Do Tree Hugging Hippies Spend Money?

by pepper81 Banned
63 replies
I'm thinking of making a website aimed at people who are interested in sustainable living i.e. growing your own food, saving power, recycling, using renewable energy, etc. In the past sustainable living probably appealed more to people who would typically be known as 'hippies' or 'greenies', but in today's society everyday people are becoming more aware of the impact they have on the environment and are willing to buy products and do things that are more eco-friendly.

What strategies do you think would be a good way to approach people in this market? Is there anybody here having any type of success with making money out of people trying to be more eco-friendly?

Thanks.
#hippies #hugging #money #spend #tree
  • Profile picture of the author BiggyJ
    It is already quite crowded, but you can try approaching this niche. Articles, video tutorials would work great to attract people to you website.
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  • Profile picture of the author mosthost
    This is one boring niche. Telling people to be kind to the environment, etc. Plus, there are tons of these eco websites out there already.
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  • Profile picture of the author gator1985
    Even thou this is an over crowded niche I would still look at keyword research and the quality of products you would put on your site to reach your visitors. For instance if I wanted to buy a eco power saving washing machine, specify the one model washing machine in the website, headlining in the domain as well as videos and articles. Everytime a user goes to buy a product of your site at least your one will be dominating from all your extensive input, that gives trust to the user. Hope this helps
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  • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
    Originally Posted by pepper81 View Post

    I'm thinking of making a website aimed at people who are interested in sustainable living i.e. growing your own food, saving power, recycling, using renewable energy, etc. In the past sustainable living probably appealed more to people who would typically be known as 'hippies' or 'greenies', but in today's society everyday people are becoming more aware of the impact they have on the environment and are willing to buy products and do things that are more eco-friendly.

    What strategies do you think would be a good way to approach people in this market? Is there anybody here having any type of success with making money out of people trying to be more eco-friendly?

    Thanks.
    Hmmm, where to start?

    First off, referring to the clientele you wish to reach out to as tree hugging hippies is going to get you no where fast. Insulting your potential customers never seems to be a successful business model for some reason. :rolleyes:

    Secondly, from the bolded line above in your quote, it appears that you are not looking to give value and help people help themselves and the environment, but rather looking at them with large glowing neon dollar signs blinking on and off in your eyes.

    People can tell what your intentions are by your content, they're just kind of funny that way.

    That being said, yes, being in the going green niche can be quite lucrative if approached and handled correctly. I have a friend who does quite well with it actually.

    Terra
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    • Profile picture of the author SeoDemon
      Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

      Hmmm, where to start?

      First off, referring to the clientele you wish to reach out to as tree hugging hippies is going to get you no where fast. Insulting your potential customers never seems to be a successful business model for some reason. :rolleyes:

      Secondly, from the bolded line above in your quote, it appears that you are not looking to give value and help people help themselves and the environment, but rather looking at them with large glowing neon dollar signs blinking on and off in your eyes.

      People can tell what your intentions are by your content, they're just kind of funny that way.

      That being said, yes, being in the going green niche can be quite lucrative if approached and handled correctly. I have a friend who does quite well with it actually.

      Terra
      OUCH! i'm sure he didn't mean to insult or anything, but you are right.
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    • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
      Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

      Hmmm, where to start?

      First off, referring to the clientele you wish to reach out to as tree hugging hippies is going to get you no where fast. Insulting your potential customers never seems to be a successful business model for some reason. :rolleyes:

      Terra
      Tree Hugging Hippie is an insult? I thought it was a compliment. I'm going to have to rethink my policy of smiling and waving when people shout it out to me.
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      • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
        Originally Posted by Greg guitar View Post

        Tree Hugging Hippie is an insult? I thought it was a compliment. I'm going to have to rethink my policy of smiling and waving when people shout it out to me.

        and I was actually going to post that I resemble that remark...lol

        /signed a tree-hugging hippie - for real
        :p
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    • Profile picture of the author pepper81
      Banned
      Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

      Hmmm, where to start?

      First off, referring to the clientele you wish to reach out to as tree hugging hippies is going to get you no where fast. Insulting your potential customers never seems to be a successful business model for some reason. :rolleyes:

      Secondly, from the bolded line above in your quote, it appears that you are not looking to give value and help people help themselves and the environment, but rather looking at them with large glowing neon dollar signs blinking on and off in your eyes.

      People can tell what your intentions are by your content, they're just kind of funny that way.

      That being said, yes, being in the going green niche can be quite lucrative if approached and handled correctly. I have a friend who does quite well with it actually.

      Terra
      Calm down it wasn't meant as an insult. And yes I am looking at these people with large neon dollar signs blinking in my eyes, I thought this was a forum where you talk about making money????? How do you know I wouldn't add value to people in this niche? I make an effort everyday to conserve the environment for future generations and am very passionate about this issue. I could add a lot of value.

      Thanks for your long-winded reply but you could of saved yourself some time and just wrote the last paragraph :rolleyes:
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      • Profile picture of the author Chris Silvey
        I wouldn't call myself a tree hugging hippie, but I do consider myself an energy geek. One of the main reasons I got into IM is to help fund my R&D on my projects. Namely hydrogen from water (and no its not based on junky HHO you see on youtube or Stan Meyers) but with precise methods based on ionization.

        Anyways, from my perspective people are looking for ways to save money and create their own forms of energy. One of the main goals is to get off the grid.

        To cut this short though I will say this, if you do not know the lingo, provide proof of the product you are promoting, or show a bit of respect for your audience, well your rep will be burned at the stake.

        A good portion of these Tree Hugging Hippies are scientists.
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        • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
          Oh my goodness me!

          I didn't mean to spark strong emotions at all and meant no disrespect to anyone.

          However if you look at the terms used and their meanings, it should be quite evident that many would find that offensive.

          tree hugger - derogatory term for environmentalists who support restrictions on the logging industry and the preservation of forests
          hippy - someone who rejects the established culture
          I myself am very conscious of our environment and avoid at all costs products that harm humans, wildlife, and bees and I am deathly allergic to bees! I do recognize their importance to our whole economical system though and don't wish to see them wiped out. I buy as many things as possible that are all natural. I also do as much as possible to conserve our natural resources and look for and use many alternative sources.

          Anyway, I am therefore a potential customer of anyone in the going green niche. And to tell you the truth, I would never purchase something from someone who openly declares on a public forum that they are wanting to be "making money out of people trying to be more eco-friendly."

          Yes, this is a marketing forum where we discuss making money and methods for having successful businesses. Most often you see successful marketers saying first and foremost to offer your clients value, over deliver, build relationships, etc.

          Commerce is vital to the health of every country on the globe.

          I don't think that being out to make money off of people is a successful business model. It's certainly not something I'd include in my advertising campaign. In all honesty would you? Would you desire to do business with people that advertise they are in the going green niche to make money off of people?

          By posting in a public forum that intention, that is exactly what the OP did. We all must watch what we say and how we say it here as countless eyes are perusing this forum 24/7.

          Those were the points I was addressing.

          Perhaps asking if the eco-friendly niche was a lucrative one would have been more business savvy.

          Terra
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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            That narrow and outdated demographic denigrated as "tree hugging hippies" are aging and fading away. Since the 70's the environmental movement began accelerating into the mainstream and now encompasses nearly every level of society including social groups, media, education, economic, scientific, legal, political, international, religious, etc. It really is an extremely competitive, lucrative but also emotionally charged arena.
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            • Profile picture of the author pepper81
              Banned
              Originally Posted by myob View Post

              That narrow and outdated demographic denigrated as "tree hugging hippies" are aging and fading away.Since the 70's the environmental movement began accelerating into the mainstream and now encompasses nearly every level of society including social groups, media, education, economic, scientific, legal, political, international, religious, etc. It really is an extremely competitive, lucrative but also emotionally charged arena.
              Yes I understand that the demographic has changed dramatically that's why I stated "In the past sustainable living probably appealed more to people who would typically be known as 'hippies' or 'greenies', but in today's society everyday people are becoming more aware of the impact they have on the environment and are willing to buy products and do things that are more eco-friendly." in my original post.
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          • Profile picture of the author pepper81
            Banned
            Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

            Oh my goodness me!

            I didn't mean to spark strong emotions at all and meant no disrespect to anyone.

            However if you look at the terms used and their meanings, it should be quite evident that many would find that offensive.

            I myself am very conscious of our environment and avoid at all costs products that harm humans, wildlife, and bees and I am deathly allergic to bees! I do recognize their importance to our whole economical system though and don't wish to see them wiped out. I buy as many things as possible that are all natural. I also do as much as possible to conserve our natural resources and look for and use many alternative sources.

            Anyway, I am therefore a potential customer of anyone in the going green niche. And to tell you the truth, I would never purchase something from someone who openly declares on a public forum that they are wanting to be "making money out of people trying to be more eco-friendly."

            Yes, this is a marketing forum where we discuss making money and methods for having successful businesses. Most often you see successful marketers saying first and foremost to offer your clients value, over deliver, build relationships, etc.

            Commerce is vital to the health of every country on the globe.

            I don't think that being out to make money off of people is a successful business model. It's certainly not something I'd include in my advertising campaign. In all honesty would you? Would you desire to do business with people that advertise they are in the going green niche to make money off of people?

            By posting in a public forum that intention, that is exactly what the OP did. We all must watch what we say and how we say it here as countless eyes are perusing this forum 24/7.

            Those were the points I was addressing.

            Perhaps asking if the eco-friendly niche was a lucrative one would have been more business savvy. ;

            Terra

            First off this isn't part of an advertising campaign, where did you get that from? It was merely a tongue in cheek question about making money in the sustainable living niche in a section of a forum that discusses making money.

            Secondly your comment saying "I don't think that being out to make money off of people is a successful business model. It's certainly not something I'd include in my advertising campaign." doesn't make any sense. Where did I say this was part of my strategy in an advertising campaign? And making money of people seems like a pretty good way to have a successful business model doesn't it?


            And last but not least, this thread was not started with the intentions of insulting people.

            Thanks for your input though.
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            • Profile picture of the author salegurus
              Originally Posted by pepper81 View Post



              And last but not least, this thread was not started with the intentions of insulting people.

              Thanks for your input though.
              What your intentions were when starting the thread really does not matter.
              This forum (apparently) has close to 400,000 members, not everyone is going to reply the way you would like.
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              • Profile picture of the author pepper81
                Banned
                Originally Posted by salegurus View Post

                What your intentions were when starting the thread really does not matter.
                This forum (apparently) has close to 400,000 members, not everyone is going to reply the way you would like.
                I can appreciate that.
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        • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
          Originally Posted by Chris Silvey View Post


          To cut this short though I will say this, if you do not know the lingo, provide proof of the product you are promoting, or show a bit of respect for your audience, well your rep will be burned at the stake.
          This is actually an excellent point Chris.

          It shows how important it is to thoroughly research and know your target audience before entering any niche. Choosing the wrong keywords and not carefully considering every word you write could cause you to be dead in the water before you even got a chance to try and swim.

          Terra
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

            This is actually an excellent point Chris.

            It shows how important it is to thoroughly research and know your target audience before entering any niche. Choosing the wrong keywords and not carefully considering every word you write could cause you to be dead in the water before you even got a chance to try and swim.

            Terra
            Adding to this...

            Too much emphasis is placed on "buyer" keywords, especially when entering a new market. It can be very enlightening to spend time stepping back through the buying process and see how each step leads to the next in this market or niche.

            Take a topic like "alternate home energy sources", which could cover everything from passive solar home design to building one's own wind turbine.

            Are the people you want to target really "tree hugging hippies?"

            Are they looking for ways to get off the grid?

            Are they looking for looking for energy sources to use when the grid goes down (as in a hurricane)?

            Are they looking to save money on utility bills or simply provide more comfort?

            Focusing too much on so-called "buyer keywords" like 'cheapest wind turbine' or 'solar panel reviews' won't do much to answer those questions.
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      • Profile picture of the author Nick Garcia
        Originally Posted by pepper81 View Post

        Calm down it wasn't meant as an insult. And yes I am looking at these people with large neon dollar signs blinking in my eyes, I thought this was a forum where you talk about making money????? How do you know I wouldn't add value to people in this niche? I make an effort everyday to conserve the environment for future generations and am very passionate about this issue. I could add a lot of value.

        Thanks for your long-winded reply but you could of saved yourself some time and just wrote the last paragraph :rolleyes:
        It's actually where we talk about marketing. Earning money is just a side effect

        To answer your original question, yes. As a "tree hugging hippie" I can assure you we spend money. With a few minutes of keyword & market research you can confirm this. The trick is finding where they spend money, and then figuring out how to bring value to that niche.

        Hopefully if you decide to go into this niche you'll shift focus from "making money of people" to "enriching the lives of your visitors/fans/followers".

        If you're curious about what that community spends money on, go to Burning Man.
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        • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
          Originally Posted by Nick Garcia View Post

          It's actually where we talk about marketing. Earning money is just a side effect

          To answer your original question, yes. As a "tree hugging hippie" I can assure you we spend money. With a few minutes of keyword & market research you can confirm this. The trick is finding where they spend money, and then figuring out how to bring value to that niche.

          Hopefully if you decide to go into this niche you'll shift focus from "making money of people" to "enriching the lives of your visitors/fans/followers".

          If you're curious about what that community spends money on, go to Burning Man.
          Nice to meet you, fellow tree hugger. Some good suggestions there, in between the moral corrections.

          Now that's out of the way, let me get on to the offensive portion of the post.

          To address your first paragraph; you need to click the "warrior forum-internet marketing forums" link, and then look at what it says under "main internet marketing discussion forum".

          It doesn't say "where we talk about marketing, and earning money is just a side effect", does it?

          It says "where we talk about making money". Crass huh? But it is what it is, and no amount of pretense can convince me that anyone in this thread is so dedicated to their audience that their main motivation is to 'add value" or "enrich others' lives", with profit a distant afterthought, so that if money is made, it's just a "side effect". Whatever gets you through the night, but I ain't drinking that koolaid.

          I believe each of us, if we're honest, will have to admit that while we aim to provide value, the end goal is to make money. Money is the point of marketing, not a by-product.

          The op got taken to task for the mistake of being honest. He wants to add value, but unlike all the Mother Theresa types here, he admits that adding value is a means to an end; making money.

          Between posts taking offense at the words "tree hugging hippy", and others lecturing the op on containing his avarice, this thread could easily be expanded into a book: "How to Mince Your Words So As Not To Disturb Your Halo".

          But if someone decides to write it, just make sure you aren't in it for the money; since marketing isn't about making money. :rolleyes:
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by Greg guitar View Post

            It says "where we talk about making money". Crass huh? But it is what it is, and no amount of pretense can convince me that anyone in this thread is so dedicated to their audience that their main motivation is to 'add value" or "enrich others' lives", with profit a distant afterthought, so that if money is made, it's just a "side effect". Whatever gets you through the night, but I ain't drinking that koolaid.

            I believe each of us, if we're honest, will have to admit that while we aim to provide value, the end goal is to make money. Money is the point of marketing, not a by-product.
            I'm not drinking it either. I always aim to send my customers on their way thinking that they got the best of the deal, but I want my share to be pretty darn good, too.

            There are definitely professions one can go into where profit isn't even an afterthought and the end goal is serving humanity, but marketing isn't one of them.

            On a side note, I'm a big fan of the HGTV shows "House Hunters" and "House Hunters International." On those shows, I've noticed that it's the entrepreneurs, the marketers and the sales reps that usually have the seven-figure budgets. It's the youth pastors and non-profit types that tend to have the agents wince when hearing the budget.

            That's not a slam on the low budget folks. Their priorities are different, and they're willing to make the compromises required to do what they do. That can be a very honorable thing. It just won't get them that beach house on Maui in this lifetime.
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    • lol, pretty much exactly what I was going to say.

      Of course they have money to spend. But approach potential clients with respect, not with dollar signs in your eyes.

      Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

      Hmmm, where to start?

      First off, referring to the clientele you wish to reach out to as tree hugging hippies is going to get you no where fast. Insulting your potential customers never seems to be a successful business model for some reason. :rolleyes:

      Secondly, from the bolded line above in your quote, it appears that you are not looking to give value and help people help themselves and the environment, but rather looking at them with large glowing neon dollar signs blinking on and off in your eyes.

      People can tell what your intentions are by your content, they're just kind of funny that way.

      That being said, yes, being in the going green niche can be quite lucrative if approached and handled correctly. I have a friend who does quite well with it actually.

      Terra
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  • Profile picture of the author Big Al
    Based on your post title:

    Do Tree Hugging Hippies Spend Money?
    Looking around where I live I genuinely believe
    that many of the folk interested in sustainable
    products have more disposable income.

    I believe poorer income families typically don't
    have the money to afford more expensive,
    sustainable products.

    For example: organic foods and green cars
    are often more expensive.

    Based on your thread content:

    I think there are lots of different kinds of people
    from the 60 year old truck driver through to the
    30 something middle-class doctor trying to be
    greener and prepared to invest some money in
    greener living.

    You just have to decide WHO you're going
    to target specifically.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      The only people who don't spend money are people who don't have money - or open-to-buy on their credit cards...

      Your job is to figure out what they want, get it, and offer it to them in a way that they'll trade their money for your product. If they end up thinking they got the long end of the stick, you have the basis for a long term business.

      Like Charlie Cowell, the travelling anvil salesman from The Music Man says, "You gotta know the territory."

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  • Profile picture of the author jazzgirl
    There are a lot of eco or sustainable living companies that make a lot of money! What all these companies I think have in common is they are in a niche, not general eco stuff, it is too broad. Second is they are very passionate about their niche and help a lot of people with high quality content and products.

    On the top of my head I can think of Hank Green's ecogeek, which is all about sustainable tech and gadgets.

    I can think of companies where you buy something and they give back to the less fortunate like Tom's shoes or warbyparker sunglasses.

    I can also think of many people in the sustainable food niche like DurianRider and David Wolfe (This guy makes A LOT of money selling health supplements and info products).
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  • Profile picture of the author thinkoutthebox
    Run a survey asking your
    potential market there thoughts
    on the environment

    Then based on your survey
    results, you will learn of giveaways
    that will be highly appealing
    to your market.

    Target your market via Facebook
    with a Giveaway.

    That's the start...
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  • Profile picture of the author Headfirst
    Do Tree Hugging Hippies Spend Money?
    Stop now. You'll never make it in this niche.

    Sustainable, green and eco-friendly lifestyles aren't cheap.

    I converted all of the solvents at my print shop to soy, corn and citrus based alternatives last year. We no longer use anything that isn't drain safe - why? Because my home is in the same area and I don't want that in the groundwater for my garden.

    My organic garden by the way.

    I also go see customers for both the marketing business and the printing companies in my Volt (its awesome - remember how cool the ipad was at customer meetings when it first came out? The volt works even better!)

    So, I'm your target customer, right?

    Guess what? I bust my ass owning three businesses and you completely offended and alienated me with that tree hugging hippie shit thread title.
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    • Profile picture of the author pepper81
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Headfirst View Post


      Guess what? I bust my ass owning three businesses and you completely offended and alienated me with that tree hugging hippie shit thread title.
      One of the most popular eco-friendly sites is actually called treehugger.com so it seems not everyone is so easily offended by this term. And as for the definition of the word hippy - "someone who rejects the established culture". I know there would be plenty of people out there who would be proud to be called a hippy. It's even somewhat trendy these days to call yourself a 'modern-day hippy'.

      But all arguments aside - there has been some great responses. Thanks for everyone's input.
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    • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
      Originally Posted by Headfirst View Post

      So, I'm your target customer, right?

      Guess what? I bust my ass owning three businesses and you completely offended and alienated me with that tree hugging hippie shit thread title.

      Why would you say you're offended after explaining how the term doesn't apply to you? Is the mere notion that someone would ever use the term "tree hugging hippy" regardless of who it's aimed at, or in what spirit intended, offensive?

      Unlike you, it arguably does apply to me. In the past, I worked for Greenpeace, and as far as I could tell, the term "tree hugger", was embraced by everyone. There was a certain humor in it; I took it as amusement at the idea of anyone being clueless enough to think hugging a tree could be a bad thing.

      I remember a popular t-shirt among activists said "Environmental Extremist". If anyone calls me that now, I will gladly agree, in light of our slow, collective suicide.

      The term "tree hugging hippy" is sort of bogus, but how bad could it be? As far as I can tell, hippies just wore funny clothes, were against the war, against racism, for preserving nature; no shame there in my eyes. The fashions were goofy, but fashion often is; who cares?

      It seems to me people are far too hung up on semantics, and the notion that you should always strive to avoid offending anyone. Nonsense; marketing is supposed to be fun, and being authentic is better than walking on eggshells to avoid hurting someone's overly sensitive feelers.


      The op made a slight error in phrasing; it sounds terrible to say "make money off" people.

      Some people will jump down your throat for that, thinking it indicates a bad attitude. That is total BS. Everyone here is here to "make money off" people. Not in a bad way (I hope); but that is why we market. Providing value first is great advice.

      Just because the op used that bad phrase, doesn't mean he's got a bad attitude, or looks at people as dollar signs.
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  • Profile picture of the author Honest Abel
    Originally Posted by pepper81 View Post

    I'm thinking of making a website aimed at people who are interested in sustainable living i.e. growing your own food, saving power, recycling, using renewable energy, etc. In the past sustainable living probably appealed more to people who would typically be known as 'hippies' or 'greenies', but in today's society everyday people are becoming more aware of the impact they have on the environment and are willing to buy products and do things that are more eco-friendly.

    What strategies do you think would be a good way to approach people in this market? Is there anybody here having any type of success with making money out of people trying to be more eco-friendly?

    Thanks.
    I believe this is a niche that you should not be unless you yourself are genuinely interested in sustainability issues. If you pretend to be interested in these topics solely to make money from this niche, this will be recognized almost immediately by your intended audience in my option. Actually, this is probably true for most niches but I believe would be more true for this niche.
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Do some niche research on Google, niche forums and blogs, and your answers will come to you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    I'll tell you what...

    Whether you go after this niche or not, you have an AWESOME book title, my friend.

    The potential here is HUGE!

    Think about it.

    All the best,
    Michael
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    "Ich bin en fuego!"
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  • Profile picture of the author koppster
    people with money spend money Why did you rob banks ?- that where the money was
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Oh course they spend money. You just need to provide what they want and/or need!
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  • Profile picture of the author JasonJason
    There is no doubt that this niche is well on its way to becoming saturated, but as in most niches, there's always room for one more.

    Most importantly, if you decide to stick with this niche, then make sure you focus on some part of that niche that you truly enjoy and have some level of knowledge about. This will greatly increase your chances for success and will make the road a much easier one. Love what you do and the money will follow.

    Just an idea, but I would consider looking toward some of the more creative alternative energy niches. These will undoubtedly become huge in the coming years, especially natural gas.
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    • Profile picture of the author marciayudkin
      Everyone here is here to "make money off" people.
      You may think this is splitting hairs, but for those of us who are sensitive to the connotations of language, "making money off people" has an entirely different meaning and implication from "making money from people."

      The former connotes exploitation. The latter connotes a respectful exchange of value for value with people.

      Marcia Yudkin
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      • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
        Originally Posted by marciayudkin View Post

        You may think this is splitting hairs, but for those of us who are sensitive to the connotations of language, "making money off people" has an entirely different meaning and implication from "making money from people."

        The former connotes exploitation. The latter connotes a respectful exchange of value for value with people.

        Marcia Yudkin
        You're absolutely right: I think it's hair splitting.

        But since you're so "sensitive to the connotations..." and interested in correcting others and delivering language lessons, I'll take it as an invite to do some hair splitting of my own: why don't you choose between "meaning" and "implication"?

        If a phrase has an "entirely different meaning" (not so in this case), then clearly it would be redundant to add that it has a different "implication" (which it actually does). That would be a truism.

        Obviously two phrases that really do have "entirely different meanings" would also have different "implications". But, redundant though it is, you needed to add "implication" because it was the only true part of the statement.

        With your love of language, you can make semantic mistakes like anyone else; see how annoying it is to get unsolicited corrections?

        I actually share your love of language, and already understood your distinction before you generously gave me the gift of a lesson in connotations (for those of us sensitive...).

        For all your concerns about how the op appears because of his words, you (and the other language critics) seem oblivious to the fact that most unsolicited semantic corrections are about as welcome as a spit burger, and are a bigger mistake than the one you're correcting.

        I am not just addressing this to you; I think all the unsolicited criticism in the thread was absurd. Just get over it people; the problem is yours, not the op's.

        Once we can all just quit pretending we're not here first and foremost to increase our bank accounts, I doubt it will hit such a bundle of nerves if someone says "money off" instead of "money from".
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        • Profile picture of the author MissTerraK
          If I wasn't offended by the phrase tree hugging hippie before, I sure would be now after you raise your hand and proudly proclaim you are one while continuing to carry on with mean spirited comments and name calling.

          You certainly aren't doing poor pepper81, the OP, any favors.

          Oh and go ahead and think up something mean and nasty trying to insult me too while you're at it. :rolleyes:

          Terra
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          • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
            Originally Posted by MissTerraK View Post

            If I wasn't offended by the phrase tree hugging hippie before, I sure would be now after you raise your hand and proudly proclaim you are one while continuing to carry on with mean spirited comments and name calling.

            You certainly aren't doing poor pepper81, the OP, any favors.

            Oh and go ahead and think up something mean and nasty trying to insult me too while you're at it. :rolleyes:

            Terra
            You talking to me?
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        • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
          Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

          Demand a refund from your school.
          Cute. But it says nothing.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Atkins
    Sure they do. You certainly can make money from people interested
    in sustainable living, especially now that several people have become
    convinced that a SHTF scenario will happen soon.
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  • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
    Wow .. sure is easy to get offended in this day and age of political correctness. Before long it will not be advisable to make a post on here without consulting your focus group first.

    What many do not understand .. with over 400,000 members on here ... if someone pisses everyone of you off it is still just a very small drop in the overall market. It is not like the OP is going to run an Eco WSO.
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  • Profile picture of the author volit
    Yes, we do. :p
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  • Profile picture of the author WarGasm
    Watch an episode of "Doomsday Preppers" and I think you'll have your answer.
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  • Profile picture of the author michaelplies
    I can tell you a perfect niche for those hippies.
    Weed Seeds.
    Bong and Smoking Accessories.
    Organic and Natural Products.
    Guides to green leaving. Saving Energy. Solar Energy etc.

    this is just a start. there are much more niches for that market.
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  • Profile picture of the author pepper81
    Banned
    I see this thread has been derailed with talk about semantics and political correctness but that is fine. I can appreciate the fact that some people may be offended by the term 'tree hugging hippies' but it seems others may actually embrace this term and be proud to wear this label. I'm actually considering it may just be a good idea to specifically target these people who see themselves as 'tree hugging hippies'.

    I just don't understand why @MissTerraK decided to start making false assumptions such as I am not looking to give value and help people help themselves and the environment. Just because I'm looking to make money off people doesn't necessarily mean I couldn't enrich their lives and offer them something of value in the process. I may be fairly new to the online marketing world but I can assure you that I have already established that offering value and over delivering are the foundations of a successful business. So far it's been working very well for my other two sites.

    @Greg guitar, thanks for weighing in on the conversation and sharing your experience. It's great to hear from someone who has actually lived the lifestyle. I agree that the term 'tree hugging hippies' used to be kind of bogus and was probably used by 'the man' as a derogatory term for environmental activists, but would I be correct in saying that this is now used as a term of endearment among people who were part of that early movement?

    And the whole issue about whether or not I should be openly declaring on a public forum that I intend on making money off people interested in sustainable living makes me laugh. It would be absurd if this was a forum about saving the environment and I was here with sole purpose of driving people to my site, but this is the "Main Internet Marketing Discussion Forum - Where We Talk About Making Money". So I am here to talk about making money. Plain and simple.
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    • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
      Originally Posted by pepper81 View Post

      I see this thread has been derailed with talk about semantics and political correctness but that is fine. I can appreciate the fact that some people may be offended by the term 'tree hugging hippies' but it seems others may actually embrace this term and be proud to wear this label. I'm actually considering it may just be a good idea to specifically target these people who see themselves as 'tree hugging hippies'.

      I just don't understand why @MissTerraK decided to start making false assumptions such as I am not looking to give value and help people help themselves and the environment. Just because I'm looking to make money off people doesn't necessarily mean I couldn't enrich their lives and offer them something of value in the process. I may be fairly new to the online marketing world but I can assure you that I have already established that offering value and over delivering are the foundations of a successful business. So far it's been working very well for my other two sites.

      @Greg guitar, thanks for weighing in on the conversation and sharing your experience. It's great to hear from someone who has actually lived the lifestyle. I agree that the term 'tree hugging hippies' used to be kind of bogus and was probably used by 'the man' as a derogatory term for environmental activists, but would I be correct in saying that this is now used as a term of endearment among people who were part of that early movement?

      And the whole issue about whether or not I should be openly declaring on a public forum that I intend on making money off people interested in sustainable living makes me laugh. It would be absurd if this was a forum about saving the environment and I was here with sole purpose of driving people to my site, but this is the "Main Internet Marketing Discussion Forum - Where We Talk About Making Money". So I am here to talk about making money. Plain and simple.
      Well Pepper, some folks are very "sensitive to connotations" and don't like seeing people talk about making money without hiding their intentions behind pretty phrases about "adding value to the marketplace", "helping people", "enhancing lives", etc.

      So just make sure you always announce your saintly intentions before talking about your desire to profit from people, (never off them-totally different meaning :rolleyes. As long as you change your wording for the "sensitive" among us, and make sure to polish your halo before revealing your profit motive, you should be golden.

      As for the label, and being "proud to wear it", I don't really take labels like that too seriously, but they don't bother me much either, and as I said, groups I've been involved with have used it in a light, humorous way to refer to each other. But not the "hippy" part; just "tree huggers".

      Having said that, it is all too common for all of us to get lazy about really trying to understand where others are coming from, and I'd say one of the primary uses of labels, if not the dominant one, is to serve that laziness.

      A lot of people can't be bothered about our natural environment, are frightened by the civil disobedience of groups like Greenpeace, and have no patience for eco-nuts (another nice label :p). For those folks, "tree huggers" is a way to put others down without any attempt to understand what they're about.

      The fact that champions of industry use "tree hugger" as an insult is why you got such a strong reaction. Add the word "hippy" and it becomes unbearable. :rolleyes:

      Ironically, having such insults flung at me has left me far less prone to taking offense than the thin skinned Warriors that found it upsetting. (I also try not to take anything personally; because doing so usually leads to defensive, childish behavior).

      Did I say I was "proud"? That is a bit of an exaggeration. I don't mind being called a "tree hugger", and won't correct anyone calling me one, (though it's been years since anyone did) but if someone really gets stuck on the label and won't look past it, they aren't worth my time.

      And I wouldn't say I ever "wear" any label. As a rule, I don't like them; they don't capture my essence; they aren't who I am.

      Humans are wonderfully complex, multidimensional animals; so be careful not to imply you think you know the people you apply a label to. Because none of us like to be reduced to a label, I think you need to be sure to convey some humor when using one.

      I would stay away from the word "hippy" because nobody has embraced that term since the early 70s. You might get away with calling yourself one in jest (like Warrior Tony Shepherd "the hippy marketer"), but I doubt anyone will identify with it (except Tony Shepherd), so I'd forget about marketing to a group nobody wants to claim membership in.

      In fact, using the term kind of announces that you aren't too familiar with the people who are the likely target of it. It's been half a century since anyone wanted to be in that much maligned club. The "real hippies" are all seniors or dead now.

      Hope that was helpful, and that nobody choked on their food as a result of my horribly offensive nature.
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      • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
        Originally Posted by Greg guitar View Post

        The "real hippies" are all seniors or dead now.
        or they are not quite seniors yet, but getting close...sorry, I couldn't resist, Greg.

        To the OP,

        For the record the answer to the question "do tree hugging hippies spend money?

        They most certainly do spend money, but they do not suffer fools gladly - so your loooooooong-ass hype-filled sales pages aren't gonna work on that group, let me tell ya!

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  • Profile picture of the author footballbob06
    Here is what I can tell you. My fiance works for a river rafting company and many of the people that buy these $2k-$4k trips are very liberal, maybe not "tree hugging hippies", but they spend tons of money. They are usually the first ones to buy stuff from REI because they think it is expensive so it must be good, when personally I get stuff at yard sales and do just fine with stuff from walmart and cabelas (not saying all their stuff is cheap). So yes I would say that these people do spend tons of money and they will spend a lot of money if they feel it will help the environment.

    You also don't want to look at just that niche. The prepper/survivalist community (many of these are very conservative NRA members) are very into the renewable energy(usually not to save the planet, but rather to be self reliant or to save money). So you should think outside of the box. There is a bigger market than you may think. There are also campers and people who own travel trailers, fifth wheels and motorhomes who are interested in renewable energy and energy saving techniques, because they can go camping longer without being hooked up to electricity.
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    • Profile picture of the author pepper81
      Banned
      Originally Posted by footballbob06 View Post

      Here is what I can tell you. My fiance works for a river rafting company and many of the people that buy these $2k-$4k trips are very liberal, maybe not "tree hugging hippies", but they spend tons of money. They are usually the first ones to buy stuff from REI because they think it is expensive so it must be good, when personally I get stuff at yard sales and do just fine with stuff from walmart and cabelas (not saying all their stuff is cheap). So yes I would say that these people do spend tons of money and they will spend a lot of money if they feel it will help the environment.

      You also don't want to look at just that niche. The prepper/survivalist community (many of these are very conservative NRA members) are very into the renewable energy(usually not to save the planet, but rather to be self reliant or to save money). So you should think outside of the box. There is a bigger market than you may think. There are also campers and people who own travel trailers, fifth wheels and motorhomes who are interested in renewable energy and energy saving techniques, because they can go camping longer without being hooked up to electricity.
      Great advice. Thanks.
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    • Profile picture of the author Headfirst
      Originally Posted by footballbob06 View Post

      They are usually the first ones to buy stuff from REI because they think it is expensive so it must be good
      Actually I buy it from REI because they have no time limit on exchanges. 7 year old backpack fraying and breaking from wear? No problem, they will give you a new one.
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      • Profile picture of the author WraithSarko
        1. Buy a ton of spoiled berries for cheap
        2. Get some tree bark and grind it up
        3. Roll the berries in the tree bark sawdust
        4. Give it a spiffy name like Organic Tree Bark Berries
        5. profit
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        SuperExpensiveNUKE...SubmitterEnvyNUKE...SENukeXCRaptastic
        I've spent the last 59 months building 412 MFA sites. Each site averages 8 cents per day...I said average, some make up to 17 cents per day, PASSIVE INCOME! This income allows me to live comfortably and buy ANY flavor Jolly Rancher or Skittles I desire. Don't give in to fear, it CAN be done!
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        • Profile picture of the author goindeep
          Originally Posted by WraithSarko View Post

          1. Buy a ton of spoiled berries for cheap
          2. Get some tree bark and grind it up
          3. Roll the berries in the tree bark sawdust
          4. Give it a spiffy name like Organic Tree Bark Berries
          5. profit
          Hahahaah lol!

          I read somewhere a while back they where selling "Special Australian Aboriginal Desert Creams" to rich women for thousands of dollars. It ended up being red dirt from the outback mixed with $2 hand cream. Lolllllllllllllllllll
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          • Profile picture of the author WraithSarko
            Originally Posted by Andrei Rotariu View Post

            Hahahaah lol!

            I read somewhere a while back they where selling "Special Australian Aboriginal Desert Creams" to rich women for thousands of dollars. It ended up being red dirt from the outback mixed with $2 hand cream. Lolllllllllllllllllll
            haha
            package it right and people will buy anything
            Signature
            SuperExpensiveNUKE...SubmitterEnvyNUKE...SENukeXCRaptastic
            I've spent the last 59 months building 412 MFA sites. Each site averages 8 cents per day...I said average, some make up to 17 cents per day, PASSIVE INCOME! This income allows me to live comfortably and buy ANY flavor Jolly Rancher or Skittles I desire. Don't give in to fear, it CAN be done!
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      • Profile picture of the author footballbob06
        I am by no means saying they have bad stuff. They have some very high quality stuff. I am more saying that these people really go for overkill and spend a lot of money and they only use it once then sell it at a yard sale when they could have gotten something much cheaper that would have worked just fine. I am not saying this is everybody, but there are many that do it. So basically if you can show them the benefits of the expensive stuff whether they are "hippies" or not they will buy it.
        Originally Posted by Headfirst View Post

        Actually I buy it from REI because they have no time limit on exchanges. 7 year old backpack fraying and breaking from wear? No problem, they will give you a new one.
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        • Profile picture of the author Greg guitar
          Originally Posted by footballbob06 View Post

          I am by no means saying they have bad stuff. They have some very high quality stuff. I am more saying that these people really go for overkill and spend a lot of money and they only use it once then sell it at a yard sale when they could have gotten something much cheaper that would have worked just fine. I am not saying this is everybody, but there are many that do it. So basically if you can show them the benefits of the expensive stuff whether they are "hippies" or not they will buy it.
          They certainly carry some pricy and unnecessary stuff, and I used to hold a similar view, but a couple years ago my brother bought a ton of mountaineering gear in preparation for some long hikes (1-2 weeks) in the Cascades of Washington, and the Sierras of California, and at the time, forcefully corrected my perception.

          He researches purchases ridiculously thoroughly, spending literally hours combing hiking sites for in-depth reviews and reading entire arguments on threads regarding certain single items, like which hat would make the best purchase using multiple criteria, including price, ability to shed water away from one's neck, light weight, strength, air flow, and compactness, etc (he got a great one that can be folded into a tiny package).

          He isn't at all loyal to any one store, and part of his research included finding the best source for each item, taking into account price, return policy, and delivery time. REI turned out to be a very competitive source in terms of all those considerations. He bought a bunch of his stuff there because it was the best source, and competitive pricing was a strong factor.

          Are there people who walk into REI with money to burn, looking for vanity gear, and perhaps barely using it? Sure, just like there are people that go to the grocery store and buy pricy prepared foods, never touching any produce.

          Are they the bread and butter for REI? Absolutely not; that would be outdoor enthusiasts of various levels, but who in the main, understand what they are getting into.

          Much of the stuff they sell has to be good or people can die as a result. Can you get versions of it at Wal-Mart or Big Five? Sure, and one of their tents would work okay if your kids want to camp out in the back yard on a clear night, and you don't care if it only lasts one season. Their sit-on-top kayaks would be fine for lounging on the local pond on a nice day.

          But if you're navigating class 3 or 4 rapids, you better pick REI over a box store for your kayak, paddles, clothes, etc. Unless a significantly increased risk of drowning is less of a concern than spending a couple grand for something you could buy a disposable, barely functional, version of for a couple hundred.

          If you get caught in a nasty mountain storm in a Wal-Mart tent and sleeping bag, good luck coming home alive. Personally, I'm glad my brother trusts his life to gear that came from serious sources, REI being one of the main ones.

          In the last several decades, I've been to hundreds of yard sales in the city where REI started, and has their main store. So far, I have yet to see a single piece of gear with their label at any of them.
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    I don't know...

    Do Tree Hugging Hippies Eat?

    Do Tree Hugging Hippies Have Jobs?

    Do Tree Hugging Hippies Where Clothes?

    Do Tree Hugging Hippies Still Smoke Pot?

    The answer to all of these questions is, "Many do, yes..."
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    Publish Coloring Books for Profit (WSOTD 7-30-2015)
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  • Profile picture of the author goindeep
    Originally Posted by pepper81 View Post

    I'm thinking of making a website aimed at people who are interested in sustainable living i.e. growing your own food, saving power, recycling, using renewable energy, etc. In the past sustainable living probably appealed more to people who would typically be known as 'hippies' or 'greenies', but in today's society everyday people are becoming more aware of the impact they have on the environment and are willing to buy products and do things that are more eco-friendly.

    What strategies do you think would be a good way to approach people in this market? Is there anybody here having any type of success with making money out of people trying to be more eco-friendly?

    Thanks.
    The real question is can you monetize. A good business model can monetize a crowd that usually would not even spend.
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    • Profile picture of the author mrmarketer1
      The best business model is one which taps into a strong and existing stream of demand where there is no resistance to purchase and no need for persuasion. You cant create and monetize demand, you can only find it. Its a Eugene Schwartz thing. Breakthrough Advertising - worth a read.

      Originally Posted by Andrei Rotariu View Post

      The real question is can you monetize. A good business model can monetize a crowd that usually would not even spend.
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  • Profile picture of the author husasa
    Telling people to be kind to the environment, etc. Plus, there are tons of these eco websites out there already.
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  • Profile picture of the author WebPen
    Every niche spends money- you just gotta find the sweet spot.

    For tree huggers- maybe you can sell them a short report on how to grow weed without getting caught or something!
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    • Profile picture of the author WraithSarko
      Originally Posted by Justin Stowe View Post

      Every niche spends money- you just gotta find the sweet spot.

      For tree huggers- maybe you can sell them a short report on how to grow weed without getting caught or something!
      No that's tree smokers, not huggers
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      SuperExpensiveNUKE...SubmitterEnvyNUKE...SENukeXCRaptastic
      I've spent the last 59 months building 412 MFA sites. Each site averages 8 cents per day...I said average, some make up to 17 cents per day, PASSIVE INCOME! This income allows me to live comfortably and buy ANY flavor Jolly Rancher or Skittles I desire. Don't give in to fear, it CAN be done!
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