GOOGLE USES EXPLOIT To Trick Users Into Clicking PPC Ads

by Rus Sells 54 replies
I happen to have a flat panel monitor and usually its adjusted perfectly vertically which would make it parallel to my sitting position.

So why the title?

Well I was on a Google search results page yesterday and I was fiddling around with the wires behind my monitor and while doing that I ended up tilting my monitor slightly forward a few degrees so that the top of the monitor was closer to me then the bottom.

I really didn't notice it much and just went about my business.

Then later while do some searches on Google I'm noticing that the PPC ads look like they are no longer displaying at the top position. Heck I even clicked some of the ads on a few searches just thinking they were organic results.

This is when I realized that my monitor wasn't positioned the way I usually have it and put it back.

So what happened here?
Why did I think the PPC ads were gone?

When my flat panel was tilted towards me from the top it made the background color of the PPC ads turn completely white, thereby making them look EXACTLY like organic results.

Some of you might say boo hoo Mr. conspiracy, however people at Google aren't stupid! They probably already knew this can happen and they also know that a large number of people probably end up clicking their advertisers ads because of this one small thing.

If you have a flat panel try it for yourself you'll see.
#main internet marketing discussion forum #ads #clicking #expliot #google #monitor #ppc #trick #users
  • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
    yes you are totally right, that color choice is slick!
    Signature
    *** Affiliate Site Quick --> The Fastest & Easiest Way to Make Affiliate Sites!<--
    -> VISIT www.1UP-SEO.com *** <- Internet Marketing, SEO Tips, Reviews & More!! ***
    *** HIGH QUALITY CONTENT CREATION +++ Manual Article Spinning (Thread Here) ***
    Content Creation, Blogging, Articles, Converting Sales Copy, Reviews, Ebooks, Rewrites
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500540].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      Its downright DECEPTIVE in my opinion.

      Originally Posted by GeorgR. View Post

      yes you are totally right, that color choice is slick!
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500554].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        If you look at your flat screen from a side angle - the background color appears darker - from a top angle looking down, the background gets lighter or totally fades out.

        Not just yellow - gray, blue, etc. work the same.

        Google has been using a lighter color background since around Panda playtime but the change was subtle. I'm sure the intent is to be unnoticeable as an "ad" but I think color change is more pixel behavior than plan.

        kay
        Signature

        Saving one dog may not change the world - but forever changes the world of one dog.

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500612].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
          Yes it is pixel behavior, and G knows this happens in a certain percentage of users. They'd of course never ever admit it but don't put it past a for profit company.

          Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

          If you look at your flat screen from a side angle - the background color appears darker - from a top angle looking down, the background gets lighter or totally fades out.

          Not just yellow - gray, blue, etc. work the same.

          Google has been using a lighter color background since around Panda playtime but the change was subtle. I'm sure the intent is to be unnoticeable as an "ad" but I think color change is more pixel behavior than plan.

          kay
          Signature
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500667].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post

    ...people at Google aren't stupid!
    You sure? :confused:
    Signature

    BS free SEO services, training and advice - SEO Point

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500622].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ChadOath
    Can you post a screenshot?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500642].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      I tried using my web cam, to the camera it doesn't change colors really but to the human eye it does.


      Originally Posted by ChadOath View Post

      Can you post a screenshot?
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500656].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Fernando Veloso
    That "slight" change makes them millions per month in profit.

    But what annoys me is their lack of common sense: if an Adcent publisher uses "that" trick to make more money, he can get banned (he's just ripping the advertiser or some **** like that) - while Google uses that exact same trick to make millions and it's all good.

    Google, no evil? What a joke.
    Signature
    People make good money selling to the rich. But the rich got rich selling to the masses.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500848].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
      Originally Posted by Fernando Veloso View Post

      That "slight" change makes them millions per month in profit.

      But what annoys me is their lack of common sense: if an Adcent publisher uses "that" trick to make more money, he can get banned (he's just ripping the advertiser or some **** like that) - while Google uses that exact same trick to make millions and it's all good.

      Google, no evil? What a joke.
      Actually, AdSense users have the ability to pick whatever color they want as the background of the ads. If your site lists links in order, similar to how Google SERPS are displayed, you can do the exact same thing Google is doing, without any repercussions from Big G.
      Signature
      My New Video Series is Free (for now)
      Crazy good marketing tips from the founder of JVZoo.
      Get EBR 365 Now!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501188].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
        Brian,

        I like your tie, I want to do a webinar with you!

        Originally Posted by E. Brian Rose View Post

        Actually, AdSense users have the ability to pick whatever color they want as the background of the ads. If your site lists links in order, similar to how Google SERPS are displayed, you can do the exact same thing Google is doing, without any repercussions from Big G.
        Signature
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501291].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Ben Gordon
        Originally Posted by E. Brian Rose View Post

        Actually, AdSense users have the ability to pick whatever color they want as the background of the ads. If your site lists links in order, similar to how Google SERPS are displayed, you can do the exact same thing Google is doing, without any repercussions from Big G.
        That is true, but most people like me don't bother doing that!
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507770].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CreativeFlair
    You don't even need a flat panel screen to see it, if the colour is slightly off on your monitor it has the same effect.

    The PPC ads when viewed on my laptop have completely white backgrounds all the time. I practically don't know if it's an ad if It Doesn't Use Title Case In The Description Like This! And psychologically, if I forget about it, I click ads all the time.
    Signature

    Professional SEO, blogger and social media expert | Personal site: Blossom.nu

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500937].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      Hi CreativeFlair,

      If you say so I must believe you! I don't currently have an operating laptop so I'll take your word for it. Thanks for chiming in!

      Originally Posted by CreativeFlair View Post

      You don't even need a flat panel screen to see it, if the colour is slightly off on your monitor it has the same effect.

      The PPC ads when viewed on my laptop have completely white backgrounds all the time. I practically don't know if it's an ad if It Doesn't Use Title Case In The Description Like This! And psychologically, if I forget about it, I click ads all the time.
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5500967].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author studlee46
    I think it's even worse on aol search. I can't tell the ads at all on that site. But it's been this way for a looooooong time, if you're lcd monitor's colors are washed out, you won't see that light color very well.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501132].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JVManna
    I noticed it, too. The background color is near white - I almost clicked on one this morning.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501305].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mrinternational
    I have noticed this too, on my laptop and thought it may be my screen display fading, but its a near new laptop.
    so what I have been doing, since I noticed this is ill move my head up and down to see the screen at dif angles , if the folks at google could only see me doing all these weird movements to avoid clicking on ads lol.
    but now over time i have mastered this technique so I dont look like such a dork lol.

    thank you so much for pointing this out rus now i feel abit more normal lol
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501390].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KirkMcD
    Do you know how many people don't even know that they are ads? They just click on the first thing on the page. A friend of mine does that all the time.
    An unnoticeable background color really doesn't matter. People wouldn't try for the top spot if it wasn't making them money.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501508].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Aussie_Al
      Originally Posted by KirkMcD View Post

      Do you know how many people don't even know that they are ads? They just click on the first thing on the page. A friend of mine does that all the time.
      An unnoticeable background color really doesn't matter. People wouldn't try for the top spot if it wasn't making them money.

      yes I agree most people would not even realize that's paid advertising
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501609].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    What gets my dander is that the ads at the top are starting to squeeze the results further down the top fold.

    G is a total hypocrite when they say they want to deliver the most relevant results when they know darn well no real significant number of clicks are obtained below the fold.

    If a site doesn't get fair representation by being highly relevant whats the use.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501535].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Craigb182
    Ahh I have noticed this too, it is probably done with the intention in mind and it is a clever mode of manipulation.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501547].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author StevenJones
    Excuse me but this has only to do with your screen being in another position? Other variables like the quality of your monitor, refresh rate and graphical card should be considered too. I just flipped my monitor up side down and nothint changed but hurting neck in the process.

    It is true that Google wants to blend in the ads but they are still bound to laws as they really need to disclose on what an PPC ad is or organic result. Sorry to say but I reall think you bumped your head while fixing your stuff, as this no exploit but just your doing.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501814].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author alexmobile
    The most common type of LCD panels used in mainstream LCD monitors is a so-called "TN" panel and it is famous for loosing the colors reproduction quality when viewed from the bottom up. Just step in to any Best Buy store or whatever computer store when you see a bunch of LCD monitors and then try to look at the monitors from the bottom up, you will see most of the monitors will lose a good amount of color reproduction right there.

    Does not happen to Apple monitors though... Apple and NEC have most of their monitors using better panel types like IPS, PVA, etc. Other manufacturers use TN panels with occasional top of the line models using proper panels with better color reproductiin and viewing angles.

    On the side note, besides being cheap to manufacture, TN panels also provide one of the fastest response times, which is very important for gamers. So I would not necessarily mark all TN panels as "bad quality". The answer is not that straightforward.... If you want better response times with affordable price, you may have to compromise on viewing angles and colors repro. Also, this industry is very dynamic and manufacturers always tweak their panels / technologies so not all TN panels are created equal....

    Anyways, now back to the OP's point..... Yes, Google could probabaly increase their revenue by 20% easily buy just making ads more obscured or by using CTR theme on their main SERP page

    The funny thing is that Google and only Google are policing themselves in terms of providing quality clicks to advertisers.... Like you know, the advertisers would prefer ads that are very clearly distingished from organic SERPS so when user clicks he is very aware of the fact that he is clicking on Ad link but he still clicks so he must have a real genuine interest in that Ad, so that would make a very good quality traffic for advertisers.

    However, Google's VP of Search Product may be under pressure from declining revenues (driven by econoomy crisis or whatever), and he does not want to report bad quarter results to the CEO / board / shareholders, so they may to "change" their definition of quality clicks just enough to gain that 5% CTR to make their financial results sound better and most of the advertisers will not be able to tell that 5% difference ....

    So here we go, ad color and crappy LCD panels bump the CTR.... The funny thing would be to make a study that would try to corellate the CTR with the physical height of the individual, the motivation is being like this - if you are shorter, then there is more chance that you are looking at you monitor from the bottom up, so the color of the ad would blend with organic search so more chances for you to click on the ad mistaking it with organic search result...

    Whew, this must be one of my longest and most useless posts on Warrior Forum... But hey, it is Friday

    Cheers, (and back to work










    Better type
    Signature
    QRID.com - login to websites by scanning QR code on your monitor! No Passwords!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5501932].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TimGross
      Here's two screenshots of an LCD HDTV monitor using my iPhone from two angles. With the naked eye the difference is even more striking... In the first pic the pale yellow is darker, and looking down from about a 45 degree angle, the background appears completely white. But using a Dell Ultrasharp monitor, I can still see the yellow clearly at any angle, so it's definitely monitor-dependent.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502266].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
    Rus, are you talking about the background color shown here?



    Wouldn't Google just use a white background for their PPC ads if they wanted to trick people into clicking them?:confused:?
    Signature

    :)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502206].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      Yes I am referring to that area however as another poster mentioned Advertisers DO want people to know they are clicking an ad so they get traffic that is interested in their offer.

      On the other side of the coin I am saying that Google is getting EXTRA ad revenue for the reason in mentioned in the OP.

      Originally Posted by mojojuju View Post

      Rus, are you talking about the background color shown here?



      Wouldn't Google just use a white background for their PPC ads if they wanted to trick people into clicking them?:confused:?
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502252].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author mojojuju
        Originally Posted by Rus Sells View Post


        On the other side of the coin I am saying that Google is getting EXTRA ad revenue for the reason in mentioned in the OP.
        Sure, that's probably true to a very small extent. But the title of this thread and the content of the original post seem to suggest that Google intentionally devised this color scheme to exploit people who position their computer monitors at strange and uncomfortable viewing angles. That seems unlikely.

        Google has a financial incentive to please their advertisers and I think they know that sending unintentional clicks to those advertisers will hurt Google and those advertisers in the long run.

        If you look around at some of Google's other properties, you'll notice that they use a lot of soft colors for backgrounds, even in contexts where accidental clicks resulting from the poor contrast of LCD screens when viewed at an angle, won't benefit Google.
        Signature

        :)

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502345].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
          Obviously the title is link bait however I don't put it past Google for using a ad background color that easily fades away when looked at from a certain angle by the user.

          Don't brush it off as, oh to a very small extent. Even a 1% increase in you're conversions doubles your sales. Multibillion dollar companies have think tanks that this this stuff up, if you think they don't you are naive sir.

          Here's an example scenario which also happens to be true but I won't go in depth because it is a very sensitive subject.

          A certain insurance company we ALL know in America data mined its property and auto claims and discovered that a certain demographic within their policy holders had a habit of taking the Actual Cash Value of their insurance claim and not completing the work that was covered. Due to this this insurance company was not required BY LAW to pay the depreciation or amount held back because repairs were never effected.

          What happened next was two things. This particular insurance company started pay LESS up front and hired a Hollywood celeb in the same demographic and has been using this person in all their media ads for quite some time. Why? To get new policy holders in the same demographic of course. So effectively this company has decreased what it ends up paying in claims and bring on new policy holders thereby making more profit.

          Now this is just an example but it is reality and to think G doesn't know all the tiny nuances of what users see and do and are taking advantage of that to increase their bottom line then again we are naive for thinking they don't.

          Originally Posted by mojojuju View Post

          Sure, that's probably true to a very small extent. But the title of this thread and the content of the original post seem to suggest that Google intentionally devised this color scheme to exploit people who position their computer monitors at strange and uncomfortable viewing angles. That seems unlikely.

          Google has a financial incentive to please their advertisers and I think they know that sending unintentional clicks to those advertisers will hurt Google and those advertisers in the long run.

          If you look around at some of Google's other properties, you'll notice that they use a lot of soft colors for backgrounds, even in contexts where accidental clicks resulting from the poor contrast of LCD screens when viewed at an angle, won't benefit Google.
          Signature
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502441].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author POLLITO122
          Originally Posted by mojojuju View Post


          Google has a financial incentive to please their advertisers and I think they know that sending unintentional clicks to those advertisers will hurt Google and those advertisers in the long run.
          For that reason they are so happy with the ban hammer.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502663].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
            You have a point but the people getting banned equate to something like, .000001% of their ad revenue so its no sweat off their backs.

            Originally Posted by POLLITO122 View Post

            For that reason they are so happy with the ban hammer.
            Signature
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502788].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MaxReferrals
    Google has been testing this for a while now, including softening colors.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502354].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ryannull
    This doesn't surprise me. Google has been doing a lot of stupid stuff lately.

    I think it's misleading.
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502559].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author hustlinsmoke
    Chalk one more up for Google lol. No wonder I stopped paying them money and getting away from them.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502799].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Paperchasing
    alexmobile said pretty much exactly what I wanted to say. This pretty much only applies to TN panel LCD monitors, which have fast response times and low input lag but poor viewing angles. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess old LCD technology tilt angles didn't factor significantly in the coloration of Google's ad backgrounds.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502846].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Shoot
    I noticed a lot of end users click on the first "ad" even when the organic result is also #1 in the organic results.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502943].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author lukemeister
    Google just has too many ads on their results pages for popular keywords, it's getting ridiculous, and with them stating that "above the fold ads" are going to start affecting other sites rankings in Google, it just makes me laugh. Whatever Google.
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5502946].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tessa Holmes
    Google has some interesting ways to show their advertising. Lighter colors Are misleading. We can argue with Google Almighty that they do not have right to do it, or can just accept that this is they way to promote their product - Google will still keep it the way it will be most profitable. Google is responding to people's complains only when there are 'A LOT' of complains on some of their changes.
    Signature
    Can I Haz A CheezBurgr?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506061].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Witty
      The problem is if Google made the adverts like a dark red colour, they wouldn't get may clicks to the sponsored posts. Doubt it very much.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506108].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
    I've noticed this as well. The color of the PPC blocks on the SERPs is so close to white that I often have to move my head lower in order to see the difference. I'm quite sure the folks at Google know they would make less money if the ad blocks were clearly distinguished from the main results.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506143].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Uncle Dimitry
    who said that Google has to separate ads from results? They are free to do what they wish on their site.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506555].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Suthan M
      Originally Posted by Uncle Dimitry View Post

      who said that Google has to separate ads from results? They are free to do what they wish on their site.
      Which I agree.

      A lot of people miss that point in this thread and pointing on conspiracy theory, calling them exploiters and so on.

      Obviously, they are only going to care about:
      • Servicing clients who use their paid service
      • Caring about their bottomline/revenues

      Think about it. Even in this forum where we have seen people who sell "free plans" and "paid plans" with free having a lot of features limited while paid ones has tons of extra features and stuffs.

      Those who don't use Google service is like using their 'free plan' and those who pay for their services (aka adwords) are their paid plans. Now, who do you think Google are going to help more?

      Somehow, I get the idea that a lot of people are having the idea that Google is a charity, but unfortunately its a business focused company.

      Some tips: Don't focus on Google as your traffic source, if you don't plan to pay them. But that's obvious right?

      You don't plan to just sticking to free plans (SEO) for life and expect G to be courteous to you and your business and sends millions of traffic from a service they built from grounds up with so much of their time, effort and money?

      As they say- No free lunch buddy..
      Signature
      ~Limited 35% OFF Discount~ Yezzar- Email Marketing Redefined WSO
      Email Service and Autoresponder System with high deliverability and low cost pricing
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506649].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
      I'm no lawyer but I'm pretty sure that the law dictates that ads must be clearly seen as ads. To obfuscate them in with regular unpaid results would be an unfair trade practice.

      Originally Posted by Uncle Dimitry View Post

      who said that Google has to separate ads from results? They are free to do what they wish on their site.
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506666].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
      Originally Posted by Uncle Dimitry View Post

      who said that Google has to separate ads from results? They are free to do what they wish on their site.
      Perhaps, but when you can't tell the ads from the search results, the search engine becomes virtually useless, so whether they are free to operate that way is sort of beside the point. I'm speaking hypothetically here, of course, since you can (barely) tell them apart on Google's SERPs.

      Also, I'm not entirely sure your premise is correct. To position your company in the marketplace as a rankings service, and then manipulate the rankings by artificially inserting people who give you money into the top spots, would strike me as legally questionable.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506847].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Suthan M
        Originally Posted by Jon Patrick View Post

        Sure, but when you can't tell the ads from the search results, the search engine becomes virtually useless, so whether they are free to operate that way is sort of beside the point. I'm speaking hypothetically here, of course, since you can (barely) tell them apart on Google's SERPs.
        Well*:
        • Normal SE results are backgroundless.
        • Paid results has a lightish brown background in a box. Plus, there's a link that says "Why these ads?" (or something like that)
        You can't tell them apart? :confused:

        *No cookies for ya' if you guys are looking upside down on the lappie/PC, looking with the monitor reclined few degrees, or looking when the PC is shutdown. JK
        Signature
        ~Limited 35% OFF Discount~ Yezzar- Email Marketing Redefined WSO
        Email Service and Autoresponder System with high deliverability and low cost pricing
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506861].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
          Originally Posted by Suthan M View Post

          You can't tell them apart? :confused:
          I can, as I said. But there's no denying that the colors are very close, close enough that whether you can differentiate between the two often depends on your monitor and viewing angle. And it's probably safe to say that the small text mentioning ads doesn't catch everyone's attention.

          While I know the ads are there, and can be careful not to click on them, "There's a sucker born every minute." I'm sure we can agree that Google is well aware of the difference in their PPC earnings when using visually distinct ad blocks versus using ad blocks that nearly blend into the main results.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506896].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Suthan M
            Originally Posted by Jon Patrick View Post

            I'm sure we can agree that Google is well aware of the difference in their PPC earnings when using visually distinct ad blocks versus using ad blocks that nearly blend into the main results.
            Sorry, I assumed from you previous post on the first observation. Sometimes, my speed reading gets me into trouble like that

            Anyway, to our casual Saturday discussion, shall we :

            Well, I am sure those are making a difference- but why we hating that they are testing their website elements and raisin their conversions?

            If this was not Google and some Random X's person website, everyone will be high fiving and congratulating the person for being able to raise the conversion on their sites to make more sales.
            Signature
            ~Limited 35% OFF Discount~ Yezzar- Email Marketing Redefined WSO
            Email Service and Autoresponder System with high deliverability and low cost pricing
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507000].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
              Originally Posted by Suthan M View Post

              Well, I am sure those are making a difference- but why we hating that they are testing their website elements and raisin their conversions?
              If we were talking about any other element besides how hard they make it for people to tell that the ads are ads, I would be inclined to agree with you... :p

              By that logic, you could defend any deceit on the part of a website owner by describing it as "testing their website elements" - but if the element being tested essentially boils down to how honest you're being, there's a different word for that.
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507059].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author tryinhere
    - how dare people market their products and services on line -
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506582].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JoshuaGallant
    Just to touch on the what advertisers want comment .. I use Adwords quite frequently and I could care less as to whether the searcher knows its an ad. I targeted that term because I wanted a searcher to click after that term was entered and was willing to pay for it. its not like the content network where my ad may be triggered inappropriately ... its appearing for exactly the term I wanted.

    Im pretty sure the "ads - why these ads" line is all they are required to do so thats all they will do.

    Absolutely most people dont realize those are ads ... people (at least the bread and butter of adsense/adwords users) dont read!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506737].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author OnlineMkter
    Some argue here that as this is google's page, they can do whatever they like. It's right but the adds should be adds and if you make them look close to the organic results, it's some sort of spam and google becomes the biggest spammer at the end of the day. I also have noticed this before.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5506950].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CyberSEO
    I have the same effect here. I also believe the owners of IPS monitors won't see it. So the trick will be see on TFT LCD's only.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507027].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sadiecopywriter
    Truthfully, unless I'm looking for a name of a company, I just start my searches on Google's 2nd page. I've been doing that for years.
    Signature

    Mercedes
    Need Free & Legal images for your books & blogs?
    Check out the FREE Little Black Book of Royalty Free Images.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507180].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author perfectlovehere
    Hmm.. But why would google care if people see it? They get money per click?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507464].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Chris Worner
    Those dirty B*STARDS!!!!! :rolleyes:

    -Chris
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507615].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author richgrad
    I think there are better things to do than worry about something we can't control no? =P
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5507632].message }}

Trending Topics