What is holding you back from trying Offline Marketing?

48 replies
Ok up front, this isn't a pitch, I'm am just curious about this. I was talking with one of my students yesterday and he was excited telling me about landing another client. I was asking him why he thought he had been successful and then he asked me the $10 question ... why aren't there more people out there doing this?

I really couldn't give him a good answer because I don't know. Is it a lack of knowledge, not understanding marketing, not wanting to meet people face to face? I don't know.

So I am curious for those of you who have thought about it but never actually taken the plunge - why not?

Tim
#back #holding #marketing #offline
  • Profile picture of the author radhika
    To be honest, I am not a good talker especially with new people, a big no-no for offline marketers. So I never tried offline marketing

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  • Profile picture of the author J smith
    In my, rather limited experience, it seems there are two business types: those doing fine, who might benefit from a web site/better site, but don't really need it (they are already doing fine) and those that are hurting and they don't have the money/desire to do internet marketing.

    Plus I guess I live in a bad state for this, there are plenty of companies offering web sites and what not. Granted I talked to someone who said they've been offered site redesign +seo/sem services for 5k+ (from several companies) and I'd be willing to do it for a whole lot less, but meh, doubt anything will come from that.

    People do seem interested in internet marketing though, it's just they don't seem to be interested in the final step (or perhaps I need to get better at closing people "would you like to have your new site up and running this week or will next week work better?" and such =p)

    PS: The support if someone hacks their site is an interesting question. What would one do besides calling your hosting provider and asking them to fix it, and trying to fix it yourself. Hmm, that is an interesting point.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      For me, I just don't feel like having to get out of the house and meeting
      with people. That it's difficult for me to get out on a regular basis doesn't
      make it any easier as keeping appointments could become a problem.

      What I do now is just so much easier so why bother?

      I'll leave offline gold for those who like to schmooze with the customers.
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      • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        I'll leave offline gold for those who like to schmooze with the customers.
        And for those who don't already have a six figure income online! LOL.

        For many people who have been trying internet marketing for months and never made any real money it's often the first serious money they make.

        I agree with you Steven.

        If you're already making over $100,000 a year out of your online business (as you are) unless you're going to set up some kind of offline empire or you really do want that live interaction with real brick and mortar business owners then your time is better spent elsewhere.

        Kindest regards,
        Andrew Cavanagh
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    • Profile picture of the author rlnorthcutt
      Originally Posted by J smith View Post

      In my, rather limited experience, it seems there are two business types: those doing fine, who might benefit from a web site/better site, but don't really need it (they are already doing fine) and those that are hurting and they don't have the money/desire to do internet marketing.

      Plus I guess I live in a bad state for this, there are plenty of companies offering web sites and what not. Granted I talked to someone who said they've been offered site redesign +seo/sem services for 5k+ (from several companies) and I'd be willing to do it for a whole lot less, but meh, doubt anything will come from that.

      People do seem interested in internet marketing though, it's just they don't seem to be interested in the final step (or perhaps I need to get better at closing people "would you like to have your new site up and running this week or will next week work better?" and such =p)

      PS: The support if someone hacks their site is an interesting question. What would one do besides calling your hosting provider and asking them to fix it, and trying to fix it yourself. Hmm, that is an interesting point.

      J,

      You have a good point, but there are other business types... and ways to market to the ones you mentioned!

      1) Doing Fine - can always do better! Maybe suited to more aggressive salespeople, but the point is that when you can show them how they can make more money... they will do it. Especially when these folks can usually just shift some of their marketing budget away from other things and into IM... it technically doesn't cost them anything.

      I talked to an owner of a Car Inspection place (he has two shops) last week that was complaining that all the money he was paying Yellow Pages was going to waste. He did a simple survey one day asking his customers how they found him, and most said from Yelp.com (he doesn't have a site). So I told him that instead of renewing his contract with Yellow Pages, he can have a site built and increase his income that way... Its pretty simple when you just ask and listen.

      2) Hurting and poor - needs you more than anyone! These people are HUNGRY for business, and unless they are having to declare bankruptcy tomorrow, then there is hope. This can be a really lucrative market if you are willing to take payments or work them up the scale (sales funnel).

      Most businesses have some type of reserve to draw upon (again, unless they are literally bankrupt). When you can make it affordable to do simple things to increase their revenue, then not only do you help them AND make business for yourself... but you can also make more money in the long run as they will come to depend on you to "make it rain."

      Example: Offer to set up a site for them to generate leads... this can be a simple domain with a signup form for a newsletter, more info, free report, etc. Then you can promote this. You can agree to sell the leads to them, get a commission, or even pass them all on, but they have to agree to an installment plan to pay for your services. YOU own the site and domain, so they can't take it and run... and you can simply work with their competition if they do.

      This also lets you work on traffic generation slowly over time and makes it worth what you are being paid.

      3) New Business - Whoops... you totally forgot these guys! There are thousands of new businesses being started each day, and with the economy the way it is, lots of people are starting (or restarting) a side business. These people are excited, they need your help, they aer eager to go and usually have planned to spend some capital on getting things going.

      This is a great group to work with because they are usually very excited about their new business and just alot of fun. If you can help them get a good start, you will have a client for life AND tons of referrals.

      4) Others - We could go on all day, but you get the idea (I hope)

      BOTTOM LINE: You have to choose the niche that is right for you... its like anything else. I personally have found that when you approach people with a true attitude of service, then they will respond no matter what. Then its just a simple matter to find a solution that works for everyone (yourself included).

      Ron
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      • Profile picture of the author laird
        Originally Posted by rlnorthcutt View Post

        J,

        ...

        3) New Business - Whoops... you totally forgot these guys! There are thousands of new businesses being started each day, and with the economy the way it is, lots of people are starting (or restarting) a side business. These people are excited, they need your help, they aer eager to go and usually have planned to spend some capital on getting things going.

        This is a great group to work with because they are usually very excited about their new business and just alot of fun. If you can help them get a good start, you will have a client for life AND tons of referrals.

        ...

        Ron
        I don't always find this to be true. More often than not, the new business owner is being deluged with offers. Checking accounts, pens with their business name on them, hosting, website development, personalized products, merchant accounts, etc.

        You CAN strive to market to these people, but there are far better riches to be had with existing businesses whom are troubled by their lackluster advertising/marketing spend.

        Having said that, for those that DO want to target new businesses. Consult your local newspapers. Most counties/parishes require that the business do a Ficticious Name Posting in newspapers of general circulation. They specify business address and principal owners.

        In response to the OP's question:

        I think people hold back for several reasons including:

        1) Fear of public speaking/selling
        2) No existing client portfolio
        3) Unfamiliar with web design, seo, sem, autoresponders, blogs, etc.
        4) Unsure of pricing
        5) Self-doubt
        6) Analysis Paralysis (There's more stuff to learn before I can start)
        7) Lack of advertising/marketing budget

        For those that ARE sitting on the sideline, take a chance. You either step forward or step backwards. Standing still gets you nowhere.

        Del
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  • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
    Originally Posted by ProductCreator View Post

    I seriously do not think it can be as successful in the UK as it is in the US i.e. less $ per unit of my time invested.

    I cannot see a small business handing over $1000 to me to create a website for them.

    And any less than that and it is not worth my time.

    Something else that people overlook is support. Unless you outsource it, what are you going to do when someone hacks their site and they start calling you to fix it? I would much rather not get involved in support.

    Interesting.

    One of my best paying clients is from the UK.

    He's hired me more than once.

    The fee for one project was well over $10,000.

    It has been my experience that UK businesses will pay significantly more than US businesses and they'll all pay more than $1,000 for a website if you establish value effectively.

    Kindest regards,
    Andrew Cavanagh
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  • Profile picture of the author artwebster
    Off line customers are looking for two things -

    1 - they want to cut expenditure

    2 - they want to increase sales

    This is what I give my clients when my local ladies bring them to me (I've tried to recruit sales people but it seems that €625 a week is not enough for them). One good salesman would get me out of debt very quickly.

    I don't blather on about SEO, Autoresponders, List building and any number of other sort of IM terminologies - I simply tell them that if they are spending €100 a month now, when I have finished with them, they will be saving €65 a month (Real cash in their pockets demonstrated with a simple pencil pitch and after they have paid me) and will probably be making more sales.

    Not knowing the power of this simple 1 - 2 is what stops a lot internet marketers - after all, most of them don't even SEO their own sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author dholowiski
    Quite simply, fear and lack of experience.
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  • Profile picture of the author rlnorthcutt
    Originally Posted by ProductCreator View Post

    I seriously do not think it can be as successful in the UK as it is in the US i.e. less $ per unit of my time invested.

    I cannot see a small business handing over $1000 to me to create a website for them.

    And any less than that and it is not worth my time.

    Something else that people overlook is support. Unless you outsource it, what are you going to do when someone hacks their site and they start calling you to fix it? I would much rather not get involved in support.
    Excellent points!

    Personally, I like to break things into packages or other "bite-sized" chunks. Its alot easier to get five $200 sales from a customer than it is to get one $1000 sale.

    Create a sales funnel with each step leading to the next. I often "pre-pave" the way by saying that certain things will need to be done, but we can talk about that later. If people really want ALL the info at once (and a few do), then I will lay out the whole funnel.

    Everyone knows that its 7 times easier to make a sale to an existing customer than it is to make a sale to a new one... its the first sale thats the toughest.

    EXAMPLE FUNNEL:
    1) Offer a Discounted Internet Marketing Consultation. Spend an hour or so checking out what they have, what they are doing and what their competition is doing (a good survey form helps). Then plan to spend 30-40 minutes with them going over the report. This will outline several steps and things that need to be done.
    2) Assuming they have a site, sell them a newsletter package. Sign them up for aweber and install the form on their site. You can try for a long term management contract as well
    3) SEO Report with suggestiongs
    4) Onsite SEO - Meta Tags, links, file names
    5) Offsite SEO - backlinks, ratings on other sites, comments, article marketing, etc (this can be broken into sub packages as well)
    6) Regular updates - 1-4 times a year do a check on the site, see what the results have been and suggest more that can be done to improve it.

    You could actually "Get" a $3-5k job that stretches over months by dripping out each suggestion and package. The strategy builds on itself because as they see results, they get more excited and want to get more done.

    SUPPORT

    This is a perenial issue. I sugges that you can partner with someone who will maintain the site (we have a basic maintenance package with our resellers), or plan to do it yourself. You can also get some freelancers that will help out when you need it... and you just markup the price.

    Answering a few short emails or phone calls is not a big deal... and is a great way to remind them of your other services or even ask for recommendations. Right after you solve their easy problem, ask for a referral... they tend to be a in a giving state of mind (the principal of reciprocity)

    You can also use a forum or helpdesk software (free online) to manage support issues, though the personal touch works really well.

    I always let clients know that I am happy to answer any email or phone request that takes less than 10 minutes to do. If its a bigger problem then that, then I will need to charge them my regular rate (usually an hour minimum). This helps weed out the frivilous complaints.

    Its also ANOTHER income stream! Look - if they screw up their site and want me to fix it, thats fine... even if I have to outsource it to other coders, I will always invoice them with a profit to cover my time.

    So - I have no problem when people need support... its just another "product" I sell...

    Ron
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Hoey
    Online Marketing ^_^
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  • Profile picture of the author justthinking
    I have tried many different offline methods. They are no where as bad as some people assume. If you can have a normal conversation with people, then you can do it. Really, it is that easy.
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  • The thing that gets me is FEAR.

    The fear of walking into a business.

    The fear of being rejected.

    I could easily make $5000-$10,000 a month if I could some how get over the initial contact part of the process. Once I got into the consultation/explanation of things, then I am gold. But it is too hard for me to approach a business and ask if the business owner is in. I even have a book from a fellow Warrior "Cold calling is a waste of time."

    That is why I wish there was a product on how to hire a salesperson for offline gold. How far into the process does that person go? The lead? The initial consultation?
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    • Profile picture of the author new guy
      Originally Posted by Charles Montgomery View Post

      The thing that gets me is FEAR.

      The fear of walking into a business.

      The fear of being rejected.

      I could easily make $5000-$10,000 a month if I could some how get over the initial contact part of the process. Once I got into the consultation/explanation of things, then I am gold. But it is too hard for me to approach a business and ask if the business owner is in. I even have a book from a fellow Warrior "Cold calling is a waste of time."

      That is why I wish there was a product on how to hire a salesperson for offline gold. How far into the process does that person go? The lead? The initial consultation?
      Thought I would respond to this because this is exactly me as well. Firstly, I work with a partner does better at this part. He needs me to close the deal (that is my strength). So you might see if there is someone you can work with. Other than that, there are other ways you can run a business so that people come to you. Advertising, for example (for some strange reason, this is often overlooked by marketers). For some strange reason, the very people who are supposed to be marketing experts resort to cold calling to generate business. Why not make an offer, send it out, get people into your sales funnel. Start out offering them a free or cheap consultation to review a specific issue? For example, "do you have a website that is not making sales", many businesses do. There is your in, review their site and then offer suggestions and turn that into a monthly deal or redesign or training or whatever you want to sell them. Or pick something different, market it and be the expert. Put on a free seminar and have people come out to learn something, the ideas go on and on.

      If you are determined to cold call then hire someone to set up appointments for you. Then you are not going into a meeting "cold". Call businesses and offer them some sort of consultation.

      My preference is to apply sound marketing techniques to market my marketing services. Cold calling sucks.
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  • Profile picture of the author Richard Tunnah
    Originally Posted by ProductCreator View Post

    I seriously do not think it can be as successful in the UK as it is in the US i.e. less $ per unit of my time invested.

    I cannot see a small business handing over $1000 to me to create a website for them.

    And any less than that and it is not worth my time.

    Something else that people overlook is support. Unless you outsource it, what are you going to do when someone hacks their site and they start calling you to fix it? I would much rather not get involved in support.
    Sorry mate...this does work equally well in the UK if you get yourself noticed by whatever way you feel comfortable. As to the fees well I can tell you local web designers are knocking out shaby sites for more than $1k a go!

    Rich
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    • Profile picture of the author jmidas
      Just a couple thoughts for those who are hesitant about "selling" yourself or a product:

      1) I understand the distaste for cold calling. I have been involved in direct sales for over 20 years with several of my own companies. I've made my entire career doing this and I still hate, and won't ever do, cold calling. This includes walking coldly into a business to introduce myself and my service. BUT, it is not that hard to get people to call you. Then, you are just the expert answering their questions and explaining to those who call how they can hire you. As soon as you change YOUR mind set to this, being a "salesman" becomes very easy.

      2) To learn more about positioning yourself as an expert and getting people to call you: get and devour all of Dan Kennedy's books on Amazon or wherever you buy books. They are only 10 bucks or so each and will help all of this make sense. It is all about positioning, not selling.

      3) Never forget: as long as you know one percent more than the person you are selling to, you are the expert. And, most likely, if you are here on this forum and participating, you already know a TON more than they do. And, probably more than you think.

      4) As long as you can get your foot in the door and start the conversation, you will make some sales. Then, when you make some sales, you can outsource nearly 100% of what you have sold.

      5) shkad14, David Preston teaches you exactly how to have others sell for you. See if you can get a copy of the WSO that he and Scott Million did about a month or so ago. This may be exactly what you want.

      Tim, great thread.

      To Your Success.
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      • Originally Posted by jmidas View Post

        Just a couple thoughts for those who are hesitant about "selling" yourself or a product:

        1) I understand the distaste for cold calling. I have been involved in direct sales for over 20 years with several of my own companies. I've made my entire career doing this and I still hate, and won't ever do, cold calling. This includes walking coldly into a business to introduce myself and my service. BUT, it is not that hard to get people to call you. Then, you are just the expert answering their questions and explaining to those who call how they can hire you. As soon as you change YOUR mind set to this, being a "salesman" becomes very easy.



        To Your Success.
        By getting them to call you, are you talking about direct mail?

        Can you elaborate a little more on this? Maybe in a new thread.
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        • Profile picture of the author a2dsilva
          what about...

          I promise the offline business to be on page one and promise that he/she will get leads through their newly redesigned website - BUT - they don't get that promised realized after I finish the website.

          This is currently holding me back. I've spent a great deal of time learning SEO strategies and know how to use Wordpress expertly - I can even talk about them for hours but my real fear is not getting the results I've promised to the business owner.
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          • Originally Posted by a2dsilva View Post

            what about...

            I promise the offline business to be on page one and promise that he/she will get leads through their newly redesigned website - BUT - they don't get that promised realized after I finish the website.

            This is currently holding me back. I've spent a great deal of time learning SEO strategies and know how to use Wordpress expertly - I can even talk about them for hours but my real fear is not getting the results I've promised to the business owner.
            I think I can answer this one. Dont promise that kind of stuff! Instead, tell them you are going to take all the steps neccassary to optimize thier site in order to get it on page one of google.

            Also, when the site is finished it will NOT be on page one of google. They are going to have to sign up for your monthly SEO service in order to keep the link building and such up. And with time, you CAN get the site to the first page of google.
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        • Profile picture of the author jmidas
          Originally Posted by shkad14 View Post

          By getting them to call you, are you talking about direct mail?

          Can you elaborate a little more on this? Maybe in a new thread.

          Direct mail is a good one. I have used direct mail for years. You can make a gret ROI on your mailings but you need to do them correctly to be effective. Again, read Dan Kennedy - a thread here would be way too long.

          Within the category of direct mail, you can do any number of different types of mail: letters, tearsheets, postcards, lumpy mail, fedex (for big clients), etc.

          But, not just direct mail. You can:


          (here are just a few free things)
          do press releases
          write articles for local papers/mags
          write articles with localized keywords and do article submission.
          be a guest on a local radio or public tv show. not hard to do.
          advertise on craigslist/backpage/other classified sites
          get invited to be a guest speaker
          very simple one: tell people you already know about what you do/offer
          volunteer somewhere. Don't sell, people will ask you what you do. And, volunteering is a good thing, anyway.



          (here are some dirt cheap things)
          JV on mailings in your community with other small businesses (not your competitors)
          participate in "card deck" type mailings (like valpak type things) (I am not a huge fan of this, but some people live off it)

          local print classifieds in weekly papers/mags
          flyers/door hangers at local businesses - go after hours if you don't want to actually talk to anyone.
          hand out 'ugly' business cards everywhere (they would have your info and a call to action on the back - almost like a tiny coupon. "Ugly" meaning a color that stands out - give em out/leave em everywhere
          voice broadcast - you can leave 10,000 30 second messages for $150.
          free standing inserts in local papers/mags
          networking groups - join one or more
          local adwords

          One last one: kinda an offline "Blackhat" thing: print up some 5x7 or 6x9 size 'post-it note' pads (the things that have the light sticky stuff on the back at the top): use a bright color paper. Print a small ad with a special offer you are making - be sure you drive them to a web site and your tel# - visit as many local bookstores as possible and go through all the marketing type books and stick one of your ads inside the front cover of as many books as you can. People are picking up these books for only one reason - they want help marketing. Your ad can start with something like: "For local marketing assistance..." Half the people who pick up the book will think the publisher is doing a nice service by making a recommendation. You can easily insert several hundred of these things in a morning of visiting bookstores in your area. The nice thing is that these things stay in the books until they are sold, you only need to visit each store once every few weeks. This actually works - I used to do it for another business.
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  • Profile picture of the author chrisnegro
    Originally Posted by ProductCreator View Post

    I seriously do not think it can be as successful in the UK as it is in the US i.e. less $ per unit of my time invested.

    I cannot see a small business handing over $1000 to me to create a website for them.

    And any less than that and it is not worth my time.

    Something else that people overlook is support. Unless you outsource it, what are you going to do when someone hacks their site and they start calling you to fix it? I would much rather not get involved in support.
    You will be surprised ProducCreator....if your confident online....its a no brainer step to go into the offline world. It will take time (not a get rich scheme for sure) but it will be well worth it !

    Chris Negro
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Reeves
    It's just soo nice to stay home and market online....

    I have never done offline marketing, but I think for me it translates into more of a traditional J.O.B...setting and keeping up appointments, etc.

    The best thing about online marketing is being able to work from the comfort of your own home and not having to get all dressed up and go talk to people if you don't feel like it, etc. I guess it's just easier/more convenient to work online.

    But I'm sure there are people who would prefer to work offline as well...

    Regards,

    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author Keith Boisvert
    Originally Posted by TimCastleman View Post

    Ok up front, this isn't a pitch, I'm am just curious about this. I was talking with one of my students yesterday and he was excited telling me about landing another client. I was asking him why he thought he had been successful and then he asked me the $10 question ... why aren't there more people out there doing this?

    I really couldn't give him a good answer because I don't know. Is it a lack of knowledge, not understanding marketing, not wanting to meet people face to face? I don't know.

    So I am curious for those of you who have thought about it but never actually taken the plunge - why not?

    Tim
    I think the same obstacles that prevent people from making the plunge and commitment in online marketing holds true for offline. The fear.

    It may be a different kind of fear, but its still fear. Could be fear of success, failure, fear of not knowing "everything", lack of confidence etc.

    The list could go on. But ultimately for those that want something bad enough, that desire and WANT has to outweigh their FEAR.

    Personally I think they are excuses for the weak minded. Either you're here to make money and enjoy life and treat this as a business, or your just a hobbyist. When you are "playing" around with something(either on or off line) and not willing to make a commitment, then chances have it you will not succeed. You may make a sale here and there, possibly enough to make a car payment or make rent, but when you take it seriously and commit yourself to ANYTHING, you will find the results are incredible.

    As for some other points from this thread, I would much rather go after businesses that already have a website and a commitment to their marketing, as they are an easier sell.

    Trying to convince small businesses that don't have a pot to piss in or a clue about marketing at all is a futile effort at best. If you are new and trying to make a name for yourself, pick one of these types and do the work for free(minus hosting/domain costs). Make it kick ass and use it to prove to PAYING customers what you can do. Plus it will give you the experience in dealing with customers if you haven't up until this point.

    KEith
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    • Profile picture of the author Kay King
      I don't do offline for two reasons. I've done outside sales and so that part doesn't bother me at all - but I like working online. I like setting my own schedule, having NO appointments or meetings and meeting deadlines I've set for myself.

      Secondly, I plan to relocate when the market improves. Had planned it for this spring but not a good time to sell so will wait a year or so.

      Working offline is a great idea for many people - but it's not for everyone. I'm concerned when I see new marketers going offline, accepting checks from businesses and then asking what they should do. I may do some offline work after I relocate but if I do it I will go into a business with a plan for what needs to be done, will under-promise, and over deliver. I've wondered if the calls/customer service questions might be reduced by giving regular updates on progress. Anyone do that?

      To me, the best way is to offer various services that can be blended into a total program for the business over time rather than asking for a large amount up front that ties me to a long term commitment.

      kay
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      • Profile picture of the author Wah Bhatti
        i make offline and online im sure what stops people is get rich quck
        as apposed to have a business
        not ever one is a door to door sales person ( thats why i hire them )

        + its easy to sit at you pc and think you have done a days work

        wow i lerned sales letters today
        wow i lerned u tube marketing
        wow any thing you like here

        pick you thing and take action thats what got me out of debt


        ps im taking spelling lesons
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  • Profile picture of the author 4deb
    Lack of experience, and lack of self-confidence in the person to person factor.

    Many times, I've been told that I should pursue something for small local businesses, and each and every time I panic, because I always question the value I have to offer.

    For me, I stop myself for these simple reasons.

    Another thought, if I'm honest...once I get involved with other people relying on me for their business stuff, what if I get bored, or decide I don't like other people's expectations and change my mind...will it be easy to just stop and get out of?

    Silly stuff, when I really sit and think about it
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  • Profile picture of the author kinney2315
    I am very interested in offline marketing. I think most people want to get rich quick, or having the dream job of staying home all day. Once they realize most people will never get rich over night, they will see offline marketing can make you a lot of money. Tim I am interested in offline marketing, please pm me.
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  • Profile picture of the author shane_k
    I have a list of 25 business that I am going to go out and talk with in the next 3 days and I have a question.

    Let's say that I do get a job building an auto-responder, or building an actual site

    If it is a site then my plan would be to hire someone to do the site and then give that site to the business owner.

    Now, if the business owner gives me a check I was thinking of depositing that and then using the cash from that check to pay the person I outsourced to, to do the actual site, and I keep the difference.

    How long does it usually take a check to clear? So I can then pay my web designer and get the website to the business person?

    What is that turn around time?


    8 - 10 business days?
    1 week or 2 weeks?

    longer?

    And what is the usual going rate to do a site?

    Because I don't want to tell a business owner I will set up a site or do an autoresponder for $800 let's say, and find out it is going to cost me a $1,000 to get the site done. Then I would be out $200 from my own pocket.

    So those are my two questions


    Thanks


    Shane_K
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    • Profile picture of the author Wah Bhatti
      Originally Posted by shane_k View Post

      I have a list of 25 business that I am going to go out and talk with in the next 3 days and I have a question.

      Let's say that I do get a job building an auto-responder, or building an actual site

      If it is a site then my plan would be to hire someone to do the site and then give that site to the business owner.

      Now, if the business owner gives me a check I was thinking of depositing that and then using the cash from that check to pay the person I outsourced to, to do the actual site, and I keep the difference.

      How long does it usually take a check to clear? So I can then pay my web designer and get the website to the business person?

      What is that turn around time?


      8 - 10 business days?
      1 week or 2 weeks?

      longer?

      And what is the usual going rate to do a site?

      Because I don't want to tell a business owner I will set up a site or do an autoresponder for $800 let's say, and find out it is going to cost me a $1,000 to get the site done. Then I would be out $200 from my own pocket.

      So those are my two questions


      Thanks


      Shane_K

      Shane usaly 3 business days allow 5 for a cheque

      get your self a good out source team and work with them
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      "You can get anything in life you want if you help enough people get what they want." -Zig Ziglar
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    • Profile picture of the author Richard Tunnah
      Originally Posted by shane_k View Post

      I have a list of 25 business that I am going to go out and talk with in the next 3 days and I have a question.

      Let's say that I do get a job building an auto-responder, or building an actual site

      If it is a site then my plan would be to hire someone to do the site and then give that site to the business owner.

      Now, if the business owner gives me a check I was thinking of depositing that and then using the cash from that check to pay the person I outsourced to, to do the actual site, and I keep the difference.

      How long does it usually take a check to clear? So I can then pay my web designer and get the website to the business person?

      What is that turn around time?


      8 - 10 business days?
      1 week or 2 weeks?

      longer?

      And what is the usual going rate to do a site?

      Because I don't want to tell a business owner I will set up a site or do an autoresponder for $800 let's say, and find out it is going to cost me a $1,000 to get the site done. Then I would be out $200 from my own pocket.

      So those are my two questions


      Thanks


      Shane_K
      Not sure where you are in the world Shane but might be worth setting up a virtual terminal via paypal. They were offering free no cost 3 month trial before Xmas. What this allows you to do is to take a credit or debit card from your client and process it via paypal without your client needing either a paypal account or to login to a computer. Of course if they've got access to email you can send them an electronic invoice via paypal. That way you get instant funds into your paypal account and can pay outsourcers immediately if need be.

      Rich
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      • Profile picture of the author shane_k
        Originally Posted by Richard Tunnah View Post

        Not sure where you are in the world Shane but might be worth setting up a virtual terminal via paypal. They were offering free no cost 3 month trial before Xmas. What this allows you to do is to take a credit or debit card from your client and process it via paypal without your client needing either a paypal account or to login to a computer. Of course if they've got access to email you can send them an electronic invoice via paypal. That way you get instant funds into your paypal account and can pay outsourcers immediately if need be.

        Rich

        Thanks

        I do have a paypal account so I will check up on how to do this.


        Ive done enough thinking, I know everything I need to do, I marked out all the steps, have my 25 businesses to approach, done my research on those businesses and now...

        There's nothing left to do but take action.

        Thanks everyone.

        I'll keep you guys updated on my progress.
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  • Profile picture of the author Eric Transue
    For me it was the face to face selling with the customer that was keeping me from progressing with Offline marketing.

    However, last week I was meeting with a buddy of mine, who runs his own small business. I had no intention of landing him as a client when I entered his office. I was actually just stopping by because we were going to grab a bite to eat.

    Well, I walked out with a check for $500 to get started on a website redesign for him. The great thing is, this is a niche market and once I get the framework for the site done, I think it may be quite simple to rebrand these website and sell them to other small business owners in the same niche.

    Sometime things happen when you least expect it.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      You could be missing a major portion of your target market by not marketing offline. Most of my business actually comes from offline sources. And major online companies do offline promoting, such as google, yahoo, amazon, etc.
      Signature
      “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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      • Profile picture of the author MikeWords
        Simple. I'm interested in IM because my goal is to work in my underwear whenever I feel like it. I like the writing and technical side of IM. I've worked many jobs dealing with people face to face and it's not enjoyable for me. Especially trying to sell things.

        I just the think the typical IMer is not comfortable with face 2 face offline marketing and I dont get why that seems hard for lots of people here to grasp.
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  • Profile picture of the author MrYossu
    Originally Posted by ProductCreator View Post

    I seriously do not think it can be as successful in the UK as it is in the US i.e. less $ per unit of my time invested.

    I cannot see a small business handing over $1000 to me to create a website for them.

    And any less than that and it is not worth my time.

    Something else that people overlook is support. Unless you outsource it, what are you going to do when someone hacks their site and they start calling you to fix it? I would much rather not get involved in support.
    I totally disagree.

    You can easily charge well over $1000 for a site. I have charged a lot more than that. Obviously it depends what you are offering, but if you produce quality, then people will pay for it.

    In ten years of web design and hosting, I have never once had an issue with hacking. It's not as big a problem as you obviously think. Most of the sorts of sites we are discussing here simple static ones anyway, so very little incentive for hackers. They are after e-commerce sites, where they think they can get credit card details, or very high profile sites, where they can get a message seen by the world at large. Small-time local sites have no interest for them.

    There are enough UK people posting in this forum who are proof that offline stuff does work here. I'm one of them. Been bashing away at IM for two years, and not made a bean. Tried offline stuff and made a very nice amount in a few weeks No turning back for me.

    Ta ra
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  • Profile picture of the author GoGetta
    Well,

    I am in the UK and like Andrew said, people will spend money for web marketing, you have either got to create some trust with them and rapport to be confident to charge that or be a good salesmen. Where I worked and sold previously, they were knocking out $2,000 5 page static sites that were built from templates. People will buy its just down to trust and the value that you place on what you are selling or offering.

    Asking a business owner to buy a website for $1000 like that will most likely get a NO!

    Asking a business owner to buy a brand new direct response website that ranks well within the search engines aswell as captures potential customers details like clockwork. Which will then allow you to market to your own pocket of potential clients whenever they wanted sounds more appealing. This is selling and adding the value you can! A business owner will pay money for this.

    ^^^^ Obviously a quick example but hope you can see the point!

    The biggest part of offline is selling, theres no hiding that and its evident with the amount of cash cow direct mailing threads that appear. How many threads appear about actually going out and selling or cold calling techniques appear. None, because there is a FEAR around this and as online marketers we tend to look for the shortcut.

    I can categorically say though that you can make more money than you could shake a stick at if you prospect. Its easier than many think, it isnt about pressure selling or being rude. You get on there level.

    Remember one thing!

    "You are doing the business owner a favour by contacting them with a working solution, they are not doing you a favour by listening. You have the skills, there are business owners out there that will beg you to help, you just need to find em! And let me tell you, you don't have to look very hard!"

    Now Go Get 'Em!

    GoGetta
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  • Profile picture of the author geotarget
    I finally decided to try offline marketing after reading posts on this forum and LBB. At first I wasn't ranking well at all but I'm finally starting to see some results.

    Good luck to everyone if offline marketing, if anyone wants to share ideas and brainstorm, I'd be happy to talk. Send me a message!
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  • Profile picture of the author roddaut
    I've been doing the offline marketing. I got a membership at offlinebiz.com. I have to say that doing what's required puts you out of your comfort zone. Also, I'm not sure I could do it if I didn't have a track record of helping to create two successful online businesses. I'd be too worried that I couldn't deliver results without past experience. So I wonder if that's holding anyone back from doing offline marketing.

    Rodney
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  • Profile picture of the author Taylor French
    I don't do it anymore, because I prefer passive income. I've done a lot of this stuff in the past, but now I just prefer to focus my time and energy on things that will make more money in the long run. I had some monthly income from maintaining client sites, but it required a lot more ongoing work than the business models I'm using online.
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  • Profile picture of the author edpudol1973
    In the Philippines it almost impossible to charge $1000 for a small business or even $200 for this kind of service.
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  • Profile picture of the author spyxx
    I can reach 1000s of people online with 10-20 clicks. lol
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Endres
    I have not shaved in days. I was hungry last night.

    I went out at 10:30 to a local Wingstop here in kenosha and was wearing my "Stay home and watch march madness" clothing. In other words, I was looking pretty rough.

    I have a baseball cap that people actually comment on because it looks like its got more sweat bands on it than Larry the Cable Guy has stripes in his underwear, and I was wearing that too.

    As I was ordering I asked the teller if he knew who the owner was, and he said it was him.

    I asked him about what he does for marketing in his store and he gave me the usual "blah blah radio blah blah coupons.."

    I apologised for looking scruffy and let him know I was a internet marketer who specialized in direct response marketing. We talked for a bit and I have another appointment to fit into my busy schedule this week to sit down and get another offline client.

    THIS IS SO EASY!
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    "Observation is an act of creation through limitations inherent in thinking"

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  • Profile picture of the author billyboy
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    • Profile picture of the author New Life
      Stringent Guidelines sent me back to the internet, outrageous guidelines and reference requests stop anyone just entering into the business.

      With a professionally written sales letter and ad, i ran an ad for 2 weeks and recieved just 30 brochure requests and 2 sales which didnt cover the £340 PER AD FEE.

      So not worth it
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      Free WSO To Come!!
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  • Profile picture of the author billyboy
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    • Profile picture of the author MrYossu
      Originally Posted by billyboy View Post

      Well you haven't got a dime from him yet nor done any work.....so the easy bit is over...the "work" has yet to start.
      IME, the opposite is true. I find getting the appointment to be way the hardest part. Once I get the owner sat down and talking, I find it hard to shut him up! They generally love to talk about their business, and will often tell you more than you need to know. Meetings tend to go very easily, and when you explain what you can offer them, they generally get very excited.

      Originally Posted by billyboy View Post

      Again...we aren't all into SEO and site design.
      Who says that's all offline marketing is about? I have never sold SEO to an offline business, and only offer site design as an extra if they need it. I offer the autoresponder idea as the main point, as that is what has the most potential for their profit, and it brings in a recurring income for me.

      Hope this helps
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  • Profile picture of the author iw433
    Man, oh man, what a thread. All I can say is remember it is not either-or. As the old saying goes, "There are many ways to skin a cat." If you want to go after the off-line market do it in the way that suits your personality. It can be face to face or all done via the internet. Just depends on your business model.
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  • Profile picture of the author reynald2790
    For me, it holds me back when I suddenly feel so nervous. It really holds me back because sometimes it is urgent and I'm not so well prepared for the job. Or the people itself. I am not so well ready in facing new clients if it is an urgent meeting or an urgent meeting. And sometimes, offline marketing really hard to work for because you are always facing new clients every other day to talk to.
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    Hi! I am Reynald Laque Logan | Reynald Logan Dreams, 22 years old. Living in Dumaguete City “The City of Gentle People.” I am a pure Filipino Citizen. I am a Freelance Provider preferably working at oDesk.

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