Working from home - it can ruin your life and business if you let it.

by rooze
63 replies
I know there have been a few related threads, but I'm interested in hearing how people are able to stay focused, separate their home life from work, and basically avoid the burn-out that can come from spending too much time on the 'pewter.

I know a guy who runs a marketing business from home. He had trouble separating his home life from work, so he converted the detached garage into a home office. Each day he puts on a suit and tie, grabs his briefcase and mobile phone, then walks 20 feet across the yard to get to his office Which is actually quite clever, he's found a way of separating the two components of his life so that one doesn't take over the other.

Personally, I flit between working at home and working from on office on a fairly frequent basis. When at home, I learned to draw a line under the work day by learning to become a decent cook. Each night I clock-off at 5.30 to begin prepping a good meal, it's usually 7.30 by the time I'm done and cleaned up.

Having been self-employed for the last 14 years I know how easy it is to land in a rut if you don't handle this aspect of home/work well.

How do you juggle your home life with work? Any tips?
#business #home #life #ruin #working
  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    My answer was simple...

    Unless I'm on a deadline (rare since I got out of consulting), when my wife gets home from work, my work day is over.

    As they say, "happy wife, happy life"
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    • Profile picture of the author Damielle
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      My answer was simple...

      Unless I'm on a deadline (rare since I got out of consulting), when my wife gets home from work, my work day is over.

      As they say, "happy wife, happy life"
      This works for me too. I also have a 2 year old that will physically sit in my lap and take over the computer .

      I really love what I do and sometimes I will 'try' and work when they are at home but its usually not long before either my wife or son start to remind me that family time has begun.
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      • Profile picture of the author rooze
        Originally Posted by Damielle View Post

        This works for me too. I also have a 2 year old that will physically sit in my lap and take over the computer .

        I really love what I do and sometimes I will 'try' and work when they are at home but its usually not long before either my wife or son start to remind me that family time has begun.
        You guys with kids are truly blessed. I wish I'd been responsible enough to become a parent when I was young enough to handle it
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      • Profile picture of the author Targeted Traffic
        I have my own office on the basement and I still set the 8 AM to 5 PM and stick to it and leave work for work.
        But it took years before somehow mastering it though...I went through times when I find myself constantly checking e-mail on iPhone when spending time with family...
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        • Profile picture of the author webskipper
          Originally Posted by Targeted Traffic View Post

          I have my own office on the basement and I still set the 8 AM to 5 PM and stick to it and leave work for work.
          But it took years before somehow mastering it though...I went through times when I find myself constantly checking e-mail on iPhone when spending time with family...
          Haha, that's so true... I try my best to ignore my iPhone on weekends but it's not easy...
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    • Profile picture of the author meaghandrina
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      My answer was simple...

      Unless I'm on a deadline (rare since I got out of consulting), when my wife gets home from work, my work day is over.

      As they say, "happy wife, happy life"
      I like your simple answer John.
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    • Profile picture of the author profitprint
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      My answer was simple...

      Unless I'm on a deadline (rare since I got out of consulting), when my wife gets home from work, my work day is over.

      As they say, "happy wife, happy life"
      I like this. I think all the married and the singles should apply/know this
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      • Profile picture of the author Trevor
        I know exactly what you mean that working from home can ruin our lives. It almost happened to me last year, but it ain't happening again.

        The fact is, working on the Internet without any personal contact with people is very asocial and it's a must (at least to me) to stay firmly with your feet on the ground and and not let it burn your personal and private life.
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  • Profile picture of the author rooze
    I think it's an easier problem to avoid when you've been working at it for a while, making decent money and the financial pressures are off.
    I used to be terrible as a newbie, with the pressure of having to make some money quickly I'd spend 16-18 hrs a day glued to the computer.....not a healthy way to live life!
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  • Profile picture of the author solado
    I dont work at home (unfortunatly) - but for me i hate working for other people, so working 16 hours from home for my self would be a dream come true. I did however book a week off work and did some IM (or building websites for adsense) and i loved it - the freedom and answering to no one. I woke up at 10am and worked until 8pm and felt great for it because i still got to take breaks (work out / go running / play games) between the article writing and backlinking).

    When i get out the slave system and work from home i would imagne playing games and working from my girlfriends would be my outlet and detach from the work-home situation. I simply cant stand working 9-5:30 5 days a week 50 weeks a year where someone "owns me"... detest the thoughts completly;
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    • Profile picture of the author rooze
      Originally Posted by solado View Post

      I dont work at home (unfortunatly) - but for me i hate working for other people, so working 16 hours from home for my self would be a dream come true. I did however book a week off work and did some IM (or building websites for adsense) and i loved it - the freedom and answering to no one. I woke up at 10am and worked until 8pm and felt great for it because i still got to take breaks (work out / go running / play games) between the article writing and backlinking).

      When i get out the slave system and work from home i would imagne playing games and working from my girlfriends would be my outlet and detach from the work-home situation. I simply cant stand working 9-5:30 5 days a week 50 weeks a year where someone "owns me"... detest the thoughts completly;
      You've highlighted most of the good points about working from home which people who work 9-5 office jobs sometimes dream about. But the dream can quickly turn into something else if you let it. There are many people who work from home who can't manage the situation, the routine, the isolation in some cases.
      It's not for everyone.... I think it's useful to know what conscious steps people take to help them cope.
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      • Profile picture of the author solado
        Originally Posted by rooze View Post

        You've highlighted most of the good points about working from home which people who work 9-5 office jobs sometimes dream about. But the dream can quickly turn into something else if you let it. There are many people who work from home who can't manage the situation, the routine, the isolation in some cases.
        It's not for everyone.... I think it's useful to know what conscious steps people take to help them cope.
        I can see why some people climb the walls - my girlfriend quite literally 'accidentally' created a ebay business that she runs full time from home after her old job position was closed. She likes to be social and around people, so to cope she purposely goes to the post office to ship her sales every day and schedules to meet up with a friend for lunch.

        But before she did this lunch meeting with friends she was very low and depressive. For me I wouldn't have this problem, after working in customer service for 1 1/2 years my faith in humanity is currently zero
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  • Profile picture of the author jesustamez
    I agree with ya'll rooze and solado, I started almost 4 months ago and my current goal is to quit my job and live solely off IM. I'm living with my parents right now while I go to school and they are telling me if I don't work 40 hours a week for 40 years what am I going to do in that free time..

    I tell em I'll probably start going to the gym, join some kind extra activity like martial arts or for me krav maga which is what I want to try.. and probably go to a better university.

    As far as my routine I wake up every day around noon, work on IM for about 2-3 hours, take a break get back on it at night around 11pm till 3am. It's going pretty well so far but I will be changing it heavily when I graduate in 3 months.

    I also add at least 1-2 days a week of just chilling and not getting on the computer at all. This helps me from burning out.
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  • Profile picture of the author Eduard Stinga
    Hmm, the way I deal with this is that I don't have a schedule, so I just do the work that I have whenever I want to, if I want to. However, as someone mentioned above, I can do this because I don't have any financial pressures.

    I am aware though that having a schedule and actually working from 10AM to 4PM for example on my business would greatly improve it.
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  • Profile picture of the author jamesrich1
    I am not going to lie I am a workaholic that has problems separating my home life and online life. The crazy part is I don't want to change, not until I am at the income level I desire.
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  • Profile picture of the author tamiro1992
    im just beginning to work from home a bit and i have to say its very difficult. for example today i slept a little bit too much and didn't get too much work done. i like the whole idea of having your office in the garage. my office is in my bed room, that's basicly the worse thing ever. hard to get work done.
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  • Profile picture of the author khut
    I've been working at home for the past 3 years and I love it. I recently was able to set up my office in my basement so I'm able to work in quiet environment away from the family noise.

    To stay motivated while working I listen to positive talk shows or books on disc, and usually try to catch Dave Ramsey in the morning.
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  • Profile picture of the author hustlinsmoke
    I manage my time by not managing, I know what needs to be done each day.
    I start off by waking and then checking emails. sifting through the important's
    and not so. Then I check a few important things on my sites. After all is said is done, its been about two hours. Now I break, run errands have a little fun, usually home by 1 or 2 p.m. and get back on the cpu. Do do some marketing some building and then check emails again. I check on my virtual workers to make sure none have flown the coupe.
    Now I have the warriors which I have committed about a hour a day too.

    By the way, Im single so I have it really easy lol.
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    • Profile picture of the author rooze
      Originally Posted by hustlinsmoke View Post

      I check on my virtual workers to make sure none have flown the coupe.
      That's funny

      The worst thing about any business, other than its customers, is its employees
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  • Profile picture of the author nictas
    Hey Rooze,

    This is a really important discussion! I have a large & noisy family and only rarely get daytime hours alone. These hours are very precious.

    It's really important to have worked out a list of monthly targets for your business, & then how you're going to achieve them. Thus you'll have a list of tasks in order of priority. Then, every spare hour you have, you'll know what your main money-making task is for that time slot. Be very focused with the time you do have available.

    For me, this can mean squeezing things in in the evenings when the kids are in bed. I frequently set the alarm clock for 3.30am as most of the webinars I participate in are at 4 am local time!! Then I make use of the long summer daylight hours & keep working until the family gets up.
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    • Profile picture of the author rooze
      Originally Posted by nictas View Post

      Hey Rooze,

      This is a really important discussion! I have a large & noisy family and only rarely get daytime hours alone. These hours are very precious.

      It's really important to have worked out a list of monthly targets for your business, & then how you're going to achieve them. Thus you'll have a list of tasks in order of priority. Then, every spare hour you have, you'll know what your main money-making task is for that time slot. Be very focused with the time you do have available.

      For me, this can mean squeezing things in in the evenings when the kids are in bed. I frequently set the alarm clock for 3.30am as most of the webinars I participate in are at 4 am local time!! Then I make use of the long summer daylight hours & keep working until the family gets up.
      Hey Nictas,
      That's a good point, I don't have kids, I can't imagine what it would have been like to have a young family in the house when I was trying to get work done. "These hours are very precious" - heck yes, you can't ever recover lost time when the kids are growing up, your time is the most important thing in their life.

      On a side note, I remember too well when I first started working at home. My wife was helping me get the business started by answering calls, emails and doing some secretarial work. We shared an office, actually a spare bedroom, around 12' X 10' if I remember correctly Anyway, the phone would ring and she'd answer it. Invariably it would be someone wanting the speak to me. She'd reply, "one minute whilst I put you on hold and try to find him, I believe he's with a client but I'll try to interrupt him".....then she'd lean across the desk and hand me the phone....
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    • Profile picture of the author nellterry
      It's true. I've been doing the work-at-home thing for 6 months now and I've found the hardest part is staying motivated. I tend to work a little, then jump on forums. Work, jump on forums. And so it goes.

      I am trying to find a way to discipline myself. It's hard though when I have 2 babies to take care of 24/7. I have to work during nap times and really late at night, so it's a juggling act.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    For 4 years now, Ive been walking from my bed, to the computer and back again, usually putting in 15 hour days. 7 days a week.

    This doesnt include the 4 years before that doing the same, whilst I was working a full time job.
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    • Profile picture of the author rooze
      Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

      For 4 years now, Ive been walking from my bed, to the computer and back again, usually putting in 15 hour days. 7 days a week.

      This doesnt include the 4 years before that doing the same, whilst I was working a full time job.
      I hear you on that.
      The 4 year stage for me was the tipping point. I had two lucky breaks in the first 4 years, one came early on and got me a bunch of long-term seo customers, the other came on the 4 year mark when I was at the point of cracking up! - an opportunity to rent cheap office space and get out of the house. Had either one of those two things not happened I might have been forced back into a 9-5 job. Now I've got a much better handle on it...juggling work and downtime is critical to stay sharp and stop you from losing your mind. You can slide slowly into a rut without even knowing it's happening. Once you get in there it can be hard to get out.
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  • Profile picture of the author webskipper
    I used to be in a industry where I had to work for long/odd hours for 6 days a week. I had a fixed salary with no bonus whatsoever so I was struggling financially and my wife was not happy at all about me being an absent husband and dad for our little daughter... So I was forced to come up with a solution and the solution was getting into the IM world and work from home (a typical thought it was for people like me).

    To cut long story short, I ended up making fairly good money with IM so I finally quite my day-job and started to work from home. I worked purely from home for about 2 years. Yes, I basically enjoyed it (much better than my previous situation) but with my little daughter always around and my wife depending on me to do things around the house all the time, it was hard to focus on my work and also started to loose the "boundary" between "work" and "family life"...

    Then one day, my daughter said to me, "Daddy, I want to play with you but you are never with me...". That actually hit me real hard. I realized often times I was not present with my daughter (even with my wife) because I was thinking about my business all the time. My excuse was.. "C'mon, I'm trying so hard to make more money for my family! Can't you see that?!"...

    Now I mainly do offline consulting as an SEO and I made long-term contracts with a couple of large local clients in such a way that I go to their office and work there for 3-4 days a week, rather than working 100% from home.

    This has been working very well for me because I can focus on my business there, while I still have a "flex" work time agreement with them so I can work from home whenever I choose to do so... And this has given me more balanced life between my "work" & "family" life and i can still work on other smaller clients or my own IM projects in my spare time as well. Besides, my social life got better as I enjoy interacting with people in the office. Needless to say, my family is happier now

    I learned that working from home successfully takes a lot more discipline, flexibility and good life management.

    Additional comment - I actually outsource a fair bit of my work nowadays and that has been making my life a lot easier for sure
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    • Profile picture of the author rooze
      Originally Posted by webskipper View Post

      I used to be in a industry where I had to work for long/odd hours for 6 days a week. I had a fixed salary with no bonus whatsoever so I was struggling financially and my wife was not happy at all about me being an absent husband and dad for our little daughter... So I was forced to come up with a solution and the solution was getting into the IM world and work from home (a typical thought it was for people like me).

      To cut long story short, I ended up making fairly good money with IM so I finally quite my day-job and started to work from home. I worked purely from home for about 2 years. Yes, I basically enjoyed it (much better than my previous situation) but with my little daughter always around and my wife depending on me to do things around the house all the time, it was hard to focus on my work and also started to loose the "boundary" between "work" and "family life"...

      Then one day, my daughter said to me, "Daddy, I want to play with you but you are never with me...". That actually hit me real hard. I realized often times I was not present with my daughter (even with my wife) because I was thinking about my business all the time. My excuse was.. "C'mon, I'm trying so hard to make more money for my family! Can't you see that?!"...

      Now I mainly do offline consulting as an SEO and I made long-term contracts with a couple of large local clients in such a way that I go to their office and work there for 3-4 days a week, rather than working 100% from home.

      This has been working very well for me because I can focus on my business there, while I still have a "flex" work time agreement with them so I can work from home whenever I choose to do so... And this has given me more balanced life between my "work" & "family" life and i can still work on other smaller clients or my own IM projects in my spare time as well. Besides, my social life got better as I enjoy interacting with people in the office. Needless to say, my family is happier now

      I learned that working from home successfully takes a lot more discipline, flexibility and good life management.
      Great post, this is key "Besides, my social life got better as I enjoy interacting with people in the office"
      It wasn't so much the lack of social interaction that got to me, it was not having like-minded individuals around to bounce ideas off.
      "I learned that working from home successfully takes a lot more discipline, flexibility and good life management." - exactly, you need a lot of discipline to stay focused when your family life is overlapping your work life....I know this and I didn't even have kids!
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    • Profile picture of the author AprilCT
      I much prefer working at home. I no longer have a dedicated office, just a corner of the dining room, but it works.

      My time is spent however I happen to arrange it because I started writing exclusively for my own purposes. All "deadlines" are very flexible. This permits me to use whatever time I want to sleep in late, for friends, running errands, housework, family, and preparing dinner.

      A long time ago I had a biz with a dedicated office and was glued to my seat with constant tough deadlines, sometimes for 16-18 hours at a time. There's no way I would ever go back to doing that. It happened to be a great arrangement for me at the time, but at this point in my life...never again.

      Work at home arrangements are not the answer for everyone. If you find it works for you, then go for it, but never quit your day job until you are sure.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brendan Vraibel
    My schedule helps me out a lot. I'm a night owl so I get the majority of my work done from about 10 PM til about 4 AM. I wake up at 10 - 11 AM and have a fairly normal day and don't really have a ton of trouble separating work from "life". I still get to have lunch with friends, train some martial arts or whatever else the day calls for. You can't beat it, in my opinion.
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  • Profile picture of the author Debbie6578
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    • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
      I think it varies from person to person. For some, having a daily routine and a wall of separation between their work and home life is crucial. I personally don't have much of a routine, and I work at all kinds of weird hours, but it works for me (so far).
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  • Profile picture of the author texas319
    I just got a 9-5 since i can do that and build my IM biz and meet with prospective JVs in my niche. from 9-5 my CRACKberry keeps me connected and I try and build as much as I can during the 9-5 even its just product creation outlines
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  • Profile picture of the author RichBeck
    Keeping "work time" and "family time" separate is tough... I'm seriously considering leasing an "Executive Suite" a mile from my house.... It would be an additional expense, but being out amongst people and the increase in productivity would be worth it.....

    All the Best,

    Rich
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  • Profile picture of the author athanne
    Choosing the environment in which to work from is not a problem but the impact of the environment on your managerial skills is what matters. A good manager will always be a good manager despite changes. Working from home will definitely add you some extra time i.e. time spent on travelling to your place of work. You can add this extra time in your work input or still, split it equally between your work and home affairs.
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  • Profile picture of the author Emily Meeks
    Whenever I had to study for finals (or any other big test), I'd bring all the materials to places like Starbucks or Ihop, depending on urgency and the time of day. I find it MUCH easier to focus when I'm not lounging around at home - I pick the location of where I work, but am out of the house when I do.

    Having a laptop and USB drive makes this task MUCH easier.
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  • Profile picture of the author Emily Meeks
    Originally Posted by fitzrobbi View Post

    marketing is all we need ....Marketing has become the backbone to the success of our onsite activations. Without them, our sampling efforts would not have been effective.
    Sampling efforts? QUE?????????

    Have you even read this thread? :confused:
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  • Profile picture of the author J Bold
    Create a schedule with clear tasks for each day.

    Keep to set hours.

    Use software or a simple timer to keep yourself on task. No checking personal email, facebook, etc. during your work hours.

    Have clear goals in mind and write them down. Don't write down too many. Have a longer time-scale in your mind but most of us are immediate thinkers and want to think about what we have to do right now. Write those things down that you need to do right now or in the course of the day.

    It's best to actually work outside of your home, I firmly believe, but outside of your bedroom should be the minimum (unless you live in a studio, out of luck there!).

    This is to help you mentally separate work from play. I think you get what I mean.

    Also apparently you sleep easier if your bedroom is used only for sleeping and nothing else (beyond the obvious for those with partners).

    Don't go to sleep worrying about your work and this is easier to do if you don't physically work in your sleep space.

    Above all, be disciplined. For how to be disciplined, buy a well-reviewed product about time management and task conquering if you must. However you go about it, find that discipline and routine.

    Lastly, have scheduled breaks. Get fresh air. Exercise. Take meal breaks but eat light when you still have work to do so as not to get too tired and sleepy because you are digesting a big meal.

    These are some tips just off the top of my head...
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  • Profile picture of the author MatthewNeer
    I take it over to your local neighborhood coffee shop like Starbucks and get the job done!
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    • Profile picture of the author SlicedGenius
      I've been working from home for 6 months now, after 12 years of office life. It's great! But along with all the advice posted so far, I would say the fastest thing to learn is the difference between being 'busy' and being 'productive'.

      It's one thing to get up in good time, and avoid all the distractions such as TV, bed, etc - and spend 8 hours in front of the computer - but are you using the time effectively?
      It's easy to think that checking email, forums and feeds are all actual work - but they can easily fill your day! I find I still need to set myself limits - and it's good to keep timesheets so you can see where the time is going.
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  • Profile picture of the author anshuldayal
    Working too much is about the only issue I have had so far after quitting my day job about 2 months ago. Otherwise, I tend to stay fairly focused as I make a list of important tasks (tasks that will actually grow my business!) first things in the morning and tick them off as I finish them.
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  • Profile picture of the author DoubleOhDave
    Sorry if this was already mentioned - I had to skip to the bottom as I don't have time right now to read all th rest of the answers, but i found a free report from a guy who also has an app that is very useful.. Google thefocusmaster and download his report and his timer app... VERY useful and when you read the report it's a real eye opener on internet productivity!
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  • Profile picture of the author anahita56
    I think self management and outsourcing can solve the problem of working overtime for anyone who works at home. Even if you really enjoy what you do, you still have to have time off to rest and regroup! so discipline, Scheduling, managing your time effectively and Delegating are crucial to productiveness and well being.
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    What about the social aspect of it. Not exactly a thriving Christmas work party atmosphere either. Yesh agreed. It's takes iron discipline for it to work. You can quickly get lost on the Net all day and most of the night, weekends etc....It does become addictive
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  • Profile picture of the author Eduard Stinga
    Reading all the posts in this thread actually makes me want to start putting a line between my personal life and my business, since they're pretty connected. I just realized how weird it is to go out with my girlfriend and have my head constantly thinking about my business, and also talk with her about it. Talking with her actually helps, but I tend to do that when we go out to a movie, restaurant, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author miketyson10
    Work from home is not easy. I personally prefer work far from home. But as a beginner, I think home is best place, because that time you don't earn a lot of money. But when you become expert and handle so many work, you will face difficult in home. So, I will prefer work outside from your home.

    I too want to break family life and working life.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dave Guiri
    I think a lot of us have the same problems, its a fine balance. On one hand we all want to build our businesses to the level we are happy with and so we work non-stop to get there.

    I personally walk from bed to my computer and work 10-12 hours a day. I break for food but sometimes skip meals when i'm really busy, this is not good. Luckily i live with my girlfriend so can't skip too many meals.

    Having worked for many companies and been stuck in many offices, i still prefer to work from home, at least i decide who i spend my time with. Now i just need to get my income up to that level to relax. I think most people involved in IM are workaholics.
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  • Profile picture of the author SmileKenya
    It all depends with an individual. Working at home should not affect your job nor your life at all. It should, in fact, be of an advantage to your job and even yourself. The time spent on travelling ( with traffic jams) to and from your workplace can be consolidated to increase your job input and your extra rest. It only needs serious management.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daws0n
    Originally Posted by rooze View Post

    I know there have been a few related threads, but I'm interested in hearing how people are able to stay focused, separate their home life from work, and basically avoid the burn-out that can come from spending too much time on the 'pewter.
    Besides all advantages and freedom that comes with 'Work from Home', the only bad thing i have observed, is becoming Anti-Social. Like most other IMer's, i spend a lot of time on the internet and this is something which is constantly cutting me off with my social contacts. I have already reached a stage of 'Financial Freedom', still i am working like a pig :p

    Being social is really important, and nowadays i am trying to cut off on my daily working hours, to find some time for friends and family... So, far so good and i will continue to do this (without ruining my I.M business).

    *On topic: i have managed to get a small office space where me and my partners sits for few hours a day and do gossips and little bit of work. In this way, i am still working in a 'Office', but the only difference is, i am not being a slave for my boss, but working for my own profits.
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    I don't have a signature dude!
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  • Profile picture of the author GSMarketing
    I've worked at home for the past 5 years (my entire career) as I worked for a FTSE100 company that encouraged home working. I guess as I've never worked in an office I find it hard to draw comparisons and differences. However what I always did was plan and have a strict timeline around my activities. Once my days work was complete I called it a day and never went on to something else. I find this allowed me to determine a finite end to each day.

    Also, I always allowed myself breaks through out the day, this may of been to watch a bit of TV or walk around the block. At first I felt guilty about this but then I thought I'm not getting all those tea and cigarette breaks that those in the office are, nor am I gathered around the water cooler or at someone elses desks chatting about the match last night or what was on TV. They got to have breaks so why shouldn't I? This really allowed me to stay refreshed and focussed.

    Cheers

    G
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  • Profile picture of the author Yulia from DNP
    I would like to add something important here..
    There are some things we were taught to do and certain rules we were taught to follow from when we were young. Like work for example, work has it rules. It has amount of hours per day where you are placed in a a situation where you are surrounded by people who are not your family, place where you are not allowed to put your feet on the table and other things which are always a reminded - you are not home, you are at work. These things define work. So, with this kind of education we found it really hard to do our work at home, without taking a nap and watching that show that we wanted to watch etc etc . So basically thanks to that education we were used to work at work and relax at home. So it is basically against our nature if i might say so, to work at home, to mix two things that were brought to us as separate and different. So in my point of view, i have more respect for those who manage to work hard at home without having trouble separating family life and work. But if you ask me,i think i would need a schedule too ; )))
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    Yulia borova
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    • Profile picture of the author rooze
      Originally Posted by Daws0n View Post

      Besides all advantages and freedom that comes with 'Work from Home', the only bad thing i have observed, is becoming Anti-Social. Like most other IMer's, i spend a lot of time on the internet and this is something which is constantly cutting me off with my social contacts. I have already reached a stage of 'Financial Freedom', still i am working like a pig :p
      Agree completely. I think I was a bit anti-social before I worked from home and it only got worse

      Originally Posted by Yulia from DNP View Post

      I would like to add something important here..
      There are some things we were taught to do and certain rules we were taught to follow from when we were young. Like work for example, work has it rules. It has amount of hours per day where you are placed in a a situation where you are surrounded by people who are not your family, place where you are not allowed to put your feet on the table and other things which are always a reminded - you are not home, you are at work. These things define work. So, with this kind of education we found it really hard to do our work at home, without taking a nap and watching that show that we wanted to watch etc etc . So basically thanks to that education we were used to work at work and relax at home. So it is basically against our nature if i might say so, to work at home, to mix two things that were brought to us as separate and different. So in my point of view, i have more respect for those who manage to work hard at home without having trouble separating family life and work. But if you ask me,i think i would need a schedule too ; )))
      I like the above comment, thanks. I think the downside is that when working from home we can become less productive, less output for each hour attributed to work. In the office, with a boss assigning you a schedule and setting targets and goals for you, there's a constant pressure for us to attain those goals which requires us to be at our most productive most of the time. Working at home, we sometimes fail in the first instance to even create a schedule with clear targets and goals, so we can easily find ourselves coasting along and being far less productive than we ought to be.

      Though others have said it already -

      1 - Try to place a barrier between work and home, physical if possible, if not physical then by some other action which becomes routine.
      2 - Create goals, targets, deadlines for yourself, just like you'd have if you worked in an office environment, and stick to them.
      3 - Try to bring outside interaction into the workplace to stop you becoming anti-social and cocooned in some kind of home-office bubble. Maybe plan regular lunch meetings, get your laptop and go work in a wifi coffee shop for part of the day, or use SKYPE to have some face-to-face interaction with your clients/customers.

      I know for some the whole work at home process is quite natural and they bask in the freedom which it provides. But for a lot of us in can be very challenging, particularly after doing it for several years.

      I think another point which perhaps hasn't been raised - if you're married, the commitment to what you are doing needs to be shared by your spouse. They need to respect your space during work hours and try to create an environment for you which is conducive to work and productivity. If they're constantly asking you to do something on the 'honey-do' list during work hours, you might need to have a little pep talk and remind them just how important and serious this venture is to both of you.

      Great comments so far....
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  • Profile picture of the author benlydenver
    don't let your bussiness ruin your life. Your doing a business because you have a goal for your self and to your family. If your life nor family is broken, what will you do to your business?
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  • Profile picture of the author focused
    There are some great comments in this thread.
    And I see now that it's so very easy to mix a home based business
    and personal life in sometimes adverse ways.
    Best to at least realize the potential for a problem,
    so you can be more aware of not letting the business
    life dominate everything.
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  • Profile picture of the author BridgetSielicki
    Working from home has always been a struggle for me, and actually creating a better schedule for myself is one of my New Year's Resolutions!

    The only way for me to separate work and family is to follow a schedule. I am a stay at home mom to 2 young kids, and I am trying to be better about not working while watching them (not like that is even possible...)

    My husband is home in the mornings so I work then, and again after the kiddos are in bed. On his days off I might pop over to the library or a coffee shop to do some work. Sometimes a change of scenery is a huge help, especially since I don't have the luxury of a home office. My goal is to always focus on work when it is time to work, and focus on family at all other times!
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  • Profile picture of the author tropvik
    Originally Posted by rooze View Post

    I know there have been a few related threads, but I'm interested in hearing how people are able to stay focused, separate their home life from work, and basically avoid the burn-out that can come from spending too much time on the 'pewter.

    I know a guy who runs a marketing business from home. He had trouble separating his home life from work, so he converted the detached garage into a home office. Each day he puts on a suit and tie, grabs his briefcase and mobile phone, then walks 20 feet across the yard to get to his office Which is actually quite clever, he's found a way of separating the two components of his life so that one doesn't take over the other.

    Personally, I flit between working at home and working from on office on a fairly frequent basis. When at home, I learned to draw a line under the work day by learning to become a decent cook. Each night I clock-off at 5.30 to begin prepping a good meal, it's usually 7.30 by the time I'm done and cleaned up.

    Having been self-employed for the last 14 years I know how easy it is to land in a rut if you don't handle this aspect of home/work well.

    How do you juggle your home life with work? Any tips?
    I actually roomed with a 9-5er friend.

    I asked him to wake me up when he did, so i synced up with his routine.

    When he would leave, i would be making breakfast, and get to work.

    Then i started using XMind - Mind Mapping and Storming

    (I love that software for mind mapping stuff i have running around in my mind.)

    Basically i created a circular mind map that i follow clockwise.

    I always start with the most tedious things, like bills, travel related scheduling (i am constantly on the move), stuff i help my family and friends with etc.

    (all that stuff drains you of energy if you let them accumulate.)

    then i move to things like "follow ups" with clients and stuff like that. (my main business is import/export)

    then i move to IM stuff, on the tech side, websites, research etc

    then i usually move to writing

    then around 4:15pm i go Crossfitting.

    I have found that if im not in shape/training i go completely out of my mind.

    W.e. you do though, just set up a routine, that you can follow at least 4 weeks. THEN adjust, but you HAVE to be able to set some type of consistency, be it a little weird and inefficient at 1st.

    My life completely changed once i kinda "parented" myself to do that.

    Independent entrepreneurs have to understand we are both the mentee and mentor to ourselves. Thats the price to pay independence. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BEING A BADASS IS WORK DUDERS!!

    hope that helps bro let me know watcha think.
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    • Profile picture of the author rooze
      Originally Posted by didacus View Post

      I actually roomed with a 9-5er friend.

      I asked him to wake me up when he did, so i synced up with his routine.

      When he would leave, i would be making breakfast, and get to work.

      Then i started using XMind - Mind Mapping and Storming

      (I love that software for mind mapping stuff i have running around in my mind.)

      Basically i created a circular mind map that i follow clockwise.

      I always start with the most tedious things, like bills, travel related scheduling (i am constantly on the move), stuff i help my family and friends with etc.

      (all that stuff drains you of energy if you let them accumulate.)

      then i move to things like "follow ups" with clients and stuff like that. (my main business is import/export)

      then i move to IM stuff, on the tech side, websites, research etc

      then i usually move to writing

      then around 4:15pm i go Crossfitting.

      I have found that if im not in shape/training i go completely out of my mind.

      W.e. you do though, just set up a routine, that you can follow at least 4 weeks. THEN adjust, but you HAVE to be able to set some type of consistency, be it a little weird and inefficient at 1st.

      My life completely changed once i kinda "parented" myself to do that.

      Independent entrepreneurs have to understand we are both the mentee and mentor to ourselves. Thats the price to pay independence. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BEING A BADASS IS WORK DUDERS!!

      hope that helps bro let me know watcha think.
      Wow !

      I didn't realize their was software to help with 'mind mapping'! I have to check that out!
      I think your comments about routine are important. When I force myself into a routine, even if it's only setting a schedule one week at a time, I find myself being a lot more productive. I think a lot of it boils down to discipline and how good you are at staying on task - I'm not, so I need all the help I can get in that direction.
      Thanks for the tip on the software, I'm heading off to check that out now [drops his schedule and goes off at another tangent ]
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  • Profile picture of the author thereikid
    Great post. I believe its all about disciple and focusing single minded on the task. I use the Eat That Frog system by Brian Tracy to utilize time well. I have also created very important but easy to accomplish tasks in every area of life spiritual, relationships, mental and emotional health, physical health and financial freedom. I won't let a day go by without doing something in these areas, even for example one push up is better than nothing. Also the bigest obstacle is yourself so don't be critical, judge, or out yourself down the good is always there no matter how bad it looks, this attitude grows with faith.
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  • Profile picture of the author tjcreation
    I think some of it has to do with who you are as a person. Some people thrive on the office environment - talking to people, going to lunch etc. Others (myself included) love what others see as isolation when working at home. I've been working from home for over 20 years. It was wonderful all the time my children were growing up (my oldest is now 22). I worked all the time...except when I needed to do something with/for them or my husband or other pieces of life needed attention. I never compartmentalized - I just let it all flow together. It works for me. But here's what I find so funny. My oldest wants nothing to do with being an entrepreneur. He wants to have a job that he can go to and then go home and forget it. My 19-year-old wants nothing to do with having a "regular" job. He is determined to work for himself. I believe everyone needs to do what fits their personality.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mary Wilhite
    It will largely depend on people’s circumstances; some are single, others are married with small children; others live in large houses where they can afford to have one room as an office while others use the corner of the living room as the office.
    It will also depend on the level someone is in IM. A person making $10,000 or more a month may work less than one struggling to make the first $1000 online.
    That said, let me assume a person only has the corner of the house as the office and has young children. This is how one would separate work and family life to avoid ruining either…
    1. Seek the cooperation of your family.
    2. Adjust your working hours-late in the night or early in the morning when people are asleep.
    3. Schedule to have uninterrupted family sessions or working time.
    4. When you have urgent tasks to finish but, there are visitors around, seek ways of going to a library, coffeehouse or lock yourself somewhere.
    Whatever way one may want to look at, in my opinion family comes first.
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  • Profile picture of the author cjp231
    great advice
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  • Profile picture of the author Anton095
    Working at home - this is the future of the economy of outsourcing. All economic indicators have shown their efficiency in the home. It is comfortable, it's less hatratno for the employer, not efficacy is reduced, and the interaction with kollgami enhanced by new information technologies.

    This is the future, no doubt.
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert Brauer
    I totally agree.

    However if you are disciplined enough to SCHEDULE times to walk away from the computer...and...(gasp!) go outside, you should be fine.

    It can definitely be completely consuming if you let it.

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  • Profile picture of the author philipdwyer
    My goal is to ensure that I shut the door to my office while working and only coming out when done.
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    --
    Philip Dwyer
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  • Profile picture of the author sailor4528
    A home office has to be an office where I can close the door and focus. Knock off at 6pm, fine, but with the lady of the house about, I go nuts. Close the ###### door. Now I'm on my boat on my own, I don't need to close the door, but I miss her :-(

    Close the door, the only way, with regular working hours. back with her next week. Close the ###### door, I'm working!
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    Phil

    Take a break - entertain yourself with a great Kindle techno-thriller! Gate of Tears by James Marinero. Action, intrigue, naval and aerial conflict in one of the world's strategic oil chokepoints. Up to the minute and beyond...Video Trailer

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