Are you an email marketing expert??

25 replies
Which one of these methods should I do?

Method A: 1 list with 12 products each 27.00.

Free content is given for 30 days at a time, then a sales pitch for a product. Rinse , repeat for this list for 12 months with 12 products at 27.00 each.

OR...

Method B: 1 product... keep trying to sell them that one product for several months...

Then subscribe them to list 2 and sell them product for 47.00

Then list 3 for 197.00

Which method do you think will ad more to the bottom line and why?
#effective #email #marking #methods
  • anyone out there?
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  • Profile picture of the author hostwindsEvanM
    I dont have any valuable input, other than I likely wouldn't put the same thing in someones face too many times without good cause.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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    Originally Posted by TheSalesTechnician View Post

    Which method do you think will ad more to the bottom line and why?
    We're guessing here, because we don't know anything about the products, the traffic demographics, the marketing methods, the system, the niche ... nothing at all, right?

    But on that basis (i.e. complete guesswork) I'm going to say that if the quality of the products justifies it, you're going to add quite a lot more to the bottom line by increasing the prices each time (but maybe not quite as steeply as with the figures you suggest above, if the products are otherwise comparable)? The idea being that you'll gain more in repeat orders at higher prices than you lose in "people dropping out". That's if the product quality and user experience justifies it.

    You might also be able to do well by selling the first 2/3 products separately at something like $27/$37/$47 and then presenting a OTO for "all the rest" at a discounted price, though.

    PS I don't call myself an "email marketing expert" but I make my living from it, and nurture lists carefully, trying to sell further products at higher prices to existing customers. Relatively easy to do as long as what you sell/promote never disappoints. As with so many aspects of successful internet marketing, quality is always the key.
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    • We're guessing here, because we don't know anything about the products, the traffic demographics, the marketing methods, the system, the niche ...

      Alexa's right.

      But have I got this right: You're only trying to sell to them once a month?

      fLufF
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      • Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post

        We're guessing here, because we don't know anything about the products, the traffic demographics, the marketing methods, the system, the niche ...

        Alexa's right.

        But have I got this right: You're only trying to sell to them once a month?

        fLufF
        --

        Perhaps It should be 4 times a month or more.
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        • Originally Posted by TheSalesTechnician View Post

          Perhaps It should be 4 times a month or more.
          I mail my list (which is not MMO, btw) 3 or 4 times a month and that may not be enough. I'd like to mail oftener but I'm chary of offending long-time customers. Relationships are more important than short-term profits.

          fLufF
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  • Profile picture of the author MattCatania
    You'll need to expose them to offers more frequently. Generally it takes 5-7 exposures (of the same product) before a prospect is willing to take some form of action (eg. Buy from you). This is an accepted 'rule of thumb' in the marketing community.

    The Rule of Seven

    Here are some papers published, pertaining to exposures and sales:
    Beyond Effective Frequency: Evaluating Media Schedules Using Frequency Value Planning [Cannon & Leckenby]
    The shape of the advertising response function [Simon & Arndt]
    The Shape of Advertising Response Functions Revisited: A Model of Dynamic Probabilistic Thresholds [Vakratsas, Feinberg, Bass & Kalyanaram]
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    Logic outweighs all.

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  • Im so frustrated. Im about to devote countless hours of work to build this funnel and I just cant think of the best "tested" fool proof formula.

    Heres the formula (revised)... Can someone please rip it to shreds?

    List #1 opt in, first 30 days... tons of free content, with 7 several atemps to sell them first product. Then 4-5 27.00 products a month afterwards WITH tons of free valuable content for up to 12 month. ...50 products total.

    If at ANYTIME anyone buys ANY product over the course of these 12 months they will be given a OTO.

    But I see no need to opt them into a second list.

    Whats the point?

    Once the ones from the first list have been on the list a while, at any time I give them a pitch for a 37-47 or even 197.00 product.

    Is this a bad method?

    Am I wasting my time creating 50 different products for this list?
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    • Profile picture of the author MattCatania
      Originally Posted by TheSalesTechnician View Post

      But I see no need to opt them into a second list.

      Whats the point?
      Generally, subscribers are opted into different lists to segment your buyers.

      Typically, you start with list #1 and offer them a standardized product that fulfill their wants and needs. Once they purchase the product (and with the help of some automated software) you can push them onto a different list and offer additional products until they purchase again, and then you continue to move them along.

      Of course, you'll be doing all the usual 'giving genuine and helpful advice/information' in between - but the whole point of moving them across boils down to not promoting products to subscribers who have already bought what you're offered.

      Think of it this way - you have a proven buyer on your list who has devoured the first product you offered to them (and they loved it!). Now they're searching for more, but every recommendation comes back to the same product that they've purchased. This means you're leaving money on the table and potentially annoying your customer.
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      Logic outweighs all.

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      • Originally Posted by MattCatania View Post

        but the whole point of moving them across boils down to not promoting products to subscribers who have already bought what you're offered.
        Thanks for breaking this down to me like I'm a 4 year old. I needed that.

        How would this funnel work with 50 products...each with 7 or so follow ups circled around the product?

        I want to make sure that list 1 gets the opportunity to buy each of these products? Or should I ditch list one at some point if they dont buy product 1??
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  • Profile picture of the author MattCatania
    'Ditching a list' is a personal preference, some on the forum would never do it, whilst others (Paul Uhl for example) claim that non-buyers are culled from his list on a regular basis. I'm really not that much help there, sorry.

    One method that you may find effective would be to automatically move non-buying subscribers onto a more 'promotional heavy' list after 'x' days (say 30 or so). This isn't something I've tested personally, but it's in the works. People don't buy for all sorts of reasons, which can range from not currently having the money to spend on products to lacking trust in the seller. In the end, they'll either buy or leave.

    I want to make sure that list 1 gets the opportunity to buy each of these products?
    It's completely up to you whether or not you want to vary the products that you recommend to prospects on your list - I just find it more logical to provide free content that hints towards solving ONE problem (the most pressing issue that they are currently facing) and then finding the most relevant and helpful product to recommend.

    Once the first product has been purchased then you go about finding other products that solve their deep-seated issues and tackle them one by one.

    So the first step would be to find out whether the products you're looking at promoting all solve different problems that your prospects would face, and then you would simply go about promoting them in some logical order.

    Of course, this is my approach, and how I think things should be done (:
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Both methods can work for you, but... i like Method A better.
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  • Profile picture of the author guptara
    Sending 30 day of free content will be too much. I would suggest you to send only 4-5 promotional email and then make a pitch..

    Reason being people won't read your emails for 30 days. I mean look at IM gurus..Most of the people on warrior forums have subscribed to their list. But do you think they read their each and every email?

    Ofcourse not.

    Providing good content in 4-5 emails will be sufficient for making 1st pitch.

    If you are really keen in providing free content for larger duration, then test out adding the product pitch softly within the free content
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  • Profile picture of the author marketwarrior06
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    1st one is better. you can have a variety. your buyers can get an option to choose the products of same value from the list. my suggestion is the 1st one.
    thanks
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    • Profile picture of the author MattCatania
      Originally Posted by marketwarrior06 View Post

      1st one is better. you can have a variety. your buyers can get an option to choose the products of same value from the list. my suggestion is the 1st one.
      thanks
      I find that too much is often harmful. When people are faced with too many choices they tend to choose nothing at all.

      The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less
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  • Profile picture of the author katepeter
    Not expert in Email Marketing ..!! but Email marketing is the best way to promote your business ..!!
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  • Profile picture of the author BenQ
    30 day of free content is way too much. They'll be so busy with that they won't think they need to buy.
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    • Originally Posted by BenQ View Post

      30 day of free content is way too much. They'll be so busy with that they won't think they need to buy.
      I suppose I could cut them off at some point... dry the well... and say buy or get off my list.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by TheSalesTechnician View Post

        I suppose I could cut them off at some point... dry the well... and say buy or get off my list.
        The method you use depends on the traffic source, as well as how well you can establish a "relationship" with your subscribers. Not knowing either one, it would seem that using a split test may be your most viable option.

        A reference was made that my method includes "culling non-buyers" from lists. My subscribers are never threatened with removal, but if they don't buy within any 60-90 day promotion cycle, they are quietly canned without any pleading or whimpering. I like to keep things clean and simple.

        Buyers are moved up to another product promotion list (across all of my niches there are hundreds of incrementally higher-end products in queue) and survivors get hammered daily for another 60-90 day sales cycle. Daily emails do contain hard-hitting promotions, but also valuable content, tips, free resources, jokes, stories, etc.
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        • Profile picture of the author DonMarketer
          I clean up my list every 3 months. The way I do it is, I create a segment list for those who read my emails but don't take action, and those who don't read my email. Then after a process of elimination I delete them from the system. I see them as an expense as I still have to pay my autoresponder provider to have them there regardless.

          It's all about providing value, if I'm not providing value to my subscribers there is no reason to waste their time and mine!
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  • I´m not an email expert, in fact I don´t do any email marketing at all. But I receive emails for years and know when something works on me. I would do a combination of both.

    Let´s say I present myself as an expert on Facebook and try to sell them a product about making money with Facebook. I would write them emails about the advantages of Facebook, seen from different angles, mentioning the product in every email and also offering them some other useful products for making money with Facebook now and then. Everything is centred around Facebook. I will probably only sell something when people are thinking: I am going to do this. And I have to convince them that it´s worth to do it.
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  • Profile picture of the author nasuryono
    I like your idea of Method B since you are qualifying your buyer by doing so.

    You are essentially moving your buyer from Group one (Low Ticket Item) to Group two (Mid Ticket Item) to group three (High Ticket Item).

    In the long run, you'll get a much better conversion tracking because you have qualified your buyers. That's why I like your B method.
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  • Profile picture of the author jack4321
    I'm not en expert of email marketing, what I can tell you is that some tips about writing email.

    1. Write a good subject line
    The Subject line that is read before the email is even opened. If this sounds canned, or like a sales pitch, the rest of the email will probably never get read.

    2. Use proper formatting.
    Proper formatting allows recipients to focus on the main point and increases the chance of them reading the entire email.

    3. Use emphasis mark to emphasize your main sentence. It is convenient for customers to notice the most important point of the content. However, not too much or it will lost its function.

    4. Professional knowledge.
    It includs grammar mistakes and introduction about your products. If there is something wrong, customers will have a negative impression about your email even company.

    5. Don’t spend your whole email telling about you or your product.
    It is just impolite and less useful. You had better tell some information about yourself and your company, which will add
    dependability favorable impression about this email. Then, manybe they will read it.

    Then, you had better get help from a help desk software, which help with getting email addresses, managing them, creating message, sending the email and analyzing the results. You can download a free one from the site to have a test.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
    Paul, that's a lot of content if you send emails day in day out. One question: do you send long or short emails? I wonder if people would like to read over 1k word articles each and every day.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      My emails are typically 1200-1500 words, along with resource links and free downloads. The "trick" is to provide rich content that subscribers actually want to read, and eagerly anticipate the next issue. There is almost always a chance, however, that lengthy emails contain spam trigger words which makes them end up in bulk folders. Early on, my subscribers are advised to whitelist my email address to avoid this inconvenience. In my experience, long (but engaging) emails can dramatically increase sales conversion rates.
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