Questions for Article Syndication Whiz Kids Here...

by Dayne Dylan Banned
29 replies
Hey Warriors, I've been diving more and more into using article syndication as a means to drive steady traffic to some of my niches. There's plenty of info here on the forum which I've read many times and also want to thank Alexa for all her help as well, she's top notch.

Here are some of my questions I've been thinking about lately that I would like to ask those of you who are expert "whiz kids" in article syndication...

1. Do you write all your own articles and if so, do only write in niches that hold your interest?

I'm finding the idea of writing long articles myself in niches I have zero passion for quite hard. But of course, the money will probably be there if I can generate quality traffic.

2. In the very beginning, how long did it take you to start to see steady revenue from your articles and how many did you publish roughly?

I'm finding that a few of my current articles I've submitted to are indeed getting picked up by sites...but unfortunately, 90%+ of them seem to be unrelated, generic autoblogs. I'm starting to wonder if my subjects are a bit TOO niche to make syndication really work well and of course, to make money.

3. Content duplication?

I know many of you here state that you should publish your own article on your site first, get it indexed, THEN submit to article directories. But if you do this, what's to say that those article directories or sites that pick up your article can outrank you in the way of SEO purposes? Or even squeeze you out all together in the search engines? I'm thinking that keeping articles, that are only unique to the site, separate from syndication ones...of course, this means more work. I would ideally like to get some SEO out of these, as well as traffic from syndication.

4. Are you sending your traffic to more of a content site with a squeeze near the top (and also products for sale), or keeping it simple with squeeze pages THEN selling them down the line?

I can see the advantages to both ways, not only for the writer of the article, but also in the way you are viewed by possible publishers of your articles. I know if I was looking for content to publish, and their link went to just a pitch page to sell their product, I might be much more put off. Like Alexa has pointed out, getting that email is key, and I agree with her. I know she also believes in sending them to a content based site which makes sense and is less "sales-y". What do the rest of you do?

I would love to know your thoughts, thanks!
#article #kids #questions #syndication #whiz
  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    1. Do you write all your own articles and if so, do only write in niches that hold your interest?
    I write all my own, yes.

    Only in niches that hold some of my interest. Kind of "enough to be willing to write about them". I happen to be quite interested in a very wide spread of things, which helps, but there are still vast areas about which I know nothing, and plenty of niches it would be a real struggle for me to get into (such as anything "technical").

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    2. In the very beginning, how long did it take you to start to see steady revenue from your articles and how many did you publish roughly?
    I've started off each niche site with about 4 articles, typically. That's plenty.

    It doesn't matter how many articles you have. It matters how widely you can get them syndicated in front of highly targeted traffic.

    You could start with 2 articles.

    When I first started (my first niche), I earned nothing for months, had no idea what I was doing, didn't understand what article marketing was (I imagined it was "part of SEO" ), didn't understand how article directories worked (I thought the idea was that you put copies of your articles into them as a way of getting traffic and backlinks ), and generally did everything wrong that you can do wrong. Including promoting the wrong products.

    So let's forget all that and talk about my "second start", when I knew (more or less) what I was doing and got going again from scratch in new/different niches.

    I started seeing steady revenue in the second month. Of course, I didn't know at the time that it was going to turn out to be steady revenue, but fortunately it did.

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    a few of my current articles I've submitted to are indeed getting picked up by sites...but unfortunately, 90%+ of them seem to be unrelated, generic autoblogs.
    Well, you can ignore those.

    You're talking about passive syndication, here, though.

    You can benefit from that (and it was actually what got me started), but far more important and significant (and fast and reliable and profitable) is active syndication: building your own syndication-list: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6575732 <---- this will help!

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    I'm starting to wonder if my subjects are a bit TOO niche to make syndication really work well and of course, to make money.
    Nooooo, not from what I've seen.

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    I know many of you here state that you should publish your own article on your site first, get it indexed, THEN submit to article directories.
    We do.

    If someone tells you something different, personally I'd strongly advise you not only to ignore them on that point, but also not to seek any further information from that person on anything related to this subject at all, just in case all their "information" comes right out of the Urban Myth School on Internet Marketing. (It often does!).

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    But if you do this, what's to say that those article directories or sites that pick up your article can outrank you in the way of SEO purposes?
    Google is to say that.

    And Google said it, repeatedly, loudly, firmly and clearly throughout 2011 with all the Panda updates.

    If you have a site that can't outrank a poxy article directory, then you have far, far bigger problems than anything that'll be discussed in this thread.

    Article directories are just about the lowest of the low, for SEO.

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    I would ideally like to get some SEO out of these, as well as traffic from syndication.
    The SEO advantages come from the relevant niche sites to which your work is syndicated. Not from article directories. :p

    All an article directory can offer you in the SEO department is a non-context-relevant PR-0 backlink (regardless of the page rank of its own home page, because your article doesn't get published on its own home page. So if you see people, later in the thread, telling you to "submit to high page rank directories", just close your ears/eyes, because they know much less about it than you do! You understand that there's no such thing as a "high page rank directory" because page ranks attach to pages, not to websites.).

    Even before all the Panda updates destroyed the article directories' SEO potential, the authors of the standard SEO textbooks were explaining why you'd typically need something between 50,000 and 100,000 article directory backlinks to give you the linkjuice equivalent to one backlink from a relevant authority site.

    It's possible - especially in the early stages - that another relevant site to which you syndicate your content may outrank you. But that's a different matter, and something you have to live with. The more you acquire initial indexation-rights for your own site, the less often that will happen and the more temporary it will be when it does.

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    4. Are you sending your traffic to more of a content site with a squeeze near the top
    Well, you know my answer to this one, but I have it "ready to say"!

    An opt-in, yes. Always. I'm an affiliate marketer, so the primary purpose of the websites to which I attract the traffic with my articles is to get the opt-in. And until I find another way to sell ClickBank products, that's what I'll always be doing: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post5210243

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    or keeping it simple with squeeze pages THEN selling them down the line?
    I don't use squeeze pages. At all. Ever.

    Not after all the split-testing I've done.

    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6123982

    Every time I split-tested, I built a bigger list with a pure squeeze-page and made less money from it. There are reasons for that.

    1 Page Squeeze Site for List Building
    I don’t believe this! Higher opt-in rate, fewer sales
    What gets peopole to sign up?
    Squeeze Page on Landing Page a Turn Off?

    Howver, squeeze pages may still work well for you. And they're a tried and tested method, after all.

    You "got me out of the way" first, here, anyway ...
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  • Profile picture of the author TorinoGray
    Alexa, will you or have you put out a WSO? I follow the links to links and I think I may be picking up enough to be dangerous, but I would love a step by step guide to "not being a twit in article marketing". Feel free to workshop the title
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    • Profile picture of the author LloydC
      I was going to post some witty comment like "in b4 alexa", do you have some sort of script that alerts you whenever someone mentions article syndication or something? lol.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
    Banned
    Alexa pretty much covered it, but I'll give my own twist as well.

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    1. Do you write all your own articles and if so, do only write in niches that hold your interest?
    Yes, to both. I still write for others as the main crux of my business, it wouldn't make sense to outsource the stuff that brings in passive income! On the niches, you shouldn't get into anything that you don't enjoy writing about in my opinion. You are essentially married to that niche, it's readers, and the products that can be sold within it. Why force yourself into an unhappy situation for marginal benefit? You have your whole life to get married to a real person.




    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    2. In the very beginning, how long did it take you to start to see steady revenue from your articles and how many did you publish roughly?
    My first niche took a month. Second one took about three weeks, and the third was the same. The latest niche I am working on will probably return the same results, depending on when I have things ready to launch.

    I start off with 4 or 5 articles personally, and then have a new one out every 5 days. Between three current niches, it's only a few short hours out of my week. Don't worry about the autoblogs and crap picking things up. Just find real publishers. Only if they don't exist do you need to worry about being too niche (although very narrow topics can be published on more general (while still relevant) blogs).



    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    3. Content duplication?
    Alexa covered it pretty thoroughly. The last thing you need to worry about is being outranked by a directory, and if the situation comes up there is something very wrong with your website.


    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    4. Are you sending your traffic to more of a content site with a squeeze near the top (and also products for sale), or keeping it simple with squeeze pages THEN selling them down the line?
    Content based website as well. I mentioned this yesterday in fact: on my newest niche site, I took an excerpt from the opt in incentive and populated the landing page with that. The content pulls them in and they have to opt-in to see what was talked about before and what happens next. It is my best converting landing page so far.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    1. Do you write all your own articles and if so, do only write in niches that hold your interest?
    Yes, I write all of the articles I make available for syndication. Some of the niches I write in, I had little interest in before I started, but researching the niche, I developed an interest. Having a lively sense of curiosity helps.

    I'm kind of an odd duck in this flock because I work both sides of the fence. I write and syndicate articles, and I use hand-picked articles from outside sources (in other words, syndicated content).

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    2. In the very beginning, how long did it take you to start to see steady revenue from your articles and how many did you publish roughly?
    I wouldn't worry too much about the autoblogs. If they annoy you, send a DMCA takedown notice with a naked CC: to their host.

    As far as how long to generate revenue, it depends. I have some niches where I am the market, so selecting products and crafting the message is easy. In others, it took some experimentation to get the 'voice' and content right. So time to revenue could be anywhere from a few weeks to a few months.

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    3. Content duplication?
    I'm not sweating SEO when I write for syndication. I want human eyeballs, interested in more of what I have to say. Funny thing is, the more relevant, quality sites and newsletter archives my stuff appears in, the better I do from search.

    I quit worrying about it when I looked at my stats and found that my search traffic wasn't coming from terms I targeted. It was mainly coming from terms I'd have never considered trying to optimize. So I write for the people, using the language they use, and the long-tail traffic just seems to appear.

    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    4. Are you sending your traffic to more of a content site with a squeeze near the top (and also products for sale), or keeping it simple with squeeze pages THEN selling them down the line?
    I want the opt-ins, but I want the right opt-ins. I can sign a lot of people up with a well-done squeeze page with a few vague benefits and a good freebie. But I don't make my daily bread by giving away freebies, and for a lot of freebie seekers, the gap between 'free' and 'paid' is bigger than most of us can cross.

    Most of the time now, I'm using a blog-style site with a static front page. The main content area on that front page has some content (Joe's idea of using an excerpt from the incentive is a good one I'll be testing - he's young, but he's sharp). The opt-in is prominent on the home page and repeated in the upper right sidebar on every other page.

    That way, those who are ready to opt-in after reading the content on the home page can opt-in easily, while those who want to snoop around a bit more have content to consume and the opt-in is easy to find when they are ready...
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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
      Banned
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      (Joe's idea of using an excerpt from the incentive is a good one I'll be testing - he's young, but he's sharp).
      Aw shucks lol .

      To be honest though, it wasn't a completely original idea. In Need to Know, Paul had a section at some point where he talked about leveraging every piece of content you have and maximizing it's effectiveness. So the idea stemmed from that.
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  • Profile picture of the author imgeek2727
    Here's what I do

    1) I investigate the niche articles in the directories I plan to submit to. I only focus on the top 10 "most respected" directories. You will get syndicated from there. No need to run a spin bot and blast 1000000000000000 directories/ezines.

    2) As part of my investigation, I figure out how existing articles cover the niche I am focusing on. Are they missing something? Are they leaving something out? Are they written badly?

    3) I then investigate how people online are already talking about my niche and figure out what themes emerge. I cross reference this (if available) against social media signals.

    4) Putting #2 and #3 together I come up with a topic list and keyword themes. I run the keywords through google keyword selector first to make sure they get decent search volumes but have low competition levels.

    5) At the end of the process, I am left with a topic list that 1) already interests my target audience 2) my article site competitors miss 3) gets decent traffic volume from SEs but have low competition levels.

    6) I outsource my topic list to a website copywriting firm I use for engaging "dramatic" content. I also have them write a press release about each piece.

    7) When I get the articles back, I post it on my site to get it indexed. Once I have it on my site for a couple of days and my facebook fan page users / twitter auto post followers have had a chance to viralize it a bit, I submit the press release about the article.

    8) I submit the article to article directory sites. Again, focus only on the ones that are heavily syndicated.

    The key is to orchestrate the different streams of attention your materials are getting. Don't expect to hit the ball out of the park at your first swing. There are many "secret sauces" in the process. You can only come up with your own blend through trial and error and knowing your niches more intimately.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dayne Dylan
    Banned
    Wow, you guys (and Alexa) are awesome, exactly the info I was looking for! Thank you
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      Being a simple kind of guy, I have a team of writers/researchers for almost all of my articles, mainly because I have little or no interest in many of the niches in which I market. Also, SEO along with its associated nuisances of ranking in the search engines, is of very little concern in my marketing model.

      The marketing approach I use is to go after the most hotly competitive niches, because that's generally where the most money is being made. It's nearly impossible to rank in the SERPs among the most lucrative niches, but the article syndication model overcomes this disadvantage by leveraging the shear numbers of publication outlets available.

      For any given viable niche, there are literally millions of potential syndication outlets; ezines, websites/blogs, newsletters, and offline trade journals, specialty magazines, newspapers, press releases ... etc. And it really does not take many articles at all to completely bypass the competition when directly distributed in front of real live targeted eyeballs.
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      • Profile picture of the author David Keith
        Originally Posted by myob View Post


        For any given viable niche, there are literally millions of potential syndication outlets; ezines, websites/blogs, newsletters, and offline trade journals, specialty magazines, newspapers, press releases ... etc. And it really does not take many articles at all to completely bypass the competition when directly distributed in front of real live targeted eyeballs.
        to the OP, be careful of the advice you get on a forum.

        For even the biggest of niches there are not MILLIONS of potential syndication outlets that are relevant. For the vast majority of niches, there are not even thousands of relevant publications. This sounds really good, but is just not a reality.

        The only place you see millions of potential places to syndicate content is online and a very very high percentage of those places are of such low quality that having your material associated with such places is going to hurt your reputation more than it helps you.
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Originally Posted by David Keith View Post

          to the OP, be careful of the advice you get on a forum.

          For even the biggest of niches there are not MILLIONS of potential syndication outlets that are relevant. For the vast majority of niches, there are not even thousands of relevant publications. This sounds really good, but is just not a reality.

          The only place you see millions of potential places to syndicate content is online and a very very high percentage of those places are of such low quality that having your material associated with such places is going to hurt your reputation more than it helps you.

          The reference to "MILLIONS" is obviously a superlative but in this case it is referring to the number of actual results returned by Google, and really is just a simple literary instrument to indicate a large base of relevant syndication outlets. For practical purposes, perhaps only a few hundred or even a couple of thousand outlets would be sufficient for many niches.

          Besides Google, consider using other sources for relevant publications such as "Writers' Market", trade directories, professional journals, associations, chambers of commerce, or even directories of periodicals available in your local library. :rolleyes:
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          • Profile picture of the author David Keith
            Originally Posted by myob View Post

            The reference to "MILLIONS" is obviously a superlative but in this case it is referring to the number of actual results returned by Google, and really is just a simple literary instrument to indicate a large base of relevant syndication outlets. For practical purposes, perhaps only a few hundred or even a couple of thousand outlets would be sufficient for many niches.

            Besides Google, consider using other sources for relevant publications such as "Writers' Market", trade directories, professional journals, associations, chambers of commerce, or even directories of periodicals available in your local library. :rolleyes:
            I think the OP was asking for practical advice not someone giving advice who is playing games with literary instruments to make it seem as though there are millions of relevant publications to syndicate to. In fact, even the mere idea that there are that many relevant publications due to the google search results numbers is very misleading to people.

            Plain and simple, its bad advice to indicate to someone those numbers are even relevant to the real number of "real world" potential syndication outlets.
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  • Profile picture of the author alfid
    I've written many of my own but also pay other people to do it for me.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dayne Dylan
    Banned
    I think I may have to hire out some of the writing and do some myself. I'm thinking the very dry subjects I will hire out.

    In your opinion, what do you think is a fair rate for a 1200 word article written for syndication (that's actually good)?
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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

      I think I may have to hire out some of the writing and do some myself. I'm thinking the very dry subjects I will hire out.

      In your opinion, what do you think is a fair rate for a 1200 word article written for syndication (that's actually good)?
      For syndicated pieces? Writers usually charge a lot, $120 bare minimum ($.10 per word) because of the ROI that each piece brings in tends to be very high when marketed correctly. These are also the kinds of pieces that you hear people charge a $1.00 per word for.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dayne Dylan
    Banned
    Is there a freelance site that tends to have more writers of this caliber?
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  • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
    Banned
    If there is, it has eluded me lol. I would have started writing there instead of iWriter, Odesk, and Elance back in the day .
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    • Profile picture of the author fin
      Op,

      If you don't think the articles you write are relevant for syndication, don't try and syndicate them.

      What's the big deal with putting every single article on your site? There isn't one.

      If your niche is truly a bit different, write amazing articles for your website, them write particular articles you only use for maximum syndication. Who knows, it could even work out better having your syndicated articles ever more targeted than what you'd normally put on your site.
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    I am wearing my bullet proof vest, so I feel safe participating in this thread. :p


    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    1. Do you write all your own articles and if so, do only write in niches that hold your interest?

    I write content that will be interesting to the people most likely to buy what I am selling.

    If that means I must lean outside of my comfort zone in my writing, then that is what I must do to achieve the results I want to achieve.


    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    2. In the very beginning, how long did it take you to start to see steady revenue from your articles and how many did you publish roughly?

    I started doing article marketing before I had anything to sell.

    Once I had something to sell and started doing article marketing to promote it, it took about two weeks to start making money.

    For the first several years, I tried to write two articles per week, but more often, I only wrote one article per week or every two weeks.


    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    3. Content duplication?

    Not a concern.

    I write and syndicate articles to get eyeballs for my articles. I want my target audience to read my articles, then follow the links in my resource box.

    SEO is a secondary concern, to finding an audience for what I have written.

    Ironically, if you get your articles published on pages that a lot of people read and your article is well written and tells a story that people think is important, then your readers will link to your article, giving you real SEO juice for your links, because your articles on those third-party websites will end up having lots of social media links pointing at them.

    Your articles will attract third-party links, which will give your article link popularity to push to the links in your resource box.


    Originally Posted by Dayne Dylan View Post

    4. Are you sending your traffic to more of a content site with a squeeze near the top (and also products for sale), or keeping it simple with squeeze pages THEN selling them down the line?

    I set two links in my resource box.

    The first is for an opt-in page and the second is for a sales page.

    Most people will only link to an opt-in page, but I don't always.
    Signature
    Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
    Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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    • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      For the first several years, I tried to write two articles per week, but more often, I only wrote one article per week or every two weeks.
      Bill, if you don't mind asking: Did you write 2 articles per week because you didn't have time or because it took a lot of research before writing the piece?

      I ask this because I see a lot of people that say they need a lot of hours before they could write a good article, and sometimes they say the research takes up more time than the actual writing.
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      • Profile picture of the author tpw
        Originally Posted by canyon View Post

        Bill, if you don't mind asking: Did you write 2 articles per week because you didn't have time or because it took a lot of research before writing the piece?

        I ask this because I see a lot of people that say they need a lot of hours before they could write a good article, and sometimes they say the research takes up more time than the actual writing.

        There is a lot of truth in that.

        Sometimes the extra time is spent doing research. But more often, I spend the most time massaging the content to improve reader experience.

        Depending on the topic, I will spend 30 minutes or 6 hours doing research.

        The first draft usually goes quickly, when I know what I want to say and how to say it.

        The bulk of my time is actually spent editing, in order to make the content perfect.

        When I struggle with the writing process, it is usually because I haven't organized the information in my mind that I want to share, in a way that makes sense.

        For example. A couple of years ago, I researched, wrote and edited an 85-page report to perfection in just three days. The one I am working on now is expected to be about 60-pages, but I have been wrestling with the first chapter for 4 days!!

        The problem I had was that I kept hitting a point that needed covered in chapter one, then I would go off on a tangent to give a better foundation to the point I was making. At a certain point, I would realize that my sub-tangent went too far and left the reader confused.

        I finally got around the problem by making chapter one into chapter two, and doing an introductory chapter that gave foundation to the concepts that would be covered in following chapters.

        The particular report I am working on now is not one that requires any research, because I know the topic well.

        Regardless of how long it might take to do the research on a particular topic, I will write my article/report, then I will go over the final product 3, 6 or 12 times, until it reads exactly as I want it to read.

        Until I am satisfied with the reading flow of the article/report, it is never done.
        Signature
        Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
        Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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        • Profile picture of the author fin
          Originally Posted by tpw View Post

          But more often, I spend the most time massaging the content to improve reader experience.

          That's my favorite part: massaging the content until it's the best I think I can make it.

          I love writing the article quickly, though I've probably been adding notes to my Moleskine for a few days or weeks. Then I spend hours dissecting it and completely revamping it. I'm hoping in a year or two it will be at a very high standard.

          That's why I don't understand why people can write articles in an hour. Yes, you can write it, but spend a few hours massaging it and it can be a lot better.
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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            Originally Posted by tpw View Post

            But more often, I spend the most time massaging the content to improve reader experience.
            Do you physically massage content in articles, or are you just playing games with literary instruments? Some here may need clarification; literally massaging articles may lead to poor reader experience and perhaps even some very catastrophic consequences.
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            • Profile picture of the author tpw
              Originally Posted by myob View Post

              Do you physically massage content in articles, or are you just playing games with literary instruments? Some here may need clarification; literally massaging articles may lead to poor reader experience and perhaps even some very catastrophic consequences.

              I guess that would be bad if I end up sweating on the paper and blurring the ink? :p
              Signature
              Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
              Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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              • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
                Originally Posted by David Keith View Post

                I think the OP was asking for practical advice not someone giving advice who is playing games with literary instruments to make it seem as though there are millions of relevant publications to syndicate to. In fact, even the mere idea that there are that many relevant publications due to the google search results numbers is very misleading to people.

                Plain and simple, its bad advice to indicate to someone those numbers are even relevant to the real number of "real world" potential syndication outlets.
                Even if there were millions of bona fide outlets for syndication, no one could nake use of them all in a lifetime. The simple truth is that, for all but the tiniest microniches, there are syndication outlets available beyond the basic "keyword + blog" searches. You just have to hunt for them.

                Even if you could exhaust all of the opportunities strictly related to your niche, you can always apply the 'pebble in the pond' model. Your niche is 'underwater basket weaving', and you believe you have exhausted all available outlets. Fine. Branch out to the next ring and write about 'basket weaving', and so on.

                On a side note, I'm not sure why you feel the need to parse every post Paul Uhl makes, but it's starting to look less like discussion and more like personal vendetta...
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                • Profile picture of the author Lucian Lada
                  Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

                  The simple truth is that, for all but the tiniest microniches, there are syndication outlets available beyond the basic "keyword + blog" searches. You just have to hunt for them.
                  Here's one way I found by accident, but I don't know if it works in all niches, and it might not be new at all.

                  Go to some big offline magazine's website. I found one in a niche that claims to have 70% of its content written by freelance writers. I looked around, and found a few of them together with links to their blogs.

                  First of all, their blog names sometimes have names that you won't even consider searching for because they try to look clever/funny/whatnot. And since most of these people run personal blogs, they don't have a clue what SEO is, so you won't even find them through Google. (I've checked their page source, and they didn't even bother with on-page SEO basics, such as entering keywords to rank for.) Email them with a syndication offer, and see how it goes.

                  Second of all, most of them have "buddies" on their blog roll. That means more people with whom they share the same passions/hobbies. Hit them up with a syndication offer too.

                  Another way is to think of the diminutives or niche specific terms, and Google them. For example, you could look up keywords such as "puppy" in the dog niche (nothing else springs to my mind right now).

                  After you find a few of these websites/ezines/etc, take a look at these posts to see how to email them your syndication offer:

                  http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post5383239

                  http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6575732

                  http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post4610124

                  And read this thread as well:
                  http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6133575

                  Is that what you had in mind when you were talking about "beyond the basic "keyword + blog" searches", John?
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                • Profile picture of the author myob
                  Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

                  On a side note, I'm not sure why you feel the need to parse every post Paul Uhl makes, but it's starting to look less like discussion and more like personal vendetta...
                  Some people seem to be Googlized boneheads, with no idea there is a great big world out there - besides Google.

                  In its classic origins, article syndication is a solid marketing and business model. However, in recent years some of its most essential aspects have been deprecated into a Google frenzy of spining and spamming for SEO ranking. The concept of "article marketing" has degenerated into an orgy of gobleygook twisted around keywords posing as "articles", which are spun into hundreds or thousands of iterations of nonsense, then submitted to article directories with no intention of ever being read. When thinking defaults to Google, we have people who can neither write readable articles nor understand marketing principles. This is why so many people fail; nefarious promoters of Google-friendly "article marketing" tools are promulgating methods which no longer have anything to do with articles nor marketing.

                  Article syndication is a basic tenet in successful article marketing, and requires understanding of some of the basics in marketing. Write quality, relevant articles that match the demographics of your targeted audience, then get them in the publications they read. Demonstrate your knowledge/expertise in the manner they expect. And you don't necessarily even need a "direct hit" for article syndication topics; general interest publications can be quite effective for a wide variety of niches. It is not unusual for editors to accept certain "off-topic" articles, providing it is of interest to their readers.

                  As I mentioned in this thread (and many others which seem to be overlooked or denigrated by people with "special interests":
                  Besides Google, consider using other sources for relevant publications such as "Writers' Market", trade directories, professional journals, associations, chambers of commerce, or even directories of periodicals available in your local library.
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                  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
                    This is exactly the kind of thinking I was talking about. If you want to find outlets the other people can't reach, you have to think about things differently.

                    If we both go to Google and search for 'dog training +blog', we're both going to get very similar lists. Couple some creative thinking with some detective work, and you put your message in front of eyeballs most of your competitors will never see.

                    Well done, my young friend...

                    Originally Posted by canyon View Post

                    Here's one way I found by accident, but I don't know if it works in all niches, and it might not be new at all.

                    Go to some big offline magazine's website. I found one in a niche that claims to have 70% of it's content written by freelance writers. I looked around, and found a few of them together with links to their blogs.

                    First of all, their blog names sometimes have names that you won't even consider searching for because they try to look clever/funny/whatnot. And since most of these people run personal blogs, they don't have a clue what SEO is, so you won't even find them through Google. (I've checked their page source, and they didn't even bother with on-page SEO basics, such as entering keywords to rank for.) Email them with a syndication offer, and see how it goes.

                    Second of all, most of them have "buddies" on their blog roll. That means more people with whom they share the same passions/hobbies. Hit them up with a syndication offer too.

                    Another way is to think of the diminutives or niche specific terms, and Google them. For example, you could look up keywords such as "puppy" in the dog niche (nothing else springs to my mind right now).

                    After you find a few of these websites/ezines/etc, take a look at these posts to see how to email them your syndication offer:

                    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post5383239

                    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6575732

                    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post4610124

                    And read this thread as well:
                    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6133575

                    Is that what you had in mind when you were talking about "beyond the basic "keyword + blog" searches", John?
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                    • Profile picture of the author tpw
                      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

                      This is exactly the kind of thinking I was talking about. If you want to find outlets the other people can't reach, you have to think about things differently.

                      If we both go to Google and search for 'dog training +blog', we're both going to get very similar lists. Couple some creative thinking with some detective work, and you put your message in front of eyeballs most of your competitors will never see.

                      Well done, my young friend...

                      Traveling the road less traveled is always a good strategy...

                      And one angle on this that few people ever consider is:

                      go to Bing and search for 'dog training +blog'


                      Those with Google-blinders on will suggest this is a fool-hearty strategy, and yet, it will work because few people even consider it a viable method to achieve similar results.
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                      Bill Platt, Oklahoma USA, PlattPublishing.com
                      Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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