I Really Need Help on 'How to Leave Them Hanging?

by marxwarfor 12 replies
Hi Guys,

After reviewing my articles once completed and thinking I've done a pretty good job,
but then I realize that maybe I just gave them way too much info and I forgot to leave the trail of breadcrumbs.

I'm frustrated that after writing what I think was a really good article - and it actually is, if it 'stood by itself' only. However, for leading a customer onto my site, that's where my weakness lies.

Why? because I get into that mind-set, that if I'm not giving them good quality info, then it will lack value. I guess I don't know how to provide a good 'teaser', instead, i just let the cat out of the bag too much.

So could you guys 'please' give me some 'specific' examples of how to leave them hanging, both in the content and towards the resource box also.

I really feel I've got the skills to write, I just fall between the cracks when it comes to putting together value, but with limited info.

I really really will be grateful for your advice.

Thanks so much for listening!

Mark
#main internet marketing discussion forum #hanging #leave
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  • Profile picture of the author sparrow
    Mark not every article has to have them hanging.

    Have you tested serveral ways on how to get them back to your site.

    Myself I very rarely leave them haning, and I feel I get decent and links out of the deal.

    Check what the top author are doing and emulate them if this is a hot button for you study the top producers

    Ed
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  • Profile picture of the author Simon_Sezs
    Originally Posted by marxwarfor View Post

    Hi Guys,

    After reviewing my articles once completed and thinking I've done a pretty good job,
    but then I realize that maybe I just gave them way too much info and I forgot to leave the trail of breadcrumbs.

    I'm frustrated that after writing what I think was a really good article - and it actually is, if it 'stood by itself' only. However, for leading a customer onto my site, that's where my weakness lies.

    Why? because I get into that mind-set, that if I'm not giving them good quality info, then it will lack value. I guess I don't know how to provide a good 'teaser', instead, i just let the cat out of the bag too much.

    So could you guys 'please' give me some 'specific' examples of how to leave them hanging, both in the content and towards the resource box also.

    I really feel I've got the skills to write, I just fall between the cracks when it comes to putting together value, but with limited info.

    I really really will be grateful for your advice.

    Thanks so much for listening!

    Mark
    Mark,

    It doesn't have to be low quality, per say. You just need to not end things on a "period", if you know what I mean. In other words, make your article not resolve itself. Then use the bio box to give the visitor a chance to go there to get that "period" on the end of your point.

    Does that make sense?
    Signature
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." Ben Franklin
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    • Profile picture of the author johnmiley
      Your articles are either going to help someone solve a problem or fuel a need, in most cases.

      Rather than giving away the ship, why not just let them see part of your solution or product, then tell them a more complete solution awaits them in this great resource you know about (i.e. your product or solution).

      If you are selling golf products, for example, you could write an article addressing why a proper grip is important, then discuss in your article three simple corrections to consider when gripping the club--and then tell them that you've found a great source of these kind of answers and more--tips to correct stance errors, back-swing mistakes, etc. in such-and-such a book/DVD.

      This book/DVD is available on your site, and your signature explains that.

      You lead them in, give them good information, but don't open your kimono the entire way. Think of it as a conversation, and it'll likely be much easier to write.

      That tends to work for me, but you may have a different style.

      Cheers.
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      • Profile picture of the author marxwarfor
        Thanks alot John!

        Actually, I don't own a kimono, but my 'sarong' unfurls like no other!

        i appreciate your example and will still strive to do my best to not give it all away, as difficult as it is for me - i have no idea why? I guess that i feel if it lacks substance, then people will be put off, hence my tendency to give the full monty - kimono, sarong or otherwise.

        My style is actully very very conversational. It has facts and informative value, but i can't seem to write in a 'matter-of-fact' style. I typically pretend I'm sitting with them across a table. I use more emotional context and mix it up with the facts. I just can't do the accounting/medical journal style. I'd put myself to sleep!

        Thanks alot for your time John!
        Mark
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        • Profile picture of the author CSwrite
          Mark, how about this: you have two or three really good facts, and then one great one. Go into complete detail on the two or three good ones, so that you don't feel guilty, and then use the last paragraph to partially reveal the last great one - but not completely. Use this to funnel them into your site.

          That probably didn't explain it right at all...been one of those days. If you have one of the articles you don't want to completely rewrite, feel free to send it over and we can see how to tweak that last paragraph.

          Cary
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          • Profile picture of the author marxwarfor
            That's really sweet of you Cary!
            Yes, actually what you said in that first paragraph did makes sense, so having of of those days, hasn't affected your delivery.

            I'll PM you soon,

            Best,
            Mark
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            • Profile picture of the author yuri12
              I agree with Cary on hitting your audience with a few good ones then shortchanging them on one really meaty info.
              However I also think that you could try and change your style a bit to not be too conversational. the pitfall of talking to someone (who you do not see, by the way) is you get the urge to explain everything in detail, thus your articles become too full of info.
              your audience might understand the whole thing too much leaving them satisfied with what you wrote so they don't need the resource boxes afterwards
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              • Profile picture of the author marxwarfor
                yes you nailed it on the head - that was my fear...

                maybe this is one case where in essence, you DON'T want a satisfied customer!

                I was beginning to look a this as a classic - 'damned if you do, damned if you don't' situation.

                Give them too much, they walk away satisfied, yet give them too little and it may be contrued as not having enough substance - it's a very fine line to tread eh?

                Thank you much, for your input
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                • Profile picture of the author yuri12
                  true that.
                  i mean really, we've all been writing since we were in prep school, and we were always taught to make sure we give the audience what they need (since the audience is our instructor)
                  so i guess writing, be it for copy or something else, right now that we're older, is a matter of getting what we want from the readers
                  i guess we should keep this in mind when we start writing - "what do i want my reader to do afterwards?"
                  we wanna make them want some more so let's leave them hanging and wanting for the juicier parts...
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                  • Profile picture of the author Mark Riddle
                    Example

                    Top 5 Reasons to Advertise on
                    Internet Radio Revealed
                    How they can add to your bottom line

                    Trying to break into new markets can be a real pain especially when you are new to the market it self.

                    There is a new and excited audience that is hungry for quality products that serves their needs, that is why there is such a ready opportunity for marketers.

                    I've compiled a list of over 50 reasons why manufactures and retailers should consider internet radio the best launching point for promotions to new markets, Says Mark Riddle, Marketing Director for KC Cafe Radio.

                    Here are His top 5 list

                    1. Internet radio provides a very targeted listener, Old radio depends on the crowd mentality where internet radio is intimate with its listeners.
                    2. Loyal people, The typical internet radio listener is there for more than just the music, it is about the community, this makes they loyal to those who are apart of their community and advertisers are part of the family.
                    3. Internet radio listeners are already online, they can and do respond instantly to messages that include web addresses and phone numbers.
                    4. Listen while at work operating their business, a high number of at home business' listen to online radio while doing their daily tasks, you will stand out in their mind because you are like them.
                    5. Internet radio is "quiet promotion" With internet radio the feel and the mood of the station is quiet and listener focused, no need to scream on internet radio.

                    For more information Visit htttppwwwwyourpromosite the complete list is there


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                    Today isn't Yesterday, - Products are everywhere if your eyes are Tuned!
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                    • Profile picture of the author Frank Bruno
                      It's human nature to want to finish reading something once their engulfed in the article.

                      If you're unsure of how to lead up to your bio just stop the article cold turkey and then it will be human nature to click on a link to finish reading or to solve the problem that the article presented.

                      Frank Bruno
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    • Profile picture of the author marxwarfor
      Thanks ED and Simon....

      I understand the "concept' of not ending the article on a 'period' per se, but I guess I was looking for some example. For some frustrating reason as rather resourceful I can generally be, I'm really stumped on this one.... hmmm? Patches of baldness on my scalp is really starting to look unattractive!

      I just wrote a dozen articles that are still on my hard-drive waiting to be submitted intermittently. I would rather fall into a pit of molten lava, than have to rewrite all of those pieces once again.....I shudder the thought.

      Maybe go back and just edit the last paragraph of each article to lead them on???..but then again, that's where I'm stumped on how to effectively do that, without sounding to 'salesy'.
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