Turning Down Requests To Become An Affiliate...

53 replies
I just declined a request from a potential
affiliate to promote my WSO via WarriorPlus.

My reason was that instructions on WarriorPlus
tell us to only approve affiliate that we know
and trust, to avoid a lot of potential problems.

I didn't recognize the name of the person
requesting to be an affiliate, and when I
clicked through to their profile it gave me
absolutely no clue as to who they are or how
to find out more about them.

I wonder how many other Warriors here routinely
decline request if you can't tell who you are
dealing with. I personally think that when you
are doing business with someone, you should be
able to tell WHO you are dealing with. That's
another reason that I rarely engage anyone on a
forum, or any place else online, unless I can
make a reasonable determination of who they
"probably" are.

Willie
#affiliate #requests #turning
  • Profile picture of the author Mohammed Hammad2
    You are totally right Willie.

    After all if that person turns out to be a scammer, it could end up hurting your own image and reputation (which for someone like you, would be pretty hard )
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  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    I use the same criteria as well. If I look at the profile
    and there is not even a real name then it's a thumbs
    down--especially if the member is new.

    -Ray Edwards
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  • Profile picture of the author Webpromotion
    I think all of you are losing big opportunity.

    I think you are being too paranoid.

    Does amazon know who exactly is every affiliate they have... does clickbank... do many other networks?? no.. they don't.
    These people are going to help you sell your product.
    It's not like you are going to give them the keys to your house.
    The ideal way to do it.. approve everyone.
    Then keep a close tab on how they are promoting your product.
    Most affiliate will only place a banner on their site.
    Learn about traffic so that you know if they are being ethical.

    Just because a prospective affiliate has a "real name" on his profile and pictures of GOD knows who--- does not mean he will not trash your product.
    Most scammers are real good at covering their tracks.


    The big companies do it that way.
    They have spent millions of dollars on research to find out the most efficient way.
    Leverage that knowledge by copying them.
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    • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
      Originally Posted by Webpromotion View Post

      I think all of you are losing big opportunity.

      I think you are being too paranoid.
      Well, not really... if you consider there are many unknown "warriors" here who would apply to be an affiliate just to buy your product and asking for a refund immediately after downloading.

      There was even a WSO selling some crazy script that automated this "applying" - to as many sellers as possible. Digiresult, another popular instant payment system was hardly hit by this idiots: I still get tens of 'affiliate applications' from people like swhtfgxy@yahoo.com.

      And no, I do NOT approve everyone; I - to quote Willie - routinely decline them.
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      • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
        Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post


        There was even a WSO selling some crazy script that automated this "applying" - to as many sellers as possible. Digiresult, another popular instant payment system was hardly hit by this idiots: I still get tens of 'affiliate applications' from people like swhtfgxy@yahoo.com.

        And no, I do NOT approve everyone; I - to quote Willie - routinely decline them.
        I probably saw this script in use since I had several people
        apply right away who all shared similar birthdates... a statistical
        improbability.
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      • Profile picture of the author Webpromotion
        Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

        Well, not really... if you consider there are many unknown "warriors" here who would apply to be an affiliate just to buy your product and asking for a refund immediately after downloading.

        .
        There is no sound logic in this statement.

        A person does not have to be your affiliate to buy your product and then return it.

        Countless people do that everyday without signing up to anything.
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      • Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

        Well, not really... if you consider there are many unknown "warriors" here who would apply to be an affiliate just to buy your product and asking for a refund immediately after downloading.

        There was even a WSO selling some crazy script that automated this "applying" - to as many sellers as possible. Digiresult, another popular instant payment system was hardly hit by this idiots: I still get tens of 'affiliate applications' from people like swhtfgxy@yahoo.com.

        And no, I do NOT approve everyone; I - to quote Willie - routinely decline them.

        Same here, especially with DigiResults. When it comes to them, I don't accept ANYONE (that I don't know is requesting before hand) with an email from Yahoo or Hotmail.

        Gmail and other accounts are questionable and I do a check on them before I even consider hitting "approve".
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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          I think all of you are losing big opportunity.
          Yep. The opportunity to get permanently banned at this forum. There has been too much hinky crap with affiliates, and I am going to start cracking down on it where I can. And some violations will involve holding the sellers responsible for the abuses of some affiliates.
          Does amazon know who exactly is every affiliate they have... does clickbank... do many other networks??
          Invalid comparison. Those companies have much more control over abuses than a WSO seller does over their affiliates.

          As usual, Willie is giving you good advice. You would be very wise to heed it.


          Paul
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    • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
      Originally Posted by Webpromotion View Post

      I think all of you are losing big opportunity.

      I think you are being too paranoid.

      Does amazon know who exactly is every affiliate they have... does clickbank... do many other networks?? no.. they don't.
      These people are going to help you sell your product.
      It's not like you are going to give them the keys to your house.
      The ideal way to do it.. approve everyone.
      Then keep a close tab on how they are promoting your product.
      Most affiliate will only place a banner on their site.
      Learn about traffic so that you know if they are being ethical.

      Just because a prospective affiliate has a "real name" on his profile and pictures of GOD knows who--- does not mean he will not trash your product.
      Most scammers are real good at covering their tracks.


      The big companies do it that way.
      They have spent millions of dollars on research to find out the most efficient way.
      Leverage that knowledge by copying them.
      Part of what you say is true, but many affiliate networks turn down
      many more affiliates than they accept. I've been turned down
      numerous times because my website didn't fit in with the
      product that I proposed promoting. The last affiliate program
      that I recall turning me down was one that rents private jets.
      I actually have clients who are their ideal customers and they
      said no, and said no again when I appealed. So not all big
      companies say yes to everyone.

      It's also at times a matter of having deep pockets. If you
      have the resources to chase down and prosecute rogue
      affiliates, then perhaps you can afford to be a little less
      cautious, but one really bad affiliate can kill a lot of small
      players.

      It's a balancing act, and a personal choice, but I don't
      typically risk having affiliates that aren't even serious
      enough business people to let me know who I'm doing
      business with.

      When I work as a joint venture broker, about HALF of my
      clients have closed affiliate programs, where each affiliate
      has to apply, and they do review who will be representing
      their brand before saying yes.

      Willie
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    • Profile picture of the author Brandon Tanner
      Originally Posted by Webpromotion View Post

      The ideal way to do it.. approve everyone.
      Sounds like a good idea at first, until you realize that all it takes is one shady "affiliate" to blast your offer to a safelist (or any other super-low conversion traffic method), and your overall conversion rate will drop like a rock. And when your conversion rate drops, you will attract less of the better affiliates.

      So it's definitely not a good idea to approve just anyone!
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      • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
        Originally Posted by Brandon Tanner View Post

        Sounds like a good idea at first, until you realize that all it takes is one shady "affiliate" to blast your offer to a safelist (or any other super-low conversion traffic method), and your overall conversion rate will drop like a rock. And when your conversion rate drops, you will attract less of the better affiliates.

        So it's definitely not a good idea to approve just anyone!
        I do have to admit that when I'm considering promoting a WSO, I always
        look at the conversion rate, assuming it's not one I agree to promote
        even before it launches because I've already had a chance to look
        at the product inside-out, and totally loved the product. So, that would
        be a good reason for me to control who promotes and in the process,
        hopefully better control the quality of hits.
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    • Profile picture of the author Coby
      Originally Posted by Webpromotion View Post

      I think all of you are losing big opportunity.

      I think you are being too paranoid.

      Does amazon know who exactly is every affiliate they have... does clickbank... do many other networks?? no.. they don't.
      These people are going to help you sell your product.
      It's not like you are going to give them the keys to your house.
      The ideal way to do it.. approve everyone.
      Then keep a close tab on how they are promoting your product.
      Most affiliate will only place a banner on their site.
      Learn about traffic so that you know if they are being ethical.

      Just because a prospective affiliate has a "real name" on his profile and pictures of GOD knows who--- does not mean he will not trash your product.
      Most scammers are real good at covering their tracks.


      The big companies do it that way.
      They have spent millions of dollars on research to find out the most efficient way.
      Leverage that knowledge by copying them.
      I think we all start out thinking this way...

      As I can see you haven't been here long - so you probably haven't released a WSO yet and also probably haven't had to actually approve any affiliates...

      I used to think every affiliate was a 'good thing" right? the "more the merrier"?

      but the truth is - it's simply not the case...

      First - the majority of your affiliate sales will only come from about 10 or 20% of the total affiliates... Meaning a handful of guys will send a good number of sales and the rest will be 5-15 sales (if that)...

      So - how does it hurt you?

      Here is a few ways...

      1. Decreases EPC's and Conversion rates (decreases your chance at WSOTD)
      2. If an affiliate refuses to pay a refund - it comes out of your pocket - and you still may have to chase the affiliate down
      3. If stuff like #2 starts happening someone could complain to Wplus or PayPal and you get shut down altogether...

      In fact this is happening right now to a very well known Warrior friend of mine...

      He has had several WSOTD's (5 to be exact) and on his last one a semi-well known marketer (you likely at least heard the name) made about 120 sales for my friend but he had a disagreement with my friend and is now refusing to process any refunds (he says they are serial refunders) and so now my friends (two of them partnered on this WSO) are getting emails from these customers saying the affiliate wont give them a refund...

      And the problem is - its on the vendor to make it right - so my friends will have to pay these refunds out of their own pocket (they paid 100% commission to affiliates front and back) in order to keep their customers happy and keep their reputation from being soiled...

      So - the moral of the story is - not all affiliates are good affiliates. In fact, my sales literally tripled once I started being more selective about who I allowed to be an affiliate for me and the main reason was because the EPC's and conversions stayed high because of the quality traffic sent by the "good" affiliates

      Some day you will understand Webpromotion...
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    I don't necessarily reject affiliate requests out of hand. I'll click on the profile and look at a few of their few posts. If they make sense and I can relate to the individual at all I might go with my gut feeling.

    Even so, I reject far more than I accept. Especially if it's clear the member is new and only here to sell stuff and not occasionally contribute intelligently to the discussion in one or more sub-forums.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Meaney
    I'll only approve Warriors who have a proven track record and have a real business outside the WF.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    A lot of my products delve into natural health, so can't risk mistakes affiliates make that may violate laws. I don't even put up an affiliate link that just anyone can sign up to. I send "JV" links instead to people I know and can trust not to do anything risky. It really limits the amount of affiliates you get, but if someone can easily do something that gets you sued or shut down, it's better to limit the sales reach than eat the damage.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Keith
    Rogue affiliates can hurt the product owners image and reputation in any program, but with wso pro and the instant commissions system, it adds a whole other set of issues.

    When using wso pro, and affiliate actually takes in the money and their customers (or a percentage of them) actually pay the affiliate directly.

    This opens the door for all sorts of scams, not to mention refund issues.

    This added control and responsibility that a wso pro affiliate has can even impact the paypal account of the product owner in certain situations that deal with refund issues.
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  • Profile picture of the author hustlinsmoke
    Hey stop talking about me you guys lol. And gals sorry. I will show myself after I think I have dug my trenches. I sort of felt bad reading your posts, but I am a little different, I am not trying to capitalize on anyone, I just firmly believe I need to earn my keep before I announce who I am what I do and how I can help people make money is all.
    But yah did put some thoughts into my head which is good. Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author jphilips
    I am not looking for pointers on how to do it, but how does someone "scam" a WSO? People click on a link and read the comments and reviews and then make a purchase decision. If the product is somehow misrepresented in an email swipe, the actual post corrects any misconceptions doesn't it?
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    • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
      Originally Posted by jphilips View Post

      I am not looking for pointers on how to do it, but how does someone "scam" a WSO? People click on a link and read the comments and reviews and then make a purchase decision. If the product is somehow misrepresented in an email swipe, the actual post corrects any misconceptions doesn't it?
      There are people who probably spend all day every day trying
      to figure out how to scam product owners, and other affiliates,
      hijack sales, make a ton of sales that they get paid for, and
      then somehow generate a ton of refunds that the merchant
      has to eat, etc.

      You would think that if some of those people put half as much
      effort into just offering value in exchange for money, it would
      actually be easier for them... but they don't see it that way.

      Some don't even think that it's wrong. I've had people actually
      ask me in all seriousness for example, if they could just buy
      a product, upload it to their server, and then copy the sellers
      salespage and swap out the payment link. We might think
      that's crazy, but to a desperate person it's not.

      The boldest ones would hotlink to you site and let you
      pay for the bandwidth as they steal your products and
      resell them!

      I was most concerned though with affiliates who don't want
      to be identified because they dedicate themselves to
      dirty tricks full-time.

      It's not as simple as we would hope.

      Willie
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    Originally Posted by Willie Crawford View Post

    I wonder how many other Warriors here routinely
    decline request if you can't tell who you are
    dealing with.

    Me.

    If I don't know them, and I cannot find any information about their mailing list, I won't approve them.

    Most everyone I know who does product creation feels exactly the same.

    We need to know someone before we approve them. And if we don't know them, we need to know how they plan to promote the offer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lloyd Buchinski
    A couple of posters don't seem to be aware of the digiresults affiliate scams that have been happening. At least with them it is important to know the affiliates you approve.

    There are a lot of WF profiles that are deliberately completely anonymous. A username that looks like a password, or like someone dropped a sandwich on the keyboard, and no contact or site information at all. Those are the type involved the the cookie stuffing incidents lately, and other serious problems here.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Hess
    Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

    Well, not really... if you consider there are many unknown "warriors" here who would apply to be an affiliate just to buy your product and asking for a refund immediately after downloading.
    It would not benefit the affiliate financially to do this... If your product is listed in WarriorPlus at a 100% commission, it's impossible to buy through your own affiliate link.

    If your product is set to less than 100% commission, the first sale would go to the vendor anyway.

    Willie, I can only assume the main reason Mike Lantz posted that comment in the backend of WarriorPlus is to protect the vendors reputation from spamming and allow the vendor more control.

    The whole "control" thing is very important to a lot of vendors since they will only approve affiliates who have lists or a solid reputation. Since the conversion percentage in the backend of WarriorPlus is important in attracting other affiliates to come onboard, they like to keep that number high.

    Typically, the higher that number, the more successful the WSO because in this environment, you need affiliates to mail in order to compete.
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by Mark Hess View Post

      Willie, I can only assume the main reason Mike Lantz posted that comment in the backend of WarriorPlus is to protect the vendors reputation from spamming and allow the vendor more control.

      There was a time Mark when someone requested to be my affiliate, I approved them, and then they started trashing my stuff in public, even though they had never seen my stuff.

      I asked Mike Lantz to reverse the affiliate approval on that person. He obliged, but said in no uncertain terms that he did not want to make a habit of that, especially if he thought the person who was an affiliate had already promoted the product.

      Shortly after, the notice started appearing on the affiliate approval page.

      Coincidence? Maybe.
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      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Hess
        Originally Posted by tpw View Post

        There was a time Mark when someone requested to be my affiliate, I approved them, and then they started trashing my stuff in public, even though they had never seen my stuff.

        I asked Mike Lantz to reverse the affiliate approval on that person. He obliged, but said in no uncertain terms that he did not want to make a habit of that, especially if he thought the person who was an affiliate had already promoted the product.
        **** happens Bill, like I said before, part of the reason is to protect the vendors reputation.

        Originally Posted by tpw View Post

        Shortly after, the notice started appearing on the affiliate approval page.

        Coincidence? Maybe.
        Always starting trouble... it figures you would be the one responsible for that
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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    I do this all the time. I don't want just anyone promoting my products because some people will send junk traffic that serves no other purpose than to screw up your WSO stats.

    If I haven't heard of the person I will always click through to see their WF profile. If it's a relatively new profile and/or with a very low post count then I will usually decline their request. If they then contact me again and tell me exactly how they are going to promote my product then I might consider.

    Most people you decline you never hear from again so you know you made the right decision. If someone really wanted to promote your product they would go to the trouble of contacting you again and explaining their intentions.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
    Coby,
    He has had several WSOTD's (5 to be exact) and on his last one a semi-well known marketer (you likely at least heard the name) made about 120 sales for my friend but he had a disagreement with my friend and is now refusing to process any refunds
    Please PM me the details of that situation, including the username of the affiliate refusing to refund purchases.

    If it's provable, they won't be doing much on this forum again. Or they'll be hiding behind whackamole accounts. Hard to build up much of a reputation when you have to hide your name from everyone with access to the controls.


    Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Hemingway
    I agree. You should offer people some credible information. That's why I like to offer my linkedin and google+ profile to people. This way they can read people who have recommended my work, and they can look over my professional experience. It has worked well for me. Customers often remark how they like hiring me with me because I am easy to engage.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
      I routinely turn down affiliate requests, if they are not forthcoming with extra information that lets me confirm their online business activities. It's my reputation and more than that.

      I've had a few bad affiliates scam me. They have their accomplice - or themselves with another PayPal account - buy the product trough their affiliate link. The commission gets paid out automatically. Then, the sly *******s put through an unauthorized purchase dispute, which holds everything up long enough for the affiliate to take the money and run.

      So, yes, it does pay to be diligent with who you approve.
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  • Profile picture of the author Yvonne Lyon
    First off Willie, thank you for starting this post. You know I have the utmost respect for you and would probably follow you off a virtual cliff if you told me it was the best route.
    (please note that does not include a zip-line)

    I've been denied to promote several great products and it was beginning to get on my nerves. The comments I am reading are making me more appreciative of the questions I am asked (when the product owner takes the time to pm me).

    And here's the "but". The majority of the reasons for denying me was my "low post count" which is a bogus reason in my opinion. I could easily run around the WF and post a bunch of great sounding replies, jack up my count to 25, qualify to be an affiliate, and still be scammer. I was considering doing that, (not the scammer part), but I really don't have that kind of time right now. I'd rather spend my energy reading sales letters, creating links, deciding whether or not I want to promote a product, etc...

    Most ask how I'm going to promote, I let them know, and they usually approve me. Only a few have still turned me down for their own personal reasons which is up to them. The ones I don't understand are those who hit the auto deny without so much as looking at my profile. And my profile clearly shows that I am a real person. (oh, and the ones who still say it's because of my low post count)... but hey...I've got tons of other WSO's to promote!

    I really enjoyed the education I received reading through the comments and I really do have a new appreciation for the pm's I receive regarding how I plan on promoting. Until I've been on the other side, I really can't say that I understand what it's like but this thread has certainly opened my eyes.

    All the best to you Willie, and to those who took the time to explain their reasons.
    Yvonne Lyon
    (aka vonnamia for those of you who would like to go back and approve me for your WSO's
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    • Profile picture of the author Yvonne Lyon
      Originally Posted by Yvonne Lyon View Post

      (aka vonnamia for those of you who would like to go back and approve me for your WSO's
      Okay...shows how much attention I pay to details on my own profile... my username was changed from vonnamia to my REAL name about 12 hours ago! Thank you support! That was quick
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    • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
      Originally Posted by Yvonne Lyon View Post


      All the best to you Willie, and to those who took the time to explain their reasons.
      Yvonne Lyon
      (aka vonnamia for those of you who would like to go back and approve me for your WSO's
      Thank you Yvonne. Now I have a new appreciate for your side of the
      equation too.

      I personally probably wouldn't disapprove a person for a low post
      count, but I do look at how long they have been a member, if they
      have a fairly complete profile, and then go with a gut feeling. I've
      learned to trust my intuition.

      There ARE plenty of good product for you to promote, so if I were
      denied, I'd just look for another product that grabbed my attention,
      probably noting conversions rates first, then price and percentage
      commission.

      Willie
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      • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
        Willie,
        I personally probably wouldn't disapprove a person for a low post count, but I do look at how long they have been a member
        Careful with that. People buy old user accounts here to get around such things. An old account that has just recently started posting is more suspicious than a new one with the same post count.

        Not conclusive, of course, but indicative.

        If you know Yvonne, I'm prepared to believe she's not an example of that.


        Paul
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        • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
          Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

          Willie,Careful with that. People buy old user accounts here to get around such things. An old account that has just recently started posting is more suspicious than a new one with the same post count.

          Not conclusive, of course, but indicative.

          If you know Yvonne, I'm prepared to believe she's not an example of that.


          Paul

          Something I hadn't consider the possibility of, but certainly
          should not be surprised at. I guess as the forum grows bigger
          and bigger, finding ways to game things will become more and
          more lucrative.

          And, I have had the honor of knowing Yvonne for many years

          Willie
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          • Profile picture of the author John Durham
            Originally Posted by Willie Crawford View Post

            Something I hadn't consider the possibility of, but certainly
            should not be surprised at. I guess as the forum grows bigger
            and bigger, finding ways to game things will become more and
            more lucrative.

            And, I have had the honor of knowing Yvonne for many years

            Willie

            If I had less conscious I could see a few ways to game the WF (however short lived they would be) such as the one Paul Mentioned, however the WF is sacred ground to those who hold it sacred, and we could never game it.

            Your post stood out to me Willie also because I just bought your program for my daughter. I told her that she could learn more from you in a day than me in a year... You are not only a brilliant business man, but a most proficient teacher, much more proficient than myself and I think Im okay. I admire your teaching ability as much as your business experience.

            Thanks in advance for training my daughter!
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    • Profile picture of the author WillR
      Originally Posted by Yvonne Lyon View Post

      And here's the "but". The majority of the reasons for denying me was my "low post count" which is a bogus reason in my opinion. I could easily run around the WF and post a bunch of great sounding replies, jack up my count to 25, qualify to be an affiliate, and still be scammer. I was considering doing that, (not the scammer part), but I really don't have that kind of time right now. I'd rather spend my energy reading sales letters, creating links, deciding whether or not I want to promote a product, etc...
      Let me give it to you from the vendors point of view.

      I too, just like you, are very busy and have a lot on my plate. When I am getting 5-10 affiliate requests every day then I need a quick way of separating the wheat from the chaff. When an affiliate whom I have never heard of before contacts me, I have very few pieces of information on which to base my decision. Join date and post count are about the only two pieces of information I have at my disposal so when a quick decision needs to be made, I will look at those two pieces of information and make an educated guess. Obviously someone who has been a member of the forum for years, has a War Room membership, and a high post count is more likely to be a reputable affiliate - not always, but more times than not.

      Obviously you can't get it right 100% of the time HOWEVER because affiliates in the Warrior Plus system are responsible for processing their own refunds, I would much rather get it right more times than not -- which inevitably means turning away some affiliates who may have had good intentions. Just like you don't have time to jump through hoops for me I don't have time to spend doing background checks on all of my affiliates and so I will usually pick the best of the bunch. As Coby rightly pointed out it is usually only a small percentage of your affiliates who make the big sales for you anyway.

      Yes, there are plenty of other products for you to choose from but from our point of view there are plenty of other affiliates to choose from as well. When I decline an affiliate it is not because I think they are unethical or not good enough to promote my course but it DOES mean based on the information I have, I have determined they are a higher risk than other affiliates I have approved.

      My one word of advice from the vendor point of view, always contact the vendor again if they decline you and you really want to promote their product. Don't take it personally, we have a lot on our plate too and more times than not, if you contact the affiliate again and explain your exact intentions for promotion, they will approve you. This initial decline is used by many to flush out all the time-wasters.
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  • Profile picture of the author Osman_M
    I treat almost like an interview process. I want to see what they have done, what kind of business do they have and etc before making a call on whether or not to partner up with them.
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  • Profile picture of the author dmason
    How in the world can you expect an unknown to become a known...if all you Seniors won't let them become Affiliates in order to get known. This thing can just keep goin' round n' round?????
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    • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
      Banned
      [DELETED]
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      • Profile picture of the author Martin Avis
        Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

        ... so in order to give yourself an edge, you need to be proactive and show them who you are and what you're all about.
        Of course, for those people who habitually post about how they can't make a dime and how everything in Internet marketing is a scam - or dead - showing 'who they are' might be the last thing they should do to be approved as an affiliate!
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  • Profile picture of the author YasirYar
    I do agree that one needs to be really careful when selecting an affiliate - products depend largely on reputation, and a random affiliate could do anything from make up lies about the product to behaving rudely with potential customers. You would definitely be best off finding someone with a reputation. Of course, post count is not a reasonable way to judge this.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    My problem is finding the "right" affiliates for my product! I want to selectively find affiliates who are willing to take the time to learn about my product, see the value that it can provide, so they can confidently say;

    Hey I know this product! I have some semblance of a relationship with the product owner because I like to not only give you something of value in a product but I want to know who's behind it.

    To date, I've only found people who just want to send to a list, and they claim to have no time to learn more about my product. DENIED!
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    • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
      Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

      My problem is finding the "right" affiliates for my product! I want to selectively find affiliates who are willing to take the time to learn about my product, see the value that it can provide, so they can confidently say;

      Hey I know this product! I have some semblance of a relationship with the product owner because I like to not only give you something of value in a product but I want to know who's behind it.

      To date, I've only found people who just want to send to a list, and they claim to have no time to learn more about my product. DENIED!

      On the other side of that coin, I insist upon looking at a product,
      before I promote it, but I won't set aside a LOT of time to learn
      about most products. So, I expect the product owner to be able
      to explain it to me succinctly so that I CAN make a decision
      to look deeper.

      I get a lot of product owners who want to do a 2-hour GoToMeeting
      presentation to explain a fairly simple product. About the only time
      that I'll do that is if I'm contemplating partnering with the product
      owner.

      It is often a time factor that keeps people from looking deeper at
      great products that they would fall in love with. As you're seeing
      it's a challenge to get them to just slow down long enough... so you
      need to have the elevator pitch ready

      Willie
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      • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
        Thanks for your reply Willie,

        I do have that elevator pitch! It getting the attention long enough to even give it that's been my issues! = |

        I am pretty selective and would rather forgo the extra sales then to promote to people who will buy the product for the wrong reasons and just end up requesting a refund.

        For those who've showed interest in promoting I give them a demo copy and once they've installed it I team view with them and run them through how powerful it is. This save them TONS of time and shows them all the features in a nutshell.

        Originally Posted by Willie Crawford View Post

        On the other side of that coin, I insist upon looking at a product,
        before I promote it, but I won't set aside a LOT of time to learn
        about most products. So, I expect the product owner to be able
        to explain it to me succinctly so that I CAN make a decision
        to look deeper.

        I get a lot of product owners who want to do a 2-hour GoToMeeting
        presentation to explain a fairly simple product. About the only time
        that I'll do that is if I'm contemplating partnering with the product
        owner.

        It is often a time factor that keeps people from looking deeper at
        great products that they would fall in love with. As you're seeing
        it's a challenge to get them to just slow down long enough... so you
        need to have the elevator pitch ready

        Willie
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        • Profile picture of the author tpw
          Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

          I do have that elevator pitch! It getting the attention long enough to even give it that's been my issues! = |

          I am pretty selective and would rather forgo the extra sales then to promote to people who will buy the product for the wrong reasons and just end up requesting a refund.

          For those who've showed interest in promoting I give them a demo copy and once they've installed it I team view with them and run them through how powerful it is. This save them TONS of time and shows them all the features in a nutshell.

          You and Willie have taken this thread in an interesting direction.

          I don't like to promote any products that I have not yet seen myself.

          I may make an exception if I know the seller really well, but I have seen even the pro's put out trash products.

          I have seen two products in the last two weeks that I refused to recommend to my lists -- products that were created by people that I would ordinarily trust to put out only good stuff.

          I always seek a review copy of a product, but I will buy it if I need to buy it, in order to do a real review.

          Also like Willie, my time is limited. I don't always want to take the time to use the software or watch the videos. But if I can watch a short video or scan the PDF to get an overview of the product, then I am happy to move forward.

          My credibility as an affiliate is directly impacted by the integrity I bring to the process.

          Recommending a bad product is always a bad idea, and I jump through many hoops to make sure that I don't do that myself.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
    James,
    Would that be fair on the sellers who may be innocent victims of what less ethical affiliates get up to?
    If the seller really is innocent, it's unlikely they'd hear much from us about an affiliate's behavior, other than "Choose wisely."

    Let's just say that some people actively encourage affiliate behavior that's ... less than acceptable.


    Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author drbennymarketing
    I am new to Warrior Forum Willie but I appreciate what you are saying totally. I am a best-selling self-help/direct marketing author. I have been marketing offline direct mail for over 30 years. I started marketing on line in 2003 for my personal development seminars and in the last few years my webinars too. I am excited about this forum. I have a large list to work with. If a person doesn't do a good job of telling and showing who they are I would not do business with them either. If you get a chance I would appreciate you looking at my profile and suggest how I could make it better. God bless and be encouraged.
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    • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
      Originally Posted by drbennymarketing View Post

      I am new to Warrior Forum Willie but I appreciate what you are saying totally. I am a best-selling self-help/direct marketing author. I have been marketing offline direct mail for over 30 years. I started marketing on line in 2003 for my personal development seminars and in the last few years my webinars too. I am excited about this forum. I have a large list to work with. If a person doesn't do a good job of telling and showing who they are I would not do business with them either. If you get a chance I would appreciate you looking at my profile and suggest how I could make it better. God bless and be encouraged.
      Hi Dr. Benny.

      Nice to meet, you and from looking at your profile I could instantly
      tell a lot about you including that your a fellow aviator.

      The only things that I would add would be a short sig file, that
      shows up under your posts. Just a line of two with a link to
      one of your websites. That lets people who read your posts
      and want to visit your site or blog do so directly from your
      posts. It also helps with search engine optimization since the
      search engines see another external link pointing to your
      website.

      Willie
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  • Profile picture of the author richfit
    Absolutely Willie. You should know who you're dealing with, what they are selling and what value it adds. When you promote products that add incredible value, you stand out amongst everyone pushing the next hottest offer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Wilson
    I always ask people who don't have many posts what strategy are they meaning to use to advertise my product.
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    • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
      Originally Posted by Daniel Wilson View Post

      I always ask people who don't have many posts what strategy are they meaning to use to advertise my product.
      I'd also like to ask them... however, they don't let me

      When they apply I am sending automatically a message asking them to write me how they are going to promote; methods, websites etc. I also warn them that without replying they will NOT be approved.

      Approx. 1% bothers to write back an email.

      (clarification: this is not only about W+ but in general about affiliates at different sites: JVZoo, Digiresults etc.)
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  • Profile picture of the author Oliver Hart
    Hi.

    Thanks for bringing this up.

    It is hard to know everybody in the forum, or knowing if they are a good match as an affiliate of the WSO offer you have.

    If I understand the majority correctly it will be a ++ if my WF profile is updated, and I put down some words about myself and how I will promote the WSO offer (list size, etc.) in the "Request Notes box" in the request windows, if I want to promote a WSO from someone I know don't know me.

    Nice to know.

    - Oddvar.
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  • Profile picture of the author absolutelee
    The number of requests I get from "warriors" with 0 post counts is amazing. I honestly don't understand this. I'm guessing there's something they know, or think they know, that I don't know. Oddly enough, IM is all about personal relationships. Just like any other business.
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