I.M. in the U.K with new Cookie Law - What to do?

147 replies
Hello,

I am curious as to how I.M.'ers in the U.K. are going to handle the new cookie law they are going to begin enforcing in May.

If you can't track affiliate sales, Amazon, etc....what is our course of action?

How are you set up to handle this or what makes you not affected?

I am curious as to how this is going to shake down and what adjustments you are making.

Thanks!,

Dave
#cookie #e.u. #law #u.k. #united kingdom
  • Profile picture of the author John Taylor
    Dave,

    Good question. I'd suggest you download the PDF from the
    ICO. You'll find lots of useful information about the new directive
    and how you can comply. For a "government" document it is
    surprisingly easy to read.

    John
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    • Profile picture of the author wisedave
      I wonder if hosting outside the UK/EU will absolve us even if our business is registered in the UK and takes Sterling.....

      Hmmm.....

      -Dave
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      • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
        Unlikely, Dave.

        I find this deeply worrying, more so even for those reliant on the likes of Amazon. Technically, it will be Amazon who set the cookie but both them and the site owner will be responsible. Pop ups will simply kill the affiliate niche store model, it seems to me.

        I don't think those who thought up this bright idea have any idea of the wider implications ...and only the UK will bother to enforce it, of course.

        I'm awaiting developments with a due sense of dread...

        Peter
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        • Profile picture of the author pandadoodle
          Originally Posted by BackLinkiT View Post

          ...and only the UK will bother to enforce it, of course.

          I'm awaiting developments with a due sense of dread...

          Peter
          If it's anything like the anti download / torrent tracker, get a letter stuff no one in the UK has anything to worry about...
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      • Profile picture of the author Global Warrior
        Originally Posted by wisedave View Post

        I wonder if hosting outside the UK/EU will absolve us even if our business is registered in the UK and takes Sterling.....

        Hmmm.....

        -Dave
        Hi

        From the ICO Document

        "An organisation based in the UK is likely to be subject to the requirements of the Regulations even if their website is technically hosted overseas. Organisations based outside of Europe with websites designed for the European market, or providing products or services to customers in Europe, should consider that their users in the UK and Europe will clearly expect information and choices about cookies to be provided."

        Hope you got refundable tickets :-)

        Happy New Year people.

        GW
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        • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
          Originally Posted by Global Warrior View Post

          Hi

          From the ICO Document

          "An organisation based in the UK is likely to be subject to the requirements of the Regulations even if their website is technically hosted overseas. Organisations based outside of Europe with websites designed for the European market, or providing products or services to customers in Europe, should consider that their users in the UK and Europe will clearly expect information and choices about cookies to be provided."

          Hope you got refundable tickets :-)

          Happy New Year people.

          GW
          What if i`m targeting users in the US?
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          • Profile picture of the author wisedave
            Originally Posted by steven Clayden View Post

            What if i`m targeting users in the US?
            Where are you based?

            -Dave
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        • Profile picture of the author bt
          Wow thats crazy, hope they don't try to pass the Sopa law In your country.
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        • Profile picture of the author GuerrillaIM
          Originally Posted by Global Warrior View Post

          Hi

          From the ICO Document

          "An organisation based in the UK is likely to be subject to the requirements of the Regulations even if their website is technically hosted overseas. Organisations based outside of Europe with websites designed for the European market, or providing products or services to customers in Europe, should consider that their users in the UK and Europe will clearly expect information and choices about cookies to be provided."

          Hope you got refundable tickets :-)

          Happy New Year people.

          GW
          I read this different to you. I read this that if your company is registered outside of europe then they cant do FA. They can "expect" all they like. They can't enforce shiznit.

          I been contemplating going offshore for a while for tax advantages. Might as well do it now.

          Whoever in UK government is responsible for this is stupid. Will cost the country a fortune.
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by John Taylor View Post

      Dave,

      Good question. I'd suggest you download the PDF from the
      ICO. You'll find lots of useful information about the new directive
      and how you can comply. For a "government" document it is
      surprisingly easy to read.

      John

      I will read John's document, but my gut instinct says to track by IP.

      It is not a perfect solution, but it would be mostly effective.
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      • Profile picture of the author fin
        I hope I speak for all of Scotland + my UK (fuzz the EU).....

        When I say............................

        You may take our taxes.... BUT YOU'LL NEVER TAKE OUR COOKIES!!!!!!!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
    Its got to be the dumbest thing the EU has ever done.

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    • Profile picture of the author GeorgeWE
      Nice one! Good old U.K. eh, we can ALWAYS be relied upon to do just what Europe tells us - even though most of Europe doesn't do the same.......
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      George

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      • Profile picture of the author wisedave
        Originally Posted by GeorgeWE View Post

        Nice one! Good old U.K. eh, we can ALWAYS be relied upon to do just what Europe tells us - even though most of Europe doesn't do the same.......
        I agree.....the U.K. is the E.U.'s bitch!

        -Dave
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  • Profile picture of the author wisedave
    What a joke this is going to be...... freaking E.U. tossers.

    -Dave
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  • Profile picture of the author Flyinghigh
    wisedave, what is this new cookie law you are speaking of and in addition to how it works (or doesn't) what will it affect? I haven't heard anything about it and I'm curious.

    FlyingHigh
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    • Profile picture of the author fin
      I liked the last part. I'm going to move to another country, LOL.

      But seriously. I'm sure there will be away around it.

      Could you not have a disclaimer, much like an affiliate disclaimer, that says any customers accept there will be cookies.

      I hate the EU, ever since they started playing about with the shape of bananas.
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      • Profile picture of the author Certitude
        Originally Posted by fin View Post

        I hate the EU, ever since they started playing about with the shape of bananas.
        You should never mess with another mans banana :p
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  • Profile picture of the author jumshi
    i like chocolate chip cookies
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  • Profile picture of the author EndGame
    It is very difficult to respond to something like this without getting political, but for anyone that is interested, if you go to the Information Commissioner's website, you will see an example of what they are expecting from people and their websites after May 2012. Check it out here: Data Protection and Freedom of Information advice - ICO

    The document John posted is genuinely very informative and quite an easy read. It gives a good break-down of what will be expected from site owners, but doesn't go into the detailed technical side of how to achieve compliance (for obvious reasons).

    Excuse my use of non-parliamentary language, but this kind of legislation looks like it is going to make creating ANY kind of website in the UK a total ball-ache for a while.
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    • Profile picture of the author wisedave
      Originally Posted by EndGame View Post

      it is going to make creating ANY kind of website in the UK a total ball-ache for a while.
      That is an EPIC understatement! It's going to cripple U.K. affiliate marketers as well as 'regular' websites that want to track their site usage and how people interact with their website.

      In order to give people a better experience on a site and fine tune it, it is essential at least have Google Analytics.

      It's a ball-ache all right and the U.K. is wearning boots made from the E.U. that are doing the kicking of said balls.

      How are you planning on dealing with this E.G.?

      More to come I'm sure!

      Cheers,

      Dave
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  • Profile picture of the author wisedave
    Here is a link to the ICO site that explains a bit.....

    Basically, it is illegal to drop a cookie on sombody's computer for tracking purposes (i.e. Google Analytics, Affiliate Maketing, FB, etc...)

    There's more to it but this is how I am seeing it.

    E.U. Wankers!

    -Dave
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    • Profile picture of the author onSubie
      Originally Posted by wisedave View Post

      Here is a link to the ICO site that explains a bit.....
      Hi

      It wasn't clear from the site, as the definition of consent is rather vague:

      ‘the data subject’s consent’ as: ‘any freely given specific and informed indication of his wishes by which the data subject signifies his agreement to personal data relating to him being processed’.

      Wouldn't checking a box in the browser marked "allow cookies" be considered an "informed indication" that "signifies his agreement to personal data relating to him being processed"?

      That could be accomplished by having browsers default setting be "cookies off" with a warning pop-up when the user activates cookies:


      WARNING: The government does NOT want you to do this! Activating cookies could hamper your browsing experience by remembering passwords, web site settings and your facebook profile. In addition you could be deeply harmed by your online pizza delivery site remembering your last order. Convenience is not vigilance. We urge you to comply.


      Certainly checking "allow cookies" after that would be "informed consent"?



      Mahlon
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  • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
    Having read the document, its a complete waste of time. Even on the ICO site it says in its blurb at the top of the page that a cookie has already been set before you tick the box to accept cookies. F$%king Joke.
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  • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
    Based in the UK,

    From what i can gather. The law is europe wide, and companies from the US targeting europe must comply with the regulations. Im from the UK and targeting American customers, does the regulation cover this?
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    • Profile picture of the author wisedave
      Originally Posted by steven Clayden View Post

      Based in the UK,

      From what i can gather. The law is europe wide, and companies from the US targeting europe must comply with the regulations. Im from the UK and targeting American customers, does the regulation cover this?
      I think you are in the **** too mate! Stay tuned....

      Cheers,

      Dave
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      • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
        Originally Posted by wisedave View Post

        I think you are in the **** too mate! Stay tuned....

        Cheers,

        Dave
        F%$king typical, EU sucks, uk should have told them to F-Off
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        • Profile picture of the author wisedave
          Originally Posted by steven Clayden View Post

          F% typical, EU sucks, uk should have told them to F-Off
          hmmm... I'm not sure what you mean? :rolleyes:

          The worst part is we really can't do much about it! What a load of bollocks.

          I have been here two years now (from U.S. originally). I may have to look into 'working the system'. I don't want to though!

          -Dave
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          • Profile picture of the author ezmystic
            Originally Posted by wisedave View Post

            hmmm... I'm not sure what you mean? :rolleyes:

            The worst part is we really can't do much about it! What a load of bollocks.

            I have been here two years now (from U.S. originally). I may have to look into 'working the system'. I don't want to though!

            -Dave

            Look into an offshore company, you only need to CONTROL it to make your business work, but seek some advice first I guess. I think you might be better back in US or in the far East, that is if SOPA doesn't happen.
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  • Profile picture of the author ezmystic
    Not condoning my response, but like most BS coming out of the eu pit, ignore it. Working time directive = go away I love working 12 hours a day, if I need to making my work week over the 42 hours or whatever the 'legal' lenght of working for a week is then I will do it and so will anyone I work with. If it originates from the eu it is generally anti entreprenerialist, anti hard work, anti help yourself. If you get any crap for it emigrate, the US, Hong Kong, Middle East, just get out of the eu you can get on with your own lives and do what you wan to do in the time you want to do it. rant over.
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  • Profile picture of the author ezmystic
    Maybe you can set up an offshore company outside the eu and then this company does the 'work', so depriving the UK of the legal stuff and tax revenue? Don't know how much revenue is made from IM in the UK but if it is large and everyone offshores then the law will change again quickly.

    This thread is the first I have seen on the matter and I think I will now try to emigrate with my businesses. I have never been asked if I want to be in the eu, I was not born when there was a referendum AND that referendum asked if we wanted to be in a SINGLE MARKET not united states europe.
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  • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
    Perhaps Google, Yahoo and Bing should have a big sign on their homepage saying. All the sites you visit have cookies. If you don't like it then.

    1) Learn how to use your browser settings
    2) **** Off
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  • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
    lol, just sent the ICO an email asking how exactly, from a technical point of view, can this law be complied with.
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  • Profile picture of the author Global Warrior
    P*****g myself laughing as they have a title in their document which i paste below:

    Practical advice for those wishing to comply

    Presumably, thats nobody then :-)
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    • Profile picture of the author fin
      Originally Posted by Global Warrior View Post

      P*****g myself laughing as they have a title in their document which i paste below:

      Practical advice for those wishing to comply

      Presumably, thats nobody then :-)
      Let's not forget, the Inland Revenue will lose money with this proposal. Anyway, since when does Britain care about rules from Brussels :p.
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      • Profile picture of the author Global Warrior
        Originally Posted by fin View Post

        Let's not forget, the Inland Revenue will lose money with this proposal. Anyway, since when does Britain care about rules from Brussels :p.
        Hey Fin

        You my friend are a F&*(%$g genius!!!

        If i don't give the Inland revenue a cookie to follow me and i refuse to accept their cookie to keep track of me, does that mean i don't have to send them any money and i can use this law to tell them to poke off :-)

        Nice idea i suppose

        Happy New Year

        GW
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      • Profile picture of the author rob1123
        Would it be possible to unify against it? Like the French did with the wheel clamps?
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        derp.

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      • Profile picture of the author ezmystic
        Originally Posted by fin View Post

        Let's not forget, the Inland Revenue will lose money with this proposal. Anyway, since when does Britain care about rules from Brussels :p.
        Don't know if you're from UK, but here they 'goldplate' any BS from Brussels, i.e. they enforce it and add some cherries on top. France who effectivelly make alot of the rules to be enforced ignore them!!

        You can see the bind we get ourselves in!

        Anyway I'll always be British, but have now decided after years of being 'harassed' by my US wife to leave and always saying no we'll stay, that I want us to leave these jewelled islands for new pastures (untouched by the eu). I have been thinking about getting out, not because or UK, but because of eu for several years now and this is really the final nail as I want my business to thrive, not be suffocated and the eu is no place to be in business. The UK needs to decide if it wants to be par tof this or plan it's own business friendly environment. It want the next 'facebook', but with the yolk from brussels will never get it, as anyone who wants to really get ahead in this game will go to California or to the Far East. I love this place, but I think my children will not call it home
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  • Profile picture of the author ezmystic
    having just briefly read the pdf from the ICO I can see that the law is clearly written (like many others) by someone that has probably only ever used the internet for email, or doesn't know what the internet is. Many laws are written by people with great beliefs and ideas, but have never actually been involved in the things those laws will affect IMO. Business laws for business by people that have gone straight from government education into government job with no experience of the real world of business. Any laws that are even thought of should have a requirement that the person writing them, no proposing them have at least 5 years experience in the filed that they are writing them for.

    Dr's have to go through 5 years of so of training before they are allowed to be let loose on the public, well lawmakers in certain fields should be the same, no ability to even start writing a proposal for a law until they have 5 years working experience in that industry
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  • Profile picture of the author cooler1
    Doesn't even Adsense use cookies? So no one from the UK can even use Adsense on their site(s) now is this correct? This sounds insane.
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    • Profile picture of the author Chris Lengley
      Now, affiliate marketing going to die?
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  • Profile picture of the author Thomas Buckley
    Will this be the law in all EU Countries or just the uk?
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    Ní hé lá na gaoithe lá na scolb - The windy day is not the day for thatching.

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  • Profile picture of the author Chris-
    One solution . . . move offshore, host elsewhere, register an offshore business and bank, make sure the money doesn't flow through the UK at any point. Serve the stupid UK right if everyone does this and they lose lots of tax. Idiots!

    Chris
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    • Profile picture of the author Ruka
      Originally Posted by Chris- View Post

      One solution . . . move offshore, host elsewhere, register an offshore business and bank, make sure the money doesn't flow through the UK at any point. Serve the stupid UK right if everyone does this and they lose lots of tax. Idiots!

      Chris
      Would be a great idea, but you would end up breaking one law to try and escape another. Tax laws here are very clear that if you are resident and controlling the company from the UK, you cannot incorporate overseas and avoid paying tax. Even if the money isn't flowing through the UK. The only way around this is to emigrate and become resident in a new country, that way you are out of the clutches of HRMC

      Lots more info at taxcafe.co.uk (I'm not associated with them, just read their books and found them useful)
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      • Profile picture of the author GuerrillaIM
        Originally Posted by chickenlittle View Post

        Would be a great idea, but you would end up breaking one law to try and escape another. Tax laws here are very clear that if you are resident and controlling the company from the UK, you cannot incorporate overseas and avoid paying tax. Even if the money isn't flowing through the UK. The only way around this is to emigrate and become resident in a new country, that way you are out of the clutches of HRMC

        Lots more info at taxcafe.co.uk (I'm not associated with them, just read their books and found them useful)
        There are lots of ways to get around this. For instance you can have a UK company and an offshore company and the UK company invoices the offshore company.

        They only care if you dodge the tax so dont dodge the tax.
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  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      For example, Warrior Plus or Amazon set cookies that allow an item the visitor selected to be remembered cross-domain to facilitate the purchase.

      I was dropped on my head several times when I was a baby, so forgive me if this is a dumb question.

      But I thought that cookies could not be set or read on more than one domain.

      Now, I understand that if someone lands on a page with Google Adsense for example, Google is able to set a cookie within the Adsense code and read it on the next site, but that predicates that the Adsense code is loaded on both sites.

      Am I understanding cross-domain cookies accurately? Or am I missing a bigger picture?

      Thanks.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tony Marriott
      It's no problem for sites like Warriors (that require login) to become compliant as you can use the login to "agree/inform" about cookies.

      Simlary with any requirement to agree terms of use. it can be done at the same time.

      Where a user logs into a website, or chooses to download a particular service that uses cookies, it should be relatively straightforward to put in place a mechanism to obtain consent for analytical and functional cookies at the point the user logs in. Clear information about the activities of these cookies can be provided and the user can be prompted to make a specific and informed choice before logging on to signify their agreement
      However where ther is no login or specific download/access request then getting "consent" is more difficult.

      It is likely to be more difficult to obtain consent for this type of cookie where you do not have any direct relationship with a user - for example where users just visit a site to browse. In this case websites should ensure the information they provide to users about cookies in this area is absolutely clear and is highlighted in a prominent place (not just included through a general privacy policy link). As far as possible, measures should be put in place to highlight the use of cookies and to try to obtain agreement to set these cookies. There are various ways in which information about cookies can be made -- see 'Providing information about cookies'.
      ICOs own solution?

      Can I copy the Information Commissioner's solution?

      The Information Commissioner's website Data Protection and Freedom of Information advice - ICO uses a banner that informs users about cookies and gives them the chance to consent. Whilst we have no objection to organisations seeing if this option would work for them any solution has to be appropriate to an organisation's own needs. We will review the use of the banner in future and may consider other options ourselves.
      See also "Providing information about Cookies in the document (link in John's post above) that offers some less intrusive options.


      The Information Commissioner made clear when the rules on cookies were introduced in May 2011 that he would be unlikely to take formal action against those who were taking steps to comply with the rules during a 12 month lead in period. At the end of this period in May 2012 the Information Commissioner will consider complaints about cookies in line with his normal approach to complaint handling under the Regulations. This will involve in most cases contacting the organisation responsible for setting the cookies in the first instance and asking them to respond to the complaint and explain what steps they have taken to comply with these rules.
      A thorough read of the document will help considerablky and you can expect information from Google (Adsense) and Clickbank etc very soon I'm sure.
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  • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
    Big Mike, I presume CookieBot V1 is currently in development? :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author chrislangley
    It's unfortunate that where money is the government will always try to enforce new laws to benefit them
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    • Profile picture of the author philhunter
      They will never be able to enforce this, there are just far too many websites to deal with.
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      • Profile picture of the author spearce000
        Originally Posted by philhunter View Post

        They will never be able to enforce this, there are just far too many websites to deal with.
        No, they'll just find some poor sap and throw the book at him/her - probably some teenager working away in his bedroom on a site that uses a Google Analytics cookie to track visitors, and hitting him with a fine that will take longer to pay off than his student loan - in a concerted effort to scare the c**p out of everyone in to complying.


        Big corporations, by and large, will get away with it because their expensive legal firms have the ability to go over the legislation line-by-line, get judgements in their favour, appeal any judgements that go against them all the way to the European Court, and establish a body of case law that could be used by everyone else to find loopholes to exploit.


        The teenager, on the other hand, will be advised by his legal aid solicitor to plead guilty and ask the judge for time to pay (or get his parents to sell their house and pay the fine for him).


        Americans needn't worry too much about this for the time being. You guys stand a better chance of seeing Elvis Presley stacking the shelves at Wal-Mart than being prosecuted for anything to do with the Internet in the UK. However it's only a matter of time before your government brings out their own version of this badly thought out piece of legislation, just like it's only a matter of time before our government brings out its own version of SOPA or has one imposed on it by the EU.


        It strikes me that most politicians would like to turn the clock back to the early 1990's when the only thing you could realistically use the Internet for was e-mail - except this time it will be quicker, and you can make a phone call at the same time, because so many people now have broadband.


        Or am I being extremely cynical?
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  • Profile picture of the author techndu2012
    there are options. anyone interested in marketing an alternative can PM me but one of the first things that come to mind is a script that launches a window when someone hits the back button that says are you sure you want to leave this page. This could then grab the user agent/IP or other data available. match that to the path of that data through the site.

    Im not so sure what the EU will do is the big problem. I would think the bigger problem is what will Amazon do to keep from losing a sizeable sales force.

    if there really is a market for a product like this Id build a couple of prototypes
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    • Profile picture of the author Tony Marriott
      Originally Posted by techndu2012 View Post

      there are options. anyone interested in marketing an alternative can PM me but one of the first things that come to mind is a script that launches a window when someone hits the back button that says are you sure you want to leave this page. This could then grab the user agent/IP or other data available. match that to the path of that data through the site.

      Im not so sure what the EU will do is the big problem. I would think the bigger problem is what will Amazon do to keep from losing a sizeable sales force.

      if there really is a market for a product like this Id build a couple of prototypes

      Not quite sure what you are responding to but.........

      If you are offerring an alternative to cookies then does not address third party cookies.

      If you are referring to the comments about pop-ups in the ICO document then they mean entry pop-ups to offer an "accept cookies" option.

      Either way it does not seem to be a solution
      ... unless I missed your point completely?
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      • Profile picture of the author matus37
        Read documents about the law on net.I think there you find more informations.
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      • Profile picture of the author Blimeyoreilly
        Hi peoples,
        I have already posted this suggestion in the other EU law thread and it looks as if this thread is still alive & kicking too. I am knackered out thinking about all the problems that this crazy law offers but now want to focus on ideas for a solution.

        I hate pop-ups myself when navigating other sites, so creating a pop-up to explain to visitors about this new law & what all these BS pop-ups mean is like rubbing salt to the wound.

        Do you think programming a live-presenter that strolls onto the site page to both subtly & briefly explain what we want the viewer to know about these changes will help? Rather than adding more pop-ups to this pop-up insanity to explain things.

        It could be a way to counteract the negative effects, re-instate trust with our visitors who may be scared off & confused by all this new pop-up culture and may also be a means for programmers (or whomever designs these things) to capitalise on our misfortunes.

        If so, can you please deliver one on my desk first thing Monday morning? lol
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  • Profile picture of the author livo
    I do no not think we need to worry to much about this law!

    There are just too many sites to police this rule!

    And anyway things are going with the euro,most rules will be not apply when the most of the countries in it pull out.
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    • Profile picture of the author Brian Terry
      Originally Posted by livo View Post

      I do no not think we need to worry to much about this law!

      There are just too many sites to police this rule!

      And anyway things are going with the euro,most rules will be not apply when the most of the countries in it pull out.
      My understanding is your website visitors can report your site for violation of the EU cookie law. Every allegation of breaking this EU law by a visitor to your has got to be followed up on by law.

      There is no shortage of people policing this (including your competition).

      My belief is only a very, very small percentage of people caught will actually be fined £500,000.

      Also, as I understand it right now there will be no government awareness program telling people about this new cookie law. There's not enough money available.

      As for affiliates there are only a couple of solutions for anyone running an affiliate program.

      1. Give affiliates a unique url that takes people to a page with an affiliate coded order button.

      2. Use query string url's that store data on the server and not the visitors browser. These are more of a security risk with not very reliable tracking.
      Query string - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      We'll have to go back to old school internet marketing technologies for any kind of tracking.

      The problem with IP tracking is it's not accurate because IP's can be shared. IPv6 might be the answer because it allows every divice to have it's own unique IP address. But this is many years away.
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      • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
        i have been thinking about this in the context of my amazon and epn sites. These are pure niche stores.

        I have two cookie issues as far as I am aware.

        First, there is the 'non-intrusive' statcounter cookie. Worst case scenario is to remove statcounter, of course.

        Second there is the epn/amazon third party cookie, ie it is set by them not me. No doubt epn and amazon will insist on a pop up when a user clicks through from my site. If that's the case then there is nothing I can do about that and I just have to accept it. At least I won't be breaking the law, I suppose.

        I do wonder what the solution will be for Adsense.

        I also hope amazon don't go the same way they did with affiliates in California...

        Peter
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        • Profile picture of the author cooler1
          Originally Posted by BackLinkiT View Post

          i have been thinking about this in the context of my amazon and epn sites. These are pure niche stores.

          I have two cookie issues as far as I am aware.

          First, there is the 'non-intrusive' statcounter cookie. Worst case scenario is to remove statcounter, of course.

          Second there is the epn/amazon third party cookie, ie it is set by them not me. No doubt epn and amazon will insist on a pop up when a user clicks through from my site. If that's the case then there is nothing I can do about that and I just have to accept it. At least I won't be breaking the law, I suppose.

          I do wonder what the solution will be for Adsense.

          I also hope amazon don't go the same way they did with affiliates in California...

          Peter
          Isn't the Amazon cookie deemed as an acceptable cookie? As reading the ICO document it sounds like cookies which record shopping sessions are acceptable without asking for the visitors consent.

          This will make the browsing experience terribly tacky if people have to put pop-ups on their sites to comply.
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          • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
            You may be right. This passage might come to our rescue:

            It's worth remembering consent is not required if the use of cookies is 'strictly necessary' for a service explicitly demanded by the user. So it could potentially be argued that some affiliate functions, especially cashback sites, require cookies to function effectively.

            Comes from this, which is an interesting read:

            Would You Like A Cookie? No Thanks... | a4u

            Maybe we can relax a little?

            Peter
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            • Profile picture of the author Snow_Predator
              Originally Posted by BackLinkiT View Post

              You may be right. This passage might come to our rescue:

              It's worth remembering consent is not required if the use of cookies is 'strictly necessary' for a service explicitly demanded by the user. So it could potentially be argued that some affiliate functions, especially cashback sites, require cookies to function effectively.

              Comes from this, which is an interesting read:

              Would You Like A Cookie? No Thanks... | a4u

              Maybe we can relax a little?

              Peter
              Well if cashback sites are OK, then there's no reason why affiliate sites should not. Since isn't a cashback site just an affiliate that gives the customer a share of its affiliate income?
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  • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
    Yes but, when they clickthrough to amazon using a link on your site, are you loading an affiliate cookie. is that structly neccesary?
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  • Profile picture of the author Eduard Stinga
    I'm wondering what Google Analytics has to say about this..
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  • Profile picture of the author Greenfatman
    Anyone saw any news from google about it????? should we email google adsense and ask for information???
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  • Profile picture of the author Greenfatman
    Honest, adsense must be out of this rule somehow, imagine how many advertisers will lose money and their business and google too will lose too much, there are millions of little/big websites using their AdSense programme in UK or EU.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Laughton
    This sucks, but I'm sure some bright spark will create a WSO on how to get round this. There is bound to be a loophole or some creative way of getting round this.
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  • Profile picture of the author pandadoodle
    The quickest and lazier ways around it would be to put an extra step before people continue to your affiliate, link, product or whatever. Much in the same way videos work on youtube now you get a 30second advert popup.

    Its a pain and its ugly but if you was generating the traffic you could start to sell "cookie acceptance advertising space" or something where a company could have a banner or video while the EU customer reads and accepts the cookie guidelines.

    It would only be a one time advert unless said customer returns to your site and deleted the "i accept cookie" and has to go through the entire thing again.

    Its not pretty but its better than a pop up and maybe a way to make some extra coin
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      • Profile picture of the author steven Clayden
        Originally Posted by minisitedevil View Post

        LOL, have you read the comments if you keep clicking cancel. Brilliant
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      • Profile picture of the author wisedave
        Originally Posted by minisitedevil View Post

        That's epic! Thanks for the laugh......

        A common ideaology about this is 'how are they going to enfore this' or 'there's too many of us to conquer'. My thought is (as mentioned before by another dude), if somebody submits a complaint the gov't has to take action. It will clearly be a against the law. If you complain to the police that somebody has assaulted you, they have to investigate.

        Regarding Google Analytics, that is a MAJOR concern. What is this law trying to accomplish? Surely educating the public would be far better than smacking down a bunch of business owners. Now you are introducing more red tape and departments whose responsibility it is to monitor and act upon violations.

        Bus wankers!

        Cheers,

        Dave
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        • Profile picture of the author adamj2
          Originally Posted by minisitedevil View Post

          LOL, great stuff!

          Originally Posted by wisedave View Post

          That's epic! Thanks for the laugh......

          A common ideaology about this is 'how are they going to enfore this' or 'there's too many of us to conquer'. My thought is (as mentioned before by another dude), if somebody submits a complaint the gov't has to take action.
          Yeah, I agree.

          This is not the sort of thing they will go trawling the internet for, but if a competitor makes a complaint then they will have no choice but to take action.

          I have had a read of that document and it seems they are looking to protect the UK/EU audience from cookies, rather than trying to prevent people from using cookies just because they happen to be from the UK.

          So if we have affiliate sites hosted in the US and aimed at a US audience then surely a pop-up type thing is not going to be needed just because someone from the UK could find the site on Google?

          And besides, if the whole site is talking about the product in dollars and in US style English then they would not know that the website owner is an English person!

          If the worst comes to the worst, maybe could just have some sort of script that only displays the pop-up if someone arrives from a UK IP address so it is unaffected for US visitors?
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      • Profile picture of the author thebitbotdotcom
        Originally Posted by minisitedevil View Post

        The popup about cookies being delicious was funny

        Cool share
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  • Profile picture of the author pandadoodle
    From what I read form the PDF at the very bottom cookies used for analutics and other stats i.e visitors are exempt from the rule :

    We only use analytical cookies – if nobody consents that will seriously restrict the amount of information we can get to improve and develop our website
    The Regulations do not distinguish between cookies used for analytical activities and those used for other purposes. We do not consider analytical cookies fall within the ‘strictly necessary’ exception criteria. This means in theory websites need to tell people about analytical cookies and gain their consent.
    In practice we would expect you to provide clear information to users about analytical cookies and take what steps you can to seek their agreement. This is likely to involve making the argument to show users why these cookies are useful. Although the Information Commissioner cannot completely exclude the possibility of formal action in any area, it is highly unlikely that priority for any formal action would be given to focusing on uses of cookies where there is a low level of intrusiveness and risk of harm to individuals. Provided clear information is given about their activities we are highly unlikely to prioritise first party cookies used only for analytical purposes in any consideration of regulatory action.
    The way I read that was as long as you explain in some terms why you use it your fine, and not needing to prompt users first.

    I agree with the above. The entire reason it was pushed back a year was because lack of guidance and public awareness, still nothing now in 2012, I mean what are they going to do tell the BBC to put something on the news the night before?
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Chicas
    Sounds like a pretty dumb law that I'm sure many people will ignore. Here in America we have plenty of silly laws such as in Virginia: Not only is it illegal to have sex with the lights on, one may not have sex in any position other than missionary. And also: It is illegal to tickle women.

    I will pay attention how the big companies such as Youtube, Google, etc. treat this new law and follow step. The government is more likely t go after the big fish first if anything at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author manicmethods
    This is just RIDICULOUS. Nothing more should be said of it and they should stick this out-dated law up their political ars*s and let us EARN THE INLAND REVENUE MONEY!

    Are they COMPLETELY STUPID?

    It makes as much sense to do this as it does to ban cigarettes... The government are going to lose so much money.

    They will effectively be destroying a whole industry.

    "Cookies" don't just happen in Affiliate Marketing. There are SO MANY industries where the same sort of practice is used:

    FOR EXAMPLE: Supermarkets = They know what you buy if you have a Tesco Clubcard for example. Using this, they give you vouchers eg, if you're on Pay and Go on Tmobile, you might get 1000 extra points for topping your Tmobile phone up. How do they know? Basically another form of Cookies.

    This is just RIDICULOUS!

    Any way, rant over!
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  • Profile picture of the author manicmethods
    Apologies for the double post. But something we as a community MIGHT be able to do is create an epetition:

    https://submissions.epetitions.direc.../petitions/new

    I've tried but it won't load it up properly for me.

    If someone manages to get on there then post the link up here and any UK members, whack it in your signature and if we can get 100,000 signatures, it has to be debated in parliament

    I know... 100,000 but if we all club together and get anyone we know on it etc. Might be worth a go... Just so they know we're not just a bunch of guys and gals on the net making a little bit of money here and there.
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    • Profile picture of the author heevyhivy
      The FUNNY side.

      This might actually help uk affiliates targeting non-UK visitors to ensure all their traffic is coming from the country they're targeting.

      Solution: Reject the visitor.

      Include some geo/ip tracking in the Header code of the site. If the visitor comes from uk, redirect them to;

      a). A page about netnannies or some antiporn organisation lol.

      b). A UK affiliate competitor working in the same niche as you (kind of like being a secret affiliate of another affiliate marketer). That way you're not misleading the visitor, you're just helping them find what they're looking for...... and maybe even creating backlinks in the process

      The SERIOUS side.

      I'm still an well-educated newb and I'm actually asking a serious question.
      So on a scale of 1-10, how flawed is my solution(s)?
      Seriously, because if it's flawed then I'm going to be very upset

      1. If you redirect the uk visitor using the method above, will your niche site/s suffer in Google/SEO ranks?

      2. Is there any other potential law violation to consider?
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  • Profile picture of the author Danny Cutts
    wow am I proud to be british.....!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author laurenceh
    Review the EU Cookie law - e-petitions

    Hey folks. Looks like a petition is up.
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  • Profile picture of the author Danny Cutts
    Unless it gets enforced they can go poke holes in cheese for all I care :-)

    I am leaving the UK in a little over a year and as far as I am concerned its not too soon
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  • Profile picture of the author manicmethods
    It's getting enforced in May 2012 ATM. Obviously, they don't realize that we do actually care and people do actually make money online and really on Cookies to be working and useable without asking visitors for permission.

    I've signed the petition btw and whacked a link in my Signature! Would love to see a debate in parliament about cookies
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  • Profile picture of the author GuerrillaIM
    I added the petition link to signature also. If you don't have a signature consider doing the same.
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  • Profile picture of the author alexmobile
    Hey guys,

    I have created a Facebook Group basically promoting this petition link above. So in case when people search on Facebook, they would see that group, and hopefully will follow to the government site and sign the petition.

    Feel free to suggest any changes / grammar / spelling in the group description (since I am not a native speaker).

    Also, if any reputable member from UK would like to become an Admin of that group, and put some efforts towards promoting that group on Facebook, please let me know and I will gladely make you an admin.

    Here is the link to Facebook Group page:

    http://www.facebook.com/groups/318454918185690/

    The group name is the following:
    "UK Webmasters - say NO to the upcoming 2012 Internet Cookies Law!!!"
    ...
    ...
    Signature
    QRID.com - login to websites by scanning QR code on your monitor! No Passwords!
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  • Profile picture of the author grandstar
    No wonder The Euro is dying! With rigid labor laws, overgenerous entitlement programs, bloated civil service, high taxes and other anti-biz laws, one shouldn't expect otherwise
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  • Profile picture of the author Kal B
    This sounds alarming
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  • Profile picture of the author heevyhivy
    Seriously, are the solutions I suggested above practical?
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  • Profile picture of the author Danny Cutts
    until amazon or any of the other big companies do anything I think we should sit tight...

    By that time I shall be out of the UK :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author GuerrillaIM
    No one really seems to be signing the petition. I guess the majority of people wont understand it until its too late and they see the end result.

    I am pretty sure though that Google could create a centralized database of sessions to track ip + referrer + session that would get around this.

    The funny thing is that if they do this they will have 100x more detailed info on you than any cookie could ever provide and it would still work even if you disabled javascript & cookies.
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    • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
      If the UK really intends on enforcing this farce, and is obligated to investigate every complaint, one possible solution is to start compiling lists of millions of UK websites, starting with the largest, and filing complaints.

      .
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    • Profile picture of the author wisedave
      Originally Posted by GuerrillaIM View Post

      No one really seems to be signing the petition. I guess the majority of people wont understand it until its too late and they see the end result.

      I am pretty sure though that Google could create a centralized database of sessions to track ip + referrer + session that would get around this.

      The funny thing is that if they do this they will have 100x more detailed info on you than any cookie could ever provide and it would still work even if you disabled javascript & cookies.
      I just signed it....(well my wife did as I am not a UK citizen and she is)

      Bollocks to them!

      Come on UK I.M.ers....get your sig on this thing and tell a friend. There has to be some clever clogs out there that can push this thing through Social Media and build a drive some traffic to a micro blog.

      Cheers,

      Dave
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  • I never knew about this!!
    Hope it never comes to Australia!!! How painful!!
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  • Profile picture of the author InWait
    I'm sure someone out there will come up with some creative alternative that's effective, doesn't break some misguided law, and doesn't intrude on people's privacy/rights. That person could quickly become very wealthy if they play the game right.
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  • Profile picture of the author InWait
    It just occurred to me- SOPA in the US and this cookie law in the UK within a short time period of each other. Not to get conspiratorial but hmmmm.......
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  • Profile picture of the author dipsx129
    I have no idea what I am going to do. I run affiliate site mainly and they all use affiliate window cookies and also Google analytics. Both are necessary to improve the sites, other wise I will be recommending products without commission and to make it worse, I will be doing it blindly as a SEO. If I put a pop up on my site my visitors are likely to say no due to them not knowing what cookies actually are. I think I may just put a note saying that "this site uses cookies to track visitors. please visit the privacy policy for more information"
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  • Profile picture of the author Ruka
    I remember at the end of last year, google were running adverts in the major newpapers, a PR exercise informing people about cookies and what they meant. Saying things like, isn't is helpful and convenient if your computer remembers little pieces of information about you?
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    • Profile picture of the author dipsx129
      Originally Posted by chickenlittle View Post

      I remember at the end of last year, google were running adverts in the major newpapers, a PR exercise informing people about cookies and what they meant. Saying things like, isn't is helpful and convenient if your computer remembers little pieces of information about you?
      I remember that campaign, but I do not even think Google has the capability to sway that decision. Also with Google not providing referral traffic for logged in users on .com means that they are looking to comply with governments. It's only a matter of time before they hide referral traffic from logged in users on .co.uk as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author markjob
    The EU don't stand a chance of enforcing this crap. So someone comes to your site to read a review about a knitting DVD? they like it, they buy it and then think? Mmmm i didn't like the idea of the cookie that site put onto my pc so im going to make a detailed complaint to the EU about this activity. YEAH RIGHT!!!

    Carry on boys! Carry on!
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    • Profile picture of the author dipsx129
      Originally Posted by markjob View Post

      The EU don't stand a chance of enforcing this crap. So someone comes to your site to read a review about a knitting DVD? they like it, they buy it and then think? Mmmm i didn't like the idea of the cookie that site put onto my pc so im going to make a detailed complaint to the EU about this activity. YEAH RIGHT!!!

      Carry on boys! Carry on!
      I been thinking along the same lines but you still need to think about the implications, at the end of the day the way I see it, unless they email me on each of my sites directly to inform about the law and the steps I need to take I can claim negligence to it and keep going.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gee S
    Some more info for anyone that requires it.

    EU Cookie Law - Legislation, Analytics & Firefox Plugin
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  • Profile picture of the author squall2050
    There's always ways to bypass laws, try to find a loophole..
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  • Profile picture of the author solado
    Well thats a little irritating to say the least.

    I guess amazon assosiates will pay only when the client goes through an affiliate link as opposed to returning a few days later.

    Needless to say im super pissed off as a law has been passed to tackle something that was NEVER a problem.
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    • Profile picture of the author cooler1
      Originally Posted by solado View Post

      Well thats a little irritating to say the least.

      I guess amazon assosiates will pay only when the client goes through an affiliate link as opposed to returning a few days later.

      Needless to say im super pissed off as a law has been passed to tackle something that was NEVER a problem.
      A few days later? But the Amazon cookie is only 24 hrs anyway.

      I guess Amazon won't turn off cookies for UK affiliate sites because it would be too complicated. For instance, many UK sites are hosted on overseas servers. If the cookie law applies to Amazon sites, I presume people will have to have tacky pop-ups on their site asking visitors if they accept cookies.

      Amazon and Adsense sites are probably exempt from this law anyway (hopefully). If not, what is the alternative? Every site in the UK with Adsense and Amazon needs to have a pop-up box? That would be crazy as it will increase bounce rates and annoy visitors.

      There doesn't seem total clarity on what is or isn't allowed by this enforcement, so how are people meant to get prepared?
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      • Profile picture of the author solado
        Originally Posted by cooler1 View Post

        A few days later? But the Amazon cookie is only 24 hrs anyway.

        I guess Amazon won't turn off cookies for UK affiliate sites because it would be too complicated. For instance, many UK sites are hosted on overseas servers. If the cookie law applies to Amazon sites, I presume people will have to have tacky pop-ups on their site asking visitors if they accept cookies.

        Amazon and Adsense sites are probably exempt from this law anyway (hopefully). If not, what is the alternative? Every site in the UK with Adsense and Amazon needs to have a pop-up box? That would be crazy as it will increase bounce rates and annoy visitors.

        There doesn't seem total clarity on what is or isn't allowed by this enforcement, so how are people meant to get prepared?
        We cant, Problem is i cant pack up my bags and leave the EU neither which is a complete pain the arse. Just as I started IM and affiliate its already becoming a game of confusion, rigid laws and headaches. If backlinking and getting traffic wasn't hard enough we all have to worry about being put in prison for a small file.

        Affiliate marketing / adsense will be over for me if it becomes as confusing as I think its going to be. Ill have to shift to offering my services for hire.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Petal
    There must be a way round this crappy law.

    How about if we stay into another country outside the EU for a few weeks and 'set' everything on our laptop to that country. So when we return to the UK, the laptop would still have cookies for that country and not the UK.

    It might sound silly but would that work against the EU Dance and Sandbox?
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  • Profile picture of the author Manie Amari
    To the OP, thanks for this post. I was totally unaware of this until now. Will be giving this a lot of thought in in the coming months.
    Signature

    This will NOT be up for long. Get it now whilst You still can. Btw it's FREE...
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  • Profile picture of the author solado
    I have been sifting through alot of the guide lines and its all very up in arms. Im thinking if I migrate my web hosts to America and target everywhere (minus eu) I could get around these laws ?
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    • Profile picture of the author cooler1
      Originally Posted by solado View Post

      I have been sifting through alot of the guide lines and its all very up in arms. Im thinking if I migrate my web hosts to America and target everywhere (minus eu) I could get around these laws ?
      That wouldn't work as they said that it's based on the country of residence of the site owner, not where the site is hosted.

      Also, even if you target non-EU countries, I don't think there's a way to stop some traffic coming to your site from EU countries.
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      • Profile picture of the author tomcroll
        Originally Posted by cooler1 View Post

        That wouldn't work as they said that it's based on the country of residence of the site owner, not where the site is hosted.

        Also, even if you target non-EU countries, I don't think there's a way to stop some traffic coming to your site from EU countries.
        So if the worst comes to the worst, we set up an offshore company which holds the rights to UK websites. Each person is given an account allowing them to "share" the profits of the site, however ownership is retained in Lilliput or whichever land we wish to inhabit.

        Keep calm and carry on.

        Can I go to the pub now?

        TC
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  • Profile picture of the author Ruka
    Just found this blog post, found it very useful, they explain what they will be doing for the sites they manage:

    Dispelling The Misinformation, And Addressing UK Cookie Law Proactively
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  • Profile picture of the author Ruka
    Also check out the comment at the bottom of this post - someone has come up with a downloadable solution with a banner where you click yes or no for accepting google analytics cookies.

    ICO publishes cookie law advice for UK website owners
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  • Profile picture of the author solado
    Still have no idea how im going to implement this on my sites - I don’t have the technical knowledge to do so.

    As my websites are primarily set up to make money, if affiliates and adsense have to have explicit consent to my website I am thinking of some form of 'splash' page (a bit like adult sites) where the background is dimmed and information about my 'privacy policy'. If they agree they can continue on my site with the cookies, if they decline they get redirected to google.
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    • Profile picture of the author heevyhivy
      I think that we should start doing split tests. One site with a cookie warning, and one without. Just to see how bad conversions could be affected
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    • Profile picture of the author Wechito
      Originally Posted by solado View Post

      Still have no idea how im going to implement this on my sites - I don't have the technical knowledge to do so.

      As my websites are primarily set up to make money, if affiliates and adsense have to have explicit consent to my website I am thinking of some form of 'splash' page (a bit like adult sites) where the background is dimmed and information about my 'privacy policy'. If they agree they can continue on my site with the cookies, if they decline they get redirected to google.

      If you are an affiliate, the cookie isn't set in you site but in the vendor's site. So,there is nothing you can do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nathan2525
    Originally Posted by wisedave View Post

    Hello,

    I am curious as to how I.M.'ers in the U.K. are going to handle the new cookie law they are going to begin enforcing in May.

    If you can't track affiliate sales, Amazon, etc....what is our course of action?

    How are you set up to handle this or what makes you not affected?

    I am curious as to how this is going to shake down and what adjustments you are making.

    Thanks!,

    Dave
    They are not banning them you just have to ask your visitors
    to accept your cookies.

    Affiliate Marketing Lives On!!
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  • Profile picture of the author KyleFury
    Seriously, what a joke. What are we gonna do now?
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  • Profile picture of the author cooler1
    Just a question.

    Does this cookie law only apply if a cookie is set when someone visits your site? Because with something like Amazon, the cookie is only set if the visitor clicks on an Amazon link and goes off site.
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  • Profile picture of the author Danny Cutts
    that is very true.... amazon sets the link
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  • Profile picture of the author Tomwood
    What about links in E books?

    What about all those free e books out there full of affiliate links which have gone viral and are no longer the control of the original author
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    FREE >>As We Thinketh << as a man thinketh for the 21st century The missing chapters are actually the best

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  • Profile picture of the author smodha
    Europe is going down the toilet and they're worried about Internet Cookies???

    Anyway I'm not worried about it. ICO are not enforcing it. They will only chase up complaints made by users. No additional resource will be allocated to this.

    More info can be found here: BBC News - Cookies: Majority of government sites to miss deadline
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    I Sell What People Want. The Money Is A Bonus..
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  • Profile picture of the author Suzanne Morrison
    I've read a few guides on this, but the Affiliate Future PDF guide that came out yesterday was probably the clearest I've read, with some examples of UK sites that are complying at the moment:

    http://www2.freequotes.co.uk/zemond/...gislation2.pdf

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    • Profile picture of the author daj
      Instead of cookies, Amazon and other affiliate networks should go back to the old school practice of letting someone put in a referral name/ID before purchasing.

      Back in the late 90s to early 2000s this is how it was done for the most part. If you went to someones website that had helpful information and you decided to buy a product through them, you would put in their referral/username that they gave you as a way of showing your appreciation or to save a certain %. No cookie or tracking code was used or needed, just someone's NAME/ID.
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  • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
    I've been installing this plug-in Cookie Law Compliance Solution | Cookie Control by Civic

    You can see it in action here It's Been Nicked
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  • Profile picture of the author inconf
    How to screw online businesses quickly!

    What a bunch of pricks...enforcing will be tricky, but rest assured they will make examples of people!!!
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    Think Big & Don't Listen To People Who tell You It Can't Be Done....Life's Too Short To Think Small!

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  • Profile picture of the author Alan Ashwood
    Anyone outside Europe must be wondering why the hell did Britain join in the first place.

    It costs us a fortune to be a member, and they constantly come up with ludicrous new directives; usually created by people who haven't thought it through, then actioned by people who have even less of a clue.

    With the Euro falling apart as we speak, we quite simply ought to GET THE HELL OUT!

    However, that doesn't mean that the burocrats in London won't still think this is a spiffing idea, and carry on.

    A spiffing idea llike the Euro; and for that matter the EEC.

    Pillocks
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    Now where did I put that pencil?

    Time for a cuppa.
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  • Profile picture of the author manicmethods
    Review the EU Cookie Law - e-petitions

    I know, only 3 sign ups at the moment, 99,997 to go, but if we get there, they have to have a debate about it.

    So everyone and anyone, sign it, get your friends to signs and their friends and get your IM lists to sign it and welll. EVERYONE BLOODY SIGN IT!
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  • Profile picture of the author Marko87
    This is just another case of clueless politicians creating and enforcing laws governing things they have absolutely no clue about.

    Seriously, look at the state of Europe currently and the politicians are bothered about website owners monitoring how their site performs. It pretty much sums up the problem, at a time when the UK and EU needs a boost in commerce, they implement new limiting regulations. (On a side note, I thought this coalition government of ours were all about removing the red tape that hampers businesses)

    Britain needs to get itself out of the EU catastrophe ASAP, but, yet again the politicians refuse to give the people a say on the matter.

    I've always thought about getting the hell out of here, now with the way things are going I may have no option but to leave.
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  • Profile picture of the author manicmethods
    In a way they've not given us a way, but in a way they have.

    Review the EU Cookie Law - e-petitions

    Seriously, no other way is going to work. We need to unite as IMers and get everyone we know to sign this epetition so the government realizes that it's not just a bunch of kids on the internet. People MAKE A LIVING online!

    If you're serious about stopping the EU Cookie Law, then sign it, and then stick it in your signature on every forum!

    Review the EU Cookie Law - e-petitions
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    • Profile picture of the author Marko87
      Signed and signatured! Lets hope that our government grows a pair and stands up to this EU nonsense.


      Originally Posted by manicmethods View Post

      In a way they've not given us a way, but in a way they have.

      Review the EU Cookie Law - e-petitions

      Seriously, no other way is going to work. We need to unite as IMers and get everyone we know to sign this epetition so the government realizes that it's not just a bunch of kids on the internet. People MAKE A LIVING online!

      If you're serious about stopping the EU Cookie Law, then sign it, and then stick it in your signature on every forum!

      Review the EU Cookie Law - e-petitions
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      • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
        Originally Posted by Marko87 View Post

        .....Lets hope that our government grows a pair and stands up to this EU nonsense.
        If only.........
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  • Profile picture of the author manicmethods
    Yeah. Problem is we need 100,000 signatures on there and well... There's 4.

    So Marko, if you have any friends who would sign it, or if you have an IM list, or an IM blog or anything, get it out there.

    We need EVERY UK WF MEMBER ON THIS!
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  • Profile picture of the author savvybizbuilder
    Just heard of it. Good thing I am not in affiliate marketing, Clickbank or Amazon.
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  • Do you think that popup actually disables cookies on their main site until clicked?

    STUPID LAW!

    Once click login is now- 2 click etc eh
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    Alexander Sebastian Just launched his new blog offering High end Training for FREE..
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  • Profile picture of the author JamesCx
    Why are the only people with power in this country, complete and utter ****ing morons?
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  • Profile picture of the author smodha
    Seriously folks don't lose sleep over this. There are BILLIONS of websites out there and no way of policing them.

    ICO have said that they will only respond to user complaints. Most of us target hungry buyers with our sites/blogs so they have no reason to complain...
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    I Sell What People Want. The Money Is A Bonus..
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  • Profile picture of the author Cabbey
    Good research info from previous posts noted here.

    It will be interesting to see what develops.
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  • Profile picture of the author spearce000
    Further to my earlier post.

    I found this plugin for Wordpress that seems to fit the bill, and have installed it on all my WP sites.

    Cookie warning for wordpress « MAJ Web Development
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    • Profile picture of the author PAFoster
      Cookie Consent - Get the code

      Great little bit of javascript. Pops up at the bottom so you can still view the site. Some great info too.

      Of course, like most stupid EU laws, it'll get forgotten about. How on earth are they going to enforce it?

      I've been breaking the law for a year now, and I only heard about it yesterday because at @inconf gave me the link to this thread.

      So I've been breaking the law for a year without knowing about it; a few more years isn't going to make any difference then.

      Oh and if you use WordPress to run your sites, you are already breaking the law. If you disable cookies in your browser and then try and login to your site, you won't be able to. It'l just clear your login details. Which confused me for a bit. I clicked login with out filling in my details and the red warning box popped up above with the message:

      "ERROR: Cookies are blocked or not supported by your browser. You must enable cookies to use WordPress."

      Thanks to @spearce000 for his link in the previous post, as it was researching further from there that I found the link above, which is just javascript and much less obtrusive.

      I for one aren't bothered about all this. If I hear of anyone being prosecuted, then I shall re-evaluate, until then, I'll just carry on as I was before I read this thread.

      And will I hear about anyone being prosecuted? Er that'll be a no then. I think the EU has some other rather pressing things to worry about.

      Do they have cookies in Greece?
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      • Profile picture of the author wizzard74
        Originally Posted by PAFoster View Post

        Cookie Consent - Get the code

        Great little bit of javascript. Pops up at the bottom so you can still view the site. Some great info too.

        Of course, like most stupid EU laws, it'll get forgotten about. How on earth are they going to enforce it?

        I've been breaking the law for a year now, and I only heard about it yesterday because at @inconf gave me the link to this thread.

        So I've been breaking the law for a year without knowing about it; a few more years isn't going to make any difference then.

        Oh and if you use WordPress to run your sites, you are already breaking the law. If you disable cookies in your browser and then try and login to your site, you won't be able to. It'l just clear your login details. Which confused me for a bit. I clicked login with out filling in my details and the red warning box popped up above with the message:

        "ERROR: Cookies are blocked or not supported by your browser. You must enable cookies to use WordPress."

        Thanks to @spearce000 for his link in the previous post, as it was researching further from there that I found the link above, which is just javascript and much less obtrusive.

        I for one aren't bothered about all this. If I hear of anyone being prosecuted, then I shall re-evaluate, until then, I'll just carry on as I was before I read this thread.

        And will I hear about anyone being prosecuted? Er that'll be a no then. I think the EU has some other rather pressing things to worry about.

        Do they have cookies in Greece?
        You haven't been breaking the law, the law comes into affect tomorrow. They were just telling sites to get ready. Don't stick your head in the sand though, even though there are reports that ICO won't be fining anyone as long as you show some compliance, things can change.
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        • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
          Originally Posted by wizzard74 View Post

          You haven't been breaking the law, the law comes into affect tomorrow. They were just telling sites to get ready. Don't stick your head in the sand though, even though there are reports that ICO won't be fining anyone as long as you show some compliance, things can change.
          Wrong.

          The law came into effect last year and you have been breaking it since then.

          The Information Commissioner announced that enforcement will only commence from the 26th of this month.
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  • Do we need to put this on our squeeze pages aswell?
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  • Profile picture of the author ProAffiliate01
    How can the UK stop affiliate sales tracking entirely? How does an affiliate get credit for their earnings then? This is confusing to me. Sorry. How has this affected people since this was enacted?
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