Is it a rule to put authorship credit on every website we make?

15 replies
Hi Warriors

I need some guidance as one of my client is refusing me to put an authorship credit on their website. It is not a personal website but an organization website.

Could anybody guide me on this matter please.

Thanks
#authorship #credit #make #put #rule #website
  • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
    Is it a rule to put authorship credit on every website we make?
    No, there isn't, as far as I know.

    You should have negotiated that BEFORE signing the contract (taking the job).
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326144].message }}
    • I kinda hafta wonder whose rule that would be and who would enforce it? Guido?

      fLufF
      --
      Signature
      Fiverr is looking for freelance writers for its blog. Details here.
      Love microjobs? Work when you want and get paid in cash the same day!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326209].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author keyuria
      Originally Posted by Istvan Horvath View Post

      No, there isn't, as far as I know.

      You should have negotiated that BEFORE signing the contract (taking the job).
      Infact, I have got the Letter of Award but this came up while discussing the contract as I had mentioned in the contract to put an authorship credit.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326230].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
        Originally Posted by keyuria View Post

        Infact, I have got the Letter of Award but this came up while discussing the contract as I had mentioned in the contract to put an authorship credit.
        And like with every contract: there will be points you both agree on... and some other points where one of the parties will have to make a compromise.
        Signature

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326254].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    Originally Posted by keyuria View Post

    Hi Warriors

    I need some guidance as one of my client is refusing me to put an authorship credit on their website. It is not a personal website but an organization website.

    Could anybody guide me on this matter please.

    Thanks
    There's no rule but one rule. Do what your client wants. They're the ones paying you.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326264].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author rantrally
      As someone who has paid for contract work, we never allow firms or contractors to put their info on the site. It's something I always look for in the contract.

      If you really want it, you need to be upfront with your client when you negotiate the contract. You can provide a pricing discount for it. Do not try to slip it in because you'll only upset the client and lose business over it instead of gaining business.
      Signature

      Michael Harris
      Co-Founder
      www.RantRally.com

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326357].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
        Banned
        Originally Posted by rantrally View Post

        As someone who has paid for contract work, we never allow firms or contractors to put their info on the site. It's something I always look for in the contract.

        If you really want it, you need to be upfront with your client when you negotiate the contract. You can provide a pricing discount for it. Do not try to slip it in because you'll only upset the client and lose business over it instead of gaining business.
        Same here. I would not want or allow contractor links on a site being built for my company.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326740].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author ishboo
        Originally Posted by rantrally View Post

        As someone who has paid for contract work, we never allow firms or contractors to put their info on the site. It's something I always look for in the contract.

        If you really want it, you need to be upfront with your client when you negotiate the contract. You can provide a pricing discount for it. Do not try to slip it in because you'll only upset the client and lose business over it instead of gaining business.
        Absolutely agree! Dude, it's really not that important to have there anyway. The testimony from them and the referrals are worth far more than a credit on their site.

        If you are already arguing with them about it, then it sounds like you've already kind of screwed yourself. Key rule... DON'T BE NEEDY. It does the exact opposite of what you want it to in the short term and long term.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6327236].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Steve McBride
    If it's that important to you to have author info on their site, here's what I suggest: Next time you are negotiating a contract for work, give them two prices. The lower of the two prices (your normal price) requires that they give you credit. The higher price is the one where they don't have to put your author info. You're either getting author credit, which I assume you want because it can lead to more work, or you can get paid a little extra. I've always found when negotiating, it's better to give them a decision to make between two or more variables. The purpose is to remove the yes/no decision from their mind, and replace it with a "yes, but which offer is better" decision. Silly little NLP tactic, but in my experience it tends to work.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6326805].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author econnors
      Originally Posted by Steve McBride View Post

      If it's that important to you to have author info on their site, here's what I suggest: Next time you are negotiating a contract for work, give them two prices. The lower of the two prices (your normal price) requires that they give you credit. The higher price is the one where they don't have to put your author info. You're either getting author credit, which I assume you want because it can lead to more work, or you can get paid a little extra. I've always found when negotiating, it's better to give them a decision to make between two or more variables. The purpose is to remove the yes/no decision from their mind, and replace it with a "yes, but which offer is better" decision. Silly little NLP tactic, but in my experience it tends to work.
      I agree with this. This is somewhat similar to a copyright release on photography work. When you get picture taken, usually you own no rights to use that picture in any fashion other than the way it's given to you. However, you can purchase a copyright release at a later time which allows you to use the image for personal or commercial purposes (unless otherwise prohibited).

      As a web designer, your work is your copyright. Clients should pay for it (not necessarily this client, but future clients). You should build this into your contract and make sure that it's clear to the client upfront...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6329607].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Robert Bleach
    You could always list your info at the top of the css stylesheet. At least then, people "in the know" could see who designed the site.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6327105].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
      Originally Posted by Robert Bleach View Post

      You could always list your info at the top of the css stylesheet. At least then, people "in the know" could see who designed the site.
      That may sound good, in theory, but...

      What a perfect way to ruin one's credibility and never get repeat work from clients!

      Don't try to find a way around a contract. That's acting in bad faith, and never a good idea. If the client doesn't want it, don't try to find a sneaky way to do it.

      All the best,
      Michael
      Signature

      "Ich bin en fuego!"
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6330646].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tim Franklin
    I have to say that work for hire is not the place for advertisements, we do not allow this, now if the contractor wants backlinks from our websites, we can do that, but incorporating a made by link in a work for hire event its just not really what you would expect of a professional.

    I have seen this a few times with some contracts I had with a company, they later asked why I never again hired them, (I figured they should have figured it out by now)

    Sometimes I am working for someone else, that does not have the time to create products, so naturally having someone else on the bill is not something I would want or need.

    Still I can see both sides here having worked both sides of the isle here.

    Over all, I think its an obsolete practice.
    Signature
    Software Development | Applications | OSX | iOS | Android | Cloud Software Engineering |
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6327344].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author keyuria
    Thank you all for the suggestions and advise to enable me now think differently. I have already communicated with the client and gave my opinion so they should be OK now.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6329534].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Tim Franklin
    I can see both sides of the argument here, but and I say this with a lot of alacrity, I have worked with very large corporations and one of the things the unwritten rules of the road is that you will keep your mouth shut about what you did and for how much you did it, otherwise your not going to get more work.

    You have to realize that out there in those very tall buildings are people who are stressed out to the max, under those circumstances it is difficult if not impossible to actually be creative under that kind of difficult stress, so they often reach out to someone perhaps like you who can deliver consistently what they want and need.

    As you might imagine when a persons job is on the line, they are depending on you to be professional and that means not revealing that you worked on a particular project, usually that means for at least three to five years, but that is usually covered in the contract.

    Its the way they work usually you have to have been inside a corporate structure to understand the right way to talk to these people.

    But with the right methods you can get good paying work on a regular basis, just dont ever mention the idea that you might publish that you did it.

    And this is not just for the OP but for others who may be reading this too, if your into creative services and you want to break into more lucrative gigs, never mention promotional vending.
    Signature
    Software Development | Applications | OSX | iOS | Android | Cloud Software Engineering |
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[6330561].message }}

Trending Topics