Hiring a full time employee in your own country..

20 replies
Hey guys,

I know there's a huge trend these days to outsource work either to skilled workers for $10-$20 an hour or to workers in developing countries for $1-$2 per hour. But I have to say that doesn't particularly appeal to me.

I'd love to have someone working on my business than I can actually occasionally meet with and I can train to become my right hand man/girl. I could hire them at first as an intern and I believe in 3-4 months they'll make a bigger return on the salary I'm paying them.

I indent on starting this in the next 2-3 months if things continue to go well.

Have you ever hired a full time employee in your business? If so was it in your local area or outsourced internationally?

Look forward to reading your replies..
#country #employee #full #hiring #time
  • Profile picture of the author Kari1
    I have always used workers from other countries, unfortunately I often got what I paid for.
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    • Profile picture of the author George Wright
      Originally Posted by Kari1 View Post

      I have always used workers from other countries, unfortunately I often got what I paid for.
      Why is that unfortunate. It seems very fair.

      George Wright
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  • Profile picture of the author camay123
    I have always outsourced in other countries because it is cheap, and some are very hardworking.
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeTucker
    In the past I have outsourced to other countries, especially India and Mexico. After sifting through a few bad apples, you can get some very good work done (all things considered) from people who take pride in their work and will communicate with you whenever you like (even at 3:AM their time).


    That being said, in recent years I have favored hiring Americans. I have nothing against other countries at all-- It's just a matter of helping people in my own country during hard economic times (and I would do the same thing if I lived somewhere else.)


    Before you hire someone and call it "full time" however, I would strongly recommend that you do some research on local and state laws. You may even consider using, or at least consulting, a staffing agency.
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  • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
    I looked into a VA from one of the cheaper countries one time but just couldn't bring myself to pay someone freakin $2 an hour No more than I would think of paying someone minimum wage here.

    You get what you pay for and Karma does have an itch
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  • Profile picture of the author Go4DBest
    Originally Posted by andreaskam View Post

    Hey guys,

    I know there's a huge trend these days to outsource work either to skilled workers for $10-$20 an hour or to workers in developing countries for $1-$2 per hour. But I have to say that doesn't particularly appeal to me.

    I'd love to have someone working on my business than I can actually occasionally meet with and I can train to become my right hand man/girl. I could hire them at first as an intern and I believe in 3-4 months they'll make a bigger return on the salary I'm paying them.

    I indent on starting this in the next 2-3 months if things continue to go well.

    Have you ever hired a full time employee in your business? If so was it in your local area or outsourced internationally?

    Look forward to reading your replies..
    Hello andreaskam,

    If you have the budget, then go for it.

    Normally, for those individuals who are just starting to earn money online and want to expand their business, they hire people from India and Philippines.

    Outsourcing is done, I believe, is to save some money and increase your profits. Try to do the math.

    Cheers,
    Geroge B.
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  • Profile picture of the author swood
    I have so many great ideas that i don't have the skills, time or money to start at this point in time, but i'd love to have someone, not run, but help me run everything.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ben Gordon
    I personally have two employees here in Canada and 8 employees working in the Philippines. Having an employee in your own country is definitely more comforting, personal and, generally better; however, I would definitely recommend hiring from the Philippines as well because it is insanely profitable.

    I personally started off hiring employees in Canada. Obviously it was pleasant physically seeing people working for my company and being able to easily communicate to my employees. But I soon found out that hiring employees in the Philippines was amazingly profitable. Due to the low wage they were paid (which is considered good in their country), it was profitable because of all the work they were able to do.

    A few quick tips that I can share from my experience is to treat Filipinos nicely. Allow them to take vacation time off, give them raises and make them happy. This way, they won't be looking for a new employer and be completely happy with working for you making them very productive. My first Filipino that I hired was first paid $280 per month, and is now paid $380 per month, definitely a large sum for their country. Even though there was a $100 increase in price, he's been so productive and not only that - but he was happy and proud coming to work, and doing his work. Also, employees in Filipinos are pretty damn easy to train. You would think that they are tough to train, but what I usually do is let them take one day off per month and set them 5 hours of video training to do skills I want them to do. Believe it or not, most of them improved a lot using this training. Just don't forget to communicate daily with your VA - it's the most important part of hiring VA's in the Philippines (but do not underestimate the profitability!).
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    • Profile picture of the author Mark Olson
      In my IM business I've got 6 Filipinos and a full time local employee who comes into the office a day or two a week. (I also have a non-IM business with 18 employees). I highly recommend having at least one local person when you can afford it. It is great having someone who completely understands me and is readily available, in person or on the phone. I use Craigslist and another local classified site to find my job candidates.
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    • Profile picture of the author Go4DBest
      Originally Posted by Ben Gordon View Post

      I personally have two employees here in Canada and 8 employees working in the Philippines. Having an employee in your own country is definitely more comforting, personal and, generally better; however, I would definitely recommend hiring from the Philippines as well because it is insanely profitable.

      I personally started off hiring employees in Canada. Obviously it was pleasant physically seeing people working for my company and being able to easily communicate to my employees. But I soon found out that hiring employees in the Philippines was amazingly profitable. Due to the low wage they were paid (which is considered good in their country), it was profitable because of all the work they were able to do.

      A few quick tips that I can share from my experience is to treat Filipinos nicely. Allow them to take vacation time off, give them raises and make them happy. This way, they won't be looking for a new employer and be completely happy with working for you making them very productive. My first Filipino that I hired was first paid $280 per month, and is now paid $380 per month, definitely a large sum for their country. Even though there was a $100 increase in price, he's been so productive and not only that - but he was happy and proud coming to work, and doing his work. Also, employees in Filipinos are pretty damn easy to train. You would think that they are tough to train, but what I usually do is let them take one day off per month and set them 5 hours of video training to do skills I want them to do. Believe it or not, most of them improved a lot using this training. Just don't forget to communicate daily with your VA - it's the most important part of hiring VA's in the Philippines (but do not underestimate the profitability!).
      Yeah, hiring VA's from the Philippines is truly worth considering.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mary Wilhite
    For me I have people here in the US who help me in the business. In addition, I have one full-time virtual employee in Kenya and two people from the Philippines.

    I find that arrangement working well. I can reach them on skype any minute. The only challenge is synchronizing the working hours for us to work as a team.

    Why don't you do a test?

    Have two interns for 2 -3 months; one virtual and the other who reports to the office.
    At the end of the period compare the output, cost, your input to each. It will give you a valuable experience.
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  • Profile picture of the author The Lighthouse
    I am a VA from the Philippines and I just want to say that I am happy reading the comments about Filipino VAs here. Although I am not claiming that there will be no bad apple, most Filipino VAs are indeed hard-working, articulate, sensible, and reliable. Treated fairly and well, we deliver what is expected from us by our employers and even give more. Thanks again for the positive reviews!
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    • Profile picture of the author Naimath
      Of course hiring a full-time employee from other country at cheaper rates is a GREAT idea.. It has been helping hundreds, but the key is to find reliable people. Yes, you may come across few bad experience because of unprofessional employee. But if you can have professional, disciplined people in the team, then the returns would be greater considering the fact that investment on these employees is very less.
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      • Profile picture of the author andreaskam
        Originally Posted by Ben Gordon View Post

        A few quick tips that I can share from my experience is to treat Filipinos nicely. Allow them to take vacation time off, give them raises and make them happy. This way, they won't be looking for a new employer and be completely happy with working for you making them very productive. My first Filipino that I hired was first paid $280 per month, and is now paid $380 per month, definitely a large sum for their country. Even though there was a $100 increase in price, he's been so productive and not only that - but he was happy and proud coming to work, and doing his work. Also, employees in Filipinos are pretty damn easy to train. You would think that they are tough to train, but what I usually do is let them take one day off per month and set them 5 hours of video training to do skills I want them to do. Believe it or not, most of them improved a lot using this training. Just don't forget to communicate daily with your VA - it's the most important part of hiring VA's in the Philippines (but do not underestimate the profitability!).
        All absolutely great tips that have really inspired me to take some action on this. I've made notes in my Evernote and I'm going to experiment with this - I'm going to set aside a budget to test out a few different workers. I'll hopefully still be able to hire local first because I think that will be helping my business the most (can have them taking pictures, holding video cameras, going to meetings)

        Originally Posted by Mark Olson View Post

        In my IM business I've got 6 Filipinos and a full time local employee who comes into the office a day or two a week. (I also have a non-IM business with 18 employees). I highly recommend having at least one local person when you can afford it. It is great having someone who completely understands me and is readily available, in person or on the phone. I use Craigslist and another local classified site to find my job candidates.
        Thanks for the tip on Craigslist. I've already got an idea who I want to hire (he's already working writing content but has expressed an interest in getting into blogging).

        Originally Posted by Mary Wilhite View Post

        Why don't you do a test?

        Have two interns for 2 -3 months; one virtual and the other who reports to the office.
        At the end of the period compare the output, cost, your input to each. It will give you a valuable experience.
        That's exactly what I'm going to do! Thank you Mary. I also may consider hiring within my family (That's such a Greek tradition!) but my sister is at university and it would be great to add something into her portfolio about how she assisted with a huge launch or re-designed a website.

        Originally Posted by Naimath View Post

        Of course hiring a full-time employee from other country at cheaper rates is a GREAT idea.. It has been helping hundreds, but the key is to find reliable people. Yes, you may come across few bad experience because of unprofessional employee. But if you can have professional, disciplined people in the team, then the returns would be greater considering the fact that investment on these employees is very less.
        I don't think the formula is as simple as "hire cheap, save money" but I see the advantage. I guess it's a case of splitting out what tasks need to be performed in your business and seeing whether they can be tought or whether they need a certain level of creativity and English writing skills that only someone in your own country can deliver (for that matter, only a specific set of people in your country can deliver).

        I'm really interested in what sort of tasks people are outsourcing aswell so if you comment please do let me know!

        Thanks for the great discussion!
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        • Profile picture of the author Ben Gordon
          Originally Posted by andreaskam View Post

          All absolutely great tips that have really inspired me to take some action on this. I've made notes in my Evernote and I'm going to experiment with this - I'm going to set aside a budget to test out a few different workers. I'll hopefully still be able to hire local first because I think that will be helping my business the most (can have them taking pictures, holding video cameras, going to meetings)
          Thanks for the kind words . I would highly recommend you take a shot at hiring Filipinos. You just need to find the right people and you'll be set. Remember, hire quick, fire quicker. If they don't already do jobs they said they acknowledged in their resume/interview then fire them because chances are they're irresponsible and untrustworthy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Scott Burton
    Originally Posted by andreaskam View Post

    Hey guys,

    I know there's a huge trend these days to outsource work either to skilled workers for $10-$20 an hour or to workers in developing countries for $1-$2 per hour. But I have to say that doesn't particularly appeal to me.

    I'd love to have someone working on my business than I can actually occasionally meet with and I can train to become my right hand man/girl. I could hire them at first as an intern and I believe in 3-4 months they'll make a bigger return on the salary I'm paying them.

    I indent on starting this in the next 2-3 months if things continue to go well.

    Have you ever hired a full time employee in your business? If so was it in your local area or outsourced internationally?

    Look forward to reading your replies..
    I outsource to the skill and person, the price and location are less relevant to me, but I've turned into a serious interrogator when starting a new outsource worker.

    I work with a few people in the Philippines, a couple from Mexico and Colombia, and several from former Soviet countries. I've developed relationships with a small number of people in these countries, and when 'interviewing' a potential freelancer, I tend to be a bit demanding up front, but those who make the cut tend to perform very well for me.

    It probably helps that I often bring one of my local contacts in on the Skype call, and in some cases have my local contact meet them directly. Somehow, when the freelancer in another country knows that there is a local point of contact, it changes many of their mindsets about working for the "American 6,000 miles away"

    But these tend to develop into long term mutually beneficial arrangements, where I bring work back to the same people time and again, and they get treated very fairly. Knowing someone locally helps me to make sure I'm not under or over paying, because I have someone I can reliably ask questions about their opinion on my offers, requirements and even local costs.
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    • Profile picture of the author andreaskam
      Originally Posted by Scott Burton View Post

      I tend to be a bit demanding up front, but those who make the cut tend to perform very well for me.
      I've heard that previously and I'm going to make it part of my hiring process - getting them to perform a simple task. Also, if I'm trialling a developer for a larger project (iPhone apps) then I'll get them to do a small project to see how they perform. If the big project is worth many thousands of dollars then it's worth it.
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      • Profile picture of the author Scott Burton
        Originally Posted by andreaskam View Post

        I've heard that previously and I'm going to make it part of my hiring process - getting them to perform a simple task. Also, if I'm trialling a developer for a larger project (iPhone apps) then I'll get them to do a small project to see how they perform. If the big project is worth many thousands of dollars then it's worth it.
        To be COMPLETELY honest I've probably scared away several good providers, but I'd rather lose a few good ones, and find ones that are consistent deliverers than go through 20 trials with flakes and poor providers.

        Definitely better to do a $200 app with a provider and be very happy with them before investing the time and energy on a $2000 app with them. I'd rather get burned on the $200.

        I guess from my "international" response before it probably sounds like a lot of my projects are bigger than they really are, but I guess the crucial thing is I've developed what works for me.

        (and I'm looking into how many of my trips overseas can be legitimate business expenses )
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  • Profile picture of the author James.N
    There's a lot of great information in this thread. What tasksjobs do you guys usually outsource whether is local outsourcers or in another country?

    andreaskam is there something in particular you're looking for the person you hire to do?
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  • Profile picture of the author Ryan Even
    I've had good results and bad results from all over the world.

    The things I look for are:

    1) Good English skills.
    2) Ability to be trained.
    3) Ability to work without supervision.

    In many cases, when things don't work out with an employee or outsourcer it's because YOU didn't do a good job training them and showing them exactly how you want things done. You can train people on almost everything (except English) so good English is my most important requirement.

    Interestingly, I've found that people from the US (especially young people) are not always as good at English as I would expect them to be. Even the college graduates seem to have English issues (at least with written English). Too much texting I guess?
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