Should I switch to Wordpress from Drupal?

67 replies
Someone has recommended I move my website from Drupal to Wordpress.

I had it built by a developer who has done a good job, however, if I had to start again I think I would build it myself to get a better understanding of the tech and to give me more control (not to mention saving money!).

As it is, if I want a module added or even some small things like changes to page types I have to pay the developer to do it. He charges a very reasonable rate, but it's not a great situation, especially considering I'm not making any money from it yet.

My developer hasn't been able to get Twitter or Facebook sign up working, and I've had to pay him for some of the time he spent trying. And there have been a few other similar issues. This is totally not his fault, he charges a low rate because he's just starting out so I understand that, but it is making me question if it would be better if I'd set things up differently.

I'm happy with the look of my site at the moment and I have a fair amount of content on there, although it's early days for the site and I'll be adding much more.

I'm wondering, if I was to build a Wordpress site from scratch, as a first-timer, how many hours I'd be likely have to spend on that. Also, how would the content transfer work and would it affect links/SEO?

My site has a lot of article content - it has a blogs section within it, where several bloggers are based, but the site itself is a lot more than just a blog. So I need something that has articles appearing as articles, not blog posts. It also has video, audio podcasts, a forum, etc. Plus I want to add newsletter sign up. I know Wordpress can cope with all that - but will it do it as well as Drupal?

It would be good to get some thoughts on this, especially if you've had a similar experience. It would be a drag to have to rebuild the whole thing, but probably better to do it sooner than later if it needs to be done.

Thanks
#drupal #switch #wordpress
  • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893523].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author richrowley
    Hi Julia,

    Im not sure about all the techie stuff as I usually outsource that kind of work. What I will say is that I use wordpress a lot and I think its very good.

    There will be plenty of guys that can help you out on here, so just sit tight and people will reply soon.

    You could also head to an outsourcing site and there will be some real experts that will take a look and give you very good rates before you commit to anything.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893538].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author richrowley
    Checked out your site too! It looks good!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893542].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author HappyLuke
    yes, i've had nothing but headaches with drupal and wp just 'seems' to be more accepted main stream.
    Signature

    In America anyone can go straight to the top. And here's what's exciting- It is the bottom that is crowded, not the top.

    (Excerpt from my Success Manual found at http://thoughtsofsuccess.com)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893548].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    Originally Posted by Julia B View Post


    My developer hasn't been able to get Twitter or Facebook sign up working, and I've had to pay him for some of the time he spent trying. You should not pay some one to learn this


    Thanks
    I would switch to WP and find another developer here on the forum. You should not have to pay someone to learn how to get Twitter or Facebook up and running on your dime.

    Some one on this forum could do this without being paid to learn it. Never worked with Drupal but I know you could learn how to make small changes on your WP site with no problems. It is also easy to update. If you run into problems people here will help. Also you can find alot of free videos on how to make changes to your WP site Online.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893582].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author chase
    Hey Julia,

    You are asking a good question. It's important as a business person to reflect on the platform from time to time to ensure it can take you to where you want to go.

    Both Drupal and Wordpress have their devotees and different strengths. One thing to keep in mind is how each started. Drupal was originally conceived as a Content Management System (CMS) while Wordpress was originally conceived as a blogging tool. Both have developed significantly but understanding their core helps you see where they have had to develop.

    Part of the question relates to what you want to do. For example if you want a site that allows you to set many different kinds of users with various levels of control who are administering the website then Drupal handles that well. WP has typically assumed a single user - in basic terms.

    To be fair WP is evolving and moving into the CMS space. Another point is the huge number of WP themes and Plugins available - many specific for marketing.

    There are numerous video available around the internet and from fellow warriors that could get you up to speed about how to use WP - if you install using Fantastico it's pretty easy.

    Hope that helps some.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893594].message }}
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" I wouldn't waste time moving a large site from one platform to another just for the sake of using a different technology.

    For future sites, I'd definitely go with Wordpress - it's just more mainstream and easier to use.
    Signature
    My WSO "10 Hour Website Creation System" - Tons of GREAT WARRIOR REVIEWS!
    ***MUST HAVE For Newbies =>http://www.warriorforum.com/warrior-...ce-needed.html
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893624].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ProvenViral
      Originally Posted by Melanie Mendelson View Post

      "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" I wouldn't waste time moving a large site from one platform to another just for the sake of using a different technology.

      For future sites, I'd definitely go with Wordpress - it's just more mainstream and easier to use.
      She's perfectly right ... switching from another CMS will most likely be detrimental to your website and it's rankings (it can drop for a while). I would just create a new website with a brand new installation of wordpress. Wordpress is more popular and much more flexible when it comes to implementation of SEO methods.

      Regards
      Signature
      "Things may come to those who wait, but only things left by those who hustle". - Abraham Lincoln
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937523].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Carlos Tabora
    Hi Julia:

    You ask a very good question. During the day, I work for a web development firm that owns and operates several high-trafficked sites in different, but highly competitive niches. We have different strategies and CMS systems that we use for different sites (depending if the sites are our "money sites", sites used for creating blogs or link wheels, and sites that are for community portals).

    WordPress is a great platform that is very user-friendly. But because it is "easy-to-use" that also means that it is "too easy" for anyone to create. This "devalues" the whole platform in my opinion because for every good valuable site that is built on WordPress (because of original content, manual link-building, daily quality control/management from a real "live" person that helps contribute to building the brand of the site, etc.) there are tens of thousands of other WordPress sites that are just "pure junk" because they are automated/spinned crap that marketers create to try to game the search engines.

    Drupal sites require the assistance of programmers that are familiar with it. Unfortunately, it's not as module "plug-n-play" friendly as Joomla and not as user-friendly as WordPress. But Drupal is supposed to be best open-source CMS for building a community portal because of its scalability for large numbers of users and advanced customization capabilities.

    We have internal link builders that our hourly + commission-based. We will pay them less commission if they are placing a link on a WordPress-based site than if it is a custom-designed html site or more advanced CMS like Drupal.

    Because of this, we've either used Drupal to build our "money" sites or custom sites built on the WordPress framework. Yes, we do have resources that many other people don't (in-house and outsourced writers, link builders, programmers, marketers, etc.) that help in managing our Drupal or custom WordPress sites.

    As for my own personal Internet marketing sites/properties, I use WordPress at first because it's cheap, easy-to-use and once I get a site setup exactly the way I want it, I can easily "clone" it using one of several WP plugins out there like Backup Creator.

    However, for domains that I want to build a unique brand for that look and feel like a Website owned and operated by a real "brick-and-mortar" company, I've been looking VERY strongly at Expression Engine. Visit the site and look at the Fortune 500 businesses that use the platform. It offers that advantages of using a "paid" software platform (which means I get dedicated customer support during normal business hours) with the flexibility and customization options of using an open-source platform like WordPress or Drupal. The company that owns and operates Expression Engine also owns Code Igniter, which is one of the most-used and highly-regarded programming tools/systems used by coders worldwide.

    I'm not a programmer so I can't really break things down any further for you. But hopefully the information I've given helps...

    keep movin'...

    buzz
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5893780].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Julia B
      [quote=richrowley;5893538]Hi Julia,


      Originally Posted by richrowley View Post

      Checked out your site too! It looks good!
      Thanks Rich, very interesting to get the opinion of someone in your position. And really cool to hear that you like my site, thanks very much for taking a look.


      Originally Posted by HappyLuke View Post

      yes, i've had nothing but headaches with drupal and wp just 'seems' to be more accepted main stream.
      Thanks Luke, thumbs down for Drupal there then!


      Originally Posted by DWolfe View Post

      I would switch to WP and find another developer here on the forum.
      Thanks DWolfe. It's not ideal at all. I think that if I do switch to Wordpress I'll have a go at building it myself though, I'd like to learn how how to build the site myself so I'm not totally dependent on techs and to help me manage them in the future.

      Originally Posted by chase View Post

      Hey Julia,

      Part of the question relates to what you want to do....

      Hope that helps some.
      Thanks Chase. Yes, some of my concerns about wordpress are that it might be a bit too geared towards delivering blogs and I do need to have multiple admins, so maybe that would be an issue too. Appreciate the advice.


      Originally Posted by Melanie Mendelson View Post

      "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" I wouldn't waste time moving a large site from one platform to another just for the sake of using a different technology.

      For future sites, I'd definitely go with Wordpress - it's just more mainstream and easier to use.
      Thanks Melanie, good point, but I will be updating the site regularly and have a lot more to add to it. It's a long term project. So if you're saying wordpress would be best for future I'm wondering whether it would be best for this one too.


      Originally Posted by buzzaddict View Post

      Hi Julia:

      You ask a very good question. During the day, I work for a web development firm that owns and operates several high-trafficked sites in different, but highly competitive niches. We have different strategies and CMS systems that we use for different sites (depending if the sites are our "money sites", sites used for creating blogs or link wheels, and sites that are for community portals)...

      keep movin'...

      buzz
      Thanks very much Buzz, quite a bit for me to think about there. Really great to get your input, sounds like you have a lot of experience in building sites. Cheers.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5895442].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Miguelito203
    Originally Posted by Julia B View Post

    Someone has recommended I move my website from Drupal to Wordpress.

    I had it built by a developer who has done a good job, however, if I had to start again I think I would build it myself to get a better understanding of the tech and to give me more control (not to mention saving money!).

    As it is, if I want a module added or even some small things like changes to page types I have to pay the developer to do it. He charges a very reasonable rate, but it's not a great situation, especially considering I'm not making any money from it yet.

    My developer hasn't been able to get Twitter or Facebook sign up working, and I've had to pay him for some of the time he spent trying. And there have been a few other similar issues. This is totally not his fault, he charges a low rate because he's just starting out so I understand that, but it is making me question if it would be better if I'd set things up differently.

    I'm happy with the look of my site at the moment and I have a fair amount of content on there, although it's early days for the site and I'll be adding much more.

    I'm wondering, if I was to build a Wordpress site from scratch, as a first-timer, how many hours I'd be likely have to spend on that. Also, how would the content transfer work and would it affect links/SEO?

    My site has a lot of article content - it has a blogs section within it, where several bloggers are based, but the site itself is a lot more than just a blog. So I need something that has articles appearing as articles, not blog posts. It also has video, audio podcasts, a forum, etc. Plus I want to add newsletter sign up. I know Wordpress can cope with all that - but will it do it as well as Drupal?

    It would be good to get some thoughts on this, especially if you've had a similar experience. It would be a drag to have to rebuild the whole thing, but probably better to do it sooner than later if it needs to be done.

    Thanks
    Your site is nice-looking. That said, Wordpress has become the standard and is very user-friendly. Moreover, the search engines love blogs. With all the social aspects to them and what not, they are more like little communities now. I'm not a "techie," and before I started my blog, I had never used it at all. I do everything myself. I don't know anything about the platform you're using now, but the only thing I would worry about is losing page rank and what not.

    Good luck,
    Joey
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5895551].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Julia B
      Originally Posted by Miguelito203 View Post

      Moreover, the search engines love blogs...
      Good luck,
      Joey
      Thanks Joey, good to hear that you like the way the site looks. Yes, I've heard that Wordpress is very Google friendly. Any idea why Google would favour a WP site over a Drupal one?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5895722].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author BackLinkiT
      Originally Posted by Miguelito203 View Post

      ...the search engines love blogs...
      This is pure garbage, Julia. Ignore it.

      Originally Posted by Julia B View Post

      Any idea why Google would favour a WP site over a Drupal one?
      It wouldn't. This is an old gem trotted out regularly that is pure drivel. A bit like 'the late Bob Holness played the saxophone on Baker Street'. Some people really believe it!

      The search engines love well written content from authority sites. The platform the site is built on is irrelevant.

      Personally, I use WP for blogging only. That is what it was built for and what it excels at. For anything else there are better solutions out there.

      I would leave your (lovely) site with drupal. The effort in switching to WP would not be worth it.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937163].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Aweinerws
    I have tried Drupal as well as WordPress. I have found Drupal more flexible than WordPress when it comes to web content development and setting up theme or layout of websites. Moreover, Drupal provides scalable, powerful, cost effective and high value solution to manage and grow Internet presence of a website.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937124].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author harveyronn
      Originally Posted by Aweinerws View Post

      I have tried Drupal as well as WordPress. I have found Drupal more flexible than WordPress when it comes to web content development and setting up theme or layout of websites. Moreover, Drupal provides scalable, powerful, cost effective and high value solution to manage and grow Internet presence of a website.
      Yes, as per my experience I am totally agreed with you that Drupal is more flexible and user friendly as compare to word press. My suggestion for switching to Drupal is best option.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6165307].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Valdor Kiebach
    Try joomla Joomla!

    The only people who say 'Google loves Wordpress' are those people selling Wordpress based products or don't know any different.

    Joomla is well worth a look and has plugins for social media:
    Social Web - Joomla! Extensions Directory

    There is even a Wordpress plugin to add wordpress to joomla!
    WordPress Blog for Joomla! - Joomla! Extensions Directory
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937227].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tadresources
    I am a huge WordPress fan. It's easy to use, even for people who aren't particularly tech savvy, and there is a ton of help available online in the way of tutorials on youtube and ehow pages. I usually recommend using a reasonably priced designer because for me it isn't worth the headache but since the whole point is that you want to learn the ins and outs of designing your site I say go or it.

    Now would be the best time since you aren't making big bucks on the site yet. Once you start making cash you will be less inclined to change the status quo since you'll have much more to lose.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937246].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author loi77
    Definitely WordPress!
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937257].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rooze
    A couple things to add to the above -
    Drupal is a content management system and the whole point is that you should be able to administer your site easily without paying a developer. So things like adding new articles, adding images, changing texts, adding navigation buttons etc should all be something you can do without involving your developer.
    They need to give you admin access to the site then you can use one of the many 'getting started' guides for Drupal, it's easy when you get into the swing of it. (this assumes of course that you do want to make your own changes/updates and not have to pay someone, which you seemed to be implying).

    Next, you shouldn't have to pay someone to teach themselves how to use Drupal. If the guy isn't sure how to do something then he should learn in his own time then charge you only when he's competent to complete the task efficiently. Adding a Facebook login module shouldn't take more than 30 minutes to complete so he shouldn't really be charging more than $15-$25 for that task.

    Lastly, if you want to develop a Blog on your website I personally wouldn't scratch the work already done. I'd leave the Drupal installation then just add Wordpress into a sub-directory on the site. Add a hyperlink from the Drupal navigation to the Blog and you're all set. You can get someone to match the template on your Drupal site on the Blog, very easily. It's a simple layout/design, so for the template creation, installation of Wordpress and configuration, you shouldn't be paying more than around $100. Truth is it's going to take someone who knows what they're doing maybe an hour at the most, so even $100 is a little steep.

    Now obviously I don't know your technical capability, so it should be mentioned that the downside of adding Wordpress separately is that you'll need to learn how to administer it and you'll need to learn basic tasks in Drupal too. Wordpress is VERY easy to learn, literally, if you can send an HTML formatted email you can make a nice looking post in Wordpress.
    Drupal has a slightly steeper learning curve but if you stick to the basic tasks of adding new content and updating existing content you ought to be able to learn it in half a day.
    Before deciding on the right path, you might want to have a detailed plan of what you want to do with the site in terms of its expansion and development. There will be situations where adding WordPress as I've described above is not the best option. For example, if you require people to subscribe to read articles and you want people to subscribe to read blog posts, then having two core software systems isn't the best approach.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937890].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Eleanor
    You seem to have quite a large site that you want to move but if you are considering your options long term then I would suggest you make the move sooner rather than later. Wordpress is certainly my first choice for a variety of different websites - just easy to use, flexible and looks great.

    It might take some time to move everything but it will probably be worth it.

    Hope that helps

    Eleanor
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5937936].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
    OK, there are WP fans and there are WP experts... the latter group is telling you: do NOT jump into WP if you already have this site!

    I am able to build very customized WP sites and I used to do it for years but I am telling you, it would be a huge PITA to try to re-create with a WP site all that functionality that you already have . And yes, I challenge everyone saying it is easy to do it with WP, to re-do the OP's site with WP without asking for help

    On the other hand, as it was already said: kick out that 'apprentice' designer and get an expert; he shouldn't learn the trade on your expense! You shouldn't pay him for "trying" - only for accomplished tasks.
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5938067].message }}
    • Wordpress it's the best actually, and you can do everything thanks to new plugins, new themes and new combinations.
      I stopped using HTML+CSS because of Wordpress, and now every site I plan to create just born from a new Wordpress install.

      So it's a YES, you must check Wordpress to leave Drupal. Absolutely!

      See you,
      Alessandro Zamboni
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[5938133].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Julia B
        Sorry about taking so long to thank you all for your responses - I thought I had subscribed to this thread, but it turns out I hadn't and missed lots of replies! Really appreciate all the advice, as always on this on this forum invaluable stuff! So generous of you all to take the time to share your knowledge.

        Since writing the post I've created another small site using Wordpress and was very impressed by how easy it was to set up and work with. But, as Istvan Horvath and a couple of other people pointed out, I can see it would be difficult to create a site that matches the functionality of the one I have now.

        But I do have some problems and concerns with the current site. Mainly, I'm just worried that anytime anything more complex than uploading basic content comes up I'll have to pay a developer to help me. I'd like to set up Twitter and Facebook login/registration, for example, and that sort of thing looks quite simple to set up on WP, but my developer had problems getting it to work on Drupal. Also, when I come to properly monetise the site (all I have at the moment are a few affiliate links) adding things like Adsense looks a lot simpler on WP.

        So maybe it would be worth the loss of some functionality for what I would gain in independence and flexibility? I'd be really interested to know your thoughts.


        Originally Posted by rooze View Post

        A couple things to add to the above -
        Drupal is a content management system and the whole point is that you should be able to administer your site easily without paying a developer....
        Thanks for the advice rooze, as I said above, very much appreciated. I think my comments above probably answer you questions, but yes, I've been fine with updating content and even some slightly more technical things like creating and editing "blocks". It's just developing the site further that I'm concerned about.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6114667].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Oliver Hart
      Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

      OK, there are WP fans and there are WP experts... the latter group is telling you: do NOT jump into WP if you already have this site!

      I am able to build very customized WP sites and I used to do it for years but I am telling you, it would be a huge PITA to try to re-create with a WP site all that functionality that you already have . And yes, I challenge everyone saying it is easy to do it with WP, to re-do the OP's site with WP without asking for help

      On the other hand, as it was already said: kick out that 'apprentice' designer and get an expert; he shouldn't learn the trade on your expense! You shouldn't pay him for "trying" - only for accomplished tasks.
      Hi.

      I am not a Drupal expert, but I have a brother who is.

      I am a Wordpress user, and I can create Wordpress themes with the "Artisteer" software.

      My brother says it like this; If you want to create a blog, use Wordpress. If you want to create Wordpress, use Drupal.

      You have a lovely site and I agree with "Istvan" that you will have a lot of work in front of you to rebuild this site with Wordpress.

      Why not try to learn basic knowledge about how to use Drupal. There is a lot of free info out there since Drupal is a open source.

      I have desided to spend a weekend with my brother learning how to use Drupal myself, because he creates a lot more beautiful sites with Drupal than I can dream to do with Wordpress.

      They rank in Google just as quick and high as my Wordpress pages do too, if not better.

      Just my 2 cent.

      Best regards,

      Oddvar M.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6161574].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author elexmedia
    For me... my choice will always be Wordpress.

    It has so, so, so much Plugin... so it's very easy to customize. User can develop the site very easily.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6114965].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author humboldt
    Wordpress ROCKS ! As long as you do a good job with backups, and security, this is definitely the way to go.
    Signature

    if not now, when ?

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6138803].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BRAlN
    My Few Suggestion:

    1. If you're happy with current look and all arrangements then you shouldn't transfer to WordPress.

    2. For Small tweaks you have to try by yourself and get familiar with the system. Its not much hard, and you can ask Google if had any trouble. (If you have time and interest to handle it by your own)

    3. You are having trouble with Social Media adjustment, If you keep paying small amount for experiments why not pay once a good amount to a expert and get it done. (Remember if you pay nuts, you'll get monkey)

    4. WordPress is very good and handy tools, you can deal every type of work you want. SEO, Blogs, Forums, Membership, eCart, Advertisement, etc. You just name and WordPress will say YES to it.

    I hope it helps, wish you best of luck.
    Signature

    Deep experience is never peaceful.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6138853].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author phpg
    If you need a developer to do something for you in Drupal, it's unlikely that you will be able to do similar thing in WP yourself, and probably will still need a developer. WP is "easier" than Drupal, but not that much. There are tons of plugins for WP, but there are tons of modules for Drupal as well. So if your only reason for moving to WP is to get rid of your developer, i doubt it will work ... Maybe you just need another developer?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6138944].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JimWaller
    Most of what you have going on on your site can be duplicated pretty easily using a few plugins:
    Forum - WordPress › Forums « WordPress Plugins
    Individual blogs - WordPress › Author Category « WordPress Plugins
    Individual blog archives - WordPress › WordPress Category Archive « WordPress Plugins
    Category themes - WordPress › GYS Themed Categories « WordPress Plugins
    Online Store - WordPress › WP Online Store « WordPress Plugins

    The forum plugin allows you to use WordPress as a forum. You could use the category function to assign the individual bloggers their own blog, and you can assign them writing privileges for just one category using the author category plugin.

    You could use the category archive plugin to show their individual blog posts only. Using the gys themed categories, each individual blog could have its own theme.

    If you want an online store for future use, you can use the online store plugin.

    You can set a static front page for the main page of the site, so it doesn't look like just a blog.

    I believe that covers most of the functionality of your existing site without much loss. If you want to switch to WordPress, it is possible without too much impact on you or your users. There are also membership plugins to allow you to have different levels of membership if you choose to do a membership section on your site. Using those plugins, you keep only one admin area, so you don't need to log in to multiple back offices for the individual blogs. Of course, you could do separate installs in a sub directory if you don't mind having multiple back offices.

    While the WordPress vs. Drupal debate is similar to the PC vs. Mac debate, it is possible to do what you want with either system. It's your choice.

    I hope this helps,

    Jim Waller
    Signature
    Are you in the Orlando area? Join our mastermind group

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6139166].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Mindthepap
    I am in the same dellima with my fresh site (under development) Home | Gynaika ...

    Many people say Drupal is better on seo, and it is faster and more secure.

    Should i switch now, or continue with drupal?
    Signature

    Knowledge is power! ;)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6139381].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JimWaller
      Originally Posted by Mindthepap View Post

      I am in the same dellima with my fresh site (under development) Home | Gynaika ...

      Many people say Drupal is better on seo, and it is faster and more secure.

      Should i switch now, or continue with drupal?
      The platform doesn't matter as much as the content. You can have the content on either platform, so it comes down to preferences. WordPress has more popularity, so it has a lot of plugins to help you achieve what you want. Drupal has more finesse, so it does the same tasks easier when you know how to use it, but it has a relatively HUGE learning curve compared to WordPress.
      In Julia's case, she is not familiar with either and faces having to learn either way. If she can learn to handle most of the administration herself, she saves herself money. As WordPress is easier to use and has more knowledgeable people it probably makes sense for her to switch. But, it isn't "necessary" for her to switch.

      Jim
      Signature
      Are you in the Orlando area? Join our mastermind group

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6139440].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Mindthepap
    Regarding my situation...

    I can play with Wordpress on all levels and settings, but i am interested to learn Drupal also...

    It has much harder learning curve though...this is the big truth!

    Obviously Content is the King...But what would happen if we had the same content on different cms? (I am not talking for duplicate content, but the ideal case study of wp vs drupal!)
    Signature

    Knowledge is power! ;)

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6139456].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Des Lau
    I would say without a doubt move to wordpress. You are missing out on a complete and efficient platform that can create beautiful sites. As an Internet merketer, I couldn't live without some of the plugins available, they take 2 secs to implement.
    And the biggest advantage of using wordpress is the ability to use Optimisepress which is the theme of choice for us IMers.

    Not sure why your social media buttons would have issues but with wordpress it would be literally a drag of a widget and it's done.

    Good luck!
    Signature
    -----------------------------

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6139539].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Julia B
    Thanks for the replies everyone, really appreciate all the great advice. Really useful stuff.

    JimWaller - Very kind of you to give such detailed and insightful responses, thanks.

    I've spent a few hours looking around at different themes today. This has been quite a useful process in itself - I'd recommend it to anyone looking to set up a content site even if you're not building it yourself because you pick up lots of good ideas just from looking... But anyway, unsurprisingly, I haven't found anything that would exactly fit what I'd need, so some customisation will definitely be in order.

    I know that how easy that would be will depend on the theme, but is there a way I can judge which theme might be easiest for me to work with before I install it?

    The kind of things I'd be looking to add would be newsletter sign up, social networking feeds, extra panels to promote latest blog posts or reviews, and areas to place ads. If I picked a theme like, for example this one... ThemeSector | Theme: Avenue

    ...would it just be a case of installing extras bits like that as widgets via the dashboard? Or would it be more complicated than that?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6139680].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Mohsin Rasool
    Hi Julia,

    Most of the standard setups and things you will be able to add using plugins,
    or built-in widgets by the theme.

    It depends exactly what you want, it is ongoing journey...
    If you ever need to go with custom theme, i recommend you save money
    and time by asking your developer to develop CHILD THEME for your site,
    using some great FRAMEWORK like GENESIS or THESIS.

    This will give you, your own theme which have secure, seo, and best back-bone( framework), and flexibility of having customized, unique look on the front end.

    I never recommend customizing the professional themes as it is always hard to keep
    up with when new updates come...so always use child theme to keep things updated,
    and also your customizations.

    Also as you are new to WordPress i recommend to keep plugins to MINIMUM,
    as more plugins you add, more security risk you add...

    Wishing you best of luck with WordPress!

    Regards,
    Mohsin
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6139921].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author tboneman
      Julia,

      Here's another thought. Nobody yet has suggested you take a look at XSite Pro 2.4. It is one of the easiest to use, thoroughly professional site building programs ever developed. I've used WordPress and I've used XSite Pro. XSite Pro 2 wins hands down. But then, some people like chocolate, some like vanilla.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6140201].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Julia B
    Thanks Mohsin. So, would the Child Theme be a sort of back up point to revert to in order to ensure no conflicts when updating?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6140098].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Mohsin Rasool
      Originally Posted by Julia B View Post

      Thanks Mohsin. So, would the Child Theme be a sort of back up point to revert to in order to ensure no conflicts when updating?
      You are welcome Julia. Child theme is what keep all of your theme customizations. And yes whenever Wordpress updates, or your theme framework (Parent theme) gets updated, you will not loose any customizations or custom functionality of your child theme.
      Child Themes « WordPress Codex
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6141408].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author adamfdotnet
        Originally Posted by Mohsin Rasool View Post

        You are welcome Julia. Child theme is what keep all of your theme customizations. And yes whenever Wordpress updates, or your theme framework (Parent theme) gets updated, you will not loose any customizations or custom functionality of your child theme.
        Child Themes « WordPress Codex
        Mohsin has an absolutely excellent recommendation here if you want to use Wordpress.

        Anyone who is building custom wordpress sites from scratch and not using a child theme and Framework is really doing 100x the amount of work that they need to do. They are most likely paying for custom development that is a total waste of resources.

        Any Wordpress developer you talk to that doesn't know how to build a child theme using a framework shouldn't be hired.

        -Adam
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6143407].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JimWaller
    When it comes to themes, there are a lot of things to consider, but the main thing is do you like how it looks? One good thing about themes is how easy they are to change if you want to change them.

    Some themes have advantages over others, because they have added functionality built in. Some themes really begin to blur the line between theme and plugin. One thing to consider is if you choose to change themes down the road, will you lose a critical functionality with it.

    In case you haven't looked at it already, the theme tag filter can be handy for narrowing down the choices at wordpress.org: WordPress › Free WordPress Themes
    One very versatile theme that I mostly like is called blogolife It has a very clean appearance, and does something pretty cool with the header tags. The main downside to it is the amount of above the fold real estate taken up by the header picture. (I'd rather have a slider there.) It has social integration built in for sharing your accounts, which I like. It also has a few color options, which gives it a little more flexibility in my book.

    I think most of us like some flexibility with our themes.

    As for the added functionality, you can achieve most of it with plugins and widgets, so it should be pretty easy.

    Newsletter signup - a simple text widget would allow you to paste the form code into the sidebar.
    Social networking feeds - There are a number of different plugins that might do what you're looking for : WordPress › Facebook Activity Feed « WordPress Plugins Shows recent facebook activity about your site
    WordPress › Mini twitter feed « WordPress Plugins - Show recent tweets from you or other selected twitter accounts (These are just 2 examples)
    Latest Blog Posts - WordPress › Latest Posts with Share « WordPress Plugins - Shows latest posts, and has buttons to share on FB or twitter
    Areas to Place Ads - WordPress › Wp-Insert « WordPress Plugins - Allows you to place ads in many places.

    As usual, there are many options, these are just a few examples of how to do what you're looking to do.

    I hope this helps,
    Jim
    Signature
    Are you in the Orlando area? Join our mastermind group

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6140317].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mmrumii
    I have limited use in either CMS, however they are very popular. As for switching, I am not aware of a way that will not involve a manual migration of the data.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6141380].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author eman1
    I would certainly suggest that you use wordpress. Wordpress websites are easy to install, easy to customize and google loves wordpress websites.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6141453].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author knish
    You already put quite a bit of work into your Drupal blog. Why not just make a new WP blog and just refer to some of your posts on your Drupal blog? You can even have RSS feeds send to your WP blog. It is good to have more than one blog anyway, just for good measure.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6141519].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author cartman
    Wordpress is just so much easier and flexible, i know some will argue but wp is far more SEO friendly that drupal. Plus there are so many plugins available.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6141577].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ejunkie
    Not if it is absolutely necessary.

    It is really critical for your site to do so? If not, don't.

    However, in future using WP for other sites would be a prudent choice.

    Also, making yourself a little familiar with the back-end stuff would go a long way. With WP that is incredibly easy.

    And also that way you don't have to keep paying people for minor tweaks & stuff.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6141622].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jpete
    I always use wordpress...
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6142730].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author GMT
    Wordpress is incredibly easy to use, drupal is infamously difficult. Wordpress has plugins and themes for anything you could want typically(free and payed), google loves it, and it has a huge following. I absolutely recommend you try out wordpress, but self host it, on a web server, don't use wordpress.com that's silly
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6143438].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ryuchi
    Wordpress all the way! Updating daily will be much easier if done via wordpress. At first you needed to make the necessary adjustments and might take time out of your hands but don't worry as this will be easier in the long run. Granted that you don't decide to move out again.

    Wordpress is a very user-friendly platform and I doubt that you won't like it.

    Ryuchi
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6143479].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author magiclouie
    Originally Posted by Julia B View Post

    Someone has recommended I move my website from Drupal to Wordpress.

    I had it built by a developer who has done a good job, however, if I had to start again I think I would build it myself to get a better understanding of the tech and to give me more control (not to mention saving money!).

    As it is, if I want a module added or even some small things like changes to page types I have to pay the developer to do it. He charges a very reasonable rate, but it's not a great situation, especially considering I'm not making any money from it yet.

    My developer hasn't been able to get Twitter or Facebook sign up working, and I've had to pay him for some of the time he spent trying. And there have been a few other similar issues. This is totally not his fault, he charges a low rate because he's just starting out so I understand that, but it is making me question if it would be better if I'd set things up differently.

    I'm happy with the look of my site at the moment and I have a fair amount of content on there, although it's early days for the site and I'll be adding much more.

    I'm wondering, if I was to build a Wordpress site from scratch, as a first-timer, how many hours I'd be likely have to spend on that. Also, how would the content transfer work and would it affect links/SEO?

    My site has a lot of article content - it has a blogs section within it, where several bloggers are based, but the site itself is a lot more than just a blog. So I need something that has articles appearing as articles, not blog posts. It also has video, audio podcasts, a forum, etc. Plus I want to add newsletter sign up. I know Wordpress can cope with all that - but will it do it as well as Drupal?

    It would be good to get some thoughts on this, especially if you've had a similar experience. It would be a drag to have to rebuild the whole thing, but probably better to do it sooner than later if it needs to be done.

    Thanks
    I have visited your site and I can tell you that wordpress together with the theme Catalyst, you could exactly copy this layout and even enhance it.

    Elegant themes can give you much options as well.

    I am not really in the position to say that Wordpress is by far the best CMS since I haven't tried using Drupal or Joomla, but just like our fellow Warriors have mentioned, there are lots of wp plugins you can choose from to help you enhance your site. There are SEO plugins too.

    Going back to your site, you can use a slider plugin to replace that big image.

    What's more, wordpress keeps on uprading.

    But of course, the decision is yours.

    Cheers,
    Louie Tugas
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6143502].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Andrew1122
    Banned
    google just loves wordpress
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6143520].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author cashp0wer
      If you are unhappy with Drupal then by all means move over to WordPress, which is much better and less problematic.
      Signature
      My Internet Marketing Blog - Warts And All!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6161396].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author antac
    Banned
    I also want to switch to wordpress from Drupal.
    Now I'm clear about this, cause everybody already make it clear to us.
    Thanks all, keep it up.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6144596].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Danny Cutts
    i use to use drupal for all of my sites but after a few years and lots of hassles with updates and a few site crashes I slowly made the move to wordpress.

    Wordpress makes everything easy and updates are easy and you can pretty much do anything you like. Even if you need to develop something it cn be done very cheaply.

    good luck

    Danny


    Posted from Warrior Forum Reader for Android
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6144834].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Julia B
      Wow, thanks so much everyone for all the great advice here. Really appreciate you taking the time to help me out. There's clearly a lot of love WP on this forum, which good to know!

      JimWaller - thanks again for some really useful info. I'm booking marking this page for reference later.

      Louie Tugas - Great, I'll take a look at that theme, thanks for looking at my site.

      knish & ejunkie - Yes, I have spent a lot of time on the Drupal site, but the CMS has been very frustrating to work with. It will be a pain switching it over, but I'm hoping it will save time in the long run and I intend to continue to grow and develop this site.

      tboneman - Thanks for the suggestion, but I'm going to pay it safe and stick with WP. One reason is because there seems to be a lot of support available for this platform because so many people are familiar with it - and I think I'm going to need that!

      I have started playing around with Wordpress, just using the free themes while I get used to it, but I'm finding that when I install them they look nothing like on the preview. They all just start out looking like basic blogs with a banner at the top and posts below, which is far from what I want. I'm fine with the basics of setting up a WP site, creating posts/pages, choosing widgets, etc. But, as a beginner it's hard to see how to start to make get these themes to look the way they do in the previews.

      Is this just something that happens with the free themes? Or would I have the same experience with the paid ones?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6158930].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Mohsin Rasool
        Originally Posted by Julia B View Post


        I have started playing around with Wordpress, just using the free themes while I get used to it, but I'm finding that when I install them they look nothing like on the preview. They all just start out looking like basic blogs with a banner at the top and posts below, which is far from what I want. I'm fine with the basics of setting up a WP site, creating posts/pages, choosing widgets, etc. But, as a beginner it's hard to see how to start to make get these themes to look the way they do in the previews.

        Is this just something that happens with the free themes? Or would I have the same experience with the paid ones?
        Hi Julia,

        To have your site in that theme look like the preview, you need to have posts/pages
        in the site, then you need to create MENUs and then select menu locations to show that
        menu..also you will need to add thumbnail and featured images to the posts..then you
        will have that look.

        Generally paid theme will have detailed documentation plus demo content in xml to import
        so you can replicate the design like shown in the preview....

        Most of the time it follow like this:

        1. You install the theme
        2. You got theme settings (most of the time you will have THEME Settings page,
        link under appearance menu)

        3. You post some content both in posts and pages, and also slides if there is...
        with featured images attached..

        4. You go to menu section, and add those pages into MAIN menu, and other menu..
        at the same page, in the right side, you choose to show those menus on defined locations
        of the theme you are using.

        5. You go to Widgets sections, and drag widgets from the left to right into the widget areas, for specially designed widgets for different location in the theme you are using,
        mostly in the sidebar, footer and header sometime also...

        6. Sometime you will also have to Install the suggested plugins to make your theme
        work the way it is in preview.. like most of the time they will have some slider plugin,
        they will specify all plugins needed to install along with the theme..so you also do that
        to make your theme work the way it is intended.

        That is the general work flow which goes into setting up a free/paid already made theme.
        If you wanted to build your own custom theme, then it is totally different game and not
        recommended for someone new to wp, but should be done by some wp developer to get
        it going....

        Best of luck with your journey,
        Mohsin
        PS. Do not forget basic wp security:

        install security plugins:
        1. wp firewall 2
        2. wp file monitor plus
        3. simple login lockdown

        also do not have 'admin' username but something like 'myAdmin'
        also must have strong admin password...
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6161136].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author smodha
    Wordpress for the win!

    It's an easy platform to build and configure. You can pretty much automate most tasks via plugins and on-page SEO is a breeze.

    Definitely stick to WP for future sites...
    Signature
    I Sell What People Want. The Money Is A Bonus..
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6161154].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author andy moore
    Julia, go learn WordPress. Absolutely vital for your business that you have Full control over your site. The advantages are huge:

    No waiting for developers
    Change things at will
    No expensive developers
    Google loves WordPress

    Sorry, Julia. I may be bias but to me it's a no-brainer.

    I spend a lot of my time showing business people the advantages of knowing how WP works and how to run it.

    Just Go For It.

    Andy Moore
    Signature
    http://videotubestation.com How To Get Top Ranking Videos In Google and YouTube - In Days!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6161748].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Mindthepap
      I am afraid that Drupal is much faster than wordpress (now that i saw my drupal 7 site), and with the new caching technology...better for seo.

      I will agree though that Drupal is much harder to handle, and you need a developer on stand by.
      Signature

      Knowledge is power! ;)

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6162628].message }}
  • Personally I really like the ease of use of Wordpress. Drupal is quite a bit more advanced IMHO. I have found lots of awesome Wordpress tutorials out there that helped me get the hang of Wordpress. I also tried out Drupal, but I ended up throwing in the towel after a while.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6162712].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mtaka8
    Hi Julia,

    I would highly recommend you to stay with Drupal, don't choose WP.
    Even though, it is a little hard to harness all the functions on Drupal.
    But, I can guarantee, your time to learn Drupal is worth the effort.
    I have no training prior to making my site; no CSS, PHP, HTML, JQuery.
    But, I think my effort to learn did pay off a lot. Now, I don't need to pay anyone anymore to host site and/or to change contents. I can even change and/or create my own themes, banners, basically anything. Basically, WP is for blog site. Drupal is for developers and can manipulate anything, so imagine what you can do when you learn Drupal.
    The learning process did take 6 mo to a year all together.
    Hope you will stay with Drupal...

    Taka - my site is lillieanns.com
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6162890].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Julia B
      Originally Posted by Mohsin Rasool View Post

      Hi Julia,

      To have your site in that theme look like the preview, you need to have posts/pages
      in the site, then you need to create MENUs and then select menu locations to show that
      menu..also you will need to add thumbnail and featured images to the posts..then you
      will have that look.

      Generally paid theme will have detailed documentation plus demo content in xml to import
      so you can replicate the design like shown in the preview....

      Most of the time it follow like this:

      1. You install the theme
      2. You got theme settings (most of the time you will have THEME Settings page,
      link under appearance menu)

      3. You post some content both in posts and pages, and also slides if there is...
      with featured images attached..

      4. You go to menu section, and add those pages into MAIN menu, and other menu..
      at the same page, in the right side, you choose to show those menus on defined locations
      of the theme you are using.

      5. You go to Widgets sections, and drag widgets from the left to right into the widget areas, for specially designed widgets for different location in the theme you are using,
      mostly in the sidebar, footer and header sometime also...

      6. Sometime you will also have to Install the suggested plugins to make your theme
      work the way it is in preview.. like most of the time they will have some slider plugin,
      they will specify all plugins needed to install along with the theme..so you also do that
      to make your theme work the way it is intended.

      That is the general work flow which goes into setting up a free/paid already made theme.
      If you wanted to build your own custom theme, then it is totally different game and not
      recommended for someone new to wp, but should be done by some wp developer to get
      it going....

      Best of luck with your journey,
      Mohsin
      PS. Do not forget basic wp security:

      install security plugins:
      1. wp firewall 2
      2. wp file monitor plus
      3. simple login lockdown

      also do not have 'admin' username but something like 'myAdmin'
      also must have strong admin password...
      Thanks Mohsin, that's really helped clear things up for me. Doesn't sound too complicated after all! Good to know that the paid themes will be more of an "out of the box" set up too.


      Originally Posted by smodha View Post

      Wordpress for the win!

      It's an easy platform to build and configure. You can pretty much automate most tasks via plugins and on-page SEO is a breeze.

      Definitely stick to WP for future sites...
      Originally Posted by cashp0wer View Post

      If you are unhappy with Drupal then by all means move over to WordPress, which is much better and less problematic.
      Thanks smodha and cashp0wer - seems to be a big majority of people on this forum who love WP!




      Originally Posted by Oddvar Meyer View Post

      Hi.

      I am not a Drupal expert, but I have a brother who is.

      I am a Wordpress user, and I can create Wordpress themes with the "Artisteer" software.

      My brother says it like this; If you want to create a blog, use Wordpress. If you want to create Wordpress, use Drupal.

      You have a lovely site and I agree with "Istvan" that you will have a lot of work in front of you to rebuild this site with Wordpress.

      Why not try to learn basic knowledge about how to use Drupal. There is a lot of free info out there since Drupal is a open source.

      I have desided to spend a weekend with my brother learning how to use Drupal myself, because he creates a lot more beautiful sites with Drupal than I can dream to do with Wordpress.

      They rank in Google just as quick and high as my Wordpress pages do too, if not better.

      Just my 2 cent.

      Best regards,

      Oddvar M.

      Originally Posted by mtaka8 View Post

      Hi Julia,

      I would highly recommend you to stay with Drupal, don't choose WP.
      Even though, it is a little hard to harness all the functions on Drupal.
      But, I can guarantee, your time to learn Drupal is worth the effort.
      I have no training prior to making my site; no CSS, PHP, HTML, JQuery.
      But, I think my effort to learn did pay off a lot. Now, I don't need to pay anyone anymore to host site and/or to change contents. I can even change and/or create my own themes, banners, basically anything. Basically, WP is for blog site. Drupal is for developers and can manipulate anything, so imagine what you can do when you learn Drupal.
      The learning process did take 6 mo to a year all together.
      Hope you will stay with Drupal...

      Taka - my site is lillieanns.com
      Originally Posted by Mindthepap View Post

      I am afraid that Drupal is much faster than wordpress (now that i saw my drupal 7 site), and with the new caching technology...better for seo.

      I will agree though that Drupal is much harder to handle, and you need a developer on stand by.
      Thanks Odvar, Mindthepap & mtaka8. You make good points, but it seems like getting to grips with Drupal could even take longer than rebuilding the site in WP. In the time I lose I'll either have to shell out more money on a developer or be unable to develop my site further. Also, I find the CMS much nicer to work with on WP. I have several bloggers writing for my site too, most of whom are not at all technical and they often have difficulties posting with images and various things because Drupal CMS is not very intuitive for them. I appreciate that Drupal has its advantages, but I think WP is the way forward for me.

      mtaka8 - nice site, by the way, lovely colours.



      Originally Posted by andy moore View Post

      Julia, go learn WordPress. Absolutely vital for your business that you have Full control over your site. The advantages are huge:

      No waiting for developers
      Change things at will
      No expensive developers
      Google loves WordPress

      Sorry, Julia. I may be bias but to me it's a no-brainer.

      I spend a lot of my time showing business people the advantages of knowing how WP works and how to run it.

      Just Go For It.

      Andy Moore

      Originally Posted by Stop2win View Post

      Personally I really like the ease of use of Wordpress. Drupal is quite a bit more advanced IMHO. I have found lots of awesome Wordpress tutorials out there that helped me get the hang of Wordpress. I also tried out Drupal, but I ended up throwing in the towel after a while.
      My thoughts exactly, thanks for the encouragement Andy, Mindthepap, and Stop2win!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6164131].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author UMS
    The way I would approach your situation is to work out how much money you would need to spend on an experienced Dupral admin/developer to do the tasks you need, against the time and money needed to move the site over to Wordpress.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6164167].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ryannmicua
      Hey Julia,

      I've dabbled with Drupal before and I love the way it's built, programming-wise, but when it comes to handing a site over to clients, I'd go with a WordPress site any time. It's way easier to teach a client how to add and edit content in WordPress than it is to do with Drupal.

      Don't get me wrong, I love Drupal, as a programmer who do a lot of custom stuff, a lot of complex functions are easier to do with Drupal than with WordPress, but I have to say, Drupal's backend/adminstration dashboard is not built for non-techies.

      I've looked at your site and yes, it can be recreated in WordPress. Some of the people here mentioned that it'll be pretty cheap (less than $100). I think that's total BS. especially if you're trying to "recreate" a site not only with look and feel but also on the functions from Drupal.

      If you are editing an already made WordPress theme/template, then yes, but for custom created WP sites, expect to pay $400+ upwards depending on the developer's experience, skills and knowledge.

      And oh, better to choose your platform early on than later especially if you still don't have members in your forum yet.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6165075].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author managepro
    Hey, For a non-technical person, wordpress is the best bet...drupal is great but is technically intensive.

    Wordpress is easy to use once setup, you really dont need a developer when you are using wordpress, you can easily setup the facebook buttons with the hundreds of plugins available. And you really can do it yourself.

    If you have any questions about wordpress in particular you can PM me about the same.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6165121].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TanYaV
    Not sure if you still need advice on switching, Julia, but there's a good video tutorial on Drupal to WordPress migration, you can give it a try: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=im4AfhhfHqc
    Signature

    regards!

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7854881].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
      Originally Posted by TanYaV View Post

      Not sure if you still need advice on switching,
      No, nobody needs your advice on threads that are one year old!

      Stop digging up old threads, that's not a way to get fans around this forum
      Signature

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7855590].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jgant
    There is nothing like being able to have full control over your own site.

    When I ran an offline biz, I hired a web developer who created an html site for my biz. I had to talk to him and pay him every time I wanted something done ... and the site earned me squat.

    I learned WordPress and some SEO and new business poured in within 6 months. Ever since then I've realized the power of being able to operate my own sites and add content on my own.
    Signature
    How I hit $10,000+ per month very fast w/ 1 niche blog - Click Here to learn more (no opt-in).
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7856541].message }}

Trending Topics