Domain name help

by neilward 8 replies
I am quite new to all of this and at the moment am trying to have a go at some Amazon affiliate sites. I have a reasonable understanding of how keyword research works but the problem I am having is finding decent exact domains with a reasonable amount of searches. I am in the uk so am looking for .co.uk addresses. I am completely doing my research on Google adwords keyword tool. I am looking for things such as best in front of the item or reviews at the end but I still cannot find anything.

So which one of these options should i now adopt for my domain name choices.

a) pick up domains with an e or an i in front of it. this is quite untapped and it looks like it will be easy to get some decent things to promote from amazon.
b) pick up domains with hyphens in them. It seems that a lot of people already do this but the availability seems a little better than without the hyphens.
c) Look for new products out in the market and base the domain name on that hoping it will become big.
d) keep searching for exact search domains just look a bit harder!
e) Search on premium domain sites and pay a bit more for the domain.

I would be extremely thankful for any advice.
Many thanks,
Neil
#main internet marketing discussion forum #domain
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  • Profile picture of the author MarketingChad
    Exact match domains aren't as useful as they once were. I recommend checking out GoDaddy auctions or similar auction sites and grabbing an aged domain. One with PR if you can. This will be more valuable to you than anything else.
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeRogers
    Hi Neil,

    True, "Exact Domain Name Matches" are hard to find now so, I might suggest another way to get where you want to be and less expensive.

    Instead of playing the domain name matching game, and spending 10 bucks or so a pop for separate domains to market affiliate products, just choose one domain - Say, productsbyneil.com and then create separate pages for each product you wish to market. You can then optimize each page title and the content for the search engines.

    This is also a great way to test the marketability of a product without cleaning out your bank account.

    Hope this helps

    MikeRogers

    Originally Posted by neilward View Post

    I am quite new to all of this and at the moment am trying to have a go at some Amazon affiliate sites. I have a reasonable understanding of how keyword research works but the problem I am having is finding decent exact domains with a reasonable amount of searches. I am in the uk so am looking for .co.uk addresses. I am completely doing my research on Google adwords keyword tool. I am looking for things such as best in front of the item or reviews at the end but I still cannot find anything.

    So which one of these options should i now adopt for my domain name choices.

    a) pick up domains with an e or an i in front of it. this is quite untapped and it looks like it will be easy to get some decent things to promote from amazon.
    b) pick up domains with hyphens in them. It seems that a lot of people already do this but the availability seems a little better than without the hyphens.
    c) Look for new products out in the market and base the domain name on that hoping it will become big.
    d) keep searching for exact search domains just look a bit harder!
    e) Search on premium domain sites and pay a bit more for the domain.

    I would be extremely thankful for any advice.
    Many thanks,
    Neil
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  • Profile picture of the author Gene Pimentel
    Originally Posted by neilward View Post

    I am quite new to all of this and at the moment am trying to have a go at some Amazon affiliate sites. I have a reasonable understanding of how keyword research works but the problem I am having is finding decent exact domains with a reasonable amount of searches. I am in the uk so am looking for .co.uk addresses. I am completely doing my research on Google adwords keyword tool. I am looking for things such as best in front of the item or reviews at the end but I still cannot find anything.

    So which one of these options should i now adopt for my domain name choices.

    a) pick up domains with an e or an i in front of it. this is quite untapped and it looks like it will be easy to get some decent things to promote from amazon.
    b) pick up domains with hyphens in them. It seems that a lot of people already do this but the availability seems a little better than without the hyphens.
    c) Look for new products out in the market and base the domain name on that hoping it will become big.
    d) keep searching for exact search domains just look a bit harder!
    e) Search on premium domain sites and pay a bit more for the domain.

    I would be extremely thankful for any advice.
    Many thanks,
    Neil
    Neil,

    a) Rather than adding a character in front of the keywords, it's better to add something to the end.

    b) If purely for seo purposes, hyphens are okay. For promoting, not so much.

    c) Not a good idea, as Trademark restrictions may come into play.

    d) Exact match domains are always better (even today), and for SEO purposes, you can use just about any major TLD for the same ranking effect (.com, .net, .org, etc.). In light of Google's latest changes, I'd tend to stay away from .org though.

    e) If the expense is feasible, why not? However, there are usually many alternatives that you can register yourself.
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  • Profile picture of the author melnat85
    Hey,
    Just made sure keyword or keyword phrase is in the front of the domain name.
    Then just add something to the end.
    You could just add shop, store, online, etc.
    Just use something that fits. The majority of the time you will get a .com.
    Example:
    Selling turbo vacuum from amazon. Domain turbovacuumsite.com
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  • Profile picture of the author metaarticles
    I personally go with option a all the time a) pick up domains with an e or an i in front of it. this is quite untapped and it looks like it will be easy to get some decent things to promote from amazon.

    Some times, I tend to insert in X depending on the context of domain or sometimes numbers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by neilward View Post

    I am in the uk so am looking for .co.uk addresses.
    What matters is surely where your customers are, rather than where you are yourself? I'm in the UK, too, but my Amazon-related activities are on TLD extensions and for those purposes I'm an affiliate of Amazon.com, rather than of Amazon.co.uk who have a £7 ceiling (or something like that?) on payment-per-item, which isn't much use to me.

    I think you perhaps mean that you're an affiliate of Amazon.co.uk only? (I'm just kind of wondering why, though it's none of my business!).

    Originally Posted by neilward View Post

    a) pick up domains with an e or an i in front of it.
    This is bad. You'd be handicapping yourself.

    If you're looking at keyword-optimized domains, you need the domain-name to start with the keyword, not to have other letters in front of it. Appending letters/a word after the keyword isn't so bad.

    Originally Posted by neilward View Post

    b) pick up domains with hyphens in them.
    Hyphens don't affect SEO/rankings at all (as Google and Matt Cutts keep stressing to people on their various blogs, videos, and so on) but may have other disadvantages, and you may lose type-in traffic to the owner of the unhyphenated domain anyway.

    Originally Posted by neilward View Post

    c) Look for new products out in the market and base the domain name on that hoping it will become big.
    Rather you than I: I have enough work to do as a marketer by marketing things for which people are already looking. I certainly wouldn't want to start registering domain-names "just in case things become popular".

    Originally Posted by neilward View Post

    d) keep searching for exact search domains just look a bit harder!
    e) Search on premium domain sites and pay a bit more for the domain.
    Maybe better options?
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  • Profile picture of the author TestiVar
    Short, catchy, easy to pronounce, dot com. These are the attributes of a successful domain name. Keywords have nothing to do with the equation.

    Alexa: I remember you from what must be 8 years ago now. You were using a different handle then on a forum that no longer exists, but I recognize your word use gave you away. Good to see that you are still around. Funny to see the messages trying to out you as a guy -- as I remember, there were those who were trying to out you as a woman back then.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by TestiVar View Post

      Alexa: I remember you from what must be 8 years ago now. You were using a different handle then on a forum that no longer exists
      Yes, could be - I've been "Lexy", "Alexa S", and "Xela" in other forums. And once "Alexaherself". And then I post in many other, dissimilar pen-names in occasional niche-forums specific to my niches (and there are 8 of those!). Certainly not as long as 8 years ago, though. Not before 2008, in fact.

      Originally Posted by TestiVar View Post

      I recognize your word use gave you away.
      LOL, this always amuses me: it was reported back to me that somebody once thought I was the same person as someone else because apparently we'd both used the same phrase about "soliciting a cash gift" (this was in conversations - in two different forums in different years! - about 'cash gifting' being illegal, of course), and he allegedly thought the fact that we both used identical wording meant we were the same person, completely ignoring the rather more obvious explanation (as people often do, when they interpret information as confirming their own pre-existing belief) that we'd presumably just happened - in quoting the law - to take our wording from the phraseology used on the FTC's own website or something very similar! But there you are: if "A" and "B" both happen independently (or even in collusion, come to think of it?) to quote "C", that "proves" that they're the same person, apparently.

      Anyway, I'm quite used to being suspected of "being other people".

      Originally Posted by TestiVar View Post

      as I remember, there were those who were trying to out you as a woman back then.
      Someone else, maybe. As the saying goes, from the old joke, "Not you either? It must have been two other people".
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