Just landed a writing gig

73 replies
I just landed a writing gig. My client is offering $50 per 1000 words. This is my first assignment like this. I am aware that many of you may charge a little more for this but I want to gain her trust. Should I accept her payment before I get started or when I'm done?
#gig #landed #writing
  • Profile picture of the author JimWaller
    Congrats, Bill! I hope it leads to bigger and better things for you! Good Luck!

    Jim Waller
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  • Profile picture of the author Victoralexon
    Awesome!

    Tell us how you did it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bill_Lawrence
    Should I accept her payment before I submit the article, or after?
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  • Profile picture of the author Jase1977
    That's a pretty good rate for starting out. Personally for me, I would charge first, then if she doesn't like it, offer a free re-write. If it somehow never works out refund her money. At least you're in control of the situation to know you'll get paid for the work. Just make sure you understand what she is asking for and don't deviate from it. Get as much info as you can about your writing assignment as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author DotComBum
    I suggest you get 50% deposit from her and collect the other 50% when the job is done, congrats to your success.
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  • Profile picture of the author apoorv.parijat
    Originally Posted by Bill_Lawrence View Post

    I just landed a writing gig. My client is offering $50 per 1000 words. This is my first assignment like this. I am aware that many of you may charge a little more for this but I want to gain her trust. Should I accept her payment before I get started or when I'm done?
    Congratulations, Bill! Go with payment first. There is always the option of refunding if it doesn't work out but I don't think it'll come tot hat. Go with payment first.
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  • Profile picture of the author WriterWahm
    If you really want to gain her trust, I'd say ask for half up front and the rest when you deliver. If she rejects your work, you get to keep the half. But do this ONLY if you're 100% confident of the quality of your work.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bill_Lawrence
    Wow, she's paying upfront. No questions asked.
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    • Profile picture of the author DotComBum
      Originally Posted by Bill_Lawrence View Post

      Wow, she's paying upfront. No questions asked.
      That's great! Remember to get a testimonial from her
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      • Profile picture of the author Chris Worner
        Originally Posted by DotComBum View Post

        I suggest you get 50% deposit from her and collect the other 50% when the job is done, congrats to your success.
        Originally Posted by WriterWahm View Post

        If you really want to gain her trust, I'd say ask for half up front and the rest when you deliver. If she rejects your work, you get to keep the half. But do this ONLY if you're 100% confident of the quality of your work.
        Horrible advice for the simple fact that the buyer can then hold you hostage and demand rewrite after rewrite after rewrite, and gain free additional articles.

        -Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author Jase1977
    Good luck on it and make sure you do a good job for her. It's always great to have repeat customers. Keep her happy and she'll keep you happy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bill_Lawrence
    Paid! I'm so excited. A goldmine is right before your eyes. There's sites we visit every day with tons of potential clients. It's just a matter of learning how to use those sites and how to engage ourselves with the people we encounter.
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    • Profile picture of the author John Coutts
      Originally Posted by Bill_Lawrence View Post

      Paid! I'm so excited. A goldmine is right before your eyes. There's sites we visit every day with tons of potential clients. It's just a matter of learning how to use those sites and how to engage ourselves with the people we encounter.
      Why not create a WSO about this? There are lots of people right here who would pay to discover the "goldmine." Believe me, I get asked about how to find good paying writing work all the time.

      You have just found some good paying writing work. You mention a "goldmine," so get other people who are keen to know what this "goldmine" is, to pay you for the privilege of discovering it.

      John.
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      • Profile picture of the author Bill_Lawrence
        Originally Posted by John Coutts View Post

        Why not create a WSO about this? There are lots of people right here who would pay to discover the "goldmine." Believe me, I get asked about how to find good paying writing work all the time.

        You have just found some good paying writing work. You mention a "goldmine," so get other people who are keen to know what this "goldmine" is, to pay you for the privilege of discovering it.

        John.
        I haven't given a WSO any thought. I probably won't create one right now. I'll see how this goes for now.
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      • Profile picture of the author bhuff85
        Originally Posted by John Coutts View Post

        Why not create a WSO about this?.
        Why is it that when I see people post a thread about a method, idea or technique that they were successful with, there is always at least one comment about "creating a WSO" for it?

        Here's the OP's method in a nutshell:

        - The OP wants to write articles in exchange for cash
        - He found a source that helped him land his first gig
        - He received payment, wrote the article and delivered it
        - Rinse and repeat

        There are hundreds (and probably thousands) of sources for finding writing gigs. Put in the effort to do the research and you can easily find several "goldmines" of your own.

        These days, I stay clear from the WSO section. Too many people slamming some low-quality content together and trying to make a quick buck out of the deal.

        To the OP - no reason to share the source or create a WSO for it. Thanks for sharing your success and keep up the good work. There will be many more opportunities to come if you stay on your grind!
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        • Profile picture of the author John Coutts
          Originally Posted by bhuff85 View Post

          Why is it that when I see people post a thread about a method, idea or technique that they were successful with, there is always at least one comment about "creating a WSO" for it?

          Here's the OP's method in a nutshell:

          - The OP wants to write articles in exchange for cash
          - He found a source that helped him land his first gig
          - He received payment, wrote the article and delivered it
          - Rinse and repeat

          There are hundreds (and probably thousands) of sources for finding writing gigs. Put in the effort to do the research and you can easily find several "goldmines" of your own.

          These days, I stay clear from the WSO section. Too many people slamming some low-quality content together and trying to make a quick buck out of the deal.

          To the OP - no reason to share the source or create a WSO for it. Thanks for sharing your success and keep up the good work. There will be many more opportunities to come if you stay on your grind!
          I made the suggestion because I wanted to encourage the OP towards even more success. I know where to find the "goldmines," or at least enough of them for my own needs, so I didn't want the WSO for myself.

          Why do you find my simple suggestion, put forward in a helpful manner, so objectionable?

          As you say, the WSO section has, "too many people slamming some low-quality content together and trying to make a quick buck out of the deal," so wouldn't it be nice to see a simple WSO that is straightforward and honest for a change?

          The OP can do what he likes, and I'm delighted for his success whatever he chooses to do. I only made a simple suggestion, trying to be helpful.

          John.
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          • Profile picture of the author bhuff85
            Originally Posted by John Coutts View Post

            I made the suggestion because I wanted to encourage the OP towards even more success. I know where to find the "goldmines," or at least enough of them for my own needs, so I didn't want the WSO for myself.

            Why do you find my simple suggestion, put forward in a helpful manner, so objectionable?

            As you say, the WSO section has, "too many people slamming some low-quality content together and trying to make a quick buck out of the deal," so wouldn't it be nice to see a simple WSO that is straightforward and honest for a change?

            The OP can do what he likes, and I'm delighted for his success whatever he chooses to do. I only made a simple suggestion, trying to be helpful.

            John.
            Sorry if I offended you, John. Just seeing a lot of "turn this into a WSO" stuff lately on threads where members are sharing some success.

            I still stand by what I mentioned previously, though. There are plenty of "goldmines" for writing gigs out there and it only takes a little research to find them.

            The way I see it, a WSO offering the OP's source for this gig in particular would only water it down in the long run. So, the source gets released and everyone jumps on it. Before you know it, you have people coming in and low-balling others, rates drop and the competition becomes fierce and no longer worth it.

            So, the OP makes a few bucks and helps out a couple of people, but if the source itself eventually goes downhill, everyone loses.

            If you look at it that way, it's easy to see that it is much different than a WSO offering training on a particular method or technique, rather than a specific source for work.

            Just put in the work to find your own sources and I'm telling you, it will be worth the effort. Build your own reliable network and you'll have more writing gigs than you'll ever need.
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  • Profile picture of the author drmani
    Originally Posted by Bill_Lawrence View Post

    I just landed a writing gig. My client is offering $50 per 1000 words. This is my first assignment like this. I am aware that many of you may charge a little more for this but I want to gain her trust. Should I accept her payment before I get started or when I'm done?
    If it's a one-time job, just for that one article, I'd
    remove as much risk as possible for both sides by asking
    either for one-half of the payment up front, and the rest
    on completion - OR offer to send over the first third of
    the article to make sure things are to their liking, and
    then completion of the project upon an advance payment
    of 50% to 65% of the total.

    If it's the first of a series of projects or jobs, then
    I'd take a calculated risk and probably send over the
    first completed article before asking for payment.

    But this is NOT general advice, just what I'd do in your
    position. Writing 1,000 words takes me around 30 to 45
    minutes, as long as I'm writing on subjects which I know
    well (which are the only ones I write for others about,
    btw) - and I can always use any 'returned' work myself,
    often more profitably

    Hope this helps.

    All success
    Dr.Mani
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  • Profile picture of the author Jase1977
    Yeah, I only write on things I'm somewhat familiar with. I can type up a 1000 word article in like 20 minutes. But that's my process. I do more of a free flow writing style, then do a heavy editing process after to fix any punctuation or grammar mistakes.
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  • Profile picture of the author bladening
    Congrats, its is a good start
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    • Profile picture of the author Christopher Fox
      Horrible advice for the simple fact that the buyer can then hold you hostage and demand rewrite after rewrite after rewrite, and gain free additional articles.
      Obviously your opinion, to which you are entitled, but a bit harsh, don't you think? More than one person suggested this course of action. It is moot for the op at this point, but more people than the op have this question, which is the only reason I am bothering to comment.

      Most people have an innate sense of fairness and this is a new relationship that may never include an actual conversation and handshake. Everything can, and probably is being done via electronic communication with no opportunity for either party to look into the other's eyes and assess their character.

      For all you know, I could be some weirdo living in my mother's basement wearing fishnet stockings, pink high heels, lime green lipstick and, to complete the image, a clothespin on each nipple.

      I don't accept your assertion on the course of events. Were it my first gig, I would consider potential harm to my reputation, which doesn't exist yet as this would be my first gig, and tell the person to go chew on rocks if I thought they were stringing me along, merely manipulating me for free work.

      Say, "Thanks for the $25, go ahead a keep the other $25 as I do not feel your professionalism is up to the level I expect out of my clients and I no longer have a desire to continue a business relationship with you".

      And before I got too bummed out, I would remember that I just figured out how to get a $50/1000 word gig and, as is often said here, I would wash, rinse, repeat and scale.
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      • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
        Originally Posted by Christopher Fox View Post

        For all you know, I could be some weirdo living in my mother's basement wearing fishnet stockings, pink high heels, lime green lipstick and, to complete the image, a clothespin on each nipple.
        Oh the mental images that came with that one. I don't see how this adds or detracts to your ability/trustworthiness as a writer though.

        Originally Posted by Christopher Fox View Post

        I don't accept your assertion on the course of events. Were it my first gig, I would consider potential harm to my reputation, which doesn't exist yet as this would be my first gig, and tell the person to go chew on rocks if I thought they were stringing me along, merely manipulating me for free work.

        Say, "Thanks for the $25, go ahead a keep the other $25 as I do not feel your professionalism is up to the level I expect out of my clients and I no longer have a desire to continue a business relationship with you".

        And before I got too bummed out, I would remember that I just figured out how to get a $50/1000 word gig and, as is often said here, I would wash, rinse, repeat and scale.
        A facet that I think you are overlooking is that your reputation is more than just "he/she is a good/bad" worker. With the strategy you put forward telling clients to "chew on rocks" every time you feel that they are stringing you along can lead to an undesired label: tough to work with. Also consider that it is now out there that you as a writer can be had for half price if you just complain enough about doing rewrites.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bill_Lawrence
    Wow, I haven't gotten any sleep. Although my deadline is March 31. I finished my assignment in 2 hours. So I guess I was paid $25 per hour. Not bad.
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    • Profile picture of the author Chris Worner
      Originally Posted by Christopher Fox View Post

      Obviously your opinion, to which you are entitled, but a bit harsh, don't you think? More than one person suggested this course of action. It is moot for the op at this point, but more people than the op have this question, which is the only reason I am bothering to comment.
      You have a lot to learn my young padawan. This is conventional wisdom amoungst many of the more experienced writers on this forum. You must choose where you get your information wisely. Neither of the people you are referencing above your post run or have run ghost writing business's, so why would you take business advice from them? Their decision is based on emotion, not experience.

      Except Dr Mani, who charges a lot more than $50 for one thousand words, but he is dealing with much higher quality clients than your average run of the mill writer on this forum.

      It is cheaper to learn from other peoples mistakes.

      ************************************************** *****8

      Bill, congratulations on getting your first writing gig.

      -Chris
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      • Profile picture of the author Christopher Fox
        I respectfully reject your assertions Joe Robinson.

        A facet that I think you are overlooking is that your reputation is more than just "he/she is a good/bad" worker.
        I am overlooking no such thing.

        With the strategy you put forward telling clients to "chew on rocks" every time you feel that they are stringing you along can lead to an undesired label: tough to work with.
        You misstate my assumed strategy. I fail to see how not allowing a client to steal from you is bad for your reputation. I was addressing a specific case about a client being a cheeseball and lacking in business ethics. That would be the clients shortcomings, not mine.

        I would not have a problem with some rewrites on my first gig. However, if I was being used as a $25 real life article spinner, I would indeed suggest the chewing of rocks ...

        Also consider that it is now out there that you as a writer can be had for half price if you just complain enough about doing rewrites.
        Out there with whom? More thiefs? More people that have found out they can steal from you? Is that really who you want your client base to be? Not I.

        I tried to put myself in the shoes of the client as well here. A client that has just hired a writer with no portfolio, no researchable work history regarding timelines, no testimonials, etc. If you are established, well, point to your portfolio, your testimonials, and demand upfront cash. If you are on your first gig, you are at a serious disadvantage for inspiring your client to fork over money to your paypal acct. after an email exchange.

        Relationships can get off to a smooth start, especially involving money, if both parties are able to feel they have a bit of security and one side views the other side as having an equal amount of skin in the game. An equal amount to lose on a completely new relationship, especially when the party getting paid has no track record to point at to say, 'see, I have done this before. I have clients. They like my work and find me honest. And you can proceed with paying me in full and up front without having to worry about quality or deadlines.'

        Not trying to get in an extensive back and forth, merely provide fodder for those other than you and I reading our posts. The pros and cons of both sides. You bring up valid points to consider ... and so do I.
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        • Profile picture of the author profitwriter
          Damn! thats great!

          im in the wrong game! i need to up my prices!

          If there is so much $$ to be had, why don't you consider outsourcing

          the work to a quality writer... say for $25... then sit back and
          collect cheques!
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          • Profile picture of the author Kay King
            Oh my goodness....

            He wrote one article for a decent fee - and is told to run a WSO, outsource his writing (he IS the outsourcer here) - and people argue about payment? I suggest he get more of those jobs and make some money writing. If you do the work well, you should not have to worry about rewrites.

            My clients pay within hours of delivery. I've been writing for them for a long time and there's mutual trust established. A new client would pay 50% up front.

            kay
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        • Profile picture of the author Christopher Fox
          You have a lot to learn my young padawan.
          Umm ... okay. Yoda.

          This is conventional wisdom amoungst many of the more experienced writers on this forum.
          I have no doubt about this. Experienced being the operative word in that sentence. Truly experienced writers have a track record. A writing record and a business record. They can demand more, both in terms of financial compensation as well as terms. They can be more selective with their clients.

          Neither of the people you are referencing above your post run or have run ghost writing business's, so why would you take business advice from them?
          Because they are people. With people experience. And we are discussing the first time paying gig of a writer with no track record to point to concerning trustworthiness in an interaction between two people. Ask yourself this: You have two potential writers to hire. Neither has a portfolio to point to inspire confidence or previously satisfied clients to display. One writer is demanding cash upfront. One is demanding half upfront and the remainder upon final delivery.

          Where are you putting your money Yoda? There are a multitude of young padawans out there. And they are competing against you if you too are a young padawan. What can you offer to make yourself stand out from the other writers who may have the same skill set? Perhaps a bit of financial security in addition to the impression that you are fair and not demanding (read: PITA) when concerning the issue of money?

          Their decision is based on emotion, not experience.
          I consider this to be a bit of an overstatement. But that is just this knucklehead. If I were established, I would demand upfront payment too. And the reason I classify this as an overstatement is that half upfront/half on delivery, or some other upfront/on delivery split, is a very common business practice in many different industries.

          You see Yoda, you assume this padawan is emotional and inexperienced in contract negotiation. I could be that weirdo I described a couple posts above, or I could be a dude a month shy of forty and a recently retired ski bum who's first career, successful career that is, was as a Project Manager assembling, negotiating and making good on 2 inch thick contracts with companies like Lockheed Martin, Ball Aerospace, US govt. agencies, etc. on top of almost 40 years of interacting with plenty of different folks in different situations in this thing we call life.

          Emotional? Hardly. A writer with NO experience to point to DOES NOT have the same bargaining power in a contract negotiation as an established one does. Further, as I already stated, young padawans are competing against other young padawans unless they are willing to blow smoke up a clients arse and lie about their work history. A sharp client knows this.

          I have no problems with opinions that differ from mine, nor critique applied to my opinion, but spare me the condescending overtones Yoda. I find it a bit juvenile, young padawan.
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        • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
          Originally Posted by Christopher Fox View Post

          I respectfully reject your assertions Joe Robinson.



          I am overlooking no such thing.



          You misstate my assumed strategy. I fail to see how not allowing a client to steal from you is bad for your reputation. I was addressing a specific case about a client being a cheeseball and lacking in business ethics. That would be the clients shortcomings, not mine.

          I would not have a problem with some rewrites on my first gig. However, if I was being used as a $25 real life article spinner, I would indeed suggest the chewing of rocks ...



          Out there with whom? More thiefs? More people that have found out they can steal from you? Is that really who you want your client base to be? Not I.

          I tried to put myself in the shoes of the client as well here. A client that has just hired a writer with no portfolio, no researchable work history regarding timelines, no testimonials, etc. If you are established, well, point to your portfolio, your testimonials, and demand upfront cash. If you are on your first gig, you are at a serious disadvantage for inspiring your client to fork over money to your paypal acct. after an email exchange.

          Relationships can get off to a smooth start, especially involving money, if both parties are able to feel they have a bit of security and one side views the other side as having an equal amount of skin in the game. An equal amount to lose on a completely new relationship, especially when the party getting paid has no track record to point at to say, 'see, I have done this before. I have clients. They like my work and find me honest. And you can proceed with paying me in full and up front without having to worry about quality or deadlines.'
          That's on me for not properly reading the post with this statement you made in mind "Were it my first gig". I based what I said on the assumption that you were saying that is how you dealt with customers period; and if we are talking about a potentially justifiable rewrite it could easily lead to the "tough to work with label" I mentioned.

          I'll revise what I meant now: for a first time writer, Christopher's point is correct. Get taken advantage of early, and it will continue until you quit or learn to stand up for yourself. Use common sense and discretion and be firm in what you will or won't do.

          Should you have to tell your first client to "chew rocks", don't let it become habit but rather a lesson. Go back and pick up on the subtle hints that this contractor left behind. Now use that knowledge to avoid working with similar clients. Scammers make up a minority of the system (albeit a loud one). Don't let that first bad experience create bad working habits for you.

          There, second time is a charm, right? Oh, and to actually chime in on the topic at hand: I have done all different types of payment; but found up front to be easiest and acceptable.

          Originally Posted by Christopher Fox View Post

          Not trying to get in an extensive back and forth, merely provide fodder for those others than you and I reading our posts. The pros and cons of both sides. You bring up valid points to consider ... and so do I.
          Aw, but I love back and forth arguments! :rolleyes:

          Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

          Oh my goodness....

          He wrote one article for a decent fee - and is told to run a WSO, outsource his writing (he IS the outsourcer here) - and people argue about payment? I suggest he get more of those jobs and make some money writing. If you do the work well, you should not have to worry about rewrites.

          My clients pay within hours of delivery. I've been writing for them for a long time and there's mutual trust established. A new client would pay 50% up front.

          kay
          But...but everyone knows that the only REAL way to make money online is with a $7 WSO telling how you got your first writing gig! Why would someone want to work?:confused:
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    • Profile picture of the author drmani
      Marianne, I'm writing this with my tongue firmly in my cheek!

      Originally Posted by Marianne Gonne View Post

      it seems to me you've broken the code... you just have to break out of the herd mentality.
      and

      Well done, too, on getting paid in full before you began work. As other respected Warriors have said, it's the norm for professional web writers.
      Wouldn't it then be "herd mentality" for pro web writers to be paid in full before
      beginning the work - and therefore "breaking out" would mean doing it differently?! ;-)

      (Which, incidentally, is the way I work - often getting paid 3 months later, for
      work done first! - of course, that's ONLY with very trusted writing clients!!!)

      All success
      Dr.Mani
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  • Profile picture of the author WebPen
    Congrats Bill! I think this is VERY encouraging, showing that native English speakers don't have to start at $1/100 words (like I made the mistake of doing).

    As for the 2 hours- $25/hour isn't bad, and it will get better in time as you start charging more and become a better writer.
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  • Profile picture of the author jeffster
    Congrats Bill. Keep it going!
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  • Profile picture of the author Lori Kelly
    Congratulations! I always get full payment before I send my content.

    Here's to your success. -Lori
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Well done, Bill - wishing you every success with it.

      Originally Posted by Lori Kelly View Post

      I always get full payment before I send my content.
      This.

      It's clean, simple and normal.

      Payment in full, in advance. If clients have a problem with this, they're not clients you need. Any services/products that people buy online, from any businesses, they pay for in advance. It's completely normal. They expect it. Why should article-writing be any different?! :p
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  • Profile picture of the author Mae Rose
    Accept payment when you're done. That's how things usually work.
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    • Profile picture of the author cashp0wer
      That's a pretty good writing gig for your so congratulations. I've seen it done many ways. If you know you can trust her than accept payment when you are finished and she has approved it. If you do not know her well, you can ask for half the payment up front and then get the rest when she has approved it. Good luck.
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    • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
      Originally Posted by Mae Rose View Post

      Accept payment when you're done. That's how things usually work.
      Things are EXACTLY as you believe them to be. If you think you can only get $5 for an article, you're right. If you think you need to wait before getting paid, you're right about that too.

      Alexa is trying to get you to be "right" about a different way of thinking. Small mental adjustment, big difference in the real world.
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  • Congratulations! Depending on how much you're being paid, it is common to request at least half upfront and the other half after you send the article.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lori Kelly
    If you send the content before you get payment and the person puts it on their site, blog, etc., what's your recourse?

    If you attempt to collect payment, you'll probably spend more time doing so than you did writing the content.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan Joseph
    Hi Bill,

    First, congrats!

    Second, as per your question, I would suggest that you use some sort of third party safe-pay account service - like escrow - with the employer to secure the funds.

    Or perhaps even speak about a 50-50 arrangement.

    All the best with it!
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  • Profile picture of the author ymest
    Yes , payment first. Business rules, as simple as this. Otherwise, your client could just disappear (literally) after being sent the article! 50% up front are usually for long-standing clients, although even then, I would press for 100% upfront payment! If they start haggling then, ask yourself whether you really WANT THEM AS CLIENTS!

    My take on this (with a bit of experience) !

    Y.
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  • Profile picture of the author diger
    I think most marketers would say "never turn down the payment" no matter when it is offered. If you feel comfortable writing the material, then all you need is to get the word out that you are available for writing and your profits will build. All you need is prospects......
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  • Profile picture of the author Cataclysm1987
    That's a great price, honestly.

    Let's say it takes you 4 hours to complete the work. That's 12.50 an hour, not bad at all for starting out. And that's assuming you've done like 8 revisions to your work. If you get it right the first time, it's an even better deal.
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  • Profile picture of the author EllesBelles
    I hate the suggestion of outsourcing writing.

    Firstly, you lose all control of how the article turns out. It could be awful. I'd rather write it myself and know my client will love it...

    Secondly, it reinforces the state of mind that writers should work for low pay.

    Maybe I'm just more of a writer because I love words than a writer because I want to make money.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bill_Lawrence
    Hey,

    I just received an email from my client. She looked over my work. She wants me to continue to write for her. I'm thinking about creating a website for my new business..lol. Maybe she'll spread the word. She seemed very excited.

    To answer a question here, I thought about outsourcing but as someone else mentioned, I don't have any control over how the article turns out. I'd rather do the work myself for now.
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  • Profile picture of the author jpeddler
    Bill,

    Congratulations on your first “premium” gig!

    Do you know how courageous it was for you to do what you did?

    You dispelled a major myth and amazed 9 out of 10 writers reading this thread that believe there is no work to be won beyond the $20 barrier. Many others hardly believe any work exists beyond $5.

    This is a big deal – you didn’t just tap on the glass ceiling many believe exists. You smashed it!

    You have my enthusiastic admiration for doing what you did and the way you did it. I read your initial post and am writing this as you posted again about your client’s satisfaction with the work. I read your thoughts about a web site too. It may be a great idea to do this – it increases the credibility you already have begun to develop.

    Things that have happened since don’t surprise me at all – I would have expected nothing less than for your client to have been delighted.

    Clients in the upper ranges of price are the easiest to please – provided you really can deliver the goods. There is little doubt now that you can do exactly this.

    I would urge you to continue to do what you are doing. Always test your pricing and never stop “sharpening the blade” as it relates to your skills as a writer.

    Keep your sources to yourself – unless and until it is more profitable for you to reveal them.

    You have a business started – let’s not muddle the objective by going into the WSO business too.

    The only suggestions I would make are:

    If your client was so willing to pay $50, might she have paid more? There are always those market “corners” that will almost literally throw money at you to write great content for them.

    Others will pay more – often a lot more. I know this because many of the pros in this thread get paid more, just as I do. I can assure you we have ZERO problems finding these high-paying, thriving markets.

    They often come disguised as real work and research - this unfortunately leaves people behind right there.

    Welcome to the “Elite Level” of writers. The air is very clear and pleasant up here.

    Incidentally, always get paid upfront – 100% upfront. I never have a problem with this, and it is the only way I work. There is such a thing as "professional presence" - and as a professional, your clients should expect that payment with order is a usual and customary practice.

    I don't negotiate this point and neither should you. Pros don't sweat being able to deliver the goods - it's a mindset that will pay you well and ensures you are never perceived as an amateur - or paid like one.

    Also make sure you read and pay attention to the advice of fellow pros like Alexa Smith, Marianne Gonne, John Coutts, Kay King, Bill Platt, Tina Golden and Lori Kelly - just to name a few. Great writers love reading the writing of other great writers and these people are among the best.

    They make their livings maximizing the value of content they write – you can learn much from them.

    As to quality and keeping your finger on the trigger of continuing to deliver your great content - write the stuff yourself. Integrity is a large part of the higher prices you get paid. Clients are paying for your skills as a writer - not an editor.

    Continue to deliver your goods - written your way.

    You have my more than enthusiastic support any time you need it. Got a question? Ask a fellow pro here - you will find there is little they won't tell you.

    There’s more business to be won though – go get all you can! Don't let the barriers that limit others slow you down - even for a moment. Don't allow $50 to become a new barrier or self-imposed ceiling - just let it be your beginning.

    Congrats again!
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  • Profile picture of the author jideofor
    Could someone at least give a clue how or where to find this kind of clients? Is it at a forum, craiglist, linkedin or where? If you don't want give the real source, could you kindly give a discribtion, directly or indirectly?
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    • Profile picture of the author jpeddler
      Originally Posted by jideofor View Post

      Could someone at least give a clue how or where to find this kind of clients? Is it at a forum, craiglist, linkedin or where? If you don't want give the real source, could you kindly give a discribtion, directly or indirectly?
      Here's a way that I have recently posted. This one way can be taken 100 different directions. There are dozens (hundreds?) of other ways to get out of the "bargain basement" of writing for money.

      http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...-re-worth.html

      I even put a 20 minute video near the end of the thread.

      Here's my guarantee:

      It doesn't cost a nickel to do this.
      It will take you out of your comfort zone.
      It is real work.
      If you are persistent and willing to bust your tail, the sky is the limit on earnings.

      The only problem with this method is that people will likely have to get out of their chairs to do it successfully and with the most benefits.

      It's all there - all you HAVE to do is take massive action.

      Oh and my fee?

      $100,000 (seriously, just kidding) - The advice in the thread is FREE.

      Hope it helps!
      Jake
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      • Profile picture of the author John Coutts
        Originally Posted by jpeddler View Post

        Here's a way that I have recently posted. This one way can be taken 100 different directions. There are dozens (hundreds?) of other ways to get out of the "bargain basement" of writing for money.

        http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...-re-worth.html

        I even put a 20 minute video near the end of the thread.

        Here's my guarantee:

        It doesn't cost a nickel to do this.
        It will take you out of your comfort zone.
        It is real work.
        If you are persistent and willing to bust your tail, the sky is the limit on earnings.

        The only problem with this method is that people will likely have to get out of their chairs to do it successfully and with the most benefits.

        It's all there - all you HAVE to do is take massive action.

        Oh and my fee?

        $100,000 (seriously, just kidding) - The advice in the thread is FREE.

        Hope it helps!
        Jake
        I just watched the video mentioned above that's near the end of the thread linked to above. It's excellent!

        If you are reading this thread and wondering how to get well paid for your writing, like the OP, then go and watch the video in the link above.

        There's nothing rocket science about his method. Anyone can do it, and while I haven't personally tried that method, I have no doubt it does work.

        It's little things like this that can and will get you out of the $5 per 500 words rut, but you have to take the action. Jake has shown a good method in his video, so anyone needing to make decent money through their writing should watch it and do what it says.

        John.
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      • Profile picture of the author jideofor
        Originally Posted by jpeddler View Post

        Here's a way that I have recently posted. This one way can be taken 100 different directions. There are dozens (hundreds?) of other ways to get out of the "bargain basement" of writing for money.

        http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...-re-worth.html

        I even put a 20 minute video near the end of the thread.

        Here's my guarantee:

        It doesn't cost a nickel to do this.
        It will take you out of your comfort zone.
        It is real work.
        If you are persistent and willing to bust your tail, the sky is the limit on earnings.

        The only problem with this method is that people will likely have to get out of their chairs to do it successfully and with the most benefits.

        It's all there - all you HAVE to do is take massive action.

        Oh and my fee?

        $100,000 (seriously, just kidding) - The advice in the thread is FREE.

        Hope it helps!
        Jake
        Thanks, J. I really love the way you put it out there and it was quite crafted inbetween that if one does not read between lines, he/she would be lost. The key concepts for getting clients were careful weaved in and I doubt if many would actually see it the way you wrote it, except they read between lines.
        In that thread you mentioned contacting companies or website(blog) owners. What kind, actually? Finance, forex, law firms,pregnancy or what?

        Thanks in advance for your time.
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        • Profile picture of the author jpeddler
          Originally Posted by jideofor View Post

          Thanks, J. I really love the way you put it out there and it was quite crafted inbetween that if one does not read between lines, he/she would be lost. The key concepts for getting clients were careful weaved in and I doubt if many would actually see it the way you wrote it, except they read between lines.
          In that thread you mentioned contacting companies or website(blog) owners. What kind, actually? Finance, forex, law firms,pregnancy or what?

          Thanks in advance for your time.
          This is Bill's celebration - his party. I do not want to hijack his thread.

          But since you have asked questions and he has responded in kind - I will too.

          Did you read the posts in the thread? It doesn't appear you did.

          They are every bit as important as the video – perhaps more so. I actually left little ambiguity about who to market to, why and even the initial approaches to take.

          Are there other ways? Of course – I couldn’t put an encyclopedia into a couple of posts and a 20 minute video.

          BUT

          All you need to do is stop looking at search results in Google as a consumer – or even a researcher. Instead look at the pages as a marketer – as a salesperson. You will see a whole new world.

          My suggestion for you is to identify your areas of strength as they relate to your writing. If you hate writing about a topic, you won’t write about it nearly as well, will you?

          The purpose of everything I have posted is not just to get you to seek larger fees for the work you produce – but to work on topics that interest you.

          Here’s the hard truth – making more money for writing is the easy part. Writing about the things you like, love or are passionate about are what makes it a little trickier, but still very doable.

          This is how, why and when you start to love the craft of writing. And make no mistake about it – while many in this forum and others just like this one seek to make what you do a commodity and minimize its value, those same people are the biggest complainers. They get upset about what they got when they ordered 150 articles for $150 - or whatever whimsical pricing they paid.

          What do I do when I see those posts?

          Smile broadly in amusement - with writing, perhaps more than any other thing on the web - you absolutely do get what you pay for.

          What you do – what every skilled writer in this and other forums do – has INSANELY high value. It is a high level skill – an art. Few can do it well – even at a modest level.

          Quality always commands higher prices – only on the web, many only see vast numbers of words on a page as the only way to measure value. They determine value numerically – not based on quality and results.

          Or they try to get cute and attach SEO value as the overwhelming consideration for every piece of writing.

          This is the ultimate BS in a world full of BS.

          My questions and comments posted in every thread like this remain the same. Sooner or later, a real, living and breathing human is going to land on your sites or blogs.

          Would you rather give them an experience that keeps them there or see them bounce quickly because of the gibberish you posted?

          Every SEO guy and gal here can spout-off all day long about getting their sites to page one of Google. They DO NOT get it – what do you do once you get visitors – you know – the ones that actually pay you?

          Who will entice the customer to take an action that really does pay you money?!

          Someone having a site with content I write, which makes the site insanely sticky and causes them to take a paying action

          -Or-

          Someone that got to page one with gimmicks, tricks and spun junk content and keeps visitors on their sites for mere milliseconds?

          I will win that battle 100% of the time. It is GAME OVER for the game players.

          People will click Adsense blocks on my clients’ sites because I gave them something of value. They will buy their affiliate offers because I explained to them in plain English that it is worth spending their money on.

          I write for them as I would want someone to explain things to me.

          The artificially, accidental Google page one sites will have to live with the occasional, accidental click or sale.

          So whose stuff do you want? How about your clients – offline or online?

          This is the way you approach every user of content – online and offline - and only need to ask this one question:

          Do you want more customers that will pay you more money – more times? It doesn't matter how you ask it - just make sure you do ask it and get a response.

          This is a simple question with an equally simple answer. (I have never had anyone tell me no to making more money.)

          Writing as a business will cease becoming a task and become fun when you see that you are the foundation for everything that happens online. As a writer, you control destinies, improve conversions, develop customer goodwill, etc.

          Hell, without you and other writers – there would be no internet. Content can be ugly as long as it’s useful. Things like web sites, blogs, color and graphics only make the only necessary component – content – pretty and structured - and that’s all they do.

          That is what being self-employed as a professional writer is all about. I gave just a couple of examples in the written posts in the other thread.

          You can find niches to write for in nearly any area you truly enjoy writing about – but they won’t come looking for you. And they won’t always lay down in front of you and ask you to take their money.

          I think you want me and others to tell you where you should work and what you should write. This is the last thing you want – only it is likely the way you’ve been conditioned to think and work by the “task-oriented” writing exchange and brokerage sites - and content "flea markets" like this one.

          You are just going to have to trust the pros here - no one can tell you what niches to write in or what topics to write about. This defeats the entire purpose of finding your own way as a professional.

          If I handed you the most prime niche in the millions of niches, but you hated it - your writing would kinda suck, wouldn't it? No one can choose your markets for you.

          This is the most insidious nature of working for cheap fees and writing for sites and topics you care little or nothing about.

          Being a writer and doing it this way makes you reactive – not proactive. You get conditioned to believe that the $5 someone may toss you for work is the only way it can be. It is the worst kind of mentality to adopt, and this is an illusion many have forced upon you as a writer.

          This is why I tell writers – ALL writers – to simply say NO to work at less that whatever your acceptable rate of pay is. To be fair, you need to be certain your fees are justified by your level of skill.

          Writing is damn hard work – but it doesn’t have to be boring, unappealing work. And finding these niches that pay obscenely well have varying degrees of difficulty, depending on what you enjoy writing.

          The business of writing for serious money is simple. As soon as you begin acting as the chief promoter for your skills and content, and not just a writer – you will immediately start to make more money.

          Determining who your clients are is simple too. Can you offer them (whoever “them” is) a way to get more customers, improve profits and make more money?

          When you think you have a solid offer and presentation – walk around to the other side of your desk and put yourself in your prospects shoes – and be unmercifully critical too.

          Does the value of your offer tilt the scales in your favor when your money is on the other side of that same scale?

          If yes, go make some money - lots of money.

          If no, restructure the offer or make it better until it does tip the scale in your favor.

          Jake
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          • Profile picture of the author drmani
            Jake upped the ante in a way with his post that takes this
            art of freelance writing into the dimension it really belongs.

            Especially this:

            Originally Posted by jpeddler View Post

            "Sooner or later, a real, living and breathing human is going to land on your sites or blogs.

            Would you rather give them an experience that keeps them there or see them bounce quickly because of the gibberish you posted?"
            Let me take the discussion a wee bit deeper (or higher) and
            ask you some provocative questions while I do.

            It stems from something critical to every marketer - the
            realization that optimizing content begins long before words
            on the page, and in the "mind of the reader".

            * Do you really KNOW the audience you're writing for? I mean
            having a good understanding of what makes them tick, what
            drives and motivates them, what results they expect, what
            hopes and dreams they nurture and nourish, what fears keep
            them awake at night?

            * Do you have a good grasp of what phrases, terms and keywords
            they are typing into search engines to find the kind of info
            you are creating as a freelancer - and more importantly, WHY
            they are using/typing those specific words/terms?


            * Do you understand the skills and art of stringing words to
            tug heart-strings, motivate and inspire, terrify and paralyze,
            grip and rivet the reader - to the point they can't stop from
            going on to the next word, the next sentence, the next para,
            and the next page/link?

            All of this requires a rare talent - the ability to GET INSIDE
            YOUR READER'S MIND.


            There are clues everywhere that will show you how to do it.

            And it's why specializing in a niche (or narrow range of topics)
            will give you an edge over a 'generalist', who can have but a
            passing acquaintance with the things s/he writes about.

            When your writing speaks directly to the thoughts, the
            viewpoints, the world-view, the inner conversations that are
            happening all the time inside the heads of your prospective
            readers, you'll have transcended the "price barrier".

            No longer will your clients hire you for your 'hourly rate'
            but for your IMPACT.

            That's not a difficult point to reach - if you focus on learning
            and (intentionally) practicing and eventually mastering the art
            of writing.

            Of course, like all worthwhile goals, this takes some effort,
            some persistence, some patience, and some willingness to defer
            earning ability until you acquire the required skills.

            Beyond that, the sky's the limit!

            All success
            Dr.Mani
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  • Profile picture of the author Bill_Lawrence
    You can find these clients outside the internet marketing niche. Visit forums, popular sites...sites where you know there is traffic. I wasted a lot of time reading this forum each day, hoping that I would find this magic formula. I never did. I changed up my routine a bit. Since clients weren't looking for me, I looked for them....be active.
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    • Profile picture of the author jideofor
      Originally Posted by Bill_Lawrence View Post

      You can find these clients outside the internet marketing niche. Visit forums, popular sites...sites where you know there is traffic. I wasted a lot of time reading this forum each day, hoping that I would find this magic formula. I never did. I changed up my routine a bit. Since clients weren't looking for me, I looked for them....be active.
      I guess you mean the non-make-money-online niche, right? if yes, should I look in the parenting, finance, family, marriage etc niches?
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      • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
        Originally Posted by jideofor View Post

        I guess you mean the non-make-money-online niche, right? if yes, should I look in the parenting, finance, family, marriage etc niches?
        Look into any niche that you have decided to work in. Internet marketers are not the only ones that need content. They're not the only ones willing to pay either.

        Once you get over that mental hurdle, things get a lot more lucrative.
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  • Profile picture of the author gentryliving
    Just get it done first before accepting the payment. This is to get more trust of your client. That's a big rate for a 1000 words. Congrats!
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  • Profile picture of the author icegin
    50% when starting and the other 50% when you've completed the job seems like a good way to go.
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  • Profile picture of the author eshoppingez
    Upfront payment is always the best. If they are not satisfied with your article, you can offer to rewrite/re-edit it. Do your best, and if they still are not satisfied, you need to think why. There are some people who expect the sky for peanuts. So, if your client is one of those guys, you need to tell them politely that you did everything they asked for, and you can't do any more work on that article. Hope this helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author jideofor
    Thanks, J. You have a lot on the ball and I respect that. I understand your point , but wanted to see if I really understood you in the other thread which you referred me to.

    I will just have to take action and get back to you if I have any question. Thanks for your time. I really appreciate it.
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  • Profile picture of the author jpeddler
    Hey Bill,

    I got your message, but cannot respond here. (Ironically, I don't have enough posts yet.) My email address is just as listed in two places here - jakesarabia AT gmail.com.

    Just let me know what you need.

    Jake
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  • Profile picture of the author jeffreys
    How did you got the job?
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  • Profile picture of the author jpeddler
    Thank you Dr. Mani!

    As is usual, you add great value, depth and more clarity to points made. This is fantastic advice for all writers - not just writers seeking to emerge from the pits of writing $5 articles.

    Always write for the reader - what you and even your client think is often irrelevant. Understand who your readers are and add value or a benefit to everything you write for them.

    They are the ultimate consumers of your writing - it is what they think that matters most.

    Writers would also do well to read your excellent FREE ebook below:

    http://www.ezinemarketingcenter.com/...ForWriters.pdf

    It is highly recommended and Dr. Mani does not even require an email to get it.

    Jake
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