings, that is the best thing that can happen to you. You don't want those types of customers.


            Just my opinion,
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Anderson
    Mozilla firefox has a built in spell checker which usually saves me... but not always ;-)
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  • Profile picture of the author jonhel
    I saw a WSO sometime ago which was from a content writer which had a big typo in the heading.

    My first reaction was to not take this person seriously.
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  • Profile picture of the author Shonee
    I agree, wrong spellings can really put off the readers. So you must spell check before you post your WSO. IN case you're unsure about how a particular word,consult a dictionary or ask your friends/family who might be able to able.
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Ayres
    Originally Posted by Kyle L Hannah View Post

    This is a word to anyone who is planning on doing a WSO or has one currently ... Fix your spelling errors!

    You are losing sales with improper spelling, that I can guarantee.

    Plus, it just looks bad. Why would I or anyone purchase something from you where you can't even spell your sales page right? Come on ...

    ... you won't see me start many threads, but this one I just had to get off my chest. Spelling is kind of one of my pet peeves I guess.
    What a load of rubbish, because someone makes spelling mistakes doesn't mean their product is rubbish.
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    • Profile picture of the author Eric Lorence
      Originally Posted by SpudDS View Post

      What a load of rubbish, because someone makes spelling mistakes doesn't mean their product is rubbish.
      As long as it's not for a ghostwriter..
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    • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
      Below are just a few of the things I would like to address. I cannot address all the posts that I would like or it would take up another 2 pages.

      Originally Posted by Todd Lamb View Post

      Here's the thing with that....(I agree spelling is critical) but sometimes you can read your work over and over and just plain miss it.
      This is true. That is why it is best to have someone look over it who has experience in the printing field. Someone trained to catch these errors before it goes to print. I was once told that it was not a mistake until it was printed. That is the way all of you should be thinking.

      Originally Posted by Thomas Belknap View Post

      Ohh Paul.... We have another spell cop on the forum.

      What do I hear, is it, is it Mrs Wombat?


      I think you are concentrating on the wrong things. You can sit there and make sure your grammar and spelling is perfect while I am out there selling more products before you even get your sales page up.
      Xavier University's college of Business did a study involving 20,000 "prospective affiliates" of a new business venture. 10,000 were given e-documents with spelling, grammar and layout errors in them while the other 10,000 were given edited, cleaned up copy. Of the 10,000 that got the error filled copy only 50 requested more information. The edited copy got well over 7,000 requests for information. Now, yes, you can be making sales before he has his page up. However, he will make more sales over the long haul. You get a few quick sales while he gets massive long term sales. Which would you want?

      Originally Posted by Christie Love View Post

      Yep, this has happened to me on a few occasions, even after reading something over and over again.

      We are all humans and we make mistakes. Tell me one person you know that's never made boo boo before.

      Sometimes, a helpful Warrior will inform me that I misspelled a word and visa versa. We are all apart of a team and not here to bash people for making a little mishap.
      That is why it is important to have someone with experience in the field look over your copy before it goes to "bed" as they say in the newspaper business. Besides the spelling errors, there are also grammatical errors and layout errors. Now, anyone good at English or American can check your grammar, but only someone who has experience in the printing business can help with layout issues and errors. That is something that I would not leave to just anyone.

      Originally Posted by Shonee View Post

      I agree, wrong spellings can really put off the readers. So you must spell check before you post your WSO. IN case you're unsure about how a particular word,consult a dictionary or ask your friends/family who might be able to able.
      Spell checkers cannot replace a human editor going over your copy. For example, a spell checker would not catch the error in this sentence:

      I wore my bough tie to work today.

      all a spell checker does is to look at the items between the white spaces and see if they appear in it's dictionary. It would not see bough as being the wrong word to use here. However, a human editor would be able to catch that mistake and fix it before it went to final stage production.

      Originally Posted by SpudDS View Post

      What a load of rubbish, because someone makes spelling mistakes doesn't mean their product is rubbish.
      I fully agree with you that spelling mistakes do not mean that the info is rubbish, but it gives the IMPRESSION that the product is rubbish. That IMPRESSION is what the customer or prospective customer is going to take with them. Now, which IMPRESSION would you want your prospects to walk away with?
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      • Profile picture of the author sylviad
        Originally Posted by CmdrStidd View Post

        ...

        Xavier University's college of Business did a study involving 20,000 "prospective affiliates" of a new business venture. 10,000 were given e-documents with spelling, grammar and layout errors in them while the other 10,000 were given edited, cleaned up copy. Of the 10,000 that got the error filled copy only 50 requested more information. The edited copy got well over 7,000 requests for information. Now, yes, you can be making sales before he has his page up. However, he will make more sales over the long haul. You get a few quick sales while he gets massive long term sales. Which would you want?

        That is why it is important to have someone with experience in the field look over your copy before it goes to "bed" as they say in the newspaper business. Besides the spelling errors, there are also grammatical errors and layout errors. Now, anyone good at English or American can check your grammar, but only someone who has experience in the printing business can help with layout issues and errors. That is something that I would not leave to just anyone...

        I fully agree with you that spelling mistakes do not mean that the info is rubbish, but it gives the IMPRESSION that the product is rubbish. That IMPRESSION is what the customer or prospective customer is going to take with them. Now, which IMPRESSION would you want your prospects to walk away with?
        I agree with all your points except one. Layout errors in the WSO section are not necessarily the fault of the poster. There's some sort of glitch with the program that repeatedly adds extra paragraph breaks and reformats sections to centered text. The more you try to fix them, the worse it gets, leaving you little alternative but to let it go, as happened with my WSO. I hate seeing the layout errors, but I am reluctant to touch it again.

        Also, you cannot see these errors until the page goes live (unless you check preview before submitting). It's possible, therefore, that some people didn't bother or get the chance to review their WSO after it went live. This might be a good tip to pass around - go back and recheck your WSO after it is published to make sure it's okay.

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        • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
          Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

          I agree with all your points except one. Layout errors in the WSO section are not necessarily the fault of the poster. There's some sort of glitch with the program that repeatedly adds extra paragraph breaks and reformats sections to centered text. The more you try to fix them, the worse it gets, leaving you little alternative but to let it go, as happened with my WSO. I hate seeing the layout errors, but I am reluctant to touch it again.

          Also, you cannot see these errors until the page goes live (unless you check preview before submitting). It's possible, therefore, that some people didn't bother or get the chance to review their WSO after it went live. This might be a good tip to pass around - go back and recheck your WSO after it is published to make sure it's okay.

          Sylvia
          Okay then, but that still does not excuse the layout errors that I have seen in the pdf files for the e-books that I have gotten. I have 7 years experience as owner of my own printing company and several more years before that as layout editor for a local magazine company. I am also for hire for editing and proofing. This is not a joke. Anyone interested in my services can pm me for more details.
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          • Profile picture of the author sylviad
            Originally Posted by CmdrStidd View Post

            Okay then, but that still does not excuse the layout errors that I have seen in the pdf files for the e-books that I have gotten. I have 7 years experience as owner of my own printing company and several more years before that as layout editor for a local magazine company. ...
            My reference to WSOs was in reference to the title of this thread, and since you brought up design issues, I automatically made that connection.

            Of course, I agree with you about design in general. My background is journalism. We put together our own newspapers - and later, I designed and put out my own local travel guide, so I know what you mean. Sadly, many people don't care much about design issues either. Like you, I "obsess" over layout so I understand exactly where you're coming from.

            Sylvia
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  • Profile picture of the author Dave777
    Maybe so...

    But there could be many other Good reasons for those spelling mistakes, one being to Get your attention! Especially, from a few particular proven warriors who people will buy from no matter how their WSO reads...

    Sean D'Souza, the brain auditor is just one the resources who puts out some great information on a variety of misc. psycho tactics worth thinking about...
    Psychological Marketing Business Tactics: Big And Small Business Ideas

    Dave
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  • Profile picture of the author Kim Standerline
    Well to buck the trend, I agree with him.

    If you can't get be bothered to check your spelling, then how do I know you bothered with your product.

    Having said that, I will look at the name, if it's non english sounding, then I will take that into consideration.

    Kim

    Originally Posted by Kyle L Hannah View Post

    This is a word to anyone who is planning on doing a WSO or has one currently ... Fix your spelling errors!

    You are losing sales with improper spelling, that I can guarantee.

    Plus, it just looks bad. Why would I or anyone purchase something from you where you can't even spell your sales page right? Come on ...

    ... you won't see me start many threads, but this one I just had to get off my chest. Spelling is kind of one of my pet peeves I guess.
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  • Profile picture of the author seree
    Sorry I believe I've many mispell here but here is just my 2 cents.

    I agree with you that spelling error could decrease WSO sales but personally, I'll look into the detail in WSO.

    If they are selling a content/article writing services. I'm sure they will lost all sales.

    But if they are selling script, software or mini-report. I don't care about it 100%. Even he have 90% of mispelled words in the sales letter.

    Yeah, just me 2 cents.
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    • Profile picture of the author bp.simms
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      • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
        I agree with the OP

        The occasional typo will slip by, but a number of spelling errors just looks sloppy. And sloppiness carries over into other things. So ... if you don't take care with your spelling, did you take care with the facts you are presenting.

        Appearances are everything (Ooops, better go comb my hair).
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    • Profile picture of the author JazzOscar
      Originally Posted by Kim Standerline View Post

      Well to buck the trend, I agree with him.

      If you can't get be bothered to check your spelling, then how do I know you bothered with your product.

      Having said that, I will look at the name, if it's non english sounding, then I will take that into consideration.

      Kim
      I agree with Kim. Everyone, at least, ought to use some kind of spell checking.

      What really makes me wonder is when I see copy with a lot of spelling errors and bad sentence structure from marketers that not only have english as their first language, but also clearly make enough money to hire a professional proof reader. Then my reaction sometimes tend to be;

      "Is he/she to greedy to spend a small amount of money on this?"

      Originally Posted by seree View Post

      Sorry I believe I've many mispell here but here is just my 2 cents.

      I agree with you that spelling error could decrease WSO sales but personally, I'll look into the detail in WSO.

      If they are selling a content/article writing services. I'm sure they will lost all sales.

      But if they are selling script, software or mini-report. I don't care about it 100%. Even he have 90% of mispelled words in the sales letter.

      Yeah, just me 2 cents.
      I somehow agree with seree too. Language isn't everyones strong side. You can be excellent in your main area of interest without being a good writer.

      Still a good advice to use a spell checker though.

      P.S. My post may contain too long sentences with bad structure. I'm not sure.
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  • Profile picture of the author mywebwork
    Spelling is not the most important thing in the world, however advertising copy that is grammatically correct and is free of spelling errors adds a degree of professionalism. Speaking as one of the worst spellers on the planet I always keep my spell-check on, the red underlines throughout my text serve as a reminder that I have work to do before I publish.

    I would not reject a WSO solely on the basis of spelling, unless it was for an article writing service. If the WSO is for an e-book I would be apprehensive about purchasing it if the spelling is really bad, however the information in the e-book is the main thing and if it sounded like it would be useful I'd probably buy it anyway.

    In the case of a software product I am much more forgiving, unless the typo is evident in the final product (such as on a display screen). In the past I have purchased and used several scripts from programmers all over the world, often the instructions have been poorly translated into English but once I had it working the results were excellent.

    Bill
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  • Profile picture of the author Suthan M
    Do you know that some of us *i dont run any WSO though currently or have been for some time* actually do it becouse we just want people to notice it and read? Well, i do.. i make sure nearly all my sales page has some simple spelling mistakes at some parts of the sales letter...

    Its a marketing technique.. And it does work.. :-O .. try it :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author Thomas Wilkinson
    I've never considered being dyslexic to be any excuse
    for creative spelling. I wind up editing most of my posts
    because I have such miserable spelling. That being said,
    my sales pages rarely have a spelling error because I go
    over and over them. I see WSOs with poor spelling and
    (my pet complaint) horrible grammar all the time. I recently
    PMed someone to tell her about a really badly mangled headline
    in her sales page. She was so appreciative I got a free copy
    of a very good product.

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author Doug Simons
    I can remember One of Mike filsaimes first launch that still had the words bullet #1 #2 #3 and so on. on his sales page he actually made a million dollars on that launch
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Carl Kelly
    Personally, I won't hold a spelling mistake on a WSO against anyone. A lot of errors, however, will lead me to question the professionalism of their material and I might bypass it.

    For my own WSO's, if I should let even one single spelling error slip by then I am absolutely LIVID with myself for being so stupid.
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  • Profile picture of the author Miguel Oliveira
    Some people just want to make a quick buck and don't even care about correct spelling. However, sometimes mistakes do creep by, so I won't stop buying from someone who has a misspell (buy if they have too many or obvious ones I will).
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  • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
    There are two schools of thought here:

    1. If I had a cure for cancer that could be summed up in a single sentence, would it matter that I spelled cancre wrong?

    2. I also disagree that spelling does not matter as long as the product is good. But it better be a damn good product, because if a sales person came into my office with his shirt hanging out, his hair like Kevin Riley's and was fumbling his words, I'm gonna be pissed...especially if his product isn't going to change my life in under 5 minutes from now.

    Presentation IS important, contrary to what people tell you.

    But a killer product with bags of proof and credibility will always trump the typos.

    (unless the product is for something that directly relates to writing and punctuation abilities, such as article marketing guides etc).
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    • Profile picture of the author Susanrh
      Originally Posted by Nick Brighton View Post

      There are two schools of thought here:

      1. If I had a cure for cancer that could be summed up in a single sentence, would it matter that I spelled cancre wrong?


      Surely what matters is that any writing should be easy to read and easy to understand. If a single sentence claimed to cure cancre, should the reader assume that the writer really meant cancer, or that there is something we've never heard of called cancre? How do you tell?

      Just Wombatting
      Susan
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      • Profile picture of the author Neil Morgan
        Surely, like all apsects of our business, we should make the attempt to get it right. A word is either spelled correctly or it's not (international differences aside).

        I can't design or draw for toffee, so I get others to do it. That doesn't say anything about me, my character, my level of education or anything else. I just want it to be as good as it can be.

        I don't regard spelling, grammar etc to be any different from that - I just want it to be correct. Why wouldn't I?

        Cheers,

        Neil
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  • Profile picture of the author tomw
    I guess it matters if the WSO is trying to sell copywriting products.

    Particularly if the sales page is lacking in the requisite standard of demonstrable knowledge and the application of appropriate grammar, syntax, pacing, rhythm, conjugation and yes, even spelling.

    I won't even begin to discuss creativity, the ability to convey an engaging sales message, the skill of honing it into a compelling offer or the craft of constructing a convincing call to action!

    The WSO forum has become a minefield recently.

    Caveat emptor!

    Thomas
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  • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
    My paranoia run deep. Misspellings aren't the disease, they are a symptom.

    Forget about misspellings. If you want to nit-pick, look at the gaffs in parallel construction, word usage, shifts of person and verb tense, comma faults, and misplaced modifiers. Yikes!

    But here is my pet peeve:

    There's reasons for the current state of affairs.

    "Reasons" is a plural noun. "There's [there is] contains a singular verb [is]. It should read, "There are reasons for the current state of affairs."

    That is my opinion, but I am deeply disturbed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Roey Pimentel
    I've seen so many spelling errors that I thought it was just part of the industry. (ha...) Actually, I have seen many more errors in pdf content than in sales letters. There is a strong argument for both sides. Rush, don't proofread, and increase your productivity (Roey's "shots on goal" theory") and in the process lose some potential sales to the negative reflection these errors have on the seller, vs. less productivity due to time spent on proofreading (or transacting with a proofreader/colleague/family member/friend.) If in theory this balances out, then the outcome should be how you personally choose to conduct business. Is your increased productivity more valuable than how spelling/gramatical errors reflect on you? It's an individual choice.
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  • Profile picture of the author Akogo
    I can name one person who has had several WSOs and admits within his reports that he makes typos which he does... But you know what? Pretty much everything he creates is unique and useful. So knowing that there will be typos doesn't bother me at all from this particular Warrior. I still bought most everything he has as a WSO.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tina Golden
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      • Profile picture of the author sylviad
        Many readers won't like what I'm about to say - because in reality, it's not unlike a sermon, although that was not the intent when I started writing it. So read on, if you want. Take it as you will.

        Being the wordsmith that I am, it still baffles me why so many people say that spelling is not important. Certainly, if you are offering writing-related services and products, you should be able to put together an ad that does not contain errors of any kind - including grammatical.

        It's true many people will overlook the writing as long as it sells or convinces them to buy. They put more emphasis on the actual product itself. A non-writing related product can pass an ad with errors, but a writing product shouldn't.

        There's also something to be said for maintaining the integrity of the English language. While it's not something most people think about, it is important to our culture and its future.

        Advertisers long ago started the decline of the language by using non-sentences as catch phrases to sell products. It wasn't long before these became ingrained into the language, even though they are still incorrect.

        Today, it's all about short forms - needed to cut down on the speed and price of text messaging. Just one more threat to the English language. Too many of our youth either are not learning or are abandoning proper spelling. It's hard to imagine how they will get on in the real world or how far they will get.

        But that's the approach today and it's unlikely we can do much about it because many people just don't care. Plain and simple.

        Sylvia
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        • Profile picture of the author jgoffshore
          Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

          Many readers won't like what I'm about to say - because in reality, it's not unlike a sermon, although that was not the intent when I started writing it. So read on, if you want. Take it as you will.

          Being the wordsmith that I am, it still baffles me why so many people say that spelling is not important. Certainly, if you are offering writing-related services and products, you should be able to put together an ad that does not contain errors of any kind - including grammatical.

          It's true many people will overlook the writing as long as it sells or convinces them to buy. They put more emphasis on the actual product itself. A non-writing related product can pass an ad with errors, but a writing product shouldn't.

          There's also something to be said for maintaining the integrity of the English language. While it's not something most people think about, it is important to our culture and its future.

          Advertisers long ago started the decline of the language by using non-sentences as catch phrases to sell products. It wasn't long before these became ingrained into the language, even though they are still incorrect.

          Today, it's all about short forms - needed to cut down on the speed and price of text messaging. Just one more threat to the English language. Too many of our youth either are not learning or are abandoning proper spelling. It's hard to imagine how they will get on in the real world or how far they will get.

          But that's the approach today and it's unlikely we can do much about it because many people just don't care. Plain and simple.

          Sylvia
          I agree completely! A lady after my own heart. I'd ask you to marry me but my wife has the same attitude to you and your probably spoken for anyway. YES! Sense.
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  • Profile picture of the author tommygadget
    If you are selling writing services, you better not have spelling and grammatical errors in your sales copy.

    TomG.
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  • Profile picture of the author ptmueller
    Kyle,

    I agree with you. I am ready to start a business approaching marketers and seeing if they would like for me to proof their copy before they send it out - I am half joking here.

    It just annoys the heck out of me that this is happening. You can't do much about a situation if you are the affiliate for them and the product page has errors (other than letting them know so they can fix it) so I try my best to get them to fix the problems. I am pretty sure that almost every marketer has some typos in their material.

    Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Dulisse
    I cannet undystand way you don like missppellinggsss...
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  • Profile picture of the author dsmpublishing
    i got several emails from one person back in 2005 from a diet website as i had typed light meals and it would be spelt differently in the US. When i pointed this out he kept bombarding me with the exact same email.

    some people are just really funny about it even if its not wrong. One the otherside people will bring them to attention thus getting the seller more hits!
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    • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
      Originally Posted by dsmpublishing View Post

      i got several emails from one person back in 2005 from a diet website as i had typed light meals and it would be spelt differently in the US. When i pointed this out he kept bombarding me with the exact same email.

      some people are just really funny about it even if its not wrong. One the otherside people will bring them to attention thus getting the seller more hits!
      This is only good if hits were the only thing you were concerned with but it is highly unlikely that you will only be interested in someone hitting on a page. You usually want them to take some sort of action once they get there. Them going there to notify you that you misspelled something is not a profit making action in any business since no money trades hands and any attempt to farm their email will be labeled as spam.
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  • Profile picture of the author Biz Guru
    Great point Kyle regarding the spelling mistakes it is also a pet peeve of mine as well.

    B U T............. For the MOST part it doesn't matter. I mean if the thing is littered with mistakes it may have some impact but at the end of the day it really comes down to the product for the most part.

    I have a friend from Alabama who always asks which sounds better?

    1. Unfortunately due to a series of unforeseen events, I am rather financially challenged at this juncture in time.

    OR...

    2. Yo man I IS a Millionaire. (which he is by the way lol)

    So again I am with ya in spirit on this one but the the re$ult$ Prove ... Don't Sweat the Small Stuff.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Hmmm...

      I wonder if we might be seeing a generation gap forming here...

      When my folks were in school, both spelling and grammar were hammered into them. By the time I went through (with some of the same teachers), spelling was hammered while the standards for grammar were a little looser.

      Not all that long ago, an English teacher stood up in a Toastmasters meeting and flat out stated that they weren't worried about spelling or grammar as long as the students "tried" and they had something to say.

      (Does that last line sound familiar after reading the posts in this thread?)

      What do all y'all think?
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    • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
      Originally Posted by Biz Guru View Post

      Great point Kyle regarding the spelling mistakes it is also a pet peeve of mine as well.

      B U T............. For the MOST part it doesn't matter. I mean if the thing is littered with mistakes it may have some impact but at the end of the day it really comes down to the product for the most part.

      I have a friend from Alabama who always asks which sounds better?

      1. Unfortunately due to a series of unforeseen events, I am rather financially challenged at this juncture in time.

      OR...

      2. Yo man I IS a Millionaire. (which he is by the way lol)

      So again I am with ya in spirit on this one but the the re$ Prove ... Don't Sweat the Small Stuff.
      Well, if he is satisfied with just being a millionaire, but I doubt that Donald Trump got to be a billionaire by not sweating the small stuff as you suggest. Now, who do you want to emulate, a measly millionaire or a multi-billionaire? Personally, I want to emulate the multi-billionaire, so I will sweat the small stuff.
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      • Profile picture of the author Tom B
        Banned
        Originally Posted by CmdrStidd View Post

        Well, if he is satisfied with just being a millionaire, but I doubt that Donald Trump got to be a billionaire by not sweating the small stuff as you suggest. Now, who do you want to emulate, a measly millionaire or a multi-billionaire? Personally, I want to emulate the multi-billionaire, so I will sweat the small stuff.
        You are making a lot of assumptions in most of your posts.
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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          Thomas,
          You are making a lot of assumptions in most of your posts.
          A normal function of obsession.


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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            I think that is a very unhealthy trend. Clarity of communication comes primarily from clarity of thought. Learning proper syntax is a big help in developing the skills for organizing one's thoughts. That's why I concern myself more with syntax than with punctuation or spelling.

            Having something to say means nothing if you can't say it in a way that ensures that most people will understand it properly.
            I couldn't agree more. A very unhealthy trend, and scary to boot. The teacher I referenced (high school-level English) even named it "creative spelling".

            I've read essays written by school children during the one-room schoolhouse days, and the clarity of expression is amazing.

            Of course, in those days, teachers were far more concerned with educating students and far less concerned with nursing fragile psyches and boosting (unwarranted) self-esteem.

            Edit: This trailer may or may not still be available...

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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        Sylvia makes an excellent point. Precise grammar and syntax can be very important in some niches, and writing instruction or services are among them. That's why I tend to go wombat on people when they include errors of grammar, syntax and word choice in their critiques of others' grammar and syntax.

        The OP, for example, contains a number of poor word choices and sloppy constructions that I wouldn't find appropriate for professional writing, but which would normally (sans grammar copping) be fine for general forum conversation. That post is not the only one in this thread which is critical of "sloppy writing" while showing signs of it...

        There are exceptions, of course. If you're dealing with a style of writing for which the rules have evolved, things change. In selling LOLcode, for example, you would be required to use a language that would be nearly incomprehensible to most adult humans.

        I consider myself a reasonably competent writer. I admire a well-constructed message as much as anyone I know. I also understand that the purpose of grammar is to help ensure clarity in communication. The rules do not exist for their own sake. If the rules get in the way of clear communication, throw them out.

        Spelling errors? From who? A copywriter from New York? A programmer from India? A graphic designer from Malaysia?

        That matters. The membership here is sufficiently widespread, geographically, that we need to adjust our perspective a bit when considering such things. Let's not forget that English is a fairly complex language. Or that there are important conceptual differences that make it difficult for many people from eastern countries.

        CmdrStidd has extensive experience with layout. He expects others to be up to his standards. That's like me expecting someone for whom English is a second language to create the complex sentence structures I often use. It's simply not realistic. Or fair.

        Sylvia says she obsesses over layout. She's not the only one. Do you suppose she's missing some of the message, with her focus that heavily diluted?

        (By the way, CmdrStidd missed John McCabe's point entirely, which suggests that he's going to have problems with that whole billionaire thing.)

        Yes, presentation can have a significant impact on sales. Yes, grammar and spelling errors that are so sloppy that they distract from the average person's comprehension of the message are a problem.

        Wombats need to understand that they are not the average person. They suffer from an attention disorder that is very much like judging a person by their clothing, rather than their character. (Yes, I know. First impressions, and all that. In the case of written communication, you get both at once. There's no excuse.)

        In response to John...

        I think that is a very unhealthy trend. Clarity of communication comes primarily from clarity of thought. Learning proper syntax is a big help in developing the skills for organizing one's thoughts. That's why I concern myself more with syntax than with punctuation or spelling.

        Having something to say means nothing if you can't say it in a way that ensures that most people will understand it properly.


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        • Profile picture of the author CmdrStidd
          Originally Posted by Thomas Belknap View Post

          You are making a lot of assumptions in most of your posts.
          The only assumptions I am making is that a person wishes to sell the ebooks they are writing and/or they want to have some form of action from the ebooks. That is the only assumption I need to make. Everything else is a matter of record.

          Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

          Spelling errors? From who? A copywriter from New York? A programmer from India? A graphic designer from Malaysia?

          That matters. The membership here is sufficiently widespread, geographically, that we need to adjust our perspective a bit when considering such things. Let's not forget that English is a fairly complex language. Or that there are important conceptual differences that make it difficult for many people from eastern countries.

          CmdrStidd has extensive experience with layout. He expects others to be up to his standards. That's like me expecting someone for whom English is a second language to create the complex sentence structures I often use. It's simply not realistic. Or fair.
          While I might agree with you that it matters a little where the spelling errors are coming from, and I acknowledge that English or American is a difficult language for many nationalities to get a handle on, it still does not excuse the use of a proofreader which should be someone very knowledgeable in the language of choice. For example, I would not think myself wise to submit an article written for a German audience without having someone who speaks, reads and writes German extensively to go over the article and make sure I am spelling everything correctly, using the grammar correctly and that I am getting the message across that I want to get across. I do not trust my limited ability with German to do the job adequately enough.

          As far as my background with layout goes, I doubt very seriously that even 20% on this forum have the editorial background to understand the importance of layout in their copy. That is a mistake that everyone of you could be making and not even realizing you are making it. That is why I brought it up here. It is not to hold everyone else to my level but to let them know that there is someone who is offering his services that has the background necessary to see how to make the layout better and thus have everyone turning out more professional looking copy in their ebooks and articles.

          These are just the facts of the case and when it comes to grammar and spelling I do not allow excuses, although I might overlook something that I recognize as a simple typo just as long as it does not happen all the time.
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          • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
            CmdrStidd,
            The only assumptions I am making is that a person wishes to sell the ebooks they are writing and/or they want to have some form of action from the ebooks. That is the only assumption I need to make. Everything else is a matter of record.
            Without looking back through the posts, I can tell you one more assumption that you're making: That following your advice will necessarily result in more sales. In some cases it will. In others, it won't.

            For instance, it is quite often the case that something called a report or manual will sell BETTER if it looks like a perfect bound book, with a very simple cover, and page layouts that look like they were done on a typewriter, rather than by a professional designer.

            I have actually had difficulty getting some designers to follow my requests for simplicity and "raw" looks. I've had this problem with multiple blog themes, ebook covers, and ad banners.

            Why? Because the designers think they understand my market and my thematic strategy better than I do.
            As far as my background with layout goes, I doubt very seriously that even 20% on this forum have the editorial background to understand the importance of layout in their copy.
            That's probably true. Likewise, I doubt that 5% of designers of any kind understand direct marketing enough to understand that there are times and products for which the traditional rules are not the optimum, and how to recognize those situations.

            I wrote a salesletter not long ago that had what any professional would consider horrible layout. Truly. But it converts currently at over 20%. I would wager (and am, by leaving it as it is), that the conversion would drop if I adjusted it to a "professional" look. That wouldn't fit with the story behind the product.
            when it comes to grammar and spelling I do not allow excuses
            [chuckle] Spoken like a true Grammar Cop.

            Don't ever buy anything from me. You'll be so annoyed you'll never get to absorbing the information. It's unlikely you'll find a single content page that doesn't have at least one broken rule in it. Ending sentences with prepositions, starting them with conjunctions, etc. (Note: Since those are deliberate choices, I don't consider them to be errors.)

            It's funny, though, to see such insistence on perfection in a post containing obvious errors of grammar.


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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    A mistake or two is fine.

    However, when the mistakes drive a reader to distraction, the focus is taken away from the sales message itself. Of course, some sales letters benefit from that.

    Too many mistakes and I do question a seller's attention to detail, and that reflects poorly on the attention to detail in their product (I assume).

    Notice, nobody has said, "If it's written with NO errors, has perfect speeling, and good grammar - then I WON'T buy it." Yet, several people have said the opposite.

    Check the spelling, don't get too caught up in being perfect. Focus on communicating your points and dong it well. If you do that, most people will forgive a few mistakes.

    All the best,
    Michael
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  • Profile picture of the author leosaraceni
    Really? A thread this long because of misspellings?

    Is this the English teachers forum?

    Go sell some products and leave grammEr and SemEntics alone...
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
      Originally Posted by leosaraceni View Post

      Really? A thread this long because of misspellings?

      Is this the English teachers forum?

      Go sell some products and leave grammEr and SemEntics alone...
      Yep.

      And it's not going to be the last.

      It's a subject that comes up from time to time, and the way this thread has gone is fairly typical.

      ~Michael

      p.s. Just wait until someone starts a new thread on English vs. whatever language they speak in the USA!
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Leo,
      Is this the English teachers forum?
      Hey. What can I say. I like tweaking the Wombats of the world. It's something of a hobby for me.

      It does serve a useful purpose or two, as well. For one, it makes people think about their communication, in terms of both clarity and style.

      A nearly equally useful point is showing the hollowness of the grammatical purist. As a rule, their styles are dry, boring and un-engaging. It is also extremely rare to encounter one who discusses the issue for more than a post or two without leaving a trail of errors.


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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    It's unlikely you'll find a single content page that doesn't have at least one broken rule in it. Ending sentences with prepositions, starting them with conjunctions, etc.
    You're right about that. And it took me a while to jump on that bandwagon. But now that I've gone and took the leap I'm more at ease than where I was previously at.

    ~Michael
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  • Profile picture of the author Jamie Orman
    I know what you mean, I constantly pass up offers because of the misspellings. Even if the idea behind it sounds great, I just can't let myself buy it.

    Whenever I sell things I check and double check the grammar and spelling, just in case, you know?
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    • Profile picture of the author jmidas
      I can forgive folks who are not native English speakers. But, if you are from the US, UK, Australia, etc.. and you can't write a cohesive sentence or spell simple words, you lose all creditability in my eyes.

      It's not just in the ads for the WSO's, it is the products too. Poor grammer and misspellings just show the seller/creator of the product just does not give a crap - about you, their business, or their reputation.

      Why would I want to buy information from someone who comes across as a third grade dropout?
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      • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
        Originally Posted by jmidas View Post

        I can forgive folks who are not native English speakers. But, if you are from the US, UK, Australia, etc.. and you can't write a cohesive sentence or spell simple words, you lose all creditability in my eyes.

        It's not just in the ads for the WSO's, it is the products too. Poor grammer and misspellings just show the seller/creator of the product just does not give a crap - about you, their business, or their reputation.

        Why would I want to buy information from someone who comes across as a third grade dropout?
        "...native speakers of English." would be correct as "native English" is not the name of a language or group of people. This mistake is called a misplaced modifier.

        "etc.." should be "etc." you don't add an extra period when a sentence ends with an abbreviation. Also known as excessive punctuation.

        "...grammar and misspellings..." why is it that this is one of the most common mistakes? There is no 'e' in grammar; you misspelled it.

        So, should I buy something from you? Or have you lost all credibility (not "creditability") in my eyes?

        I'm sure there were several more, but those were the ones that stood out.

        All the best,
        Michael

        p.s. Thank you Mrs. Meisenheimer for teaching me these things in third grade.

        p.p.s. I forgive you for those mistakes.
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        jmidas,
        I can forgive folks who are not native English speakers. But, if you are from the US, UK, Australia, etc.. and you can't write a cohesive sentence or spell simple words, you lose all creditability in my eyes.

        It's not just in the ads for the WSO's, it is the products too. Poor grammer and misspellings just show the seller/creator of the product just does not give a crap - about you, their business, or their reputation.

        Why would I want to buy information from someone who comes across as a third grade dropout?
        You spelled grammar incorrectly. Stylistically, you goofed by using the word 'just' twice in close proximity. You began a sentence with a conjunction. You used two periods after etc. The first sentence of the second paragraph should have been two sentences, rather than one with two independent clauses. It's clunky.

        Rather a lot of mistakes for a 5 line post from a grammar cop.

        That's a separate issue from the disturbing and unfounded assumption that failure to spell-check documents somehow indicates a specific attitude on the part of the people behind the product.

        Bad wombat. No biscuit.


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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    Ha! Ha!

    Beat you to it, Myers!



    ~Michael

    p.s. And yet we were both able to find different errors, which neither of us were likely to have brought up if not for the pontificating poster.
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  • Profile picture of the author IMChick
    I have to go against the prevailing opinion here. Sloppy anything (spelling included) indicates a lack of attention to detail. This is also reflected in the content offering of the creator. If I see glaring errors in a sales page, especially ones that are easily guarded against, I think that there are going to be errors in the content, whether or not that is true in any particular case.
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Anderson
    Ask Mike Filsaime is misspelling costs sales.

    No one misspells more than mike does when he sends out an email promotion...

    I don't think it hurts his bottom line... but then he does not brand himself as an English teacher either ;-)

    Misspelling never had any impact on my own buying decisions.
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
      Originally Posted by Josh Anderson View Post

      Ask Mike Filsaime is misspelling costs sales.

      No one misspells more than mike does when he sends out an email promotion...

      I don't think it hurts his bottom line... but then he does not brand himself as an English teacher either ;-)

      Misspelling never had any impact on my own buying decisions.
      I'm asking this because I don't follow Mike's stuff...

      Are his sales pages replete with error as well, or are they more polished? After all, once he has people on his list, he has them on his list.

      Just thinking out loud (well, in print).

      All the best,
      Michael
      Signature

      "Ich bin en fuego!"
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  • Profile picture of the author IMChick
    Well, I'll tell you the truth about Filsame -- from experience. In recent months, he's released some pretty sloppy programs in a big hurry while they were still in beta. Those sales letters and emails had typos, and it carried over into the products. Not just one product, either. Very disappointing.

    While they (the software programs in this case) didn't have spelling errors in them, they did in fact follow the same 'stream of consciousness' 'can't be bothered with the small stuff because I'm too busy with the content' lack of attentiveness as the sales pages and rambling unscripted sales videos.

    Unfortunately, judging by the refunds and angry threads on these products, the spelling on the pre-sale stuff wasn't the only thing that was sloppy--content was lacking, too, and a lot of people were rightly furious.

    This, to me, indicates a pattern, whether it's from a big name or not. A fast slap up job with lack of attention to detail and misspellings on the outside indicates the same quality on the inside.

    If you don't believe me, look at the GMAT/LSAT/MCAT score predictors as indicators not only of academic success, but as predictors of success in the career area after graduation. In the exam industry it's been that finely honed.

    Same here, I think--direct correlary.
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      IMChick,
      I have to go against the prevailing opinion here. Sloppy anything (spelling included) indicates a lack of attention to detail. This is also reflected in the content offering of the creator.
      A couple of challenges with those statements.

      I don't see anyone saying that people should be sloppy. About anything. If you can show me where anyone in this thread has suggested that you should, I'd like to see it. I surely haven't yet.

      The overall message seems to be, "Be more forgiving of small errors, in your own work and that of others."

      Frankly, I couldn't care a great deal less if someone decides that they're going to skip an offer because they see two typos and a sentence ending in a preposition in the sales copy.

      No, that's not true. I'd rather they skipped the offer. Such people tend to be high maintenance customers, who never actually do anything useful with the products they buy. In short, they waste my time for no useful purpose.

      That is not an assumption or prediction, by the way. That's the reality of a lot of years of actual in-the-field experience.

      I appreciate it when someone points out edit errors and typos in my work. That's helpful. I just don't want to bother with people for whom the presence of those errors becomes the primary (or only) focus.

      People who "demand" perfection are as dangerous to the success of new folks as the family members and friends who say, "You'll never get anywhere with that." I refuse to stand by and let them screw with people's potential like that without being challenged.

      These perfectionists are also, in most cases, flaming hypocrites. They preach about spelling with no concern for the value of the content. They pontificate over grammar, and ignore the clarity of the communication. They rant about the rules, and forget the purpose for which those rules were created.

      And they'll litter their tirades with violations of the very rules they're preaching as Sacred Writ.

      If you're going to demand perfection, you ought to at least make an effort to be clear in the process.

      If you're going to bitch about grammar, you ought to at least be able to spell the word.

      Flaming hypocrites.

      They will tell you all day long about how they think things work, and pay no attention at all to the comments of folks who've "been there, done that." Or they'll cite studies that apply to corporate environments and apply them to markets where corporate thinking and attitudes are actively rejected.

      But they LIKE corporations. Those are friendly places for purists. You don't actually have to think, adapt or create. Just follow the rules. The entrepreneurial world is too messy for them.

      They refuse to grasp that mistakes sometimes imply "Someone like me." They deny the results of design tests that show, in some markets, that there's truth to the saying, "If it's ugly as hell, it will sell."

      That's because they're more interested in rules than in people. I haven't got much time for such thinking.

      What some of us are suggesting is balance. A reasonable tolerance that benefits everyone involved.

      We're not saying that anything goes. No-one is denying that an excess of errors will hurt sales or comprehension. We're saying that you're not going to achieve perfection, and that you shouldn't let demands for it keep you from accomplishing useful things.

      The late Jon Postel had some advice for the operators of email systems that I think is a wonderful rule of thumb for civilized communication in general: "Be conservative in what you generate, and liberal in what you accept."

      As for the second part of that quote: You're inverting what would otherwise be a generally valid observation. People who are sloppy thinkers, and who pay little attention to detail, will usually show that in their sales materials. (Assuming they don't hire someone to handle that part of the business for them.)

      The reverse is not always true.

      The fact that someone has challenges with grammar or spelling has little to do with whether they have valuable knowledge, and solutions to real world problems. It doesn't mean that they can't communicate those solutions in clear and easy to follow ways.

      If you want to assume that grammar is a sign of intelligence, go for it. I'll be happy to let you do that. It frees up the targets' time for people who are more concerned with real world results than artificial structures.


      Paul
      Signature
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      Stop by Paul's Pub - my little hangout on Facebook.

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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Reeves
    I have to admit...when I see a wso with major typos/terribly bad grammar it does kinda turn me off.

    It makes me question the posters effort/pride in their work. I know that if it was my WSO...I would triple check that thing to make sure it's perfect, but that's just my personality.

    A little while back someone was offering a PLR package and the ecover images in the wso had an obvious spelling error. To me that shouted out that the product was rushed and the user didn't care enough to go back through and check the product he made.

    But then again...we're all human and everyone makes mistakes!

    Just my .02

    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author captivereef
    sum timz wen i spel i werd riet i fel specizl but sum timz i spel rong 2
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