Amazon Review Sites VS. Google Product Search...

9 replies
Okay, so I've been really close to starting a so-called amazon review site...

But I've been hesitant to doing so because of Google.

For product searches, they are slowly eating up the SERP and replacing it with their own product (Google product search).

If their result was just another result I wouldn't really care and easily beat them. But they're so mighty they even display linked pictures along with a price tag. Doesn't that catch all customers eyes? Is it still a good idea to create amazon review sites, despite what Google are doing?

Screenshot: living room chairs - Google Search | Diigo
#amazon #google #product #review #search #sites
  • Profile picture of the author MonopolyMan
    I wouldn't say they're eating up the SERPS. They're there certainly and they're talking some of the CTR from Amazon sites certainly. But there's still traffic there which is looking for reviews and information rather than just straight to the buy now button.
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    • Profile picture of the author PLRExpress
      I have noticed this also but I haven't been too worried about it. I just carried on writing my reviews and making sure that they were great quality. I haven't noticed any problems ranking my reviews and I am, in most instances, above Google's Product Search images for most of my reviews.

      I think that someone that's looking for Product X Review wants to actually find a review of the product - they want more information - not a thumbnail and a price from Google. I always try to use the phrase review in my title and I also target other keywords that are not to a specific product. Eg. best cordless drills or something.

      Video is a great one as well. You can easily get your video on to the first page of Google - even if it's lower down on the results page, it's still attractive enough for people to click on. I think it's great to use a combination of video and well written reviews and just try to provide quality.

      I haven't noticed any loss of sales since Google's Product Search thumbnails became more prominent.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sweely99
    Wow, Nathan! What a wonderful answer.

    This is why I love the WF. The thanks button has been pressed
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  • Profile picture of the author Sojourn
    I agree with Nathan and also haven't seen any negative repercussions from the Product Search change. It's important to remember that selecting a product for which people actually search for reviews is critical. In your example, no one is looking up the phrase "living room chairs reviews" or any similar reviews according to the Google Keyword Tool. That kind of product is one people buy based heavily on appearance and doesn't make for a good review site.

    When you choose the right product and set up quality product reviews, you'll also find that you get tons of long-tail traffic for research phrases for which Google does not present product images or prices. These phrases include things like "which x is best for kids/beginners/adults", "top 10 x for 2011", "best x under $300", and "x product vs. x product". These are the kinds of phrases and post titles you can include in a review site to grab additional traffic and sales and Google Product Search doesn't even enter the equation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sweely99
    Sojourn, are you sure it's extremely important to pick a product for which people are searching for reviews?

    I've been doing keyword research for years, and I rarely find people searching for reviews of products being sold over at amazon. When I do so, it's all about 100 searches per month — tops!

    How about this scenario: for example, let's say I targeted the keyword "outdoor wood furniture" and managed to get the site ranking #1. What if the title of my site, just like Nathan suggested, included the word "review" — would that be any good or a total disaster?
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    • Profile picture of the author Sojourn
      Originally Posted by Sweely99 View Post

      Sojourn, are you sure it's extremely important to pick a product for which people are searching for reviews?

      I've been doing keyword research for years, and I rarely find people searching for reviews of products being sold over at amazon. When I do so, it's all about 100 searches per month — tops!

      How about this scenario: for example, let's say I targeted the keyword "outdoor wood furniture" and managed to get the site ranking #1. What if the title of my site, just like Nathan suggested, included the word "review" — would that be any good or a total disaster?
      Yes, I am sure. After mentoring quite a number of people and consulting on quite a number of sites, I can't tell you how many times people have struggled to do a "review" site on a product that just doesn't need a review site. Someone will ask for help with their site on "fuzzy monkey reviews" and no one is looking for fuzzy monkey reviews. The discussion always goes back to product selection and how product selection guides site structure and layout.

      Not that you can't do an affiliate site on a product for which folks don't search for reviews but the site layout and content then need to be structured differently.

      For example, people buy outdoor furniture based heavily on appearance. A patio set can be a great price by a great manufacturer but if it doesn't match my decor needs, I'm never going to look at it. If I'm shopping for outdoor furniture, I already have some things in mind and I care heavily about appearance and less about what others said about the set.

      Instead, you'd design a site on outdoor furniture with lots of visual images and you'd organize your products based on material and/or price and the content posts might include things like wood vs. resin discussions or best outdoor furniture protectors or something like that - not "Strathwood Brentwood 4 Piece Set Review" when no one is searching for that phrase.

      If you did happen to include the word "review" in your site on a product that doesn't really get "review" traffic, it wouldn't be a disaster just because you included that phrase but you'd be using the word "review" unnecessarily and targeting phrases that weren't relevant to your niche.

      If you're struggling to find products for which people do search for reviews, here's a trick:
      1. Bring up the Google Keyword Adwords tool and look up only the word "reviews".
      2. Click on Exact for a match type.
      3. Sort the results by Global Monthly Searches
      You'll see many niche ideas where people search for reviews of a generic product niche. You can further filter that list by putting the word "reviews" in the box marked "Include Terms" on the left sidebar.

      You can make thousands a month from a product niche with only a couple of thousand exact searches a month for the review phrase because you'll get so much long-tailed traffic, as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author damasgate
    Good stuff I can add to my review site from this discussion
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  • Profile picture of the author Sweely99
    Erica, your tips have been invaluable to me. I don't know how to thank you.

    Is the thanks button enough?
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