Would you quit your job before making the money online?

105 replies
Over the years I have had a lot of questions from people asking if I would suggest quitting their job before making money online.

Here is their philosophy: If they quit their job then they have tons of time to spend dedicated to making money online.

The downside: You then don't have that stability for at least a little bit while you're in the process of setting up your first website or launch.

What's your philosophy on this?
#job #making #money #online #quit
  • Profile picture of the author Shannon Tani
    It's about having security.

    My husband and I quit our jobs to try to start a B&M business, but we had enough cash to last us about a year. If you have some sort of safety net like that, then I don't see why you can't make the leap and try to apply those extra hours to working online and making it happen for you.

    Other times, you may not really want to, but you get forced into the position. My main bread and butter client suddenly cut the available workload and I'm 6.5 months pregnant, so it's hard to try to seek out more clients at this point, since I won't be able to work in a few months. So I'm turning more to making online things happen, whereas before they were a sort of hobby. Fortunately, my husband is working, so we can get by, though things are real tight.

    In general, though, I don't think it's smart to just up and quit a job if you don't have anything to fall back on.
    Love,
    Shannon
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    • Profile picture of the author Jacob Hargreave
      My Philosophy on the matter is that no source of income gives you the right amount of focus you need to get moving in the right direction.

      Having a job to fall back on can in fact hold you back or even distract you from completing your desired goals. The job is a comfort zone and to make progress one must be willing to step out of it entirely.

      I have been on both sides of the fence. Trying to make money while holding a job and trying while unemployed. I made a ton more while unemployed than I did working. The mindset you have is completely different, while working I had the "If it works it works" attitude, and while unemployed I had the "It has to work and if it doesn't I will make it work" attitude.

      I am sure those on either side of the spectrum can verify this.
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  • Profile picture of the author art72
    My philosophy is "KEEP" you're job, the learning curve can take time to develop a viable marketing plan, and start generating a suitable income.

    On the 'flip side' of that coin, I lost my job recently with little notice, and truly want to make a run at full-time online earning. Currently, I have sales 'trickling in' but nowhere near as fast as the bills.

    Therefore, it has been said a million times over, definitely do whatever job it takes to keep the basic bills paid, and work the internet as much as you can afterwards. I am putting in applications, and working my tail off online, and to date; the job market is seemingly saturated in my area with people 'looking' for work.

    If you can (and I am challenged by this now myself) generate a steady daily income online; go for it. However, times are tough for many right now, and I would NEVER advise someone quit their job for IM. If you have a job, keep it until you are 100% proof positive your online efforts will be consistent, and able to support you, your family, and your needs first!

    Now, I am off to go apply my own advice, as I am not exactly solving my own issues at the moment, by posting here.

    All the Best,

    Art
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    • Profile picture of the author fin
      I'll keep an eye on this thread.

      I'm thinking about doing this just now because I hate my job.

      I was thinking about doing it in 3 weeks. I have some some cash saved up and little bills + I can start my own PT business next spring when the fitness rush happens if my sites don't work out.

      I'd have to pospone travel plans I have for next year but do I really want to be working outside this winter when I don't need to? Plus I think working full time for 3 months on the sites might be a good thing. If I can only make some, I can work part-time till I bring it up to full time earnings.

      Oh decisions:confused: 3 weeks work or a soul destroying winter?
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  • Profile picture of the author Willie Murray
    Personally I wouldn't advise anyone quit their job until they are generating a steady revenue stream via their new venture, IM or any other business for that matter.

    I still hold down a full time job and I wouldn't have it any other way at the moment, it means working very long hours 7 days a week, however I have my own goals in mind and I'll do what it takes.

    If they have capital however to support them during their learning curve then that's a different matter.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tom Ryan
      I'd probably hold onto the day job until you were making enough to cover that. Yeah you'd have a lot of free time to work on your projects, but it is a heck of a lot different than working for someone else. Time management and money management becomes a huge deal.

      Also without an job and income it puts a lot of stress on a person and it is very possible to make some rash decisions. For some people the do or die thing works, but for others the stress of having to make it work keeps things from actually working.
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  • Profile picture of the author IM Business
    You need two things before quitting.

    1) Some success. You need to have found something that works for YOU. I don't care what other people say or do or whatever, have some kind of foundation to work from that already exists in reality for your income.

    2) You need a nice cushion, I'd recommend at least enough cash to live off for a year. Give yourself time to make mistakes and have failures, they're going to happen. You can never have too much cushion, but you can easily have too little.
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  • Profile picture of the author WebPen
    I think it's best to have a steady job while working on your IM. When you're first getting started, you're spending a lot of time learning and won't have consistent cash flow.

    Plus, remember that a job isn't just about your pay. Insurance- a typical benefit of a "normal job"- is pretty expensive depending on yourself/your family.
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  • Profile picture of the author 3000
    Before I use to have the same mentality: "I should quit my day job so I can have more time..."

    Now I realise if I did that I would still procrastinate as much as I do now lol.

    Having a day job allows me to become less stressed about paying bills and also I realised that it takes money to make money.

    Until I hit my goal of making 3000 a month that's when I can finally think about quitting my 9 to 5
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    • Profile picture of the author Morganzolar
      I agree with most of the comments above, since starting IM it's been a bit of a 'fantasy' to be able to leave all other work related commitments behind, and concentrate on a successful online business model (that you hear so many stories about).

      The first step I've taken is moderate outsourcing without the return to cover it all yet, investing into my aspiration (at a minimum it gives me the drive to keep pushing it, as my money is tied up in it).

      I would like to be able to do IM online, but realistically it would be years from now before I could even think about it.

      I guess I'll just enjoy the ride, at work and online

      MZ
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    • Profile picture of the author sal64
      Huge mistake in my opinion.

      Lack of cash flow places undue stress and expectations. Not to mention financial stress. If I had my time over, I would have stayed employed for 12 months and reinvested sales into the business instead of using them to fund my life.

      In a word...



      Sal
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      • Profile picture of the author RobKonrad
        Originally Posted by Kelly Verge View Post

        No.

        Cash flow will be an issue.
        Originally Posted by sal64 View Post

        Huge mistake in my opinion.

        Lack of cash flow places undue stress and expectations. Not to mention financial stress. If I had my time over, I would have stayed employed for 12 months and reinvested sales into the business instead of using them to fund my life.

        Sal
        I second that. It's old business wisdom that liquidity beats profitability every time. You can have the greatest product with the greatest margin every - if you are out of cash, you won't go very far; on the other hand, if you're liquidity is healthy then you can go on pretty long until you hit the right spot.

        Don't confuse liquidity with "I can be lazy", though, if you're serious with your business.

        Cheers,
        Rob
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Putt
    I've been on both sides of the fence too, and I would definitely hold onto the job until you are up and running
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  • Profile picture of the author marcuslim
    Ya the safe way is definitely to stay and find some success before you quit. Although there is also something to be said for people who take the leap and devote themselves wholeheartedly to IM. The urgency to pay the bills, to make or break, will most certainly inject a drive to succeed, which will not be the case if it's just something done on the side.
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  • Profile picture of the author louie6925
    I work as a fireman and love my job and no amount of online success will change that, but to answer the question, unless you are already rich, it would be iresponsible and reckless to leave a guaranteed income to pursue a dream! Build your online business slowly and effectively and the decision will take care of itself!

    All the best
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  • Profile picture of the author jmdw99


    In the best case scenario, I suggest treating this as any other business. Have a cushion of about 6 months of bills stashed away - especially if you have family responsibilities. Without security, you may feel pressure to quit before you see the fruits of your labor. But I would not suggest procrastination or waiting for the perfect time. It doesn't exist. If someone needs to make it happen, they should make it happen. It is amazing what people can do when their back is against the wall. As they say, difficult situations inspire ingenious solutions.

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    • Profile picture of the author Shaun Simpson
      Well Chase I think you answered your own question in the downside part, cause even if your lucky enough to have some money set aside like Shannon (which few of us are) I still think it's a bad idea to walk away from steady income, sure you'll have more time to work on your sites but that'll be little of comfert if its not making you any money, Plus you don't want to burn yourself out, put in so many hours so fast that you give up, which happens alot faster when your not seeing any results. Of course everyone's situation is different, but for the most part its probily not a good idea.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheHotChick
    Banned
    No! If you're stressed about money, it will negatively effect your focus, self confidence & ability to make any money online. If you need a job, get one & keep it until you're CONSISTENTLY making more online than you are from that paycheck.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      I'm thinking about doing this just now because I hate my job.
      That has nothing to do with your ability to earn online. I think many new IMers use internet marketing as an excuse to quit a job they don't like in the first place.

      The theory proposed is often "I'll HAVE to do something then" - but what if you don't? What if you freeze up due to financial stress or the money doesn't start coming in?

      You can do IM you can start earning working on it part-time and then quit a job to move ahead. If you can't get anything to work now - there's no magic that will happen when you quit a job.

      Look at the worst that can happen if you quit. Can you live with that? If not, don't quit.

      kay
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Wilson
    If you have a home and food why not. If you are young and if you have support by parents. Why not.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Rankin
    I ended up without a job after finishing Hurricane Katrina work. My best option at the time was to start my own company. Nothing makes you try harder than having your back against the wall with only 10,000.00 to get by on. The same happened for one of my best friends with internet marketing. He sold his company equiptment giving him about 10,000.00 to run on. He had tried IM and givin up several times before. Now it was do or die. He is currently helping me get my IM biz up and going. To put it short, he does very well and works very hard at it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Brock
    A couple years ago, when I was more big headed, I would have said yes, quit the job and start full force online.

    However, I've realized after coaching a bunch of people that in the beginning stages there's a ton of doubt. So much doubt that the average person gives up after about 3 weeks of trying. So for the average person, I would say no, don't quit your job until you have another income stream.

    The only time I would recommend it is if someone has thoroughly planned out their business and is 100% serious... not curious, like 99% of the people out there. They have to not only want to do it, but have the drive to push through the doubts.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kal Sallam
      Originally Posted by Daniel Brock View Post

      A couple years ago, when I was more big headed, I would have said yes, quit the job and start full force online.

      However, I've realized after coaching a bunch of people that in the beginning stages there's a ton of doubt. So much doubt that the average person gives up after about 3 weeks of trying. So for the average person, I would say no, don't quit your job until you have another income stream.

      The only time I would recommend it is if someone has thoroughly planned out their business and is 100% serious... not curious, like 99% of the people out there. They have to not only want to do it, but have the drive to push through the doubts.
      Very well put my friend.

      SELF DOUBT! Along with internal negative influences are Huge road blocks

      In the beginning of ones online adventure.

      Speaking from experience.
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  • Profile picture of the author aaaa33030
    If you have made at least 10 years worth of salary online, then I would suggest quitting your job to work full time online
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  • Profile picture of the author vtotheyouknow
    I feel obligated to chime in here because I DID quit my job to do IM full time, thinking that by the time my money ran out (I didn't have much), I'd be banking in IM.

    I was relying on Parkinson's law; having enough pressure on me to make sure I succeeded.

    But making money online consistently takes time and I ran out of money and had to go back to working a "job". It really failed to compress (i.e. it sucked).

    Unless you have at least a year's worth of money accumulated and some more money to invest in your online business, my wholehearted advice is to stay at your job, no matter how much it sucks, or get a job that sucks less for the time being.

    It's much easier to reinvest a fixed portion of your income when you know exactly what your monthly pay and expenses are.

    Just one man's opinion.
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  • Profile picture of the author K. Rondo
    If you would have asked me this question a couple of weeks
    ago I would have answered no.

    However, I just quit my horrendous job going on about a week.

    I asked my boss for more money; he offered more.
    It wasn't enough.
    At least not for the duties I had to loyaly carry out.

    Health wise it was the wisest move I could've ever made.

    Was it a smart move financially?

    Well, that will depend on what I decide to do with my newfound time.

    At first, I thought about going back when it gets colder here in Minnesota
    and try to renegotiate my pay because the job involves alot of outside work.

    But I changed my mind.

    At first, I questioned my decision to turn down the few extra dollars but I knew
    I acted in my best interest, especially; after I read this article, by Steve Pavlina,
    that resonated with and shook my inner core.

    I need to move fast and find something that works.

    Damn, I love this feeling.
    It's natural inebriation at its finest.
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    • Profile picture of the author im1217
      That article by Steve Pavlina is useless for people that NEED a job to survive. A lot of the article is PURE opinion and fantasy. If you were making 40K + a month (that's what he claims to make), could you write an article like that? Sure you could.

      Originally Posted by K. Rondo View Post

      If you would have asked me this question a couple of weeks
      ago I would have answered no.

      However, I just quit my horrendous job going on about a week.

      I asked my boss for more money; he offered more.
      It wasn't enough.
      At least not for the duties I had to loyaly carry out.

      Health wise it was the wisest move I could've ever made.

      Was it a smart move financially?

      Well, that will depend on what I decide to do with my newfound time.

      At first, I thought about going back when it gets colder here in Minnesota
      and try to renegotiate my pay because the job involves alot of outside work.

      But I changed my mind.

      At first, I questioned my decision to turn down the few extra dollars but I knew
      I acted in my best interest, especially; after I read this article, by Steve Pavlina,
      that resonated with and shook my inner core.

      I need to move fast and find something that works.

      Damn, I love this feeling.
      It's natural inebriation at its finest.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex Kage
    Well, if you earn online more than you earn at your current job and put less time in it(or at least earn something comparable to your salary but with less time involved) and are sure that you can keep it up for a long, long time then "YES" ,quit your job. I would.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nightengale
      I've recently been in this situation, but not by choice.

      In short, "NO!" Do NOT quit your day job to do IM full time until/unless your current IM income at least matches your day job income -- CONSISTENTLY.

      The stress of no income will be detrimental to your business-building efforts, even if it doesn't hit you right away. Sometimes, the best thing you can do in launching/building a business is to get a JOB.

      I lost my job of 7 years in Feb. 2010. I loved the company I worked for and the people I worked with, but HATED the job itself. (I worked in an in-house call center for a large, local utility, doing customer service.) I worked a lot of overtime, plus was going to school part-time. I was burned out and exhausted.

      It wasn't completely unexpected, but I was still completely unprepared. (I'd kept hoping I'd get promoted OUT of that position into another one, but it didn't happen.) I had NO savings and had just one paycheck in the bank. Yikes!

      I'm single with no kids. Plus, my dad is my landlord, so I'm in a better position than a lot of people. I'm responsible only for myself and I'll never be homeless.

      But I still have to pay my bills and eat.

      I'd always contributed to my 401(k), but I deliberately never looked at it. (I'm a buy-and-hold kind of girl.) But when I checked it (in desperation) after losing my job, I had a whopping $20,000 in there, plus another $10,000 in my pension. Total: $30,000. Wow!

      I'd been dabbling in IM for a long time, but never gone "big' with it or done it "for real" as I hadn't yet found exactly what I wanted to do online.

      At the same time that I discovered that I had all that money, the opportunity to mentor with the perfect mentor (my current mentor) dropped into my lap and I also found the publisher for my first book. And exactly what I wanted to do and how I wanted to do it crystallized. I truly believe none of it was an accident.

      Within three weeks of losing my job, I had a signed book contract and had signed up for a full year's coaching with my current mentor -- which included a 1-day workshop and a 3-day conference.

      I dove into writing my book and set the pub date for my book at Sept. 2010. It took a couple more months than that, but the book was published Nov. 2010.

      I was still looking for a job during this time, but only half-heartedly. I was burned out with the job and desperately needed some time off. I really didn't WANT a job. I also wanted to finish my book, the book I'd been wanting to write for so long but never had the time to do.

      As 2010 ended, the book was done (a lifetime dream of mine) and I'd completed a year of coaching/mentoring and had set up my business, ready to launch.

      And that's when I ran out of money. I wasn't able to launch because I had NO money -- I struggled to even buy groceries or put gas in my car. I don't care what anyone says: it's nearly impossible to launch a business (even a cheap IM business) if you can't buy gas or groceries, much less pay your hosting bill or phone bill.

      Yes, I went through $30,000 in one year flat. I knew that money wouldn't last forever. (Even if you have a financial cushion, the money won't last forever.) Maybe some people would see it as foolish to spend all of my retirement money setting up a business when I was unemployed. But I KNEW this is what I wanted to do and I made a long-term commitment to it. I didn't do that just because I was unemployed and it sounded good at the time.

      But I struggled. I'd had some temp jobs, but still nothing permanent. While I'm in no danger of being homeless, the stress was still incredible. My parents don't pay my bills.

      I applied for dozens of interviews, got some and even got a few temp jobs. But they were VERY temporary and none of them were right for me. The stress and discouragement is soul-crushing. Your self-worth and mindset take a real beating.

      And then I found my current job. I just hit the 90-day mark now and I'm quite happy in my new position, primarily because I work at home!. I do tech support for Verizon. It's more nasty call center work, but it's such a blessing to have work I CAN do (I have some unusual physical problems which inhibit my mobility and make a lot of jobs very difficult or impossible for me to do) and to work at home.

      Working at home shaves 5 (FIVE!) hours off my day, EVERY DAY. (No 1-hr commute each way, no getting ready time in the morning (2 hours because of my physical problems) and no lunch hour.) And my mobility problems become a virtual non-issue because I work at home.

      Believe me, having your days completely free doesn't necessarily make you more productive in IM. It just means you waste more time. Sometimes, having TOO much freedom in your schedule is detrimental. I don't know why this is. It seems counter intuitive. But it's absolutely true. I'm more productive now than when I had every day, all day to myself.

      I'm in an ideal position now to launch my business and make it work. I still little/no money to invest in marketing my biz. (I took a hefty pay cut and make not much more than minimum wage in my current job.) But at least my basic, bare necessities are taken care of, which is a HUGE help to allowing me to focus on my business.

      Bottom line: do NOT quit your day job before you have another income to replace it.

      If you're dissatisfied with your current job, use that as motivation to build your business. The limited amount of time you have to work on your business should drive you to get ruthless about what your expect of yourself and from the hours you put into IM each day. Start demanding ROI from the time you spend in IM (i.e. stop dallying on the WF if you're still not making any money!).

      Hope that helps!

      Michelle
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  • Profile picture of the author Kecia
    I did this, to an extent, when I decided to go full-time working from home. My husband's income was still there, and I was making enough to at least supplement his paychecks, so I took the plunge. I was going to leave my job 4 months later to return to college full-time anyway, so I decided to just cut ties early and work online until school started.

    I would only recommend that someone quit their job before having a steady income if they have a 9-12 months worth of living expenses saved up or a spouse's income that can cover the necessities.
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  • Profile picture of the author IamTJM
    If the job is the only thing keeping you financially stable, then there is no way that you should ever quit to pursue something that is not a sure thing. I would advise someone to already have had some success that they know for sure they can scale up if they had more time, and also that they know they would be successful in the long term before they quit their job.
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  • Profile picture of the author jgant
    I echo those who say don't quit your job unless you have a very healthy nest egg or are already earning as much as your job (or enough to pay ALL the bills) consistently.

    I recently sold my offline business to focus on my online business so I've taken the plunge. My online business was and is generating more income than my previous salary so it was an easy decision. Besides, I have a decent nest egg to ride out any miscalculations / income dips in the near future.

    I would NOT have gone full time online if I didn't have both the nest egg and was earning consistently.

    I worked both gigs for quite a while and I was able to reinvest a decent portion of my online earnings back into the online business. I also saved a good chunk of it. My point is that although working a 9 to 5 restricts your time with IM, you can reinvest/save all your IM earnings to put in a solid financial position in the future to take the plunge.
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  • Profile picture of the author vivi62
    personally I would not quit my job till I was up and running and assured of a good constant income.
    Best wishes
    vivi62
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  • Profile picture of the author Eyetrap
    My wife and I worked hard and paid off all our debt (cars, 2nd mortage, student loans) except the 1 mortgage...this took us a few years. This enabled me to quit my full time job.

    I built my online income up to about 40-50% of my horrible dream crushing dead end full time job and went for it. This was last march, I've been making more than my old full time job for the last 4 months. An awesome feeling.
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    • Profile picture of the author Msands
      Yeah I'd definitely say try to chug away at making your online business a success while holding down a job. And when you start to see success with your online venture, I'd def. say leave your job and go for it...

      I know personally that it could be hard though tryna hold down a job and then have to come home to deal with two(2) kids...and then having to find time to build your business online...That takes committment...It is in those times I wish to quit my job just to have enough time to develop my thing online...but I have to think about my family and not just me...

      Anyway...Good luck with that!!
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Since you are saying "online"... I would not quit my job first, but if it was "offline" I would make more in one sale probably than most peoples weekly paycheck...so I would make an offline sale before I would even "look" for a job.

    I would rather look for a good offline prospect than a job, and would probably find a decent one faster and get paid quicker.

    Online
    though... its different, you need time to develop, and your money grows more incrementally.
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    • Profile picture of the author LiquidSeo
      John,

      I completely agree. Offline is probably the only real way someone can make "job quitting" income in a short while. Chasing online riches will leave virtually everyone making a few dollars a month at best.

      Brian



      Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

      Since you are saying "online"... I would not quit my job first, but if it was "offline" I would make more in one sale probably than most peoples weekly paycheck...so I would make an offline sale before I would even "look" for a job.

      I would rather look for a good offline prospect than a job, and would probably find a decent one faster and get paid quicker.

      Online
      though... its different, you need time to develop, and your money grows more incrementally.
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  • Profile picture of the author Courtney Lee
    I personally did; but things like that inspire and motivate me!
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  • Profile picture of the author feliciayapsl
    It's best to generate a steady income online 1st before quitting your day job. You won't feel the stress of having to 'make it'.
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  • Profile picture of the author ATH
    scaredy cats.

    balls to the wall. champion.
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    Fully self-employed. Nothing to advertise. Happy with life. There were cup noodles and hard nights along the way.

    Yes, it's possible.

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  • Profile picture of the author gjohansson1
    I pretty much havent had a real job since 2009...

    I only REALLY started marketing online (as opposed to tinkering around) in the beginning of this year.

    I have been able to make some decent cash monthly, but its been really difficult.

    I have spent money on crappy ads and useless products then had no way to recover that money.

    I have cancelled aweber 3 times this year because of stupid mistakes.

    Then again, I don't really put in as much effort as I should have.

    If you're truly dedicated, then there's no reason why you couldn't blog your day away and make it work.

    My personal opinion?

    Keep a job until you make 3 times as much as your job per month.

    My job pays $0 per month and 3x0=0 but thats not the point! lol
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  • Profile picture of the author 3bagsfull
    6 months minimum of saved cash -- get rid of all of your extras -- go down to the bone -- no extra cable channels -- get rid of landline -- clip coupons

    find out what exactly you are willing to give up -- not eating out -- eating noodles, etc

    too risky to quit without some kind of money in the bank
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  • Profile picture of the author celente
    Here is the question to ask.

    Could you pay your bills, mortgage and other costs with your onine stream of income.

    If NO, stay in job..... If YES..... quit your job, tell your boss where to shove it, and then the rest is history.

    I did not do this, until my online income was double my job income. that gave me a bit of a head start and was able to start outsourcing straight away.
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  • Profile picture of the author sal64
    Ok, here's my spin...

    If you start part time, then it takes longer, but you can afford to learn and fail on the job... without the financial repercussions.

    If you decide to quit then I reckon you'd want to have some sort of business plan and be damn sure you know what you're doing.

    I've seen some clueless people sink a lot of good money into a bad business. IM is no different.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chicago87
    Should someone that is young, and living with their parents quit their job?
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  • Profile picture of the author Nics
    Keep the job to fund the business.

    When starting out in internet marketing you need tools. Hopefully soon you will start to see a trickle of income and that will only just cover the tools you need. Then you might start to make some profit over and above your tools. Then you should probably reinvest that in some outsourcing so again you'll be back to even.

    When you start to see profit over and above your tools and outsourcing and you have at the very least replaced your income from you job only then should you even "consider" leaving your job.

    My two cents
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  • Profile picture of the author bobbyhuang
    I think it's ok to quit your job if you have a large cushion of savings and not as many obligations (kids, wife, family, etc).

    In The Art of War, one tactic used to win battles is take your army across a river.

    Unload all supplies, weapons etc.

    Now, burn the boats you used to get across the river.

    The enemy army is advancing on your army, they have more people and more supplies and a route to retreat in.

    Your army has no route to retreat in, it's either Fight or Fight.

    The enemy army can choose to Fight or Flight.

    Your army, with it's back to a river, knows there is no way out but to win in this fight.

    The morale of your troops is raised to amazing levels, the enemies can see it in your eyes.

    Your army has no where to go and clashes with the enemy army with so much energy and ruthlessness that the enemy army retreats because they CAN retreat.

    The lesson is basically this:

    If you HAVE to succeed or ELSE, you are far more likely to succeed.

    So many people will disagree with this, because people LOVE to have options.

    Options have been the enemy of many successful people and companies.

    For example, Apple. They could build low cost computers like dell. But they choose to focus on the high end market and on user experience.

    “In the summer of 2007, Dell was the biggest PC manufacturer in the world, with a whopping 30 percent share of the U.S. market. Apple trailed third, with a much smaller 6.3 market share. Yet in the third quarter of 2007, Apple reported a record profit of $818 million, while Dell, which sells more than five times as many machines, earned only $2.8 million in profit.”

    2.8 Million in profit, that just blows my mind.

    Right now apple also makes around 50% of the net profit of smart phones with a very small share of the market.

    There are so many articles about android over taking apple in market share, but in the end, profit matters more, even if there are less people buying.

    I'm not saying you can't succeed unless you 100% focus on what you want to succeed at, you can, but it will take a longer time.

    If there are 182 steps to create a successful online business, doing it part time might take 4 years instead of 1 year full time to follow the 182 steps.
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  • Profile picture of the author CyberAlien
    I'm glad to hear everyone's opinions on this - it's been awhile since I worked for anyone else and was making sure that I wasn't going crazy. I have people argue with me on a daily basis about if it would be better for them to quit their day job.

    I normally have 3 criteria before suggesting that to them:

    1. You need to be making about 3x as much as you're making at the normal job.

    2. You need to have been making the above about for at least 3 consecutive months.

    3. You should only quit if it is effecting you actually increasing your revenue online - otherwise, just keep both streams of revenue.

    But for some reason people think that they can just work real hard and not need their day job, which I do think is definitely possible - but definitely not something I would ever recommend to someone.
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    If you can afford to pay your bills with savings and have enough to last 6 months to a year I can see it. If you can give yourself fully to a business you will be more likely to succeed in it.

    But just like starting on the side it is about your skill as a business owner. Can you make money doing what you choose to do. Can you put in the time and/or money it takes to get the business going.

    If you can starting a business is a great things to do. But if you quit with no plan you will fail.

    For most people this means starting on the side while your job pays your bills.
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    • Profile picture of the author johhno131
      Some of us have found ourselves in the unfortunate situation of losing our job and struggling to find a new one after almost 20 years with the same employer.

      I did leave with about 16 months of money, but it is still really stressful trying to find your way in IM.

      The problem is that little periods of desperation creep in and your mind goes to the next big money maker, and then nothing ever gets finished, so you are back to where you started but less money.

      My advice is to start a single project at a time, finish it regardless of how long it takes and then move to the next, but do it whilst you are still in employment if you can and keep that safety net behind you.
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      • Profile picture of the author spirituscorpus
        Originally Posted by johhno131 View Post

        My advice is to start a single project at a time, finish it regardless of how long it takes and then move to the next, but do it whilst you are still in employment if you can and keep that safety net behind you.
        The problem with that philosophy is you might be drilling for oil in a dry oil field and no matter how long you spend on a given project it might be fruitless.

        It's not what people what to hear but sometimes you have to move onto something else. Luck and instinct will tell you when.
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        • Profile picture of the author sal64
          All valid points.

          The key is that money loves speed.

          So before you undertake any project, IMO it must meet certain "speed" criteria... or at the very least, some sort of test such as a sample offer. Then roll it out if successful.

          This is where many get it wrong both on line and off. They start with this grand idea... add emotional attachment... only to find out later that it's a fail.

          Sal

          Originally Posted by spirituscorpus View Post

          The problem with that philosophy is you might be drilling for oil in a dry oil field and no matter how long you spend on a given project it might be fruitless.

          It's not what people what to hear but sometimes you have to move onto something else. Luck and instinct will tell you when.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan92
    This is a fascinating issue. I would definitely advocate staying conservative, which means keeping the job for whatever time is reasonable.

    I think that if you have a few months worth of living expenses saved, an obviously growing business and no foreseeable major expenses in the near future, then this is plausible. It does cost to NOT work on a business of course.
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    • Profile picture of the author bitriot
      If you are new to IM I would highly recommend keeping your job. The reason for this is that IM takes time. Even if you are doing everything PERFECTLY, it is going to take time to see the results. And if you are like the rest of us, it is going to take you a long time to do everything perfectly. For me the time is not about earning potential but rather about how long it will take you to learn what you are doing.
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    • Profile picture of the author webmazter
      Wow I just read the post..........lol nice teaser

      Everyone knows a rocket scientist would not quit their job
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      • Profile picture of the author steppinonup
        Remember the old adage "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush". This would probably go for most normal people. OTOH this all depends on the individual. How confident are they, how resourceful are they, how gifted are they, how much determination and elbow grease drive do they have, how many people of significance for where they desire to go do they have contact with, how much financial resources do they possess and do they have an extremely strong gut feeling about this?
        If their gut feeling isn't very, very strong then when adversity presents itself, failure through quitting will appear appealing.
        It's your life, choose wisely and receive counsel from those you trust.
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  • Profile picture of the author discrat
    Originally Posted by Chase Watts View Post

    Over the years I have had a lot of questions from people asking if I would suggest quitting their job before making money online.

    Here is their philosophy: If they quit their job then they have tons of time to spend dedicated to making money online.

    The downside: You then don't have that stability for at least a little bit while you're in the process of setting up your first website or launch.

    What's your philosophy on this?
    Being a stay at home dad I cannot quit my job !!
    Its a two headed sword though. I want to always be with my children throughout the day but I get only a couple hours with IM
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  • Profile picture of the author royljestr
    No way! You gotta be able to pay the bills! The only way that I would suggest that someone does this is if they already have enough in savings to carry all of their expenses for a year or so.
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  • Profile picture of the author Colin Palfrey
    Well I just went for it and succeeded. I had no savings at all, a family to feed and a pile of debt. As mentioned above, it becomes a fight or die situation. Not fight or flight, as the second option is no longer available to you.

    Some people change and become not only great workers but great thinkers when they are put in that much trouble, while others collapse in on themselves and retreat into what they know. If you suffer depression then you should stick to a much more secure plan of action. Having to make money and having no option but success, focuses the mind beautifully. However, this is only the case if you can deal with the disaster your life becomes until you can pull it back out of the s**t.

    Only you know how much stress you can handle. I would say though, if you don't handle extreme levels of stress positively, stay in work until your IM income exceeds your wages.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tyler Colby
    depends on the amount of savings you have built up - expect at least 6 months of no income...
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    • Profile picture of the author Chaddy
      I would never quit my job to do this starting up. I'm probably too conservative in that I would have to be making quite a bit of money to even consider quitting once my project got rolling.

      However my case is a little different in that I have a job I love doing and offers me a lot of free time to work on my project.
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  • Profile picture of the author jamesrich1
    I say just become a obsessed workaholic. Keep your job and dedicate most of your free time towards building a business. It will work better if you and your spouse do this as a team. Two people's minds are better than one.
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  • Profile picture of the author spirituscorpus
    I'm current doing precisely that !

    In August our department at work was made redundant For the last few years I've been doing IM in the evenings and weekends but it's tough thinking straight after you've already put in a full days shift at the office. Despire that I've had some months where I've equalled my monthly salary and many months where I've only been a few hundred down.

    A week after my redundancy I was offered another full time position somewhere which I readily accepted but I hated the new position. I then decided to take a long hard look at myself and decide what I should do.

    I could carry on with what I had been doing but wondered would I ever make enough money to quit my daytime job. Probably not if I just did a few hours a week so I decided to quit my new job and go full time on internet marketing.

    I have money saved up from my past online earnings and will use less than 40% of those savings to last me for six months (that's assuming I earn nothing at all in those six months).

    If it doesn't work out then I will find myself in the job market again in six months time but at least I will know that I have tried.

    PS I have a mortgage and bills to pay so it's not been an easy decision
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  • Profile picture of the author mskerry
    I wouldn't recommend embarking on anything unless you had a great plan and confidence to promote the product or service. The great thing about this industry is that you can still test while working full time then if you succeed then consider taking the plunge
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  • Profile picture of the author Chulbul Pandey
    I actually did that..and lemme tell u its a really bad idea.. Never quit ur job till you have set up a system and are actually making money..!
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  • Profile picture of the author Keith Everett
    Staying in your job until you make enough money part time seems the logical thing to do. The trouble with logic is, it's not always correct.

    I quit my job with a few thousand in savings but in truth it did take me over a year to really make any money online. I should have stayed in my job before taking that leap of faith... BUT..

    Sometimes though, if you stay in your job, you just DON'T get anywhere. Often you are too tired to think when you get home from the daily grind.

    I did quit my job a few years back right on Christmas, no safety net and a mortgage to pay, to sell on eBay - I figured if it didn't work out, I could always go back to work...

    Luckily for me it did work out..

    Go with your heart but also make sure you have some back up...

    Keith
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  • Profile picture of the author Brendan Vraibel
    Don't quit your job until you already have the money coming in. Being your own boss is harder than it is perceived. You can never predict the future and even though you think you have the hang of something, you'll never know until you do it.

    What happens if it doesn't work out? There can't be much of a contingency plan.
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Chase Watts View Post

    Over the years I have had a lot of questions from people asking if I would suggest quitting their job before making money online.

    Here is their philosophy: If they quit their job then they have tons of time to spend dedicated to making money online.

    The downside: You then don't have that stability for at least a little bit while you're in the process of setting up your first website or launch.

    What's your philosophy on this?
    You can't put food on the table or pay bills on dreams. A lot of people never make a dime. What will they do if it doesn't pan out?
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  • My philosophy would be to work FULL time on your job and PART time on your business. Until cashflow from your business overtakes or exceeds the income from your job then think about quitting your job. I would wait until your business is making twice as much as your job and then I would seriously think about quiting your job and continue to work 'full time' on your business. Makes sense?
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanyu
    I wouldn't suggest anyone to quit their job before they have found their own systems making them money.

    There are many good advices above and in my opinion the biggest problem with quiting your job before you have a strong income stream is the feeling of being anxiety and hurry.

    As @Kelly Verge mentioned above, the cash flow is the main issue you will face. If you start to feel hurry, there are more chances that you are going to make bad decisions and cannot really focus on one strategy at a time.

    I don't believe if someone says he/she doesn't have enough time to do the Internet marketing business by keeping their daily job. That's an excuse from their life patterns formed by their habits. They need to change their habits and make time to do the Internet marketing as a part-time before quitting their jobs.

    There is a book titled "Before You Quit Your Job" written by Robert Kiyosaki and it will give you very nice ideas of what needs to be done before quitting your job.
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  • Profile picture of the author Viremia
    I did it. I have quit my job and began digging through the internet to try and make money online. It has been 2 years now.
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  • Profile picture of the author World Marketing
    Definitely keep your day job...I currently work part time to fund my IM business...but that extra money can be so helpful
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  • Profile picture of the author Osman_M
    Having a stable income coming in every month could valuable or invaluable. It depends on the person. I have seen people do very well after quitting there job and I have seen some do the opposite. So it really depends on the person.
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  • Profile picture of the author tracy821
    Hi, I would say NO!!! I am embarrassed to admit how long it's taken me to finally buckle down and focus and earn my first bit of money. It's starting to come in in trickles and I'm working on making those trickles into streams and eventually I will have a nice lake. In the meantime, I'm still working full-time as a counselor to kids in foster care and running a part-time private practice.

    It would be wise to sit down and make a written business plan to help you maintain focus. It would also give you the hard numbers you need to have to let you know when you can let the JOB go and work entirely for yourself.

    Best wishes for much success!
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  • Profile picture of the author officer_iron
    There's no way that I would quit my job before proving that I can make a consistent enough income from IM. Tons of people have flash-in-the-pan success that makes them a lot of money, but only lasts a short time. You need to know that you can sustain the income.
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  • Profile picture of the author FromBrokeToRich
    Unless you don't want to end up out on the streets... Keep your job until your making at least what your job pays you, and have done so consistently for at least a few months.
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  • Profile picture of the author Damielle
    I actually did this and recommend that you at least be earning a steady income online before quitting your 9 to 5.

    Sure I had more time to work on my business, but at first I was operating like I was on vacation and it took months before I started to make money online.

    I had to learn some serious time & money management skills. Its not easy when you are your own boss especially if its the first time running your own business. I found that the mindset change was my biggest hurdle.

    So I would definitely recommend having some steady income before quitting your 9 to 5. Things never quite work out exactly as we plan so its always nice to have something to fall back on
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  • I would never recommend for someone to quit their job until they're able to make at least as much as they're making on their job in their spare time.
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  • Profile picture of the author IMSince2003
    Originally Posted by Chase Watts View Post

    Over the years I have had a lot of questions from people asking if I would suggest quitting their job before making money online.

    Here is their philosophy: If they quit their job then they have tons of time to spend dedicated to making money online.

    The downside: You then don't have that stability for at least a little bit while you're in the process of setting up your first website or launch.

    What's your philosophy on this?
    Unless you live in your parent's basement rent free, ABSOLUTELY NOT!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author monetization
    It's totally based off of your financial circumstances.

    If you are seeing small CONSISTENT success with making money online, BUT your job is slowing down your progress AND you have enough money to live off of for at least 3 months, THEN it may make sense to leave your job.

    The reality is that you are going from being an employee to owning your own business. Unless you have a job where you get paid bonuses based on your production (like a sales job or executive position), then the mental transition may be difficult. A lot of people squander the extra-time they have available when they leave their job, because they haven't mastered managing their time yet.

    Also, no longer having that steady paycheck coming in, and knowing that you will most likely need to re-invest your online earnings back into you business, will take some getting used to.

    I would recommend practicing good financial management of your money before jumping from your job to your own business full-time.

    The only exceptions I could see to this would be if you live with someone who has enough money to take care of your expenses while you build up your business, or if you have such a low paying job that it wouldn't take much effort to replace your salary.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alfred Shelver
    I would only consider it if you have a fantastic support structure, maybe a spouse or parents who agree withnyourndecsion and will help you. Doing that on your own with no help could be disastrous.
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    • Profile picture of the author 711gemstone
      In these hard times it is best to get prepared when you change jobs. Like they have been saying in the posts above don't quit your day job before you try im. However if you are already out of work. Do what you can until im starts working.
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  • Profile picture of the author marceauct
    thers so much to know and learn , i would not give up your sure thing until you have some success with this first
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  • Profile picture of the author john1818
    I just want to share my story regarding this.

    I was 17 years old when I start working with a company on a part-time basis (I was still studying back then). They are paying me just enough for my needs. When Internet kicked in, my curiosity aroused. It amazed me and sparked up my imagination. "It could be a goldmine" I said to myself.
    That's the time that I resigned to my job and choose to work on the net.

    I'm a gambler. I take things the hard way and I like a hell lot of challenges. I learned a lot of things because of that.
    It's hard at first specially in my part, because I was working with pay-per sign up campaign over the internet while studying. I only sleep for 5-6 hours a day. I have NO knowledge about affiliate marketing nor SEO back then. I just a nerdy guy who wants to read to learn stuffs, and I learned it over the net.

    I earn my money based on commission based sites that offers : Pay Per Sign-up, Pay per leads, Lead Generation, and Selling my own products online (Buy and Sell).

    My thinking back then was like this. If I were to quit my job and put my time and effort in Online Business/Marketing that would be a challenge for me. I'm outside the comfort zone and I must work hard in order to survive.

    Some people will be scared without a steady financial income but on my part? That would be an awesome challenge. It's hard at first, but when I received my first paycheck that's worth $100 it feels incredible. It's like I'm the king of the world and was very proud of it.

    Experience is my greatest mentor and I can say that I've overcome the fear of not being in the comfort zone. I experienced rough times, even my friends told me to get a "decent job" but it didn't stop me for believing in myself. I worked harder this time and after a few months, I've received my first $500 a week income. It was Purely based from commissions, and products that been bought from me.
    I remembered going into some nice restaurant to reward myself after that. I continued eating till I can. . It was an overwhelming experience.

    To cut the story short, I've been successful in overcoming this kind of situation and I'm proud of it.

    I'm not saying that I did the right thing, nor that everybody will be successful doing it. My point is, I've done it and I don't have any regrets doing it.

    My next goal for the next 10 years? Be the next Steve Jobs. .

    Thanks for reading,

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author wildjohnny
    Quit your job. If you do that, you will MUST succeed or you will die from hunger.

    But do this only if you are really serious about this. If you only want to "try" yourself in IM, don't quit job.
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  • Profile picture of the author joshmstanton
    I think the best way to think when it comes to this kind of issue is what Robert Kiyosaki mentions in Rich Dad, Poor Dad -

    Step 1: Security(take care of yourself - job)

    Step 2: Get Rich(build passive income streams that FREES you up from your job)

    Step 3: Get Wealthy(when you're rolling in it)

    Simple strategy, but that should be your goal.
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    • Profile picture of the author spirituscorpus
      A lot of responsible suggestions from members on this thread

      I also would not recommend giving up the day job until you have proven to YOURSELF that you can earn as much as your monthly expenditure via IM.

      I based my decision on the fact that I have been able to reach this figure before I decided to quit my job so I have the confidence and belief I can do better if I commit myself full time.

      I'm going to throw a spanner in the works here and say that if you're TOO responsible and TOO cautious then you won't get far.

      I'm a typical "steady Eddie" character. I'm careful with my money and don't take many risks but I realised that if I continued doing IM in my spare evenings and weekends then the reality was I would only every really have a part time income from it.

      Every situation is different and you need to weigh up your own circumstances
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  • Profile picture of the author Kashi456
    Personally, I started out as when I was 15 (17 now ) so I didn't have a job in the first place. I am making a full time income from my business but if I was older and was working before I started, and also if I was independent, I would not quit my job unless I was making 4x as much online.

    Business I about sales, sometimes I make a lot per week and sometimes I don't make a lot, so in order to keep secure, I would imagine I would have to earn 4x as much online of what I was getting from my job, if I had one and was thinking of quitting.

    So quitting your job before making a decent income online would be a big gamble.

    Thanks
    Bilaal
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  • Profile picture of the author rockong
    I actually did just that...I'm leaving my job to pursue a full time living online. However, certain things factored into that:

    1) I have a comfortable amount of savings to get me through "rough times" if business does not pick up
    2) I have little to no debt
    3) I make some money online and I know the exact direction I plan to take it. It just requires time to find the clients now
    4) I've learned a lot over the years. I've failed plenty during that time as well.

    So in short, everybodys situation is different. Def don't quit if you haven't accumulated enough knowledge or have even tried implementing techniques and stuff you've learned. There's still a large learning curve.

    And don't quit just because you hate your job. Then you'll be leaving for the wrong reason. You should be leaving because you know you can grow your online business by spending more time on it. Get that confidence and you'll just have a feeling to take the dive

    Best of luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeff Bronson
    If your job is a stable one you've had for years....first see some success with your online business, then save 6 - 12 months worth of backup funds and reconsider.

    Ideally you'd at least be making as much money with your online projects first.

    The pressure you will feel during low cash flow periods will be intense, and potentially make you lose focus on the goal.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeff Parker
    Never quit your job if you are not making money online.

    If you don't get any money within the first several weeks then you will start thinking you can't make money online. But in order to make a stable income online it takes time.

    There is no such thing as a Instant Millionaire online.
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  • Profile picture of the author HairyPoppins
    Would I do it? Absolutely not.

    Do I understand the thought process behind it? I do.

    I think it would only be a good idea if you had a real nice nest egg and a back up plan just in case you're plans don't work out.

    I do get it though. If you don't have an income source then the flame under your ass is going to be pretty hot for you to start getting stuff down and to focus. It's a great incentive to not goof off. With that said some people don't do well under pressure.
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  • Profile picture of the author theebookcavern
    I think it completely depends on the individual and their circumstances. I am quite surprised to see a lot of people saying you need to be matching your salary before considering it though. I don't think this is absolutely necessary if you can answer the following questions:

    1) What's Your Current Financial Situation?

    If you have a year's worth of savings and no debts then quitting your job is obviously a lot more viable than if you have no savings and a lot of debts. In the first situation I would say quitting your job is viable as you have a full year to make it work which is definitely possible. In the second situation I would say quitting your job is only realistic if you have a pretty strong online business already.

    2) How Much Experience And Success Do You Have Online?

    If you have only been doing IM for 6 months and are already earning half your salary then I would say quitting is definitely a viable option. If you can earn half your salary in 6 months part time then you should be able to scale this up a lot more quickly once you are able to focus on IM full time. However, if you have been doing IM for 5 years and still have had little success then quitting is not option till you find something that works for you.

    3) What Do You Stand To Lose From Failure?

    If you are single, have limited financial commitments, your IM income is growing MOM and you truly believe it can be successful based on past performance then I would say go for it. If you fail you will lose some money and have a bit of egg on your face but at least you will know that it either works or it doesn't work.

    If you have a family to support and a mortgage to pay then obviously you have a lot more to lose. Your decision could put your family in jeopardy and could lead to you losing your home. The cost of failure here is very high and in most cases isn't worth the risk.

    4) How Self Motivated Are You?

    Personally, I'm pretty good at setting myself targets and getting them done. However, I know a lot of people who would crumble if they worked from home and would get absolutely nothing done. Deep down you probably know if you need a boss pushing you to work or if you can push yourself. If you need a boss then definitely don't quit your job. If you can motivate yourself quitting is an option.

    I'd say once you've answered those questions you can make the decision about quitting your job. As I said above I don't agree that you need to be matching your salary. Quitting your job because you hate your boss and you like the idea of working from home but have absolutely no knowledge of IM is insanity. However, if you are generating a reasonable IM income, you have a good plan off how to scale it up when you go full time and have enough funds to keep you going whilst you scale it up I would see it as a calculated risk that could be very lucrative.

    The problem with waiting until you match your salary is this may never happen if you have a very demanding job. Quitting may be the only way to free up the time necessary to scale up your IM. Nonetheless it's a decision you should think about deeply before making the call.

    Tom
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  • Profile picture of the author Zabrina
    There's a gain versus loss way of looking at this decision.

    How much do you gain/lose from quitting your job?
    How much do you gain/lose from going full-time in IM?

    And perhaps more importantly...

    How much do you gain/lose from staying in your job?
    How much do you gain/lose from being a part-time IM'er?

    Think about all these questions carefully before doing it.

    In my case, my decision to quit was based on mental health, as my job was causing me nervous breakdowns and more, and triggered a spell of depression that's only started to lift now (two years later). I wasn't quitting specifically to do IM. I gained my sanity back, but lost steady income; after I'd recovered, I was able to work on being a full-time IM'er, since I didn't need to pay bills until I moved for university.

    If you have to pay bills or face going homeless, the gain of being employed full-time can sometimes be worth it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jouvan Johnson
    I quit my job before making consistent money online..

    The best decision I ever made was fun but hard... I felt like I had burnt all bridges behind me so my only way is forward and up..

    I started IM this year then quit my job and uni a few months ago I am now making money and aim to be on $5k a month by the end of Feb start of March..

    Wish me luck... I am loving the freedom most of all
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  • Profile picture of the author canada94
    Great question! I was always told by a very successful mentor of mine that you build your business along with your j.o.b, then when you are earning 150% more than your full time job for 6 consecutive months, then make the decision.

    Hope this helps


    Kevin
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  • Profile picture of the author nicheblogger75
    In my case I got laid off. HOWEVER, I think it was the best thing that ever happened to me because if it hadn't happened, I never would have discovered Internet Marketing.

    Don't get me wrong, I struggles for quite some time. Luckily, I had a little money saved, and between that and the little bit I was making online, I was able to get by for almost two years.

    I had set a goal for myself to make a full time living in a years time, but it took longer. The point is, I knew that I never wanted to work for anyone else ever again. So, I was forced to succeed, or go back to a grind with my hard work building someone else's business.

    That being said, no, I wouldn't quit a job if I had one to get into Internet Marketing. It was strictly an unfortunate turn of events that brought me to Internet Marketing. I now believe that everything does happen for a reason!
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  • Profile picture of the author infomaniacs
    I would love to be able to up and leave my day job, but rely on the income too much. I wish I had started this when I was a SAHM and we survived on one income, but now we have gotten used to two incomes (and mine is significantly higher than OHs) and are used to a certain standard of living, I won't be able to quit until I can at least replace my income.
    Have tried lots of different things while working, little bit of success with some, none with others, but I think I have found my perfect business now. I have set a goal to hand in my resignation by Christmas 2012, just have to put my plans into action to get there now
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  • Profile picture of the author ColinT
    Never put all your eggs in one basket....need I say more?
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  • Profile picture of the author markdobson
    Thanks for asking a well thought question

    I will not quit job rather I will manage to do both
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  • Profile picture of the author Irwin Dominguez
    It really depends on your situation (like so many people have mentioned already) - are you living at home with your parents? How much debt do you have? Do you have any kids? Do you have a mortgage to pay for?

    It really depends - also you have to factor in your risk tolerance...

    Different people will give you different answers - do what's right for you based on your situation (that's my advice).
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