Taking Notes From Frank Kern - List Building - Should I Just Give Away Tons Of Stuff For Free?

37 replies
So I was studying this pdf:

http://www.productlaunchvault.com/Fr...lSwipeFile.pdf

There is this belief on warrior forum that if you give away too much free stuff, you wind up attracting the wrong people.

I can see this to be true, but I still think a person needs to strive to give away LOTS of free content.

If you really look at the amount of content some of these gurus give away for free, you'd think they are building a list of people just looking for free stuff.

THEN I REALIZED.

Their "hook" seems to lie soley in the QUALITY of what they're giving away. It honestly seems there is nothing else to it. Is Frank Kern a great copywriter? Sure. But I don't see anything about his writing that couldn't be replicated by most folks with half a brain.

Say you target a niche that is use to recieving a certain quality of content in that niche. Then you come in and give away content 100 times better,

My question is how do you promote to these people so they KNOW not to expect free stuff? How do you *condition* a buyer mindset WHILE executing this?

Frank gave 2 reasons why he was sending emails to people.

1) Just to be cool.

"I mean hey why not? I could use the good kharma" he says.

2) Blatant self promotion. He TELLS PEOPLE he will be releasing even better content soon, and the content he's releasing now is unlike anything they've ever seen before.

To me, this sounds like a VERY simple, but BRILLIANT way to build a quality list.

I have tons of unique hi quality content I can give to a specific niche, and wanted to give this a try. I almost feel like this. If someone just keeps giving you AWESOME content, then one day they stop, you're going to WANT MORE CONTENT FROM THEM on matter what. I noticed this a while ago when Ewen Mack kept posting quality direct mail pieces in the offline forum, the day he stopped I lost my mind. You are making people *psychologically dependent* on your material. I mean what better way can there be to build a list?

So the day they don't release free content, and release their product, if their content before that was HI QUALITY, you will buy whatever they wind up releasing.

I want to have some type of focus here. So my main question is who has used a system like this? Did you have good results?

If not, what do you think you did wrong?

This information will be very useful for me so I know what to watch out for when I try this myself. I'm most curious about how you keep the buyer mindset going while you're giving them free material. I don't want to make any mistakes and have people get pissed off when I launch my product.

It seems the best thing to nail down would be keeping peoples focus on the product your about to release, moreso then the free content. Like you hype up the free stuff alot, get them excited about it, but you always keep their focus a bit more on what you're about to launch. You use the free stuff as a "reference point" for the quality of the product you will be releasing. So the better your free content, the more people will expect your product to be killer (which it should).

Thanks - Red
#building #frank kern #free #give #list #notes #stuff #taking #tons
  • Profile picture of the author Danny Shaw
    You should do some research around up-selling and down-selling. I would not use this technique in the IM niche but would work great with other micro niches.

    The trend seems to be this year. Product => Webinar/JV Emailing Blasts => Down-sell (Freebie) => Up-sell (Related $ product)
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Yep, Eben Pagan calls it moving the free line. Same idea, though.

    A big part of what makes that work for Kern, et.al., is that as much as they give away, they have much more in reserve. Their list members expect great content on the front end. They also expect the pitch to come.

    I have no problems giving away a bunch of good content. What I have a problem with is people who keep giving away the farm, and then when it comes time to sell, have nothing left but some lame affiliate product. In the meantime, they've trained their list members to think of them as a buddy, a pal, someone who just wants to help. When they finally get up the nerve to make the pitch, their members see it as a curve ball they weren't expecting. So they get upset, call the list owner names, accuse the owner of just wanting to sell stuff (regardless of how much good free stuff they've already gotten), and unsubscribe.

    One thing with the way Kern, Pagan, Reese, etc. do business. You always know that at some point they want you to buy something. You know the pitch is coming and they know it's coming. No surprises.
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    • Profile picture of the author davidkings
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      Yep, Eben Pagan calls it moving the free line. Same idea, though.

      A big part of what makes that work for Kern, et.al., is that as much as they give away, they have much more in reserve. Their list members expect great content on the front end. They also expect the pitch to come.

      I have no problems giving away a bunch of good content. What I have a problem with is people who keep giving away the farm, and then when it comes time to sell, have nothing left but some lame affiliate product.
      What is the correct way to do this?
      and the incorrect inefficient way?

      giving free content, (which is a minor % of the whole thing), and then sell them the bulk majority?
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      • Profile picture of the author MyiMall
        Originally Posted by davidkings View Post

        What is the correct way to do this?
        and the incorrect inefficient way?

        giving free content, (which is a minor % of the whole thing), and then sell them the bulk majority?
        Try finding info (free, of course) from Ryan Deiss and also from Mike Filsaime. I think it's Ryan that does a great job explaining how to use a free report or video as a lead gen tool - then following up. Filsaime has probably the best explanation of upsells/downsell strategies of anyone I've seen. His Butterfly Marketing book (still free, I believe) is a great resource.

        In short - when you give away free stuff - go for the immediate upsell to a moderately priced product. It all depends on what you're selling and what you're giving away, of course - but you should be able to at least present a product for sale right from the start of the relationship. If they say "no" to the upsell - either go for a lower-priced downsell or offer them something else for free. If you offer a 100% money-back guarantee on your product (which you should - or offer a free trial period), then you'll get some sales earlier on. Brian Tracy refers to it as the "Law of Reciprocity" - when you give someone something OF VALUE - they feel compelled to do the same for you (i.e. to give you money by buying something). Don't be afraid to ask for the sale IF you're providing real value with your freebie.

        For example - I give away free advertising with no strings attached. If you get good results, you're likely to want to go for the paid advertising. If not - you won't. Either way - I've developed a good relationship with you because I gave you something for free and didn't try to scam or oversell until you had a chance to see if what I offer is of value to YOU. The message that I'm going to ask you for money later if I provide value is stated right up front. There's no need to keep piling on more and more free stuff - and there's no reason not to ask for the sale if you're really providing something they need/want.
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        • Profile picture of the author davidkings
          Originally Posted by MyiMall View Post

          Filsaime has probably the best explanation of upsells/downsell strategies of anyone I've seen. His Butterfly Marketing book (still free, I believe) is a great resource..
          Is this the ebook you are on about?

          http://yourreviewguru.com/wp-content...utterfly_3.pdf
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          • Profile picture of the author MyiMall
            Originally Posted by davidkings View Post

            Is this the ebook you are on about?

            http://yourreviewguru.com/wp-content...utterfly_3.pdf
            Yep, that's the Butterfly Manuscript I was talking about. A lot of it is stuff most IMers already know - but for someone just getting started, it's a great resource. And, even for veterans, there's always some nugget to be picked up.
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        • Profile picture of the author HoxIgnono
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  • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
    Ok excellent!

    Thats where it seems the real experience comes into play. So as I give away my free stuff, I'll be sure that people don't get the wrong idea. This is probably why honest copy is so significant when it comes to marketing. I will have to frame myself more as someone releasing an awesome product, more than someone just giving away free stuff (which is the truth I'm releasing the stuff to make sales - so I won't frame it any other way). Seems like there is a very delicate balance you need to strive for so maybe thats where the decades of experience become a requirement.

    I think if I can really reinforce that mindset in my list, then when I release my product they'll be that much more likely to buy it.

    Either way there's only one way to find out. Will definitely be posting some interesting case studies in the near future thats for sure.

    -Red
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    • Profile picture of the author Bill Hugall
      Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

      Ok excellent!

      Thats where it seems the real experience comes into play. So as I give away my free stuff, I'll be sure that people don't get the wrong idea. This is probably why honest copy is so significant when it comes to marketing. I will have to frame myself more as someone releasing an awesome product, more than someone just giving away free stuff (which is the truth I'm releasing the stuff to make sales - so I won't frame it any other way). Seems like there is a very delicate balance you need to strive for so maybe thats where the decades of experience become a requirement.

      I think if I can really reinforce that mindset in my list, then when I release my product they'll be that much more likely to buy it.

      Either way there's only one way to find out. Will definitely be posting some interesting case studies in the near future thats for sure.

      -Red
      Well said and good thread and thanks or this. I have learned more in this post than any product to date. That line is so fine between someone who sells great stuff but gives away high quality free content, and the guy who is just handy to keep around because the content is good. You have to learn and act so fast in this industry.
      That's what makes it fun!

      Thanks again
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      • Profile picture of the author Colin Theriot
        Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

        There is this belief on warrior forum that if you give away too much free stuff, you wind up attracting the wrong people.
        It's not the quantity of free stuff given away, or even the quality. It's the MANNER in which it's given away. If you want to sell a product about topic X, and as part of your prelaunch, you can GIVE AWAY the kinds of things competitors in niche X are charging for, then you suck all the attention out of the market, and have it ready to aim at your HIGH TICKET solution for problem X. But if you don't have the money-making stuff ready to go, giving away tons of value is the WRONG thing to do.

        Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

        Their "hook" seems to lie soley in the QUALITY of what they're giving away. It honestly seems there is nothing else to it. Is Frank Kern a great copywriter? Sure. But I don't see anything about his writing that couldn't be replicated by most folks with half a brain.
        The issue is that in any given Kern email, it is hard to remember ALL the PREVIOUS Kern content he's given you that factors into how you read it. He can send a one sentence email to his loyal list and it works BECAUSE they can "hear" him and "see" him and all of those bits in their brain influence the content. If you or I were to send a one sentence email to strangers, we should not be surprised at getting a different result. "Frank Kern" is a carefully manufactured persona, and the messages describing that character to the marketplace are very specifically engineered to do this. To embed "Frank" into your mind. As a copywriter, I can say with great certainty that it's NOT a copy thing in any given message that makes Frank's stuff work the way it does. It's the accumulation.

        Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

        My question is how do you promote to these people so they KNOW not to expect free stuff? How do you *condition* a buyer mindset WHILE executing this?
        I sort of stated it before, but this strategy works in a market where there are:

        A. Multiple suppliers selling the same thing at roughly the same price.
        B. The customers in this market buy and buy and buy.
        C. You have some degree of visibility and recognition in the market.

        What you are doing is taking YOUR competing product, marking it WAY up, then you GIVE AWAY the parts your competitors sell. THAT is moving the free line - not just picking a niche and arbitrarily giving away tons of free info.

        Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

        So the day they don't release free content, and release their product, if their content before that was HI QUALITY, you will buy whatever they wind up releasing.
        RIght here, totally for free, I'm going to give you my single biggest secret for creating "content" that will NOT make people resistant to a sale. It's so easy, you may disregard it as being too simple. I assure you it works.

        Basically, you ONLY create free content that is focused on PROBLEMS in the niche. You amplify the intensity of the problems, you augment their knowledge of problems, you teach them the nooks and crannies of every pothole they MIGHT run into one day.

        Why?

        This provides VALUE to them psychologically. Saving people and warning them away from danger FEELS like you've helped them. But in reality, all you've done is tune their brain to recognize problems in more detail.

        And when you talk about problems, this is information that people accept WITHOUT resistance (unlike results claims, for example). They feel that you are being altruistic because they can't connect it to an ulterior motive.

        And finally, it feels valuable but doesn't give them anything to actually DO to make progress. They know what to AVOID, but they aren't busy. The last thing you ever want to do is give away free how-to info, because when people actually DO it, they'll be too busy to buy your shortcut.

        So don't do that.

        Now, why does this work to sell stuff? Presume the next product I am promoting is say, SEO software for the sake of example. Now, in the weeks preceding this promotion, I will create "content" that talks about how VALUABLE good SEO is, BUT reveal the HONEST DIFFICULTY that comes with doing it well. I will talk about flaws in available software. I will talk about incomplete strategies. I will talk about the issues with relying on unethical outsourcers.

        Then, just when you're feeling full of ideas and super confident, BOOOM. You get a promo for some software that eliminates the need to hire outsourcers and is simple to use and works with detailed overall SEO strategies, too. You think "wow, I was just thinking how this is exactly what I need."

        And the best part is you won't remember I am the one who gave you that idea.

        Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

        It seems the best thing to nail down would be keeping peoples focus on the product your about to release, moreso then the free content. Like you hype up the free stuff alot, get them excited about it, but you always keep their focus a bit more on what you're about to launch.
        If you do the method I described above correctly, you will seemingly be describing a problem unsolvable by available means and they will practically BEG you to tell them about a solution that avoids the potholes and roadblocks you've been pointing out.

        Originally Posted by RedShifted View Post

        You use the free stuff as a "reference point" for the quality of the product you will be releasing. So the better your free content, the more people will expect your product to be killer (which it should).
        As stated, be EXTRA CAREFUL that you only use this strategy when you have a product you can sell for MORE than the competition, then what you give away is the level of product they sell. That is when it works. Otherwise, you're shooting yourself in the foot when you give away free stuff that other people sell. It ONLY works with the high-ticket product.

        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        I have no problems giving away a bunch of good content. What I have a problem with is people who keep giving away the farm, and then when it comes time to sell, have nothing left but some lame affiliate product. In the meantime, they've trained their list members to think of them as a buddy, a pal, someone who just wants to help. When they finally get up the nerve to make the pitch, their members see it as a curve ball they weren't expecting. So they get upset, call the list owner names, accuse the owner of just wanting to sell stuff (regardless of how much good free stuff they've already gotten), and unsubscribe.
        This is the exact reason I recommend the above. Good response, John.

        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        One thing with the way Kern, Pagan, Reese, etc. do business. You always know that at some point they want you to buy something. You know the pitch is coming and they know it's coming. No surprises.
        They almost all use a method similar to what I described above as part of the prelaunch. The reason you "know" a pitch is coming is because they are carving out a space in your brain - they are describing the empty shape of the problem at hand - then they drop their perfectly shaped product right into that spot, so of course people want it. You feel it coming and yet anticipate it as something that will FEEL GOOD.

        This is because unlike other people, they never seem to be selling something you DON'T NEED. That's because the bulk of their marketing - all the stuff people THINK of as "free content" is really what is creating the need.

        Make sense?
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        • Profile picture of the author David-JP
          Originally Posted by Colin Theriot View Post

          It's not the quantity of free stuff given away, or even the quality. It's the MANNER in which it's given away. If you want to sell a product about topic X, and as part of your prelaunch, you can GIVE AWAY the kinds of things competitors in niche X are charging for, then you suck all the attention out of the market, and have it ready to aim at your HIGH TICKET solution for problem X. But if you don't have the money-making stuff ready to go, giving away tons of value is the WRONG thing to do.
          I won't quote the rest of this- but anyone reading this thread- read the full reply. It is incredibly insightful Colin.

          Checking out your podcast now

          David
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        • Profile picture of the author Chris Worner
          Originally Posted by Colin Theriot View Post

          It's not the quantity of free stuff given away, or even the quality. It's the MANNER in which it's given away. If you want to sell a product about topic X, and as part of your prelaunch, you can GIVE AWAY the kinds of things competitors in niche X are charging for, then you suck all the attention out of the market, and have it ready to aim at your HIGH TICKET solution for problem X. But if you don't have the money-making stuff ready to go, giving away tons of value is the WRONG thing to do.........yada yada yada......
          I am printing this entire post and sticking it to the side of my computer case where I can see it. I suggest the rest of you reading this do the same, especially new people.

          Thankyou very much for this gold nugget.

          -Chris
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  • People want the "free" stuff only if they think it's not free and worth something.
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    soon people... Relax...
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  • Profile picture of the author adsassist
    News letters work very well.

    If you have a great news letter every week, your customers will stick around for the next one no matter what you promote.

    Just make sure your product is 10x better then your freebie.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ross Cohen
    Enjoyed the post, Red. Thanks for the read. It's a topic I think about regularly.
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  • Profile picture of the author MyiMall
    I would suggest putting a value on the "free stuff." For example, many of the top IM guys give away a product that previously sold for a few hundred dollars as a lead generating tool. Then, through their follow up autoresponder, they give some more free information as a follow up - maybe more current information to replace the outdated info you got for free. In those 2-3 subsequent emails, they ALWAYS tell you to look for the release of their newest - not-yet-ready product that's been updated for what's happening today. That's your hook - "this was great info - and it still is - but it's lacking either because it's outdated or because I've learned a lot more since it was released." You give away a nugget - pitch a product later in the email...give away another nugget - pitch a product. I think Kern recommends "giving" in 3-4 emails to every 1 pitch email.
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  • Profile picture of the author fedor50
    You can give a bunch of stuff away to build your list but... here's the problem with that, You may get a list full of freebie seekers who don't buy nothing that you promote. Where as if you charge somebody even a really low price for a product of yours they have still purchased something from you making it easy for you to sell to them again in the future
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Hess
    I would pay attention to more of what these guys are DOING instead of listening to what they're saying...
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  • Profile picture of the author theoptionsprofessor
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by davidkings View Post

      What is the correct way to do this?
      and the incorrect inefficient way?

      giving free content, (which is a minor % of the whole thing), and then sell them the bulk majority?
      There are two basic approaches, depending on what you have available to you. If you have a deep funnel with a lot of products, go back up and read Colin's response (post #9).

      If you don't have a lot, you can still build that relationship.

      1. Focus your email series on a small part of a bigger product. For example, if you want to offer a list-building product, focus on something like 'how to read a market and find out what you should tell them'.

      You have lots of room to talk about different aspects of market research, creating ideal customer profiles, etc., while reserving the 'meat' of list-building for the product you are promoting.

      Now that your subscribers know how to find out what their chosen market wants, you connect them with a quality product that shows them the how-to steps to get that done.

      You can supplement the hard-core emails with industry news, etc. if you are offering a 'real' newsletter.

      2. You can craft a series of 'FAQ' emails, related to the product(s) you want to promote. Answer the question in a way that enables people to actually accomplish something, without giving away the whole plot. No 'spoilers'. Which questions you choose to answer will affect your ability to render real service, establish your authority, and still have some meat left on the bones when it comes time to ask for action.

      Each answer is the best stuff you have, but it's a small piece of the whole enchilada.

      The inefficient way to do it is very common. Find a problem, craft or locate a solution, then spill your guts until there's very little reason to buy a product.

      Or, to put it another way, give away your best stuff - but not all of your best stuff...
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      • Profile picture of the author RogueOne
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        I'm really not the type to pat you on the back, but...

        I just want to comment that this is the best, most informative "money making" post i have seen in some time on WF.

        RedShifted: I like the way your mind works.

        Colin: you have a way of making things very clear.

        Thanks for all the helpful information. Now I have so much more to think about.
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        • Profile picture of the author RogueOne
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          Originally Posted by drunkenmonkey View Post

          They could just go: "F it...nah..too much hassle!" and go..without even getting to your pitch....since you've just pointed out to them what a pain in the ass it's gonna be?...
          You've planted in their minds that the "secret" is coming that will make it easy.

          That's why, when the pitch comes, they are ready and eager to buy.

          wow, I was just thinking how this is exactly what I need.
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  • Profile picture of the author sriram rajan
    Once you have the brand / r the to go expert then you have more flexibility , if you have a following , make sure you impact that and increase your authority presence.

    Personally i love brendon burchards style, he gives like 20% of his course away , and even if people dont buy they get a lot of value from his FREE stuff , and also word of mouth spreads so he attracts more people and eventually makes more sales....
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    You dont need to give away alot of stuff. Just drive a ton of traffic to your sales letter page.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oliver Orbitz
    Hey, Redshifted.

    I fully believe in giving away free stuff. If you know what you are doing, money almost always follow. It is almost mystical, or seems to be anyway. You can follow the website in my signature. That is the best case study that you will get for giving stuff away for free. Actually, if you want a great case study that is still in progress, and much further along than my offering, check out smartpassiveincome.

    Pat Flynn offers tons of free content, and it is easy to see how much money he is banking. If done right, offering amazing content for free can pay you back 100x over compared to if you were to try to sell that same information. It also depends on what niche you are in. Not every niche is going to be suited to pay Flynns business model, which is the business model that his main blog SPI uses.

    So yes, I really don't think that it is possible to give away too much free stuff. Focus on giving stuff away that really helps people, and the money should follow in spades. Not everybody will agree, but who cares?

    Oliver
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  • In fact, if you follow the "gurus" (you mentioned Frank Kern), you will find that they do NOT give away lots of free content. In fact, for EVERY piece of content they give away, there's an offer pitched mid-way through their videos, and that's how it should be.

    The idea is not to give free content for the sake of it. The idea is that the free content works as an appetizer for the main course (the paid offer), just like those 30-second porn teasers that show you just 30-secs of the action, and you're required to pay to unlock the full film.

    So the formula is to give away free content that...

    A) It is related to your paid offer, so you narrow down your audience towards your target offer.

    B) It is solves an IMMEDIATE doubt/problem for your subscribers, so they understand that you know what you're talking about and that you can delivery quality stuff they desire.

    C) It leaves them "hungry" for more premium content (aka the paid offer).

    Frank Kern is a master of this 3-step formula. I see it applied over and over in his videos, spiced up with Kern's natural wit and charisma of course.
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  • Profile picture of the author sal64
    On eof Kern's premise is that what you give them has to solve their problem. Get them from where they are now to where they want to be.

    Nothing new about this to be honest. This approach establishes your relationship with your list and shows cred.

    BUT...

    The key as has been mentioned is to keep something in reserve.

    If you like... the free stuff is the trailer and the product is the main event.

    If you give away free crap... you get a crap list.

    This is where marketers get it wrong IMO.

    The free thing has to have value and stand alone as a product. But be related to the main product.

    So the answer? In my case, I would take a chunk out of the product that addresses a specific solution and use that as the freebie. Make the benefit as specific as you can.

    It's like giving away the intro of a book which gives the overview etc... then selling them the rest of the book.

    Best,

    Sal

    Sal
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  • Profile picture of the author CurtisSWN
    Someone may have already said this but let me give me two cents:

    Yes, but give them tons of value, real info that people can use. Wow, isn't that what a newsletter is supposed to be? When readers recognize you as an authority, or like you, or both; then they will buy your recommended products.
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    • Profile picture of the author adsassist
      Originally Posted by CurtisSWN View Post

      Someone may have already said this but let me give me two cents:

      Yes, but give them tons of value, real info that people can use. Wow, isn't that what a newsletter is supposed to be? When readers recognize you as an authority, or like you, or both; then they will buy your recommended products.
      I would like to add to that.

      Give great value but not free. Don't offer free products in the newsletter. Just great information they can actually use.

      If you give free product after another, your training your list to not buy and look for free.

      Great Information people can use is the goal. Not FREE.
      Cant even sell a decent WSO these days because everyone wants free.
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  • Profile picture of the author karlmay1980
    Frank Kern sells extremely high priced products, there are very few that that are lower than $100 and most go nearer the 4 figure numbers.

    He gives away amazing value for free as it build a massive buzz around everything that he does, but the truth is his sales rate is very low, probably lower than some newbies but he even admits that he only needs a few sales from each promotion to get them onto his buyers list.

    His buyers list are then offered much higher priced range of products that bring in most of his annual income.

    He knows most people accessing the free stuff cant afford the main product offer, but it is all part of the buzz and how he draws even more attention to it.

    He reaches many people with the quality of his free stuff and the consensus is if this is what is free how good will the paid stuff be?

    Truth is not so much better as he gives a lot of the real nuggets away but the paid stuff will allow you to understand it more so is still worth the money.

    He keeps the entry level to his buyers list quite high so really only action takers buy and ones that he can up sell more high value stuff later on.

    In the meantime all those he helping free hold him up as one of the figures to emulate and look up to and when they make money are very likely to buy the next offer he has out and eventually make it onto his buyers list, and the none action takers that dont take what he taught and put it to good use and make money are riddled out without any waste of his time, but may of brought some buzz for him by sharing etc when they received the free stuff.

    He doesn't let others use him in any type of promotion and never allows anything that will devalue any of his own products so everyone keeps the perception of his high value and high ticket products.

    He obviously has mastered the art and it is quite hard for a newbie to suddenly start wanting thousands for stuff on the back end like he does, even though many could give away some great stuff upfront, the work is where to place the upsell to get them buying without devaluing your reputation before you have one.
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  • Profile picture of the author warreng
    I agree with Danny Shaw. Always look at the trend and try to ride the wave. Remember, you don't have to reinvent the wheel.....
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  • Profile picture of the author JasonBennet
    I love the idea of giving away free quality content which will then lead to a paid offer. This seems like a simple and effective way. By providing content I will be providing values to the subscribers and the the next step to sell them relevant products will seem like a natural steps. Thanks for sharing this idea.
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Schenk
    Colin, at the upcoming Warrior Event don't be alarmed when I walk up to you and place my thumb and little finger on the side of your head. I am only doing a Vulcan Mind Meld to download your brain. I assure you, it is painless.

    :-Don
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  • Profile picture of the author GetRichMatrix
    I try to give away as much as I can for free, if the cost to me is almost 0.

    Why?

    Because it creates a great relationship between me and the visitors of my websites. And when they 'like' me, they don't mind spending money on my products, again and again.

    I'm in it for the long haul. That's how I've been able to create more passive income than I could ever have dreamed of ;-)
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  • Profile picture of the author tac88
    The freebie thing we all do is played out!
    What I mean is your attracting freebie seekers, they get their freebie and unsubscribe a day later.
    What I realized is it's not the size of your list that counts it's your relationship with your list that matters.

    What we all want is a buyers list One buyer on your list is equal to 100 freebie seekers. So I went "Old School" and the best way to build a buyers list is to create a High Quality Product or white paper and sell it for a couple dollars .

    My list of 450 that I built this way kicks one of my freebie lists of 5,500 butt every time. And a real butt whipping too!
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    A Simple Formula For Online Success
    This is what's putting money in my pocket Right Now!

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  • Profile picture of the author JoDyGcEMyL
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  • Profile picture of the author wakey7
    I don't think it's so much about conditioning people, just finding the right mix.

    When my subscribers opt in, they get a free guide that I wrote myself, all about getting traffic for free. This is a nice little freebie that also goes into how to turn the traffic into cash.

    When I mail my list, I vary the content over different days, and keep to a schedule. Some days I post great, free content to help them with their endeavours, some days I'll promote a product.

    For me, it's all about building a relationship with my list.

    The first thing I ask my subscribers when they receive my welcome email is 'How can I help?'

    I've had loads of personal responses to this and it's great for finding out the types of problems my list encounter. I'm then better primed to promote a relevant product.

    This is the key for me.
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