Selling Without Effort Decoded...

6 replies
Here's what I'm trying to say though. I'm not too sure how to
explain this, and everything below might seem like
crack-pottery, but believe me when I say that this works like
magic.

I don't know why, but you might be able to exploit that
hidden selling beast inside of you. I didn't say you would, but
you could.

In fact, I was a little reluctant to write this post because I
might seem like a crack-pot to people who didn't get what I
meant.

Let's say you hang out with a group of friends. Bob is a
person you're comfortable with and he's helped you out so
much in the past.

Tom, on the other hand, you find that he tries to be friends
with you, but you simply don't have that "connection". He's
tried to help you in the past, but he always asks for a
repayment of a favor.

If Bob and Tom are going to sell you the exact same thing,
who are you likely to buy from?

Actually, let's not even say the word "sell".

If Bob and Tom recommends a product to you, and says that
it works awesome for them... on whose account would you buy
the product?

I'd go with Bob, if it was me.

Frankly, Bob's a lot more sincere. He's genuine. Tom, he's
sneaky, he's trying to sell me something.

That's how I would summarize the thing. Empathy counts, but
if you aren't sincere, no buyer is going to sense it.

If you don't leak out the traces and scent of being genuine in
wanting to help the other person, your sale is screwed.

If the prospect doesn't believe in your desire to help them,
your sale is screwed.

It isn't even logical - I tried thinking about it, but the only
thing is what everybody else said in the past:

People buy on emotions.

Not any kind of emotion, though. The strong, tugging ones.
The strong, over-bearing confidence in the other person. The
leap of faith that just minimizes every single logical reason.

It's like this pillow that smothers away everything.

The mind starts to invent reasons to believe Bob.

Bob is a great guy. He wants to help me. If it works well for him,
it'll work well for me. Tom is sneaky and shifty. He's just trying
to sell me something.

You could use all the high-pressure sales tactics in the world,
but if someone is completely unconvinced that your solution
OR you are not genuine... You're going to lose to that emotional
part of the brain.

Self-persuasion is a very real reason though.

Winston Tian
#decoded #effort #selling
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    I would add one more thing...

    People love to buy, but they don't want to feel like they're being sold to.

    All the best,
    Michael
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    "Ich bin en fuego!"
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  • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
    The power to have your recommendations taken serious enough to produce a sale comes with great responsibility.
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  • Profile picture of the author retsced
    I don't see how anyone would think you're a crack-pot for pointing out the truth about selling. As Jeffrey Gitomer says "All things being equal, people want to do business with their friends. All things being not quite as equal, people STILL want to do business with their friends."
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    • Profile picture of the author Zend
      The problem is, how to sell without make them realize that you are selling. Sincerity, honesty, and pure motives is indeed blurred in the world of Internet Marketing. Every people know this, nevertheless, we shouldn't give up and keep working on the first problem.
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      • Profile picture of the author Steve B
        Good post Winston. I, for one, believe there are a lot of what some people call "triggers" that push folks toward buying. Emotions are usually there. Self persuasion can be powerful. Other triggers include curiosity, trust, scarcity, authority, liking (friends), acceptance, reciprocation, and many, many more.

        Putting a lot of triggers in your offer is a real art (challenge).

        Steve
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        • Profile picture of the author WinstonTian
          Originally Posted by Steve B View Post

          Good post Winston. I, for one, believe there are a lot of what some people call "triggers" that push folks toward buying. Emotions are usually there. Self persuasion can be powerful. Other triggers include curiosity, trust, scarcity, authority, liking (friends), acceptance, reciprocation, and many, many more.

          Putting a lot of triggers in your offer is a real art (challenge).

          Steve
          That's very right actually. I'm a huge fanatic over neuronal
          patterns. We all have a deeply-wired huge complex of
          stimulus-motor responses in our heads, and often, the more
          powerful patterns always activate OVER the weaker ones.

          I think triggers is an apt way to describe "stimulus", which is
          simply anything that triggers the mind to respond. It can be a
          sound, a taste, a touch, a sight, smell or even a movement.

          However, the same trigger CAN trigger a completely different
          response in different stimuli fields.

          That means, as other "triggers" are firing in the background of
          your prospect's mind, the particular trigger that you fire may
          be rendered ineffective if you choose the wrong weapon in the
          wrong "battlefield".

          Winston Tian

          PS - I do wonder if people are really grasping the gold nuggets
          I've given out in my first post... :p
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          Cheers,
          Winston
          The Beginner's Doctor

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