Does Hype beat Honest Value Driven Pitches?

by sambaz
20 replies
Just wanted to get opinions on the idea of Hype vs Non Hype in terms of making decisions on purchasing a product.

Would you feel more comfortable if the sales letter/video or pitch was a more relaxed and honest approach to what you are getting or are you more driven by that real loud exciting type hypey sales letter.

Does that make sense? I am interested in knowing what people think,

Will the hypey sales letter always rule? Or do you prefer a more relaxed an honest approach? I think Hype is more when something is being shoved down your throat to buy but you still like it and Non hype is when its crystal clear without being sold to that this is something for you so you purchase on that merit.

Are you guys with me? Im finding it difficult to try and explain what I am trying to say but I think I've made it as clear as I possibly can.

Thanks!
#beat #driven #honest #hype #pitch #pitches
  • Profile picture of the author techservice
    It depends on the niche/market.

    MMO = Hype sells
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    • Profile picture of the author sambaz
      Originally Posted by Highenergy View Post

      It depends on the niche/market.

      MMO = Hype sells
      Do you think that that should just remain the case, accept it and just go with that? I feel so uncomfortable with hype because you just get often let down with the product its like an anti climax most of the time.

      I thought people are getting fed up of hype? No? in the Make money online niche I mean.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Highenergy View Post

      It depends on the niche/market.

      MMO = Hype sells
      I'd go further and say it depends on the individual. I could think of very few (if any) markets that are one-size-fits-all.
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      • Profile picture of the author sambaz
        Originally Posted by Joseph Robinson View Post

        I'd go further and say it depends on the individual. I could think of very few (if any) markets that are one-size-fits-all.
        Would you care to elaborate on this?
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        • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
          Banned
          Originally Posted by sambaz View Post

          Would you care to elaborate on this?
          Easy: IM niche. Promise of fast cash will enthrall one person, and make another within the same market roll their eyes.
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    • Profile picture of the author YoungAndOpulent
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Highenergy View Post

      It depends on the niche/market.

      MMO = Hype sells
      Not just in MMO, but in most markets. Hype gets the sales, but it's quality that determines whether or not that person will be a repeat buyer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    Originally Posted by sambaz View Post

    Just wanted to get opinions on the idea of Hype vs Non Hype in terms of making decisions on purchasing a product.

    Would you feel more comfortable if the sales letter/video or pitch was a more relaxed and honest approach to what you are getting or are you more driven by that real loud exciting type hypey sales letter.

    Does that make sense? I am interested in knowing what people think,

    Will the hypey sales letter always rule? Or do you prefer a more relaxed an honest approach? I think Hype is more when something is being shoved down your throat to buy but you still like it and Non hype is when its crystal clear without being sold to that this is something for you so you purchase on that merit.

    Are you guys with me? Im finding it difficult to try and explain what I am trying to say but I think I've made it as clear as I possibly can.

    Thanks!
    Bear in mind that there isn't just one way to use hyperbole (a.k.a. "hype"). Everyone knows that when they're watching a Dr. Pepper commercial, people aren't going to form a flash mob in real life and start singing a song. And when a basketball athlete is jumping 75 feet into the air because they're wearing the latest Nike or Reebok sneaker, people know it's not real, yet it's still effective.

    And when your girlfriend or spouse puts on Victoria's Secret lingerie, they're not necessarily going to look like a super model (unless your wife IS a super model...LOL).

    Sales copy is salemanship in print, video, audio, etc. So there are effective ways to mix both "hype" along with facts, benefits, emotional triggers, etc. And there are so many different styles and ways to do sales copy, that isn't as simple as hype verus non-hype. That's just not how the real business world works.

    So I don't agree with your premise, because "hype versus non-hype" actually doesn't make sense to me, and I've been writing copy since I was 15 years old (over 20 years ago btw). In some markets, using hype effectively works extremely well, in other markets it's not as effective, depending on who your target audience is.

    If you're reading or hearing sales copy and you feel like it's been "shoved down your throat" either:

    a. You're not the target audience OR.....

    b. The sales copy sucks.

    Hype is here to stay, it's not going anywhere.

    RoD
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    • Profile picture of the author sambaz
      Originally Posted by Rod Cortez View Post

      Bear in mind that there isn't just one way to use hyperbole (a.k.a. "hype"). Everyone knows that when they're watching a Dr. Pepper commercial, people aren't going to form a flash mob in real life and start singing a song. And when a basketball athlete is jumping 75 feet into the air because they're wearing the latest Nike or Reebok sneaker, people know it's not real, yet it's still effective.

      And when your girlfriend or spouse puts on Victoria's Secret lingerie, they're not necessarily going to look like a super model (unless your wife IS a super model...LOL).

      Sales copy is salemanship in print, video, audio, etc. So there are effective ways to mix both "hype" along with facts, benefits, emotional triggers, etc. And there are so many different styles and ways to do sales copy, that isn't as simple as hype verus non-hype. That's just not how the real business world works.

      So I don't agree with your premise, because "hype versus non-hype" actually doesn't make sense to me, and I've been writing copy since I was 15 years old (over 20 years ago btw). In some markets, using hype effectively works extremely well, in other markets it's not as effective, depending on who your target audience is.

      If you're reading or hearing sales copy and you feel like it's been "shoved down your throat" either:

      a. You're not the target audience OR.....

      b. The sales copy sucks.

      Hype is here to stay, it's not going anywhere.

      RoD

      Thank you for this Rod, This was exactly the kind of reply I was looking for
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    • Profile picture of the author YoungAndOpulent
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Rod Cortez View Post

      Bear in mind that there isn't just one way to use hyperbole (a.k.a. "hype"). Everyone knows that when they're watching a Dr. Pepper commercial, people aren't going to form a flash mob in real life and start singing a song. And when a basketball athlete is jumping 75 feet into the air because they're wearing the latest Nike or Reebok sneaker, people know it's not real, yet it's still effective.

      And when your girlfriend or spouse puts on Victoria's Secret lingerie, they're not necessarily going to look like a super model (unless your wife IS a super model...LOL).

      Sales copy is salemanship in print, video, audio, etc. So there are effective ways to mix both "hype" along with facts, benefits, emotional triggers, etc. And there are so many different styles and ways to do sales copy, that isn't as simple as hype verus non-hype. That's just not how the real business world works.

      So I don't agree with your premise, because "hype versus non-hype" actually doesn't make sense to me, and I've been writing copy since I was 15 years old (over 20 years ago btw). In some markets, using hype effectively works extremely well, in other markets it's not as effective, depending on who your target audience is.

      If you're reading or hearing sales copy and you feel like it's been "shoved down your throat" either:

      a. You're not the target audience OR.....

      b. The sales copy sucks.

      Hype is here to stay, it's not going anywhere.

      RoD
      The part in bold....
      Don't sleep on people's stupidity. You'd be surprised.
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      • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
        Originally Posted by YoungAndOpulent View Post

        The part in bold....
        Don't sleep on people's stupidity. You'd be surprised.
        I was referring to it in general terms, referring to the majority, not the exceptions. And nothing surprises me these days.

        RoD
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        - Jim Rohn
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    I'm in the minority, but I want features, not benefits. Give me features and I'll create my own benefits. However, this is contrary to what is usually most effective. My point is, be aware of your target...Not all people respond to hype in the same way. Some groups of people will respond to hype, but the more technical they are, the less they will respond to hype.

    While some "hype" is important, the most important aspect of making sales is probably "reach", and getting your offer in front of as many targeted/interested people as possible.
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  • Profile picture of the author HostWind
    This is something I have always wondered about. I see people using very hyped sales letters with out-there promises and wonder, why do people buy this stuff? Its a big turn off.
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  • Profile picture of the author louie6925
    This is a question i've asked on this forum a few times before, sadly the answer always seems to be hype!

    Personally I'd like to live in an up front and honest world where hype is only used if the product deserves it, but as we don't, we have to face facts and live with it.

    From a personal perspective, if a wso owner put in his/her sales pitch that "$x amount is acheivable if you follow the steps and put in a hell of a lot of work and commitment and that you are going to make mistakes and there will be times you will want to launch your PC through the nearest window, but stick with it and you will succeed!", I would probably buy it as it sounds honest and realistic, but unfortunately the masses are wanting the hype to get their juices flowing and emotionally bribed into a purchase!......just human nature I guess, and there is nothing we can do to change that!
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  • Profile picture of the author mosthost
    It's all a matter of preference. Since I like and value honesty, I find that honesty is the only policy I can follow with marketing online.

    If you enjoy being lied to by hype-sters, then feel free to do it unto others as they have done it unto you
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    • Profile picture of the author TheEye
      What you are after is closing the sale.

      A tradesman buying a drill will know what he wants and will cut through the hype and look at the features. If it can't do the job he wants done, he will not buy it.

      A housewife who has never used a drill but is buying one for her husbands birthday will not be able to cut through the hype.

      If you are selling to an buyer that does not know what he/she wants, then hype works well.

      If you are selling to a person that needs the product to do specific tasks, then hype does not work as well.

      You need to know which category your customer fits in to.

      If you can't know this then split test your traffic sources.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      You ask the question as if Hype and Honesty are two different things.

      If you mean Exaggerating Claims...then that's Lying.
      If you mean Writing In A Way That Shows Off Every Feature In It's Best Light...that's good copywriting.

      Sometimes people say they are being "Honest", when they really mean "I can't think of a better way to say it".

      "Honesty" does not mean "Just lay out the basic information because I can't take the time to learn how to write copy".

      "Honesty" does not mean Boring.

      So it's not an either-or thing.

      That being said, I have seen a few WSOs that are very hypey...and very poorly written. But, if it's TRUE...it isn't hype, it's smart selling.
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  • Profile picture of the author dc_publius
    Depends on your audience, different messages will resonate.
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  • Profile picture of the author johnpea
    If it's cheap, cheesy, glitzy or otherwise aimed at the low-end consumer market then go with hype. If it's a quality product or service witha high-end price tag then you need serious detail. This is a generalisation though, and there are exceptions.
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  • Profile picture of the author shane_k
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post


    You ask the question as if Hype and Honesty are two different things.


    If you mean Exaggerating Claims...then that's Lying.
    If you mean Writing In A Way That Shows Off Every Feature In It's Best Light...that's good copywriting.



    This is exactly what I was going to comment on.


    The way the question is setup is it implies that hype equals lying and equals being immoral. And that a more relaxed approach is being truthful.

    There is a big difference between giving something hype and making false claims and outright lying.

    So to the OP, it's ok to not want to lie, but don't confuse that with making something look the best it can within the realms of reality. Like Claude says, that's just good copywriting.
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