If I Sent You An Email About My Day, Would You Read It?

86 replies
You and I are part of many Internet marketing-related email lists. I'll bet a nickle on it.

Some of them only promote offers. Some of them promote offers every day. Others do it monthly, or every other week.

But then there are some people that every couple of days send out a random email. It mentions a new blog post, maybe something new they released, but the majority of the email just talks about their week. Generally "their week" doesn't revolve around the cheeseburger and fries they had for lunch, but rather maybe something they learned (which generally has some vague relation to online business) or some thoughts (again, usually online business or IM related).

Do you like reading about people's lives? Is it an email you'd open? For example, I'm part of Tiffany Dow's email list (no referral link - haha), and a lot of the time she talks about random stuff - like her date nights. BUT! I read them. I don't know why, I just do. And I enjoy them.

Argue. Banter. Brawl. I'm all ears!
#day #email #read #send
  • Profile picture of the author WiseWarrior1
    Yeah, those catch my eye. Just like your post.
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  • Profile picture of the author contentwriting360
    Banned
    Emails that talk about somebody else's experiences, moods, thoughts, and life experiences in general catch attention. I think we can build a better (or a personal) connection between us (the sender) and the receiver of our marketing emails if we relate the content to the happenings in our daily life.

    Try to notice movies or shows on TV. We know to ourselves that we don't care who that person is, but, sometimes we hear the host talks something about that person and it suddenly interests us to look onto the TV, listen quite a bit, and we forget that we're already watching that show 'till the end.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Cohen
    Damn - what's your PayPal?

    ... but really? You're not part of any lists? Pshh I call lies!
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    • Originally Posted by Ross Cohen View Post

      Damn - what's your PayPal?

      ... but really? You're not part of any lists? Pshh I call lies!
      I run several lists. I don't get email from anyone else's list. I don't want to put anyone down but I really don't see the point of allowing emails from people who have, shall we say, imperfect knowledge of their craft.

      And no, I'm not that interested in your day. I don't know you.

      fLufF
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  • Profile picture of the author Big Al
    Do you like reading about people's lives? Is it an email you'd open? For example, I'm part of Tiffany Dow's email list (no referral link - haha), and a lot of the time she talks about random stuff - like her date nights. BUT! I read them. I don't know why, I just do. And I enjoy them.
    I'm on her list too and I think she's one of the few people who does it well. Most of the time I don't think it works so well unless you're very good at spinning that story into a parable of sorts with a marketing or money making relevance.

    For the most part I think there has to be a benefit to the reader. At the end of the day everyone's favourite subject is themselves.
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  • Profile picture of the author AmandaT
    I love Tiff's emails too.

    I've been trying to incorporate a bit more of that into my emails. I love hearing stories about other people and what they are doing, especially marketers I respect.

    Of course, a bit part of this is always trying to make sure you can redirect attention to IM whether it be something new you are doing or something you learned. In the end you will get a much better response if they close out of the email or click away feeling like they gleamed some knowledge from the email.
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  • Profile picture of the author Buildingfutures
    When I read the title of this thread, all I could think of was:

    Dear List,

    Today I saw Sarah, my sweetheart. I just sighed and couldn't work up the courage to talk to her, AGAIN. When will I learn and step up to the plate?

    I also went out for some lunch at poblano's, the awesome mexican place down the road. SO GOOD! Always order the sopapillas.

    Sent an email out to a few of you who were whining about something, I'm sorry I offended you, but I was trying to make some money!

    I'm having cake for dinner tonight (I'm so naughty!).

    Hope your day is well,

    Ross

    PS

    I heard that Willie Crawford stuffs his shorts, can you believe that?
    And I giggle to myself insanely.

    -Sean
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Cohen
    Fluffy - what if the person DOES have perfect knowledge of their craft? I certainly haven't "mastered" any skills... I mean, I bet there are people out there that can do whatever I do and better for that matter. The world is a pretty big place after all.

    Sean - I didn't know you were part of my list... how did you get that email?
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    • Ross, "imperfect knowledge" is a euphemism. We use euphemisms to let other people down gently.

      I'm curious, though (and here's a real opportunity for you to get some experience in overcoming objections): If I joined your list, what could you teach me? Keep in mind I was making money online when you were in first grade.

      fLufF
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  • Profile picture of the author sloanjim
    No way! Sorry. But please I am not that sad.

    Unless you are a porn star?
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    • Profile picture of the author ashloren
      Originally Posted by sloanjim View Post

      No way! Sorry. But please I am not that sad.

      Unless you are a porn star?
      Would you settle for an escort...? I almost got into porn at one point, but I decided to stick with my independence as an escort, since I am more comfortable with one-on-one experiences with the clients who I have built relationships with over the years.

      Think it would increase my email open rate if I were to throw in a story or two about my recent "dates" (now THAT is a euphemism)...? I doubt it! Unless I were to track down some good adult-themed affiliate programs. In that case, I could probably get 100% open rate and more clicks than I could count. Anyone know of some I could check out?

      Couldn't resist.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Ross Cohen View Post

    Do you like reading about people's lives? Is it an email you'd open? For example, I'm part of Tiffany Dow's email list (no referral link - haha), and a lot of the time she talks about random stuff - like her date nights. BUT! I read them. I don't know why, I just do. And I enjoy them.
    Yes, definitely.

    I like this when other people do it (didn't know Tiff did - must subscribe!), and I do it myself in most of my niches. From the overall feedback I get from subscribers, it's very popular and certainly a factor in maintaining a high open-rate.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Cohen
    Fluffy - Ok... example. I churn out PLR packs from time to time and they do pretty well. Have lots of happy Warrior customers. These Warriors know that being part of my list means higher discounts & first dibs on new releases. For that reason they like being part of my list.

    And I work in sales professionally, I'm used to rejection.

    Sloan - ... You lost me?

    Update: Got it. It all makes sense now Sloan, lol.
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    • Profile picture of the author cashp0wer
      I actually enjoy these emails. I have one in particular that I receive at least once per week where he talks about his life experiences, etc. and I enjoy reading them.
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    • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
      It really would depend on two things. The first being how much value I have found in your previous emails and also what the subject line read.

      If the title of your email was About My Day, rather than something like You Aren't Going To Believe What Happened To Me Today or Today, I Slayed A Giant, or Ha! Today, I Scored Big Time! or something to that effect, I probably wouldn't.

      Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
    Banned
    Because I know you? Yeah, I would want to read about your day. That comes down to the whole relationship that you build with the people you email. If you've done things well, they will care about what is going on with you.
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    I'm not on a lot of lists. I'm very selective and I only want email that is related to the reason I stay on the list, which would be the product that I purchased or similar products. I'm not really interested in idle chit chat or news about the senders life. If it were a close friend, it would be different, but normally I am on a business list for business purposes.
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  • Profile picture of the author realreview
    I get so many emails that I only have time to read a couple. So although you may get up to great things I'm not sure I would be more inclined to read them. Sorry mate
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  • Profile picture of the author sriram rajan
    As some trying to get connection with the list going, i think providing value is the foremost and then a bit of personal stuff thrown in will be good , I would attempt that only after some sort of connection is established and they "KNOW" you from your e-mails... before that most likely they'll run away a.k.a unsub
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  • Profile picture of the author liliaha
    Absolutely not! Sorry...
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  • Profile picture of the author rontheitguy
    I think it makes a lot of sense. If you have an email list and want to actually benefit from it, why wouldn't you go after the emotional connection? It's the old 'building relationships of trust' concept so you don't just have email contacts, but people who can see you care so they stick with you. And when you do promote something, they're more open and willing to listen. I see a lot of value in building the relationship vs just selling.
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    • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
      Originally Posted by rontheitguy View Post

      I think it makes a lot of sense. If you have an email list and want to actually benefit from it, why wouldn't you go after the emotional connection? It's the old 'building relationships of trust' concept so you don't just have email contacts, but people who can see you care so they stick with you. And when you do promote something, they're more open and willing to listen. I see a lot of value in building the relationship vs just selling.
      I agree and to add to what you've pointed out, it also lets the clients on your list know that you are more than just a money making number on their list, but a person they do indeed value as a customer.

      I think, anyway.

      Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author getano
    I really like case studies. I usually don't like flashy/overrated titles created just to catch my attention. You would gain some interested readers for a long time if you employ a strategy that follow my ideas (I would be the first subscriber).
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  • Profile picture of the author kcom
    Just about your day? Or about your day with a passive sales pitch at the end?
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    • Profile picture of the author Lana Hampton
      I'm not on many lists, but when someone shares a great "personal" day he/she is having, it inspires me. When someone shares a bad "personal" day with me, it reminds me of my blessings.
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      • Profile picture of the author kellabella
        Originally Posted by Lana Hampton View Post

        I'm not on many lists, but when someone shares a great "personal" day he/she is having, it inspires me. When someone shares a bad "personal" day with me, it reminds me of my blessings.
        I absolutely agree
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        • Profile picture of the author Sandor Verebi
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          ...
          I like this when other people do it (didn't know Tiff did - must subscribe!), and I do it myself in most of my niches. From the overall feedback I get from subscribers, it's very popular and certainly a factor in maintaining a high open-rate.
          Originally Posted by Joe Robinson View Post

          Because I know you? Yeah, I would want to read about your day. That comes down to the whole relationship that you build with the people you email. If you've done things well, they will care about what is going on with you.
          Originally Posted by rontheitguy View Post

          ... so you don't just have email contacts, but people who can see you care so they stick with you. And when you do promote something, they're more open and willing to listen. I see a lot of value in building the relationship vs just selling.
          Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

          ... lets the clients on your list know that you are more than just a money making number on their list, but a person they do indeed value as a customer...
          Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post

          Thought I'd chime in since my ears are burning...lol

          I think it's VERY important to determine what YOU as the list owner want out of your list. I guarantee you I could pump up the size of my list to a HUGE number if I:

          1. Emailed less often (I'm daily)
          2. ONLY talked about marketing GRQ stuff

          But that's not what I want. I WANT that friendship (two way) connection to my list. I LOVE that they email me about their personal stuff too. I have a small but extremely high converting list BECAUSE they know I value their friendship. Do I know every single one?

          No - but I know a TON of them. I also don't want to have the people who are grumpy about personalization on my list - they're not interested in a two way friendship, so why would I want them on my list?

          I've talked about date night, stress, things my kids did, etc. But I also try to not over do it. You won't ONLY get an email about that - it's usually 1-2 short paragraphs at the beginning of my email as my way of saying, "Hey, buddy! What's up? I'm doing XYZ...today I have a couple of things for you..."

          To me it's just polite. Say hey for the day, then offer something helpful.

          And everyone can have different ways of email marketing. There IS no right or wrong. There's just what you want as a list owner and what subscribers want coming into their inbox...
          These entries meet my taste.

          You cannot please everyone, as also can be seen here. And this is natural.

          I can live with it, because in my childhood taught me to realize that other people are also humans, so their interest may differ from mine. This applies to everyday life and business as well. And I'm not intended to tell you how to operate your business.

          The market will tell you. And the market consists of different humans. Those particular humans will select to whose list they are going to sign up and remain or unsubscibe.

          I like to make business with someone I know to some extent, who has won my trust. To gain my confidence you need to give something about your human side as well.

          Tiffany cultivates this topic masterfully I know, I'm a member of her community too.

          Greetings,

          Sandor
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        • Profile picture of the author capitalalchemy
          You know what email I got the most response with?

          Subj: How Are You Doing?

          I want to know about you. I want to know how life is.
          I also want you to know that you can email me any time
          you like, and I'll do my best to respond and answer
          questions.

          -------------------------------------------------------

          I totally agree with Tiffany. I don't want hordes of robotic, emotionless,
          opportunity seekers on my list. In fact, if I ever got a hint that a subscriber
          was this kind of person, I would immediately remove them from my list,
          because they aren't going to gain anything from me, and I'm certainly not going to gain anything from them.

          I like real people. I want people on my list who are similar to myself. I work hard to attract these types of people before they ever get on my list. So if they are not qualified to be on it, or are going to give me problems on down the road -- they get axed.

          And I don't want to surround myself with people who can't crack a smile or be real. These folks suck my energy dry and drag others down. You can't take yourself too seriously or life too seriously.

          And...you SHOULD be on at least a handful of mailing lists, because

          you will see what they are promoting/how they promote it
          you will see how they conduct themselves (both positively and negatively)
          you will stay in the loop
          you will see how they are helping others

          Some folks who stopped by this particular thread already had their minds made up and were kind of curt about it. Without attacking anyone, all I can say is that about 80% of people in this thread just told you that they love those kinds of emails...if I weren't sending out these kinds of emails, maybe I would start after reading this.

          Business it not about your opinion...it's about your customer's opinions.
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        • Profile picture of the author Casey Wong
          I would read it, as it's a great learning platform on how internet marketers communicate with their subscribers. Besides, learning from successful people will 'fast track' your path to develop stronger business in the IM world.
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  • Profile picture of the author TorinoGray
    Done the right way, if you have something to offer, info, humor...YEP!
    There are lots of blogs I follow, mostly Food, I'm ALWAYS hungry
    There are some I bounce into to grab a recipe only and some feel as if I know
    the person a bit. They relay where they got the recipe, how/when aunt Midge used to make it, etc....

    There is also a local restaurant owner that sends a Monday morning email, sometimes it's about what they found at the local farmer's market, a good vintage of wine they have gotten in, but there is usually an additional story about his week, day. If you are a good story teller, (some) people (like me) enjoy it.

    It beats the emails I optin for and get, "hey, how's your day.. wanna buy something?"
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Honestly no... i dont want to here about peopless lives everyday. I'm too busy and could be out fixing dinner instead of reading about these peoples' lives. I want the email quick and straight to the point. I look for good information. I already know "what the deal is"... eventually they will try to sell me something. I'm cool with that. But dont try to cloak it as if you're not trying to sell me something.
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  • Profile picture of the author FreeMeal
    I'm a difficult subscriber to please. Bore me with too many personal stories and I will unsubscribe. It's amazing how many people whose list I'm on seem to have plumbing disasters they want to share with me!?

    I think I prefer the emails which are informative and to the point. I like to hear about any new blog posts, expert opinions, and I don't mind the odd sales pitch mixed in there. Those are the lists I stay on for the longest. Totally not interested in other peoples personal lives at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author AmandaT
    As a lot of people are saying... it depends on what you are talking about and how you tie it in with actually helping them.

    Personally I have seen it help a lot both with lists I am on and my own lists. If you inject stories and personalities it really helps draw people in. They get to know and trust you and see you as a person instead of words on a page. It will help you connect with your readers and it also makes your emails more entertaining and memorable.

    When Tiff talks about getting ready for date night... it isn't so much that I care that she is going out on a date, but the fact it further "humanizes" her. It helps you get to know her which makes me look forward to her emails more.
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  • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
    Thought I'd chime in since my ears are burning...lol

    I think it's VERY important to determine what YOU as the list owner want out of your list. I guarantee you I could pump up the size of my list to a HUGE number if I:

    1. Emailed less often (I'm daily)
    2. ONLY talked about marketing GRQ stuff

    But that's not what I want. I WANT that friendship (two way) connection to my list. I LOVE that they email me about their personal stuff too. I have a small but extremely high converting list BECAUSE they know I value their friendship. Do I know every single one?

    No - but I know a TON of them. I also don't want to have the people who are grumpy about personalization on my list - they're not interested in a two way friendship, so why would I want them on my list?

    I've talked about date night, stress, things my kids did, etc. But I also try to not over do it. You won't ONLY get an email about that - it's usually 1-2 short paragraphs at the beginning of my email as my way of saying, "Hey, buddy! What's up? I'm doing XYZ...today I have a couple of things for you..."

    To me it's just polite. Say hey for the day, then offer something helpful.

    And everyone can have different ways of email marketing. There IS no right or wrong. There's just what you want as a list owner and what subscribers want coming into their inbox.

    Tiff
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    • Profile picture of the author reclark
      Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post

      Thought I'd chime in since my ears are burning...lol

      I think it's VERY important to determine what YOU as the list owner want out of your list. I guarantee you I could pump up the size of my list to a HUGE number if I:

      1. Emailed less often (I'm daily)
      2. ONLY talked about marketing GRQ stuff

      But that's not what I want. I WANT that friendship (two way) connection to my list. I LOVE that they email me about their personal stuff too. I have a small but extremely high converting list BECAUSE they know I value their friendship. Do I know every single one?

      No - but I know a TON of them. I also don't want to have the people who are grumpy about personalization on my list - they're not interested in a two way friendship, so why would I want them on my list?

      I've talked about date night, stress, things my kids did, etc. But I also try to not over do it. You won't ONLY get an email about that - it's usually 1-2 short paragraphs at the beginning of my email as my way of saying, "Hey, buddy! What's up? I'm doing XYZ...today I have a couple of things for you..."

      To me it's just polite. Say hey for the day, then offer something helpful.

      And everyone can have different ways of email marketing. There IS no right or wrong. There's just what you want as a list owner and what subscribers want coming into their inbox.

      Tiff
      Count the comments Tiff gets and you'll see some of the value. If she ever de-humanizes herself, I'll unsubscribe. She gives tremendous value and answers private email as well as works on her blog, does other work, takes care of a family, etc. Her list is loyal and supportive and we like her just the way she is. She goes out of her way to help everyone and shares her knowledge. She's open, honest, and a valuable member of the Internet Marketing Community. I'm not. I'm new. I'm learning. I can tell you this: I delete many emails without reading them (the ones I haven't gotten around to unsubscribing from yet) but I never delete hers. I read every word and click every link. I have yet to be disappointed.

      "Re: If I Sent You An Email About My Day, Would You Read It?"
      Absolutely - at least once, maybe twice, and maybe forevermore. It depends on how much value goes along with the personal stuff and whether you can spell or at least use a spell checker. Have a great day!
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan Curtis
      I agree with the sentiments of these two posts.

      With my marketing I do only what makes sense to me, what I can feel proud of and what I enjoy. It doesn't matter to me if some technique might generate more revenue -- I'll only do it if I find it interesting, if I feel it is worthy of my time and if it makes me feel better by doing it.

      So sending something cheerful, helpful, and personal to your list, what could be better than that?


      Originally Posted by Martin.Avis View Post


      My answer is that the more personal you can be the better. That's what I teach my students and what I have proved to be most effective over the many years I have been making a living from newsletter marketing.

      When I started out - 1260 editions of my newsletter ago - I didn't do personal at all. My newsletter was short, sharp and to the point. It also wasn't very responsive.

      300 or so editions in and I 'accidentally' wrote about something that had happened in my family.

      The response I got via emails from subscribers to that one issue was more than I'd had from all 300 previously, combined.

      I guess it should have been obvious: people do business with people.


      Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post


      I guarantee you I could pump up the size of my list to a HUGE number if I:

      1. Emailed less often (I'm daily)
      2. ONLY talked about marketing GRQ stuff

      But that's not what I want....

      There's just what you want as a list owner and what subscribers want coming into their inbox.

      Tiff
      And I subscribed to her list. With such glowing testimonials, how could I not?
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      The world is quite ruthless in selecting between the dream and the reality, even where we will not. Between the wish and the thing the world lies waiting. -- Cormac McCarthy

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  • Profile picture of the author ghostrecon
    I do agree, it's always nice if a list owner I'm subscribed can be both entertaining and beneficial to know in business.
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  • Profile picture of the author anymore
    I delete hundreds of emails daily

    I may only open one out of one hundred

    Sometimes one or two will catch my eye

    I always quickly review WSO offers
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  • Profile picture of the author ChocolateCheese
    Originally Posted by Ross Cohen View Post

    Do you like reading about people's lives? Is it an email you'd open?
    It depends (yeah, I know, the worst and most boring answer).

    I think the advantage of doing is that: you will be able to create a much much more loyal following and the relationships you have with your readers will be a lot more meaningful and profitable.

    But I think writing this way requires a lot of skill. The people who do it successfully probably don't just say: "Hey, let's see what happened this week, you know", but they use persuasive storytelling to get and keep you hooked.

    If you manage to write about your life in a way I find entertaining, yep, I'd read it. But that's not an easy thing to do ;-)
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  • Hmmmm interesting topic...

    We all know that the key to email marketing is bonding with your mailing list. The more "personal" and "real" you look to your list, the higher the chances you will connect with them and thus the higher the chances that your emails will be opened.

    However, do I really have the time to read about someone else's life? do I really care? how is it relevant to me?

    Hmmm... very interesting dichotomy. I've never tried this "personal" approach to email marketing (my emails are usually short and straight to the point).
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    • Profile picture of the author Martin Avis
      It is an interesting question and one I have firm opinions about.

      My answer is that the more personal you can be the better. That's what I teach my students and what I have proved to be most effective over the many years I have been making a living from newsletter marketing.

      When I started out - 1260 editions of my newsletter ago - I didn't do personal at all. My newsletter was short, sharp and to the point. It also wasn't very responsive.

      300 or so editions in and I 'accidentally' wrote about something that had happened in my family.

      The response I got via emails from subscribers to that one issue was more than I'd had from all 300 previously, combined. I had stumbled upon something that turned my subscribers from passive readers to active participants.

      I guess it should have been obvious: people do business with people.

      As I changed my style of writing to include a lot more personal stuff, my list became more responsive. A lot more. It also became hugely more profitable - turning from what was barely a paying hobby into something that generates a very healthy full time income.

      At the same time many of my subscribers became friends.

      Of course, there were people who didn't like the new style and left. But there were a lot more who stayed - and emailed me, and bought stuff I recommended. And told their friends.

      There are two big caveats though: your writing and your list.

      If you can't write in a way that people want to read, going personal isn't likely to help you. There is a balance between self-aggrandizement, self-promotion and plain old showing off on one side, and entertaining, informing and using personal stories as illustrations on the other. I don't know that I get it right, but I do know that when I fail to publish many of my readers email to see if I'm okay. That's not likely to happen so much if all you send out is a to-the-point product pitch once a week.

      The other caveat regards the type of list you have and the relationship you have built with it. The closer that relationship to start with (forged by providing quality newsletters that seek to educate, inform and entertain regardless of whether you write about your life or not) the more your readers will want to know more about you, your life and your family.

      Martin
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      • Profile picture of the author Kim Standerline
        I was going to suggest Martin as someone who gets it right just about all of the time, but I see he's already chipped in

        I read his emails from start to finish, cant say I do that with anyone else, they usually get skimmed or deleted

        Kim

        Originally Posted by Martin.Avis View Post

        It is an interesting question and one I have firm opinions about.

        My answer is that the more personal you can be the better. That's what I teach my students and what I have proved to be most effective over the many years I have been making a living from newsletter marketing.

        When I started out - 1260 editions of my newsletter ago - I didn't do personal at all. My newsletter was short, sharp and to the point. It also wasn't very responsive.

        300 or so editions in and I 'accidentally' wrote about something that had happened in my family.

        The response I got via emails from subscribers to that one issue was more than I'd had from all 300 previously, combined. I had stumbled upon something that turned my subscribers from passive readers to active participants.

        I guess it should have been obvious: people do business with people.

        As I changed my style of writing to include a lot more personal stuff, my list became more responsive. A lot more. It also became hugely more profitable - turning from what was barely a paying hobby into something that generates a very healthy full time income.

        At the same time many of my subscribers became friends.

        Of course, there were people who didn't like the new style and left. But there were a lot more who stayed - and emailed me, and bought stuff I recommended. And told their friends.

        There are two big caveats though: your writing and your list.

        If you can't write in a way that people want to read, going personal isn't likely to help you. There is a balance between self-aggrandizement, self-promotion and plain old showing off on one side, and entertaining, informing and using personal stories as illustrations on the other. I don't know that I get it right, but I do know that when I fail to publish many of my readers email to see if I'm okay. That's not likely to happen so much if all you send out is a to-the-point product pitch once a week.

        The other caveat regards the type of list you have and the relationship you have built with it. The closer that relationship to start with (forged by providing quality newsletters that seek to educate, inform and entertain regardless of whether you write about your life or not) the more your readers will want to know more about you, your life and your family.

        Martin
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  • Profile picture of the author Catinas87
    I dont think I will read it...Sorry...
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  • Profile picture of the author MagLyn
    We need to build a relationship with our subscribers in order to gain their trust and confidence. So writing personal emails abt yrslf is one way of building that relationship.
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    Yes, those emails get my attention a lot. I really think that more people should do this and will probably see increased open rates.
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    • Profile picture of the author 2ndopkate
      Originally Posted by talfighel View Post

      Yes, those emails get my attention a lot. I really think that more people should do this and will probably see increased open rates.
      Talfighel and others have mentioned how important relationship building is in business.

      Increase your email open rates by establishing a connection to your reader. Tell a story to help your reader understand and relate. Those are lessons and tactics I prefer to follow.

      {I do think there is one grumpy pants on this thread that could learn from those marketing tips. Or course, she's not looking to build relationships with potential clients. But I digress...}

      I follow Tiff and I don't read through all her emails, but I open most of them just to take a peak to see what's on tap that day. In most cases, if not all, there is a product review, tips or how to do something, and sometimes personal stuff.

      She also responds to every one of my questions.

      Lessons in marketing for free.
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      • Originally Posted by 2ndopkate View Post

        {I do think there is one grumpy pants on this thread that could learn from those marketing tips. Or course, she's not looking to build relationships with potential clients. But I digress...}
        It might surprise you to learn that this thread has been the single largest referrer of traffic to Miss Grumpy Pants' website in the last three days.

        Oh, don't worry, she won't try to teach you anything about marketing -- you clearly know it all.

        fLufF
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        • Profile picture of the author 2ndopkate
          Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post

          It might surprise you to learn that this thread has been the single largest referrer of traffic to Miss Grumpy Pants' website in the last three days.

          Oh, don't worry, she won't try to teach you anything about marketing -- you clearly know it all.

          fLufF
          --
          Righto! Well said. We know where your heart is at. Traffic equals sales. Good luck with all those conversions Fluff!
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      • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
        Banned
        Originally Posted by 2ndopkate View Post

        {I do think there is one grumpy pants on this thread that could learn from those marketing tips. Or course, she's not looking to build relationships with potential clients. But I digress...}
        You do not anger the grumpy pants, or single yourself out to them. You would be better off attracting the eye of Sauron.
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  • Profile picture of the author subbun
    Email sending and getting paid will work, if you have niche related email least, you can earn easy money by sending them CPA offers...
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  • Profile picture of the author MarkBradley
    I noticed Frank Kerns emails are one to two sentances max then a few links. I am on some copywriter lists and theri emails are 2 to 3 pages. A pictures worth a thousand words- send me a funnny pic inside your email
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Douglas
    Sharing my personal experiences to build a relationship with my list has probably been the most impactful email marketing strategy I've used in my 11 year career. It's especially effective when your subscribers can relate to the stories you're telling.

    It's more an art than a science. You have to learn how to be entertaining and likable without coming off as arrogant or self absorbed. But when you get it right, the bond you create with your list is a major asset.
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    • Profile picture of the author Sandor Verebi
      Originally Posted by Ron Douglas View Post

      Sharing my personal experiences to build a relationship with my list has probably been the most impactful email marketing strategy I've used in my 11 year career. It's especially effective when your subscribers can relate to the stories you're telling.

      It's more an art than a science. You have to learn how to be entertaining and likable without coming off as arrogant or self absorbed. But when you get it right, the bond you create with your list is a major asset.
      Ron, I suppose you have a wide range of experience in writing your emails (if you do not outsource) that people open and read. I realized in the beginning, that writing these relationship-building emails may be damned hard work if you omit your personality.

      If I think of it, you need invest blood, sweat and tears besides your time to find that voice with your audience for enjoying the years of benefit and income as a result.

      And yes, that cannot be a science. As you make friendsips offline. You just need to be yourself. And the initial efforts is so worth it for years of good times spending together.

      Greetings,

      Sandor
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  • Profile picture of the author ymest
    Tiffany Dow does it marvellously! Plus, we even get to know about her Chihuahua and I think she has posted a pick of her today! Go see it lol!

    I think that when someone shares a bit about his/her personal life in emails- without crossing the line of course lol, you all know what I mean- you stand out from those who blast pre-formatted emails and are just after the big $$$$! Whatever that means.

    I like the idea of building a relationship with marketers, it is a win-win situation, IMAO!

    xxx Y
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  • Profile picture of the author Iwriteforyou
    I do read emails, especially from Tiffany. I believe making personal connections is the most powerful way to do business. That's true, whether you're strictly in internet marketing or still work in the brick and mortar world. Personal connections also are a reminder that we all struggle with something.
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  • Profile picture of the author moreno
    As i can see people are different some want to go personal and love to chat and some want to go down to biz. I personally don't go for social that much online i do prefer offline friendship. But hey seems like alot of people need to know if your baby was cryng , or if you wake up with the blues and than they feel relationship and that help to get the deal a bit sweeter.
    If i'm interested in your private life ? really not that much ...online everybody can tell anything .....so many story ....beside Google love if you go social , make profiles , share all your private stuff , best part ? We are free to do whatever we like .
    Sometimes i read story on the mail i get in the imbox , only when i like to loose my time.
    Long live to chit -chat if this make you sell more.
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    • Profile picture of the author NatalieJ
      I don't remember every getting on a list where the emails included personal stuff. But I think I'd read it if there was usually something of value in it. Like, something you learned. Or perhaps, something funny.

      I think it's a lot better than the "do I have a deal for you" emails. I delete those and quickly unsub.
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  • Profile picture of the author Minna_Bryant
    There are so many ways to communicate. Which ones does your list value? If you aren't providing what they value, they aren't going to read any of your emails. If they aren't reading your emails, they aren't clicking any links.

    If they aren't clicking links ... well people click links (okay so do bots) but people are the ones who laugh, cry, relate and eventually trust you enough to buy. Even if it's a business based email, are the people relating to your tone, your style, your information and it's presentation?

    If they are you're golden, if they aren't change something until they are.

    Tiffany has the formula right for her list of people who relate to her and with whom she relates.

    I still have her first that starts with Welcome and ends with Sincerely, Tiffany Dow.

    The next one she's just talking to me, a person. Her style and voice haven't changed. But through her interactions, responses and personality she's gone from sincerely Tiffany Dow to just Tiff.

    If personal doesn't work for you, don't do personal. If straight-laced business doesn't work for you don't do straight-laced business.

    I'll read your emails when I get the value I'm looking for from your emails. Period.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mary Davis
    I see a strong parallel between Tiff's e-mails and the successful formats for sales videos and sales copy. They more often than not start by telling you a bit about the person, their background, their motivation, their past failures, and onward to their successes.

    The format is successful because it helps new marketers relate to the person, while allowing many seasoned marketers to hear or see how a theoretical concept came to life and played out.

    I for one am a huge fan of Tiff and her 'keeping-it-real' style -- no hype and lots of value (which leads to an extremely high open rate on my part). I think other marketers could learn a lot from her. I know I have!
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  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
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    • Profile picture of the author Sandor Verebi
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      Ross, I think you're catching on to something that some of the more savvy marketers figured out a long time ago - this is somewhat of an extension of social media, and in some ways a precursor to it, which many (of course all) people seem to want.

      There are different approaches to doing it - the key is really knowing your list, having strong communication skills and being consistent. Think of it as bringing the blog to your list, rather than your list to the blog...
      Hi Mike,

      You pointed out the essence of the thing. I like these words: "extension of social media". Really, if you know your list you also know who are your customers, what do they want from you and how they want to be treated.

      As the saying goes: "It's not what you say; it's how you say it".

      Consequently, what you are saying must to resonate with the reader of your email, because all your words possess emotions. To appeal to their needs and desires is difficult if you aren't able to imagine yourself into their situation and don't understand their thinking.

      "...bringing the blog to your list, rather than your list to the blog."

      Like again. As I observed, many people dedicate so much effort and attention to getting leads. If you bring your blog to your list then you involve them in the creative process, so they may feel honored themselves. And their trust meter can reach the peak.

      One more thing. I know from my experience how important the relationship is in offline business. There you have the possibility of meeting face to face.

      Putting this into perspective everyone can understand just how important building good relationships with your audience online where the face to face meeting is missing.

      All the best,

      Sandor
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  • Profile picture of the author kolbywhite28
    I would definitely read them if they are Penthouse stories.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chri5123
    I would read it if it was related to what you said you would send me.

    When building a list, or if you look at any "how to build a list" courses they say it is vital to build trust.

    This is where a lot of the "I have had a weird day..." emails come from - normally they contain some story that has a lesson or something to think about.

    Normally the question they pose will be answered in the next email for only $97!

    Chris
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  • Profile picture of the author prismkuet
    Most of the time, I dislike reading someone's week, how he passes. But few people, only very few people have the ability to hold the reader in their experience of the week (may be fake!), where they don't put their details but the learning that can be helpful for reader. Sorry to say, Probably I'll not get interest to go through your day to day activities, once in a week is ok.
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  • Profile picture of the author MaryKathan
    I really like the shorter personal stories, especially if it has humor - like Tiffany Dow - I open her e-mail every time.

    The ones that I do not like are the long stories or the ones where their "story" is just overly lifestyle bragging and maybe not even true..."I am on a yacht today because of the secrets I know" type thing.

    But I like to get a good, funny or inspirational quick story.
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  • Profile picture of the author Viramara
    Absolutely! When I opened marketing email, without the human touch, it will feels like a robot sending it.....Lifeless.

    I do read Tiffany Dow emails too. And she doesn't just tell a rant, she shares useful stuff. It's much better to share your fragile human side, than a marketer who bragging himself going on vacation, exotic place, buying fancy cars and mansion, then pitching you something salesy in the end. "Look, I'm superman. Buy my stuff!" LOL!
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul_Evans
    Personally, I connect best with stories.

    I would think that whether or not a person likes it depends on listening style.

    Ex: I've been speaking for over 30 years. In every audience there are a handful that want you to cover the material and move on. "Hit me hard. Hit me quick. Let's go home."

    BUT... roughly 90% of the audience when they hear something like... "The tragedy started on a Tuesday morning. 11:23 to be exact." ...they will put down their phones and engage.

    Most people like stories. And almost everyone loves to laugh. So if you can write funny stories you'll be ahead of the curve.
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    • Profile picture of the author Minna_Bryant
      Originally Posted by Paul_Evans View Post

      "The tragedy started on a Tuesday morning. 11:23 to be exact." ...
      Haha Paul, I can hear your southern twang just reading what you wrote. Now are you gonna tell us the rest of the story or what? Waiting with bated breath ... wait, send it via email
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Gram
    I don't mind hearing a little bit of personal info in an email but then again, I am literally on almost no IM lists because almost all of them suck, so I don't get barraged with crappy emails anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author goindeep
    If you told me about your day and I cried, I wouldnt be too happy. I actually spend much of my time in the gym trying to be a big man.

    On the other hand if you made me laugh or showed me how to steal a car or something valuable like that, i'd actually appreciate it. Awesome.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheClarkey
    Probably not in all honesty, unless it was humorous or interesting
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  • Profile picture of the author RossVegas
    Yeah man, I'd check out your day to day emails.

    Ross'...*put hands in circle*... UNITE!
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Cohen
    Yay Ross'! Yay Ross' in PA!
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  • Profile picture of the author michaeljcheney
    I think the trick here is to have personal STYLE to the emails so that even if they're about a business topic they are still personal and contain a nugget or two about "real life".

    That's what I try and do anyway and most of the people on my 100,000+ list seem to like it :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author tmoby
    I personally don't like these "inspirational" stories. I feel like it's just half made up, exaggerated fluff that's supposed to make people inspired. Which don't get me wrong, that's not a bad thing, I just think the lessons learned are 90% of the time cliche and boring.

    I don't need a long story about your day to learn that there's "opportunities everywhere" or that "if you work hard you can do anything".
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  • Profile picture of the author Peru101
    It depends on whether or not I like and trust the internet marketer. If so, then I'd rather hear about their IM day than their life, but that would be ok, too.
    If not, then I automatically think it's a trap to try and sell me something.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randohm
    Only if I cared about you. If you were someone I was interested in then yes, I'd love to hear about your day. Usually IMers do this because they want to get people interested in them. If you just say boring stuff that doesn't make interested in you then I'll stop reading them. If your e-mails reveal that you are intelligent and on the inside track in your field then I'll read them if I want to know more about your field. The real content about your e-mail should be about the insider information you provide about your niche, while making me think I'm developing a personal relationship with you.
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    • Originally Posted by Randohm View Post

      Only if I cared about you. If you were someone I was interested in then yes, I'd love to hear about your day. Usually IMers do this because they want to get people interested in them. If you just say boring stuff that doesn't make interested in you then I'll stop reading them. If your e-mails reveal that you are intelligent and on the inside track in your field then I'll read them if I want to know more about your field. The real content about your e-mail should be about the insider information you provide about your niche, while making me think I'm developing a personal relationship with you.
      I fully agree with this.

      It's all good and dandy to try to become "friends" with your subscribers, but let's not forget WHY they're in your list to begin with: because they're interested in your niche, not in you.

      So... you can get all personal and warm in your emails, but only as long as you continue providing quality content about the topic at hand.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
    If you can engage your readers, you're on the right track. Figure out how you can make your personal style engaging. It might be with stories or it might be with hard data. Make your style work for you.

    If you can get your readers to interact, you'll build a community (or tribe, as the kids say today). Build a community around your brand and you'll build your wallet.
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  • Profile picture of the author random
    Having been a marketer online since 1993, I no longer spend more than a few seconds reading an email. In fact, in 2012, I think it's time for new non-manipulative marketing tactics. People have grown tired of the same o' manipulation techniques just to get them to pull out their credit card with the hopes that they will stuff their Clickbank accounts thousands of dollars a week. We are in some serious need of online marketing innovation and new ideas. Most emails IM emails I receive are junk. Same o' "look what I found and you will like it too" kind of stuff. What's worse, most emails usually end up pointing to regurgitated, rehashed stuff that us old timers have seen since the 90's.
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  • Profile picture of the author angelina10
    I read those emails which is informative and about my work.
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  • Profile picture of the author Viramara
    One of an IMer I follow is Eric Holmlund, he shared a lot of useful IM ecourses for free, as well as his view on Christianity, photographs, paintings, and his children's photos. They really humanize him.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dean Thompson
    Originally Posted by Ross Cohen View Post

    You and I are part of many Internet marketing-related email lists. I'll bet a nickle on it.

    Some of them only promote offers. Some of them promote offers every day. Others do it monthly, or every other week.

    But then there are some people that every couple of days send out a random email. It mentions a new blog post, maybe something new they released, but the majority of the email just talks about their week. Generally "their week" doesn't revolve around the cheeseburger and fries they had for lunch, but rather maybe something they learned (which generally has some vague relation to online business) or some thoughts (again, usually online business or IM related).

    Do you like reading about people's lives? Is it an email you'd open? For example, I'm part of Tiffany Dow's email list (no referral link - haha), and a lot of the time she talks about random stuff - like her date nights. BUT! I read them. I don't know why, I just do. And I enjoy them.

    Argue. Banter. Brawl. I'm all ears!
    Hi Ross,

    Great theme for a thread.

    I think most people relate better to an honest story or an insight into someones life - or day.

    After all for those of us who've been on mailing lists for a while can usually tell when they're being sold to or about to be sold to no matter how subtle the wording is.
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  • Profile picture of the author larry1113
    Yea definitely, if the email is entertaining and then makes a good point.

    That's relationship building after all i.e. sharing about yourself.
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    • Profile picture of the author MP80
      No, I wouldn't read it.

      I may, or may not, open it; it would depend on the headline used, plus my overall impression of you.
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  • Profile picture of the author MattCatania
    To the OP (@Ross Cohen)

    You're obviously going to get mixed answers here, and that's fine - everybody is unique and we all have different tastes.

    Personally, anything that humanizes a faceless email address seems to win me over more times than not.

    The real sticking factor would be how effective their copy was in telling a relevant story that will capture and hold my attention.

    More specifically, I'd be won over by stories pertaining to struggles and triumphs that the marketer has faced within the niche. I think we're conditioned to hear these stories at an increasing rate; just look at the story lines in movies nowadays, it's all about how the protagonist endured suffering and hopelessness for what seemed like an eternity before they triumphed over their problems.
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