How To Tell How Far You've Progressed

by Steven Wagenheim 12 replies
A lot of people think the only way to tell how far you've come as far as
Internet marketing is by the bottom line. Granted, in the final analysis, that's
all that matters, but there's really a better indicator as to how far you've
come as far as your knowledge of marketing.

Today, I took a look at an ebook I purchased quite a while ago by a pretty
well known marketer. At the time I read it, I thought it was quite informative
and cutting edge. However, looking at it today, I realized how far I've come.
Much of what is in that book is so basic to me now. Sure, I didn't know it at
the time, but now...it's second nature.

And that is the key. It isn't so much getting the info and just reading it. It's
getting it, reading it and UNDERSTANDING IT...to the point where you
actually USE IT and make it a part of your everyday life as a marketer, to
the point where you can't even remember where you learned it or who you
learned it from...to the point where it has become a part of your being.

And of course most of all, to the point where it is actually make a difference
in your bottom line.

THAT'S how you can tell how far you've come. See, if you read that book
again and it all still seems so new and revolutionary to you, then you
really haven't gotten what you were supposed to get out of it.

Go back to your old books and see how many of them seem OLD to you
now. If not many, then you need to really work on making these concepts
a part of your everyday routine, provided of course that they have been
proven to work. Yes, that's another can of worms all together (what DOES
work?) but we'll leave that for another thread, otherwise this one will turn
into a philosophical discussion that might even give Paul Myers a headache
and I for one am just not up to it today.

And should you find that you really haven't learned much in the few weeks,
months or years you've been doing whatever it is you're doing, take one
of those books and go through it again. Really try to get something out
of it. If it adds even just a few hundred dollars a month to your income, it
will have been worth it.

So, how far have YOU progressed?
#main internet marketing discussion forum #progressed
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  • Profile picture of the author Akitoye
    Steven,

    That's good advice.

    Reading not just for reading sake but
    learning and implementing what's in that book.

    Above all watch your progress.
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    • Profile picture of the author freudianslip27
      One thing that I've noticed is when I've been teaching some other people things online, it helps me to discuss things back and forth, and see where these people are just starting out, and compare it to what I have experience with. It's a pretty neat feeling

      Matt
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      • Profile picture of the author TimG
        Steven,
        Another one of your no nonsense straight to the point postings that is full of wisdom and guidance. Well done....well done!!

        Respectfully,
        Tim
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        • Profile picture of the author Dan Grossman
          I measure progress by how little effort I have to put into making the next dollar compared to the last.

          I was beating the "4-hour workweek" (doing less than 4 hours a week work to completely support myself online) before I read the book, but there's always something else I can automate...

          My goal is to work as little as possible while owning a business I can be proud of.
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          • Profile picture of the author jonparker83
            Here's my story...

            My first exposure was last year's 30 day challenge which I did well in to start with but then lost interest when my niche website got dropped from Google for 11 days.

            I didn't 'complete' the 30 day challenge in the time allowed but continued to make some adsense pocket-change afterwards, even though I didn't do any work on the site.

            Throughout the next year I bough a few WSOs, took little or no action and didn't make any money (surprise). I would start all sorts of new projects but only work on them for a couple of days, making the mistake of having far too many ongoing projects.

            Looking back now I know that if I only stuck with the 30 day challenge niche website I made originally and hadn't wasted all that time jumping from idea to idea, I'd probably be doing alright now (even though I'm not a massive fan or blog or article writing).

            This hit home and I started thinking how I could have possibly gone a whole year and not make any progress. I vowed to start this year's 30 day challenge and turn over a new leaf.

            And that was the time I realised although I'd not made any money, through all my little unfocussed projects, I'd actually gained a lot of knowledge and made a massive amount of progress.

            The 30 day challenge content just seemed TOO simple and I quickly lost interest. I realised that I actually knew a lot about IM, but I just hadn't applied it properly.

            I'd picked up a lot of things over the last year with the one exception being FOCUS.

            Now armed with my new-found friend, I have a PLAN, i have FOCUS and I'm putting everything I now know into a SINGLE project.

            I've still made no money but I have made a lot of progress, I'll let you know how it all pans out in a few weeks time!
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            • Profile picture of the author Michael Mason
              I have only been doing internet marketing for about 3 months now, and I know I am improving. Although I haven't made that much money...and sales aren't pick up yet either...I still feel like I'm doing something right. Now when I read the info I started with it seems basic, like you said. Now I am starting to understand more advanced things and hopefully I will be successful soon. Good luck to all of us! And remember...improving doesn't necessarily just mean more money, although that is a good sign.
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              • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
                Did I miss something?

                You said the bottom line counts but isn't the most important - then you said what matters is the things you've done that have affected your bottom line.

                Too many IMers get caught up thinking they have to learn all about IM - it's not necessary and learning more about what's in ebooks is irrelevant in itself.

                While people are confusing themselves trying to keep up with the latest IM jargon - there are people who think they're too stupid to learn it just going ahead and taking action, and making money while the others spend their time not taking any action but doing lots of thinking.

                I don't think the amount of 'IM knowledge' you have has a direct relationship to what your revenue potential is - selling stuff doesn't require that you know all of the mechanics of IM.

                I should know - I spent several years becoming an expert only to find that more often than not, most of the IM information is a useless distraction and making money is simple.

                Andy
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                nothing to see here.

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                • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
                  Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

                  Did I miss something?

                  You said the bottom line counts but isn't the most important - then you said what matters is the things you've done that have affected your bottom line.

                  Too many IMers get caught up thinking they have to learn all about IM - it's not necessary and learning more about what's in ebooks is irrelevant in itself.

                  While people are confusing themselves trying to keep up with the latest IM jargon - there are people who think they're too stupid to learn it just going ahead and taking action, and making money while the others spend their time not taking any action but doing lots of thinking.

                  I don't think the amount of 'IM knowledge' you have has a direct relationship to what your revenue potential is - selling stuff doesn't require that you know all of the mechanics of IM.

                  I should know - I spent several years becoming an expert only to find that more often than not, most of the IM information is a useless distraction and making money is simple.

                  Andy

                  Andy, I agree to an extent. You can do very well in IM without knowing
                  all the latest "gimmicks" but you DO have to have some kind of marketing
                  knowledge and fundamental base otherwise how can you do anything?

                  My daughter who knows nothing about marketing at all could not make
                  any money online. She wouldn't even know where to begin. So she has to
                  have some kind of knowledge, no matter how basic it might be.

                  Does that make sense? Otherwise, anybody could just turn on their
                  computer and make money.
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                  • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
                    That's oversimplifying it but it's absolutely not necessary to spend months learning IM to make money.

                    I have friends who I've just spent 10 minutes with them and they've been able to make money.

                    The 'struggle' and 'steep learning curve' that so many people put themselves through is not necessary.

                    The basics of making money have very little to do with IM, IM is just one way to focus on leveraging the Internet, but word of mouth marketing always works - whether you use the Internet a little or a lot to do it.

                    You could decide to find poorly described and listed products on Ebay and present them better and make money without caring a hoot about most IM things.

                    There are LOTS of business models and the amount of IM knowledge required can be anything from none - infinity.

                    It's a choice, but it's a common problem for people to wade through the sea of "you need to know this" crap that's flooding every part of the internet.

                    Andy
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                    • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
                      Evaluating your position, however you care to measure it, is important both in your business and as a human being.

                      In order to do either you need to establish a starting point, a reference of where you were and compare it to where you are now. Secondly, you need to choose your units of measurement.

                      Businesses usually choose the most obvious and easiest measurement - the bottom line, how many more $$$ are you making than you were. I think Steven is pointing out another unit of measurement - knowledge. It is a worthwhile measurement if that was your original intent, or it may simply prove an interesting observation.

                      And there's the key, the question, "How Far Have You Progressed?" is open to interpretation. Progression is a subjective term, just as success is - even for a business. Many will solely quote their bottom line, some their quality of life (another subjective term), and others may measure how many homeless people they've helped off the breadline.

                      It's important to start any venture with some idea of where you want to end up. If your aim is to learn more and increase your bank balance while you're at it - fine. But it's only one of many ways to measure your progression.


                      Peter
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                      • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
                        Originally Posted by Peter Bestel View Post

                        Evaluating your position, however you care to measure it, is important both in your business and as a human being.

                        It's important to start any venture with some idea of where you want to end up. If your aim is to learn more and increase your bank balance while you're at it - fine. But it's only one of many ways to measure your progression.


                        Peter
                        That's the point I would make.

                        Measuring your 'progress' is not just about how far you've moved from where you started - but how much closer to your goals you have come.

                        You can move far away from your starting point without getting any closer to your goals, so just measuring how far away you are from where you didn't want to be doesn't seem like an entirely useful measurement on its own.

                        But if you are going to measure forward movement in IM terms then revenue would still seem to be the thing to measure - unless you're not trying to make money.

                        It's easy to come up with ways to feel like you're succeeding while the evidence around you contradicts that, but it's not necessarily the best way to get your to where you're trying to go.

                        Andy
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                • Profile picture of the author JasonKing
                  Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

                  Did I miss something?

                  You said the bottom line counts but isn't the most important - then you said what matters is the things you've done that have affected your bottom line.

                  Too many IMers get caught up thinking they have to learn all about IM - it's not necessary and learning more about what's in ebooks is irrelevant in itself.

                  While people are confusing themselves trying to keep up with the latest IM jargon - there are people who think they're too stupid to learn it just going ahead and taking action, and making money while the others spend their time not taking any action but doing lots of thinking.

                  I don't think the amount of 'IM knowledge' you have has a direct relationship to what your revenue potential is - selling stuff doesn't require that you know all of the mechanics of IM.

                  I should know - I spent several years becoming an expert only to find that more often than not, most of the IM information is a useless distraction and making money is simple.

                  Andy
                  In my opinion, this is absolutely spot on.

                  -JasonKing
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy Fletcher
    That's great advice and it doesn't just apply to Internet Marketing either.

    If you're actively learning anything then you should be able to look back on stuff that was "new" a month ago and realise it's old hat now. Not because it no longer applies but because it's just part of your game.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tuzic
    Banned
    Hi,

    yes its true you can spend months learning about the internet & IM & when you do start selling or start writing doesnt then mean it will be a great success.

    & i also know people who dont have any knowledge of IM & have basic knowledge of the internet but have made great money selling online & then going on to set up other sites.

    sometimes it does help when your just thrown in the deep end, it can be a great way to learn but risky so experience does help but its not the end all be all.
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