Your Sales SUCK and Here Is Why....

by tpw
37 replies
If I told you that your sales sucked because you suck, I would just be doing that to annoy you... Not because I believed it...

:p

Dennis Gaskill just made an excellent post about conveying value to your prospective customers, and he was right, but he did not mention the most common mistake that online sellers make.

I see all the time sales pages that effectively convey value in the offer, but fail to get the sale...

Why? Because the seller drops the ball in the sales copy...

At the point in the sales page where it really matters, the seller loses his or her nerve and chickens out doing what they need to do...

Why do people fear so much "asking for the sale"??

I don't know, especially since they are usually talking to people they do not know and will never meet in person, and especially since they are "asking for the sale" anonymously online rather than face-to-face...

I see people all of the time who make an excellent case for their product or service, but when it comes time to ask me to actually buy their offer, the seller starts to waffle and hem-haw around!!

Let me tell you why this is so bad from the standpoint of a consumer...

If the seller fails to demonstrate enough confidence in his or her offer to ask me for the sale, then I start to lose my confidence in the seller's offer!!

I cannot tell you how many times I found myself looking at an offer that interested me only to lose confidence in my decision to buy, because the seller actually lost confidence in their offer when it was time to tell me to hit the buy button.

If you don't have enough confidence in your offer to ask me to buy it, then why should I have enough confidence to get out my credit card?
#asking for the sale #closing #copy writing #sales #sales copy
  • Profile picture of the author Bill Farnham
    Let me bring this into the real world with an example of what Bill is talking about...

    Years ago I bought the sportfishing boat of my dreams. Being as it was for deep sea fishing I also wanted to equip it with some really stout deep sea rods and reels. Specifically, the kind I could use for trolling, which is a method of fishing.

    So I went to the local fishing guru, a guy all of us knew and respected, the kind of guy who was always featured in the local fishing rag. A super nice guy who had recently opened up his own bait and tackle shop.

    So he takes the time to explain to me the various differences between the rods and reels he sells, and also gives me the benefit of his years of knowledge on why those would be a good choice.

    So there I am standing there expecting to make an on-the-spot purchase, checkbook in hand, and then unexpectedly he says to me..."Take your time, and come back when you're ready to decide what you want buy, and I'll be here."

    "WHAT?!?" my brain thought? Did I just get broomed? Is this some protocal I'm not aware of? WTF just happened?

    I left the store thinking to myself, "I need the stuff before the weekend", and headed over to another albeit chain sporting goods store where I ran into an ex-charterboat captain who was now working the fishing counter at that store.

    I told him the same story that I told the other guy, only this time he walks me over to where the stuff was I wanted and goes, "Here, you'll need two of these". as he takes two rods from the rack and hands them to me, and "You'll need two of these", as he hands me a different set of rods from another rack.

    He does the same thing when we get to the reel counter and hands me four reels, two of each style, and walks over to the cash register where I write him out a check for nearly $1000 in 1986 money. I walked out of the store with exactly what I needed and used those rods and reels for years.

    So what happened there...?

    The first guy, who unfortunately went out of business within a year, did everything right except to recognize that I was expecting a "buying experience". I came there to BUY four rods and reels. The second guy did what is called "assuming the sale" and SOLD me exactly what I was looking for.

    Now getting back to Bill's last point, I could have forced the sale with the first guy, but since he was the one that indicated, at least subliminally, that it wasn't the right time to buy, I didn't. And the weird thing to me at the time was I got the vibe, call it a lack of confidence to force the sale, that right then wasn't the time to buy. Believe it or not it actually works that way some times.

    ~Bill
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by Bill Farnham View Post

      The first guy, who unfortunately went out of business within a year, did everything right except to recognize that I was expecting a "buying experience". I came there to BUY four rods and reels. The second guy did what is called "assuming the sale" and SOLD me exactly what I was looking for.

      Bill: Incredible example. Thank you.

      I would differ with you on only one point...

      The second guy was "assuming the sale", and the first guy was "assuming the fail".
      Signature
      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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    • Profile picture of the author celente
      Originally Posted by Bill Farnham View Post

      Let me bring this into the real world with an example of what Bill is talking about...

      Years ago I bought the sportfishing boat of my dreams. Being as it was for deep sea fishing I also wanted to equip it with some really stout deep sea rods and reels. Specifically, the kind I could use for trolling, which is a method of fishing.

      So I went to the local fishing guru, a guy all of us knew and respected, the kind of guy who was always featured in the local fishing rag. A super nice guy who had recently opened up his own bait and tackle shop.

      So he takes the time to explain to me the various differences between the rods and reels he sells, and also gives me the benefit of his years of knowledge on why those would be a good choice.

      So there I am standing there expecting to make an on-the-spot purchase, checkbook in hand, and then unexpectedly he says to me..."Take your time, and come back when you're ready to decide what you want buy, and I'll be here."

      "WHAT?!?" my brain thought? Did I just get broomed? Is this some protocal I'm not aware of? WTF just happened?

      I left the store thinking to myself, "I need the stuff before the weekend", and headed over to another albeit chain sporting goods store where I ran into an ex-charterboat captain who was now working the fishing counter at that store.

      I told him the same story that I told the other guy, only this time he walks me over to where the stuff was I wanted and goes, "Here, you'll need two of these". as he takes two rods from the rack and hands them to me, and "You'll need two of these", as he hands me a different set of rods from another rack.

      He does the same thing when we get to the reel counter and hands me four reels, two of each style, and walks over to the cash register where I write him out a check for nearly $1000 in 1986 money. I walked out of the store with exactly what I needed and used those rods and reels for years.

      So what happened there...?

      The first guy, who unfortunately went out of business within a year, did everything right except to recognize that I was expecting a "buying experience". I came there to BUY four rods and reels. The second guy did what is called "assuming the sale" and SOLD me exactly what I was looking for.

      Now getting back to Bill's last point, I could have forced the sale with the first guy, but since he was the one that indicated, at least subliminally, that it wasn't the right time to buy, I didn't. And the weird thing to me at the time was I got the vibe, call it a lack of confidence to force the sale, that right then wasn't the time to buy. Believe it or not it actually works that way some times.

      ~Bill
      I have a similar story when I was younger selling stuff. But this is very important to learn, study and understand the experience.

      You do learn as you go but with this sort of stuff.
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      • Profile picture of the author clove
        Banned
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        • Profile picture of the author tpw
          Originally Posted by clove View Post

          It's psychological:

          If you just have the stuff, the customer has to MAKE THE DECISION TO MAKE THE PURCHASE.

          If you put the stuff in front of the customer and begin to ring him up, he has to MAKE THE DECISION TO STOP THE PURCHASE.

          Unfortunately, I doubt this applies to a landing page.

          The same principles apply to online and offline, but it is not nearly as easy as touching their arm and leading them to the cash register on a landing page.
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          Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
          Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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    • Profile picture of the author ant888
      Thanks for the in-depth version
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim_Carter
    Well said Bill.

    That will put it in perspective for those who weren't getting it.
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  • Profile picture of the author art72
    If that isn't a wake up call... "I'm speechless!"

    Keyword: [confidence] - Something I had for years in business offline, and somehow have yet to enforce online.

    Thank You Gentlemen!!!

    -Art
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    Coming Soon... *Laser Targeted Lead Generation Services
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  • Profile picture of the author SEOemotheraphy
    True, I feel the same way too Bill, Its all about the confidence of the seller in his product.
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  • Profile picture of the author UMS
    Bill,that example speaks volumes. As a seller, you really need to have confidence in your product/s and be able to read your potential customers so that you know what information to feed them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    Bill Platt stole my next thread topic!

    Just kidding . . . sort of. Nice post, Bill. Couldn't have said it any better.

    To bring together the thread I started (that Bill mentioned in his OP) with this one, a person can also ask for the sale too soon. If you haven't established the value I wrote about, asking for the sale isn't going to bring many positive results.

    Now, Bill, which of us will start the "importance of the PS" thread first?
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    Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    You should never be afraid to ask for the sale. If the customer isn't ready they will tell you.

    A customer wants to be asked to buy. As customers we expect it.
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by lordauric View Post

      You should never be afraid to ask for the sale. If the customer isn't ready they will tell you.

      A customer wants to be asked to buy. As customers we expect it.

      Interestingly, having worked as a face-to-face sales person, I have learned as many sales people have learned that "no" seldom means "no".

      More often, "no" means "not yet".

      If a prospect is standing in front of you listening to your pitch, they are interested in what you have to say.

      If you ask them for the sale and they say "no", they are basically telling you that you have yet to answer all of their questions.

      "No" is an invite to keep talking.

      Only when you hear something like "Kiss my fat ass," is the conversation over. :p
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      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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      • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
        Originally Posted by tpw View Post

        Interestingly, having worked as a face-to-face sales person, I have learned as many sales people have learned that "no" seldom means "no".

        More often, "no" means "not yet".

        If a prospect is standing in front of you listening to your pitch, they are interested in what you have to say.

        If you ask them for the sale and they say "no", they are basically telling you that you have yet to answer all of their questions.

        "No" is an invite to keep talking.
        Exactly right. No means they need more information. It's your chance to explain the product's value and benefits more fully. That's why a lot of folks don't make good in-person sales people. They take no as a rejection rather than an opportunity.
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        Just when you think you've got it all figured out, someone changes the rules.

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  • Profile picture of the author JCorp
    For every "No" you receive, you're one closer to a "Yes"... and you really have to believe in your product. There was a time when I sold a fixer upper to a rehabber, and even though the place was covered in animal feces and rotting garbage, I never hesitated to call it "a beautiful hidden gem with massive buyer potential" during the transaction... If I remembered correctly I closed on that home in less than a week.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheInternet
    This works outside sales too. Embedding a request for comments below posts on my blog increased comments by ∞.

    Sometimes I forget to add it to things and remind myself of why being explicit about what you want someone to do is important.
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  • Profile picture of the author WakondaMarketing
    Very well said, Bill. This will keep others who are lost back in track.
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    Wakonda Marketing Inc
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  • Profile picture of the author Elizabeth Fee
    Very good information - especially for someone like me who tends to be less aggressive. More like lack of sales experience, but I'm getting there.

    On the flip side though... while I totally and completely agree that the seller MUST show confidence in his/her product, the seller can also go way too far in that direction.

    I'm talking about pressure sales - not taking "no" for an answer, pushing, and then getting dramatic or upset when the buyer still refuses to buy.

    I realize this isn't what you are preaching here.... just making a point that sometimes a seller can go a bit TOO far to the other extreme of confidence.

    I am just thinking of a time where my husband and I got roped into a free breakfast at a vacation resort where we were then taken into a room with tables and a sales person sat down to discuss with us the opportunities of owning a timeshare. His intent was to get us to sign up right then and there. While he was completely confident and handed us the pen to sign the "paperwork", we said NO and that we were not interested, nor would we ever be interested in their product and thanked him for his time.

    Things got REALLY interesting there... he got up and started intimidating us into why our decision was horrible... he even threw a chair down for the dramatic effect (scare tactic, maybe?) to get us to buy. We ran as far away as we could from this company.

    I've also seen instances online where you go through a sales video (great and inspiring) then get told you are getting the best deal for whatever price. If you're not quite ready to buy and try to leave the page, you get a pop up saying, "Wait! If you buy now, I'll slash another $10 off!"... then you try to leave again with another pop up saying, "AND I'll throw in a freebie!".... By the 3rd pop up, I have lost interest... again, seems like too much hoopla by that point (almost seems a bit desperate to me... but maybe that's just me).

    Again, I have a LOT to learn and really value this information about asking the buyer to buy your product. In fact, I am going to start going in with that mindset of "assuming the sale".

    I just suspect that there is a fine line in there somewhere where a seller can start going a bit too far and end up losing the sale.

    Thanks again for the valuable advice!

    Elizabeth Fee
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    Elizabeth Fee
    The Niche Mom - My personal blog to inspire and guide you towards earning an income online.

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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by feetwins View Post

      I just suspect that there is a fine line in there somewhere where a seller can start going a bit too far and end up losing the sale.

      There certainly is a fine line. It resides firmly between desperation (pretend confidence) and confidence.
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      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
        I want to try to clarify what Bill means by "asking for the sale" because I don't
        think he literally means that in your sales copy you should write...

        "Buy my product! NOW!"

        It's a subtle thing in itself and the master copywriters know how to do it.
        Each of us has our own style.

        Personally, what I do, after explaining all the benefits and showing how the
        price is ridiculously cheap for what they're getting, is say something like this
        at the end of the sales letter.

        "If you can't see that this offer is a no brainer and something you need to jump
        on immediately, I have to seriously question your sanity."

        "Either way, this offer is going to go FAST and when they're all sold out
        they're GONE FOR GOOD " (Yes, most products I now sell have limited
        quantities)

        So I combine the "you're stupid if you don't buy this" (without actually
        calling them stupid) with the "You snooze you lose" pitch and between
        the two, the product goes...FAST.

        If you don't have enough confidence in what you're selling to make people
        realize that it's something they MUST have, then why are you selling it in
        the first place?

        I have confidence in EVERYTHING I sell. In my mind, my products are the
        BEST you can buy.

        I have to think that way. I have no choice. Otherwise, insecurity is going to
        make me do what too many marketers do...hem and haw and ultimately say
        something like...

        "So you think maybe you'd like to buy my product? If you don't want to, I
        understand. After all, it's not really that good but maybe you'll buy it because
        I've been honest with your about how so-so it is."

        If you don't believe in what you sell get out of the business.

        Thank you Bill for yet another no holds barred look at why so many people
        suck at selling stuff online.
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    • Profile picture of the author Levira
      Originally Posted by feetwins View Post


      I've also seen instances online where you go through a sales video (great and inspiring) then get told you are getting the best deal for whatever price. If you're not quite ready to buy and try to leave the page, you get a pop up saying, "Wait! If you buy now, I'll slash another $10 off!"... then you try to leave again with another pop up saying, "AND I'll throw in a freebie!".... By the 3rd pop up, I have lost interest... again, seems like too much hoopla by that point (almost seems a bit desperate to me... but maybe that's just me).


      Elizabeth Fee
      I agree with you Elizabeth. That has happened to me quite a few times and it sucks. The seller just ends up sounding desperate and will do anything to get hold of your money.
      If they are confident of their product, why should doubt the value of it?
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  • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
    Originally Posted by carolf View Post

    I really enjoyed reading this now what you need to do is go here Why Work With Carol « Carol Finlayson - How To Be Happy click on the paypal button and book that coaching session that you all know you need.

    Thanks
    No, no and no again.

    ...(Now you're mean't to keep talking because I haven't told you to "Kiss my fat ass" yet, as Bill put it )
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    Wibble, bark, my old man's a mushroom etc...

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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by Richard Van View Post

      I really enjoyed reading this now what you need to do is go here Why Work With Carol « Carol Finlayson - How To Be Happy click on the paypal button and book that coaching session that you all know you need.

      Thanks

      No, no and no again.

      ...(Now you're mean't to keep talking because I haven't told you to "Kiss my fat ass" yet, as Bill put it )

      There was an excellent example of pretend confidence. :rolleyes:
      Signature
      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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  • Profile picture of the author Aaron Doud
    Bill I agree. I meant if they are not interested they will tell you by giving you true signs. A salesperson knows to uncover the real reasons behind a no.

    Sometimes the no means "I need to think about it this weekend." Depending on what you sell you close them now and make it no problem for them to cancel on monday. I get this loads in my business and 80 to 90% of them don't cancel.

    Sometimes no means the price doesn't fit their budget. Now you find out more about their budget. Often by doing this I realize I have a unit very close to what they loved that fits their budget. Soemtimes we miss these signs during the sales process so never be afraid to find out why they are saying no.

    There are so many objections(no's) that really mean "yes but....", once you find out the but you can turn it into a real yes.

    But sometiems you will find the no has to mean no because the but is too much. For example someone who wants $15k for their trade when it is worth $5k. The price isn't going to change by $10k and if they are stuck on that price you have to be honest with them. I'd still say I close about 1 in 10 of these guys the following week once they have time to realize the deal is fair. of course if they want $15k because they owe $15k you might not be able to roll that over into the new loan so you have to know when even their yes is going to turn into a no from the bank.

    If you found the right product or service for them and it is in their budget you should be able to close most of them because it is what they want.
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by lordauric View Post

      Bill I agree. I meant if they are not interested they will tell you by giving you true signs. A salesperson knows to uncover the real reasons behind a no.

      Sometimes the no means "I need to think about it this weekend." Depending on what you sell you close them now and make it no problem for them to cancel on monday. I get this loads in my business and 80 to 90% of them don't cancel.

      Sometimes no means the price doesn't fit their budget. Now you find out more about their budget. Often by doing this I realize I have a unit very close to what they loved that fits their budget. Soemtimes we miss these signs during the sales process so never be afraid to find out why they are saying no.

      There are so many objections(no's) that really mean "yes but....", once you find out the but you can turn it into a real yes.

      But sometiems you will find the no has to mean no because the but is too much. For example someone who wants $15k for their trade when it is worth $5k. The price isn't going to change by $10k and if they are stuck on that price you have to be honest with them. I'd still say I close about 1 in 10 of these guys the following week once they have time to realize the deal is fair. of course if they want $15k because they owe $15k you might not be able to roll that over into the new loan so you have to know when even their yes is going to turn into a no from the bank.

      If you found the right product or service for them and it is in their budget you should be able to close most of them because it is what they want.

      I wasn't disagreeing with you. Rather I was amplifying upon what you had said.

      As I will do here as well...

      When I sold cars in the mid-90's, I sucked at it.

      Fortunately, I did not give up on learning the trade...

      When I sold TV's in the early 2000's, I was a much better salesman, but certainly not the best in the building.

      These days, in my business, if someone is willing to pick up the phone and call me to ask me about my services, my closing ratio is generally pretty darn good.

      I have learned to follow all "no" answers with a question.

      It generally goes something like this:

      Me: You seem generally interested in this product/service. Do you mind if I ask what is holding you back?

      Prospect: Sounds out their objection, which could be anything.

      Me: If I could overcome your objection, is this a product/service you think you might be willing to purchase?

      Prospect: If "no", then I seek clarification on the real objection.

      If "yes", then I address the objection shared.

      Me: If I address the objection to what I believe is the prospect's satisfaction, I ask for the sale again.

      Rinse and Repeat as necessary....

      In a nutshell, I am having a conversation with my prospect. I am giving them the information that they need to make a good decision about whether my offer is something they want to purchase.

      By listening to my prospect, I can pick up on nuances in one's voice (and in person, I can pick up on nuances in body language), and I can listen to the words spoken.

      By listening to the spoken and unspoken words, I can help lead a prospect to a decision that is both good for them and good for me.

      Where high-pressure salesmen screw up is that they are only focused on what is good for them, with little to no concern as to what is also good for their prospects.

      A "no" is simply an invite to ask, request and discover what your prospect's concerns may be, so that we can help our prospects overcome their own objections.

      We are doing nothing to them... Instead, we are helping them do for themselves.
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      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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      • Profile picture of the author Robert Puddy
        Originally Posted by tpw View Post

        I wasn't disagreeing with you. Rather I was amplifying upon what you had said.

        As I will do here as well...

        When I sold cars in the mid-90's, I sucked at it.

        Fortunately, I did not give up on learning the trade...

        When I sold TV's in the early 2000's, I was a much better salesman, but certainly not the best in the building.

        These days, in my business, if someone is willing to pick up the phone and call me to ask me about my services, my closing ratio is generally pretty darn good.

        I have learned to follow all "no" answers with a question.

        It generally goes something like this:




        In a nutshell, I am having a conversation with my prospect. I am giving them the information that they need to make a good decision about whether my offer is something they want to purchase.

        By listening to my prospect, I can pick up on nuances in one's voice (and in person, I can pick up on nuances in body language), and I can listen to the words spoken.

        By listening to the spoken and unspoken words, I can help lead a prospect to a decision that is both good for them and good for me.

        Where high-pressure salesmen screw up is that they are only focused on what is good for them, with little to no concern as to what is also good for their prospects.

        A "no" is simply an invite to ask, request and discover what your prospect's concerns may be, so that we can help our prospects overcome their own objections.

        We are doing nothing to them... Instead, we are helping them do for themselves.
        which is why long form sales letters work, because you have to go through that process in print with out the face to face.

        The conversation is virtual and has to cover any ground that might come up
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  • Profile picture of the author GSMarketing
    Thanks for the info Bill, Rich has pointed me in your direction to get to grips with article writing etc so I shall be reading more of your threads.

    Just wanted to touch on Elizabeths point also about the oversell with online products. Products were I click the red X and get offered $10 off, and then I click again and get $20 off etc never convert with me because I do not believe in their true value.

    What I mean by this is if someone was selling me something for $40 but I said no and they just said have it for $30, and then offered it for $20, I would not purchase because they lied in the first place about its $40 value. If it was worth $40 they would not knock $20 in a flash. If they lied about the value initially (im already questioning credibility) and what's to say they're not lying now when they are offering it for $20? It may just be useless info and therefore I'm not going to pay anything for it.

    Hope that makes some form of sense.

    Thanks again

    G
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  • Profile picture of the author WebPen
    Wow- that's an awesome story, Bill.

    It also proves that "being nice" isn't going to get you the sale- you have to want to help the customer, even at the risk of being rejected.
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  • Profile picture of the author tayuyaa
    You are absolutely right sir, this is why anyone starting a business should learn at least some basic sales skills, and once they will, they will never miss a chance to close the deal!

    A good source I recommend to anyone eager to learn how to sell is the free ebook from Bryan Tracy "24 Effective Closing Techniques Up".

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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by tayuyaa View Post

      You are absolutely right sir, this is why anyone starting a business should learn at least some basic sales skills, and once they will, they will never miss a chance to close the deal!

      A good source I recommend to anyone eager to learn how to sell is the free ebook from Bryan Tracy "24 Effective Closing Techniques Up".

      The ebook isn't free. Only the first 2 chapters are.
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      • Profile picture of the author tayuyaa
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        The ebook isn't free. Only the first 2 chapters are.
        Well I joined his list and I received this ebook, I'm just looking at it right now and it's nowhere written that's it's the 2 chapters of an ebook, actually there is no chapters as he only list 24 closing techniques with examples and explication...so maybe we don't speak about the same ebook?
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  • Profile picture of the author Robbie B
    If you don't have enough confidence in your offer to ask me to buy it, then why should I have enough confidence to get out my credit card?
    That's one of the best ways I've heard about "components of a landing page" basically. While I don't have my own product or anything like that, I do have a couple of affiliate websites and the ones that makes the sales here and there are the ones where I have bought the product being offered to learn about the topic. Then blog about it using the information. When you're educated on what you're selling it's a lot easier than just turning up at clickbank, grabbing a link and throwing it around.

    Great way of explaining it, Bill.
    Cheers
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  • Profile picture of the author Dann Vicker
    Okay, that goes to show that if your copywriting sucks, your sales will ultimately suck. It won't be a bad idea to copy successful salespages and model yours after theirs.

    Provided, of course, you also believe in your product.
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    Looking for high quality solo ad traffic? 200-2000 clicks available/day. Testimonials here. PM me

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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Barrs
    Bill, I'll try to keep my typos to a minimum today

    Wanted to ask if I can also "swipe" your OP for my blog; it would follow very nicely to yesterday's post. Also, what site can I link it to for you?

    Paul


    Originally Posted by tpw View Post

    If I told you that your sales sucked because you suck, I would just be doing that to annoy you... Not because I believed it...

    :p

    Dennis Gaskill just made an excellent post about conveying value to your prospective customers, and he was right, but he did not mention the most common mistake that online sellers make.

    I see all the time sales pages that effectively convey value in the offer, but fail to get the sale...

    Why? Because the seller drops the ball in the sales copy...

    At the point in the sales page where it really matters, the seller loses his or her nerve and chickens out doing what they need to do...

    Why do people fear so much "asking for the sale"??

    I don't know, especially since they are usually talking to people they do not know and will never meet in person, and especially since they are "asking for the sale" anonymously online rather than face-to-face...

    I see people all of the time who make an excellent case for their product or service, but when it comes time to ask me to actually buy their offer, the seller starts to waffle and hem-haw around!!

    Let me tell you why this is so bad from the standpoint of a consumer...

    If the seller fails to demonstrate enough confidence in his or her offer to ask me for the sale, then I start to lose my confidence in the seller's offer!!

    I cannot tell you how many times I found myself looking at an offer that interested me only to lose confidence in my decision to buy, because the seller actually lost confidence in their offer when it was time to tell me to hit the buy button.

    If you don't have enough confidence in your offer to ask me to buy it, then why should I have enough confidence to get out my credit card?
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    **********
    It's Simple... I don't "sell" IM anymore, but still do lots of YouTube Videos
    **********
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by Paul Barrs View Post

      Bill, I'll try to keep my typos to a minimum today

      Wanted to ask if I can also "swipe" your OP for my blog; it would follow very nicely to yesterday's post. Also, what site can I link it to for you?

      Paul

      Yeah Paul, that is cool.

      Either link to WritingPuzzle.com or RedneckMarketers.com, depending on whether your audience consists of mostly writers or mostly general marketers.
      Signature
      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        This has to be the first time I ever appreciated the "Bills" piling up...

        As for the timeshare clowns, that isn't confidence. That's knowing that intimidation may be the only way to make that sale, and if you don't sign while they have you locked down, you never will.

        They're bullies, not salespeople.

        Some time ago, Paul Myers put out a report called "Why Johnny Can't Sell". I recommend it if asking for the sale makes you uncomfortable...
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        • Profile picture of the author Elizabeth Fee
          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          This has to be the first time I ever appreciated the "Bills" piling up...

          As for the timeshare clowns, that isn't confidence. That's knowing that intimidation may be the only way to make that sale, and if you don't sign while they have you locked down, you never will.

          They're bullies, not salespeople.

          Some time ago, Paul Myers put out a report called "Why Johnny Can't Sell". I recommend it if asking for the sale makes you uncomfortable...
          Yep, we learned that the hard way and you are right... these guys were bullies and it was quite sad to see so many others around us actually fall right in to their trap and "close the deal".

          Some great resources were provided here that I'll take the time to gather and read.
          Signature

          Elizabeth Fee
          The Niche Mom - My personal blog to inspire and guide you towards earning an income online.

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  • Profile picture of the author ant888
    Great post
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