29 replies
Hey Warrior Members,

I was looking into a a couple offline methods to make some nice cash. Well I found a local running store (I actually go there to get shoes) that has a website, but it is very basic, needs a ton of updating, has no autoresponder and needs SEO done. They rank on the first page of Google, but are the last result.

I am thinking of offering to update and revamp their site, add an autoresponder and do some SEO.

Do you think this is a good idea?
What would be a reasonable amount to charge?

The last question is my biggest. I want to charge them enough to make it worth my while, but I don't want to rip them off. I also want it to be little enough that they will be willing to accept.

Thanks!
Rory
#offline
  • Profile picture of the author teenmoney
    Does anybody have experience with offline methods like this? I am just not sure of the price to request.
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  • Profile picture of the author spires
    Hi

    Yes, this is a good idea. I've done this for lots of companies. In-fact this was how I got started.

    First off, you need to work out an hourly rate that you are happy with. Then work out roughly how ling the work will take.

    You will also need to pitch the client, so make sure you take proof that you can do what you say that you can do.

    When I do it, I tend to do a complete redesign and rebuild, using every website conversion & SEO technique going. For this I do charge quite a bit, but once you have a good reputation and creditable testimonials. You'll be surprised at how many companies will start approaching you, and are willing to pay big bucks for your service.

    Just make sure just can deliver before you start.

    Good Luck
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    Hi Rory,

    What's the most you can see yourself asking for the job?

    ~Michael
    Signature

    "Ich bin en fuego!"
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    • Profile picture of the author teenmoney
      Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

      Hi Rory,

      What's the most you can see yourself asking for the job?

      ~Michael
      I really can't see myself asking above $1000. I mean I have read the offline threads on here and people are charging $3500 and up. I really can't see myself asking that much money.

      Maybe I am wrong about what the service is worth, but would you as a small business owner really be willing to pay someone $3500 to redesign your site, do some, get some backlinks and add an opt-in box?
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    Whatever your answer was, my response was going to be "double or triple it". That puts you between $2000 and $3000.

    Instead of asking if they would be willing to pay $XXXX, you could ask yourself, "would they be willing to increase their business, retain customers, stay in contact with them, and build their brand?"

    However, you don't want to be nervous when you mention the price. Practice. Decide what it's worth to you, and show them how much more it's worth it to them.

    All the best,
    Michael
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    "Ich bin en fuego!"
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  • Profile picture of the author teenmoney
    Hmm oh ok. Well, why were you going to say double or triple it?

    The only thing is I don't want them to be like "ummmm $2000 you are crazy!". I want a reasonable price that is worth my time, but not too high.
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  • Profile picture of the author Russ Reynolds
    Value based pricing - show them the value (if you can do it) and they will pay for it (if they are not broke).
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    • Profile picture of the author teenmoney
      Originally Posted by Russ Reynolds View Post

      Value based pricing - show them the value (if you can do it) and they will pay for it (if they are not broke).
      So how do I show them the value. I'm sure the website/opt-in will make them more money. I am just not sure of how to prove it to them.

      Also what do you recommend having as proof you can actually complete the work? Would you actually come up with a prototype of what their site could look like?

      Sorry for all the newbish questions. I just an not exactly sure how to get started with this. I have been making money online for about a year and much of that year I just READ and READ and READ. So, I know a lot of information and I have been trying to figure out a way to use that knowledge to help people to don't know.

      Then I saw this site and said to myself "I could fix that"

      But I am not really sure how to start
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      • Profile picture of the author TimCastleman
        Russ & I must be on the same wave length. STOP thinking about an hourly fee or feeling bad for charging what you're worth.

        If a doctor saves your life do you think he really earned his fee? Of course.

        Do you think Bill Gates needs to make a million bucks an hour - does he work hard enough to be worth that?

        He and you are paid for the value you bring to someone. Again if I can make you $15,000 extra a year and reduce your cost by thousands a month do you not think that is worth $3,000?

        Seriously would you pay me a dollar to save 3? It is the same thing just with a larger number.

        Want to be confident asking for your fee - say it in the mirror 15 times before you met with them.

        Speak with confidence and they will accept it. If not move on - plenty of work out there. Stop being a street corner worker and start being a high priced call girl ;-)

        Tim
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        • Profile picture of the author AndrewCavanagh
          The basic question missing from your rundown is exactly how are you going to make this footwear business money.

          Making their site work better or getting them better rankings on google might make them more sales and it might not.

          Having an autoresponder certainly could make them more sales based on what you put in that autoresponder and who you get to sign up to it.

          What you need to do is talk to the owner of the business and find out what's working now.

          Are they getting real paying customers from their website?

          Is there any kind of follow up they're doing with the customers and prospects they already have walking into their store? (That's where your autoresponder could come in).

          Where are they making their best profits now?

          Are there some lines they're selling that have an especially high profit margin and in the case of a footwear shop do they have good fast supply of that line if you start helping them sell a boatload of them.

          The bottom line working with businesses...if you make them back more profits than they pay you everyone will be happy.

          That's where your thinking needs to start....

          HOW CAN I HELP THIS BUSINESS MAKE MORE SALES AND PROFITS USING THE INTERNET MARKETING AND OTHER MARKETING STRATEGIES I KNOW.

          Kindest regards,
          Andrew Cavanagh
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            I can't top Andrew's advice, but I can offer an illustration to "prove" value.

            Just for conversation, assume the store has 500 names on a mailing list, and they send a simple one-page self-mailer once per month to that list.

            The cost to mail, just in paper and postage, is around $0.50 per piece, or $250 per drop. Multiply by 12 months, and you get $3,000 per year. And the incremental cost of adding to that list is still $6 per year per name.

            Compare that to having an autoresponder with that same 500 names in the database. Once set up, the cost to email that database is essentially zero.

            If you charge him $2500 for setup and first year's maintenance, he's already ahead $500, and that's without making a single sale.

            The incremental cost of adding to that list is essentially zero.

            With distribution costs down close to zero, except for your (known) fees, he can email more often with better offers.

            And the odds of making zero sales are negligible. A handful of extra sales covers your fees, and the balance is gravy.

            That is how you demonstrate value. At least inside the confines of this forum.

            In the real world, you would want to talk to the owner and ask him to estimate his own numbers. You can plug them in, and present your case using his numbers.
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          • Profile picture of the author Maria Gudelis
            Originally Posted by AndrewCavanagh View Post

            The basic question missing from your rundown is exactly how are you going to make this footwear business money.

            Making their site work better or getting them better rankings on google might make them more sales and it might not.

            Having an autoresponder certainly could make them more sales based on what you put in that autoresponder and who you get to sign up to it.

            What you need to do is talk to the owner of the business and find out what's working now.

            Are they getting real paying customers from their website?

            Is there any kind of follow up they're doing with the customers and prospects they already have walking into their store? (That's where your autoresponder could come in).

            Where are they making their best profits now?

            Are there some lines they're selling that have an especially high profit margin and in the case of a footwear shop do they have good fast supply of that line if you start helping them sell a boatload of them.

            The bottom line working with businesses...if you make them back more profits than they pay you everyone will be happy.

            That's where your thinking needs to start....

            HOW CAN I HELP THIS BUSINESS MAKE MORE SALES AND PROFITS USING THE INTERNET MARKETING AND OTHER MARKETING STRATEGIES I KNOW.

            Kindest regards,
            Andrew Cavanagh
            Andrews' advice is 'da bomb' - as you really gotta think of that as a savvy biz owner will ask you back after your quote:

            "When will I see a return on my investment?"

            So you gotta be prepared to answer that question with authority...

            in one example with one of my prospects that became a client - I asked him back,

            "I'll be glad to answer that question...for me to determine when you will see a return on your investment of $1,500 (that was the quote I gave), I need to know a few things....

            1. What is the lifetime value of your customer?"

            ...and usually the biz owner has never calculated that out, and you, together with him/her, calculate that out...

            So...then the life time value of that customer is x...divide the quote (in my case $1,500) by x - and in my case the return on investment was for him to get 3 brand new clients OR 6 repeat clients and based on the 'paper list of emails he had of his clients...his 'initial return' was less than 30 days with the assumption the emails he had were 'correct'.

            Hope that helps!

            Cheers, Maria
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        • Profile picture of the author teenmoney
          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          I can't top Andrew's advice, but I can offer an illustration to "prove" value.

          Just for conversation, assume the store has 500 names on a mailing list, and they send a simple one-page self-mailer once per month to that list.

          The cost to mail, just in paper and postage, is around $0.50 per piece, or $250 per drop. Multiply by 12 months, and you get $3,000 per year. And the incremental cost of adding to that list is still $6 per year per name.

          Compare that to having an autoresponder with that same 500 names in the database. Once set up, the cost to email that database is essentially zero.

          If you charge him $2500 for setup and first year's maintenance, he's already ahead $500, and that's without making a single sale.

          The incremental cost of adding to that list is essentially zero.

          With distribution costs down close to zero, except for your (known) fees, he can email more often with better offers.

          And the odds of making zero sales are negligible. A handful of extra sales covers your fees, and the balance is gravy.

          That is how you demonstrate value. At least inside the confines of this forum.

          In the real world, you would want to talk to the owner and ask him to estimate his own numbers. You can plug them in, and present your case using his numbers.
          Originally Posted by AndrewCavanagh View Post

          The basic question missing from your rundown is exactly how are you going to make this footwear business money.

          Making their site work better or getting them better rankings on google might make them more sales and it might not.

          Having an autoresponder certainly could make them more sales based on what you put in that autoresponder and who you get to sign up to it.

          What you need to do is talk to the owner of the business and find out what's working now.

          Are they getting real paying customers from their website?

          Is there any kind of follow up they're doing with the customers and prospects they already have walking into their store? (That's where your autoresponder could come in).

          Where are they making their best profits now?

          Are there some lines they're selling that have an especially high profit margin and in the case of a footwear shop do they have good fast supply of that line if you start helping them sell a boatload of them.

          The bottom line working with businesses...if you make them back more profits than they pay you everyone will be happy.

          That's where your thinking needs to start....

          HOW CAN I HELP THIS BUSINESS MAKE MORE SALES AND PROFITS USING THE INTERNET MARKETING AND OTHER MARKETING STRATEGIES I KNOW.

          Kindest regards,
          Andrew Cavanagh
          Originally Posted by TimCastleman View Post

          Russ & I must be on the same wave length. STOP thinking about an hourly fee or feeling bad for charging what you're worth.

          If a doctor saves your life do you think he really earned his fee? Of course.

          Do you think Bill Gates needs to make a million bucks an hour - does he work hard enough to be worth that?

          He and you are paid for the value you bring to someone. Again if I can make you $15,000 extra a year and reduce your cost by thousands a month do you not think that is worth $3,000?

          Seriously would you pay me a dollar to save 3? It is the same thing just with a larger number.

          Want to be confident asking for your fee - say it in the mirror 15 times before you met with them.

          Speak with confidence and they will accept it. If not move on - plenty of work out there. Stop being a street corner worker and start being a high priced call girl ;-)

          Tim
          Thanks guys for the help!! I understand it better now. What I am doing is not just setting up their website and autoresponder. I am saving them money AND making them more money.

          I really appreciate the tips
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    • Profile picture of the author artwebster
      Originally Posted by Russ Reynolds View Post

      Value based pricing - show them the value (if you can do it) and they will pay for it (if they are not broke).

      Wow, Russ,

      What refreshing and sensible words.
      Here's me thinking the advice that I have been receiving to give my stuff away when I only have a single product must be correct since everybody was saying it.
      Signature

      You might not like what I say - but I believe it.
      Build it, make money, then build some more
      Some old school smarts would help - and here's to Rob Toth for his help. Bloody good stuff, even the freebies!

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      • Profile picture of the author Russ Reynolds
        Originally Posted by artwebster View Post

        Wow, Russ,

        What refreshing and sensible words.
        Here's me thinking the advice that I have been receiving to give my stuff away when I only have a single product must be correct since everybody was saying it.
        If somebody had a tool that could make you 5 times your investment, you likely would not mind that it was the only tool in their tool box.

        The trick is having the confidence to know that you can make your client much more money than you charge.

        If you are interested in value based consulting, check out Alan Weiss, the million dollar consultant.

        Cheers,

        Russ
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        • Profile picture of the author majidmaskat
          us internet marketers have developed the urge of not being able to talk to poeple face to face, as we are used to the screens of our laptops. so if you have the guts then i have some new respect to you
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  • Profile picture of the author Russ Reynolds
    Somebody may have alluded to this already but the best way to add value is to ask the customer a ton of questions that will help you understand their business.

    Only once you understand where their money comes from and what they need help with can you properly offer a solution that will add value to them.

    If you truly can't add value to their business, move on to the next one....
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    • Profile picture of the author DeadGuy
      Another consideration to make is the value of a satisfied customer. I couldn't tell from your initial post whether this would be your first offline job or not.

      If you are planning to do more work along these lines, you might want to consider doing the work for a reduced fee or on a contingency basis. A satisfied customer goes a long, long way toward getting more work. Just food for thought.
      Signature

      You are making this work at home stuff way harder than it is. Ready for some sanity? Clear your head and start over.

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  • Profile picture of the author laird
    People arrive at negative mental statements when they look at costs. Shift their focus on the benefits of the investment. What specifically will they be gaining. Monetize that expectation so they can make the mental switch.

    SEO, Blogs, Twitter, AutoResponders, Mailing Lists are costs. The results of what happens when these tactics are used to build their business, the money and repeat business it generates, represents the benefits they'll be receiving. Show THAT value and clients see the potential.

    Del
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  • Profile picture of the author FlightGuy
    Psychology is huge when you're out promoting offline internet consulting. Perceived value is a must and you have to know how to effectively shift a natural skeptic to believing you are truly there to help them make more money.

    THE FIRST STEP to this is to actually want to help them - this is a must. If you sit down and think about things that will really make them money, then you will really make them money.

    If you can't sit down and think about some of these things, don't know the business much, or are just having a mental block... then start asking questions. You want them talking a lot. Get them to the point where they're comfortable enough to talk about which products, services, dishes, lines, etc. bring in the most profit when everythings factored in (shipping costs, food prep costs, labor costs, margins, blah blah). Get a little personal. Notice pictures of kids, identify hobbies, decor, etc.

    Another good way to get them comfortable enough to talk about these things is to ask questions about their business. Remember, these people are business owners and 99% of them love the fact that they're business owners. Ride on that, and ask them how they got started. Passed down? Joint ventured with a partner/best friend/family member? Why are they in the business they're in, what got them started. Have them subconsciously touch on pleasant memories.

    And REALLY take an interest in these things. Do this, and 90% of the time you will both be perfectly comfortable with talking to one another and you'll be on your way to a big fat check because you're helping them make bigger, fatter checks.

    Kindly,
    John Dennis
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    "If you don't design your own life plan, chances are you'll fall into someone else's plan. And guess what they have planned for you? Not much." - Jim Rohn
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  • Profile picture of the author jamesviago
    i agree with the value-based approach.
    i also like success-based, IF i am in any way uncertain about the outcomes - because once i take their money, i want my predictions (regarding the benefits they'll get) to come true, if i can possibly achieve it.

    here's a specific deal we did recently to help a customer in our offline business...

    background:
    1) they engaged our services in 2007/2008 to help speed up their manufacturing operation - that was sucecssful so we had some credibility.
    2) the recent downturn in the local construction industry caused a significant drop in their turnover - so they asked if we could help with that, like we had helped in the factory.
    3) we said "well... what about internet marketing?" they said "not really appropriate, all our work is custom-built and we have to do measures, quotes, meet the customer in person... etc etc".
    4) we said "okay - we'll risk 2 days of our time and $200 of our money in AdWords to prove we can (or can't) flush out relevant leads - if it works, let's do business - but only if you'd spend $1 to make $3... or $1,000 to make $3,000... or $10,000 to make $30,000... ok?" they said "sure, go for it!" That was in September 2008.
    5) we spent 2 days and maybe $50 to set up a landing page and an AdWords campaign and started emailing them 2 leads a week generated from a simple "contact us" form. after 7 weeks and about 15 leads (not counting a few tyre-kickers) we said "that's it for now - we're turning it off because it's costing us to keep advertising... let us know if you'd like it turned on again." (Actual cost was about $4 per day - $0.10 x about 40 clicks/day, 1 lead every few days.) By then it was late November 2008.
    6) Three months later (early March 2009) we got the call: "How much to ramp that internet marketing up? we've sold 3 jobs totalling over $3,000 from that last batch of leads and we want more... 10-15 leads a week would be good!!"
    7) "No problemo - call it $12,000 and to reduce your risk we'll do it like this:
    * 20% now, in advance
    * the rest paid from the gross margin (markup) you generate from the leads
    * we'll take all the risk (after the first $20%) and we'll pay for all the Ads, shopping cart, hosting etc etc until it's working at the rate you want, then you can take over or pay us to run it"

    here the email i sent him:

    From: James Powell
    Sent: Wednesday, 11 March 2009 10:33 p.m.
    To: *************

    Cc: Ulu Aiono; Bryce England
    Subject: internet marketing


    hi *********

    to summarise our conversation, it works like this:

    ·find broad niches
    ·create 10-12 subject areas - each with a landing page and AdGroup
    ·for each, 7-12 sub-groups, each with about 10 keywords - AdGroups and sometimes landing pages
    ·30-day tuning program to pull all conceivable traffic as leads
    ·it's a form-submission model - not direct sales of course

    it's NZ$12k of work.

    suggestion:
    NZ$2400 up front (no gst as it's an export).
    then, 50% of the throughput it generates up to total $12k - you advise as you go and we charge your credit card.
    then, either you take it over, or you could offer us say 10% of the throughput to run it for you (to be discussed later).

    if you approve, let me know and we'll process the NZ$2400 on your credit card.

    cheers,
    james

    he thought about it for a few days and then approved the project.

    that was last week, we processed the deposit last thursday and we'll get started on monday.

    Hope that helps.
    James

    Update: P.S. i should have been clear that all those $$ in my post are NZD. Multiply by 0.6 for USD - so the NZ$12k is about US$7k.
    P.P.S. the "no gst it's an export" refers to the fact that this particular customer is not in New Zealand, so our Goods and Services Tax does not apply, as the output of the services is being "exported".
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    • Profile picture of the author BeauPenaranda
      Originally Posted by jamesviago View Post

      i agree with the value-based approach.
      i also like success-based, IF i am in any way uncertain about the outcomes - because once i take their money, i want my predictions (regarding the benefits they'll get) to come true, if i can possibly achieve it.

      here's a specific deal we did recently to help a customer in our offline business...

      background:
      1) they engaged our services in 2007/2008 to help speed up their manufacturing operation - that was sucecssful so we had some credibility.
      2) the recent downturn in the local construction industry caused a significant drop in their turnover - so they asked if we could help with that, like we had helped in the factory.
      3) we said "well... what about internet marketing?" they said "not really appropriate, all our work is custom-built and we have to do measures, quotes, meet the customer in person... etc etc".
      4) we said "okay - we'll risk 2 days of our time and $200 of our money in AdWords to prove we can (or can't) flush out relevant leads - if it works, let's do business - but only if you'd spend $1 to make $3... or $1,000 to make $3,000... or $10,000 to make $30,000... ok?" they said "sure, go for it!" That was in September 2008.
      5) we spent 2 days and maybe $50 to set up a landing page and an AdWords campaign and started emailing them 2 leads a week generated from a simple "contact us" form. after 7 weeks and about 15 leads (not counting a few tyre-kickers) we said "that's it for now - we're turning it off because it's costing us to keep advertising... let us know if you'd like it turned on again." (Actual cost was about $4 per day - $0.10 x about 40 clicks/day, 1 lead every few days.) By then it was late November 2008.
      6) Three months later (early March 2009) we got the call: "How much to ramp that internet marketing up? we've sold 3 jobs totalling over $3,000 from that last batch of leads and we want more... 10-15 leads a week would be good!!"
      7) "No problemo - call it $12,000 and to reduce your risk we'll do it like this:
      * 20% now, in advance
      * the rest paid from the gross margin (markup) you generate from the leads
      * we'll take all the risk (after the first $20%) and we'll pay for all the Ads, shopping cart, hosting etc etc until it's working at the rate you want, then you can take over or pay us to run it"

      here the email i sent him:

      From: James Powell
      Sent: Wednesday, 11 March 2009 10:33 p.m.
      To: *************

      Cc: Ulu Aiono; Bryce England
      Subject: internet marketing


      hi *********

      to summarise our conversation, it works like this:

      ·find broad niches
      ·create 10-12 subject areas - each with a landing page and AdGroup
      ·for each, 7-12 sub-groups, each with about 10 keywords - AdGroups and sometimes landing pages
      ·30-day tuning program to pull all conceivable traffic as leads
      ·it's a form-submission model - not direct sales of course

      it's NZ$12k of work.

      suggestion:
      NZ$2400 up front (no gst as it's an export).
      then, 50% of the throughput it generates up to total $12k - you advise as you go and we charge your credit card.
      then, either you take it over, or you could offer us say 10% of the throughput to run it for you (to be discussed later).

      if you approve, let me know and we'll process the NZ$2400 on your credit card.

      cheers,
      james

      he thought about it for a few days and then approved the project.

      that was last week, we processed the deposit last thursday and we'll get started on monday.

      Hope that helps.
      James

      Update: P.S. i should have been clear that all those $$ in my post are NZD. Multiply by 0.6 for USD - so the NZ$12k is about US$7k.
      P.P.S. the "no gst it's an export" refers to the fact that this particular customer is not in New Zealand, so our Goods and Services Tax does not apply, as the output of the services is being "exported".

      Great Post jamesviago. That is a really good idea especially to just get your foot in the door with a customer.

      Thanks again,
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      • Profile picture of the author jamesviago
        Originally Posted by BeauPenaranda View Post

        Great Post jamesviago. That is a really good idea especially to just get your foot in the door with a customer.

        Thanks again,

        Thanks BeauP... An update: the AdWords campaign was activated on Wednesday 25th.
        • first lead (via inquiry form submission) came in that evening
        • second lead on Thursday
        • third lead Friday
        • fourth lead this morning (Sunday)
        The client is very pleased... and has already issued a custom quote to the first inquiry (on Friday - only $800 or so but it's a start). hopefully he will get a confimed sale this week, which would be a great outcome.


        Originally Posted by teenmoney View Post

        Thanks guys for the help!! I understand it better now. What I am doing is not just setting up their website and autoresponder. I am saving them money AND making them more money.

        I really appreciate the tips
        how's going teenmoney?
        update please!!
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  • Profile picture of the author jamesviago
    i agree with bayo & spires - make sure you can deliver.

    in the example i gave i did not intend to make it sound like it's "easy money" - we are now committed to do "whatever it takes" to make the client happy - we might have a great hourly rate when it's all over... but we might end up doing a lot of work and have to pull out before the goals are achieved.

    if it truly died (unlikely given the "free trial" we gave him but anything can happen in business) then i would refund even the deposit, as having integrity and being honest in what you are willing to promise, and deliver, is more important than getting paid every day.

    so... be sure.
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  • The thing is, the farther you are from "selling a package", the better you'll do.

    Ask questions about:
    • Their sales process
    • How they currently get new customers
    • Their business plan -- especially their Mission Statement
    • Their most profitable merchandise/services
    • Any underused capacity that can be scaled up, e.g. accessories that can just be taken to the cashier and purchased without a lot of "salesmanship".
    • What causes the most aggravation -- don't promote that which will cause more trouble than revenue!
    This is also a great way to demonstrate your own value. You're not "selling", you're consulting.
    Signature
    "The will to prepare to win is more important than the will to win." -- misquoting Coach Vince Lombardi
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  • Profile picture of the author MrYossu
    Originally Posted by teenmoney View Post

    Hey Warrior Members,

    I was looking into a a couple offline methods to make some nice cash. Well I found a local running store (I actually go there to get shoes) that has a website, but it is very basic, needs a ton of updating, has no autoresponder and needs SEO done. They rank on the first page of Google, but are the last result.

    I am thinking of offering to update and revamp their site, add an autoresponder and do some SEO.

    Do you think this is a good idea?
    What would be a reasonable amount to charge?

    The last question is my biggest. I want to charge them enough to make it worth my while, but I don't want to rip them off. I also want it to be little enough that they will be willing to accept.

    Thanks!
    Rory
    As others have said, you need to look at what benefit you are offering the business owner, and judge your costs in terms of that. If you can bring in an extra (say) $50,000 every year, then charging him $500 per month isn't out of the question.

    There was a discussion about this in another thread, and I posted a Word doc with a sample calculation I use to show offline business owners how much the autoresponder idea can bring in for them. Read http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...tml#post548879 for more details. I'll attach the Word doc here again for you.

    I use this calculation with all my offline prospects, and this is the one thing that impresses them. When they can see a reasonable estimate of the amount they can make, and compare it to the (relatively) modest sum I'm charging, they can't really say no.

    Hope this helps.
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  • Profile picture of the author artwebster
    Hi, Teenmoney,

    You sound like you have still got one foot in the real world.

    Will you really go out and speak to business people?
    Can you learn a very, very simple script to use - and use it?
    Would you like to be able to visit an off line prospect and guarantee to cut his costs?
    Would you like to be able to show him where he will probably find new customers?
    Would you be happy to know that the money you save your prospect today can pay for the services(?) you want to offer him later?

    'Yes' five times? PM me. Let's talk.
    Signature

    You might not like what I say - but I believe it.
    Build it, make money, then build some more
    Some old school smarts would help - and here's to Rob Toth for his help. Bloody good stuff, even the freebies!

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