54 replies
Are you a part of a MLM network? If so, why did you join?

Are you or someone you know making a killing doing MLM?

What are some of the best MLM networks you've seen/experienced?

I'm amazed at how many people are still apart of MLM networks. The concept makes sense but the products are usually lackluster and individuals are sometimes overly aggressive or manipulative in their approach.

It also reminds me of having a regular 9-5 job.
#mlm
  • Profile picture of the author visimedia
    I joined MLM twice online , but the only thing that I'm aware now, only join MLM when you're able to drive good amount of traffic and you have good skills in list building.

    MLM is about numbers game, when you join MLM and if you know nothing about traffic generation and list building, all you'll face is only to be offered new latest shinny eye catching training program of "How I got 156 subscribers in just 7 days!"... lol.

    Believe me, they work this way up until now.

    Hope it helps.
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    • Profile picture of the author MarketingMinded
      Originally Posted by visimedia View Post

      I joined MLM twice online , but the only thing that I'm aware now, only join MLM when you're able to drive good amount of traffic and you have good skills in list building.

      MLM is about numbers game, when you join MLM and if you know nothing about traffic generation and list building, all you'll face is only to be offered new latest shinny eye catching training program of "How I got 156 subscribers in just 7 days!"... lol.

      Believe me, they work this way up until now.

      Hope it helps.
      O I'm not looking to join MLM, it's not my thing.

      Just really curious as to why people love joining them.
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      • Profile picture of the author Johnny Canuck
        I joined an MLM type platform a month ago and I'm Loving It! The difference with this network is it is not really MLM, there is only you and your sponsor so that's cool, plus they offer 100% commissions on products that are well done, unique, and can learn a lot from them.

        It has only been a month so NO I am not making the millions, living on a beach, but the approach I use with this network is different than most MLM networks.

        I do not hound friends and family untill they shun me LOL!

        Just my 2 cents!

        All the best,
        Johnny
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        • Profile picture of the author MarketingMinded
          Originally Posted by Johnny Canuck View Post

          I joined an MLM type platform a month ago and I'm Loving It! The difference with this network is it is not really MLM, there is only you and your sponsor so that's cool, plus they offer 100% commissions on products that are well done, unique, and can learn a lot from them.

          It has only been a month so NO I am not making the millions, living on a beach, but the approach I use with this network is different than most MLM networks.

          I do not hound friends and family untill they shun me LOL!

          Just my 2 cents!

          All the best,
          Johnny
          That's cool. Glad to hear that you're ethical
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        • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
          Originally Posted by Johnny Canuck View Post

          I joined an MLM type platform a month ago and I'm Loving It! The difference with this network is it is not really MLM, there is only you and your sponsor so that's cool, plus they offer 100% commissions on products that are well done, unique, and can learn a lot from them.

          It has only been a month so NO I am not making the millions, living on a beach, but the approach I use with this network is different than most MLM networks.

          I do not hound friends and family untill they shun me LOL!

          Just my 2 cents!

          All the best,
          Johnny
          Then you are not doing MLM. MLM stands for multi level marketing and you are into two level marketing lol.

          I myself find it hard to build someone's business other than my own.
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          • Profile picture of the author Johnny Canuck
            Originally Posted by Troy_Phillips View Post

            Then you are not doing MLM. MLM stands for multi level marketing and you are into two level marketing lol.

            I myself find it hard to build someone's business other than my own.
            I appreciate your opinions and feedback on this. Technically speaking, I use the term MLM as this is the overall view of the network, although the comp plan is seen as only your sponsor and yourself.

            My business model consists of many different platforms, this being ONE of them, not the only thing, leaving a more rewarding feeling at the end of the day.

            Again, this was just my 2 cents

            All the best,
            Johnny
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            • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
              Originally Posted by Johnny Canuck View Post

              My business model consists of many different platforms, this being ONE of them, not the only thing, leaving a more rewarding feeling at the end of the day.

              Again, this was just my 2 cents

              All the best,
              Johnny
              Very smart not depending on any one model too much. When it comes down to it the part of your quote I highlighted is all that really matters.

              Wishing you good luck and laser focus,
              Troy
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  • Profile picture of the author louie6925
    Used to do GDI a few years back, did OK, but took alot of work, and it wasn't the best program in the world!........but its what got me into IM and although it wasn't great, it did teach me the ropes and I don't regret it, but certainly wouldn't do it again!
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  • Profile picture of the author LukeDavenport
    Yeah, I agree It's a lot more aggressive. The rewards can be much better, people like the concept of putting people under you too. Because then it's like you have people working for you in a certain sense.

    Really personal opinion, I've tried to get into some MLM stuff, it requires A LOT more hustle and to talk to people all the time and be trying to add people in under you.

    If you have that ambition I say go for it.
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    • Profile picture of the author MarketingMinded
      Originally Posted by LukeDavenport View Post

      Yeah, I agree It's a lot more aggressive. The rewards can be much better, people like the concept of putting people under you too. Because then it's like you have people working for you in a certain sense.

      Really personal opinion, I've tried to get into some MLM stuff, it requires A LOT more hustle and to talk to people all the time and be trying to add people in under you.

      If you have that ambition I say go for it.
      It requires way too much hustle and isn't all that scalable either.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    There are so many companies claiming to be MLMs that it can be hard to generalize, but here goes...

    The reason most people join MLMs is that it sounds like easy money to them. They figure the people above them will get people below them, and they will be able to cash in.

    That is an unrealistic belief, but it's common amongst prospects in MLM.

    I'm not saying this is how money is made in MLM, just that it's what prospects believe.

    All the best,
    Michael
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    • Profile picture of the author MarketingMinded
      Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

      There are so many companies claiming to be MLMs that it can be hard to generalize, but here goes...

      The reason most people join MLMs is that it sounds like easy money to them. They figure the people above them will get people below them, and they will be able to cash in.

      That is an unrealistic belief, but it's common amongst prospects in MLM.

      I'm not saying this is how money is made in MLM, just that it's what prospects believe.

      All the best,
      Michael
      You summed it up perfectly.

      People are being sold dreams.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeff Schuman
    I like the MLM business model, but only if I am sold on the product. Because the average network marketer only sponsors 2.7 people, according to the Direct Selling Association, you have to like the product line, and use it even if you are not in the business of building a downline.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steve Solem
      Originally Posted by Jeff Schuman View Post

      I like the MLM business model, but only if I am sold on the product. Because the average network marketer only sponsors 2.7 people, according to the Direct Selling Association, you have to like the product line, and use it even if you are not in the business of building a downline.
      I agree with Jeff here. I've known many who buy and use products because they have to to qualify and to be able to sell to others, and they're usually jumping from one fad to the next.

      For me, once I found a unique product I knew I'd use anyway because it filled a real need for less than the competition could and it was something I'd want to tell people about wether I got paid for it or not, it was an easy progression to take the step and become a distributor.

      Overall I think the business model is a proven one, but for every 1 good company our there, there are probably 20 crappy ones - so people need to do their due diligence before deciding to get involved with one.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
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    "Your personal philosophy is the greatest determining factor in how your life works out."
    - Jim Rohn
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    I tried MLM. My cousin threw a "family seminar" pitching the family on it... then when i saw everything i had to do to make money... i quit instantly.
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    • Profile picture of the author MarketingMinded
      Originally Posted by Randall Magwood View Post

      I tried MLM. My cousin threw a "family seminar" pitching the family on it... then when i saw everything i had to do to make money... i quit instantly.
      There's nothing more sleazy than those type of pitches, especially when it's comes to family and friends.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
      Originally Posted by Randall Magwood View Post

      I tried MLM. My cousin threw a "family seminar" pitching the family on it... then when i saw everything i had to do to make money... i quit instantly.
      Man... did you screw up... lol
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Whisonant
    I love it! Actually make very good money at it. Also I don't have to work much at all. Now let me clarify something...

    You got to work a lot in the beginning for very little money. This is where the majority quit and say oh... network marketing does not work, it's to hard, it's a scam etc...

    Now if you keep working at it and actually build out your team the rewards pay off big time in the "long run". Then you get paid a lot to work very little.

    Of course you have to align with a good network marketing company that has products that people actually want to buy and you need to be sponsored into a team that actually helps you to build your business.

    The old hold meetings, hammer your friends until they start running from you etc... Is still around. That's called a bad upline team teaching you old methods that just piss people off. There are a lot better ways to work the network marketing business that does not piss people off or make you look like a scam artist.

    Re's
    Rob
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    • Profile picture of the author MarketingMinded
      Originally Posted by Rob Whisonant View Post

      I love it! Actually make very good money at it. Also I don't have to work much at all. Now let me clarify something...

      You got to work a lot in the beginning for very little money. This is where the majority quit and say oh... network marketing does not work, it's to hard, it's a scam etc...

      Now if you keep working at it and actually build out your team the rewards pay off big time in the "long run". Then you get paid a lot to work very little.

      Of course you have to align with a good network marketing company that has products that people actually want to buy and you need to be sponsored into a team that actually helps you to build your business.

      The old hold meetings, hammer your friends until they start running from you etc... Is still around. That's called a bad upline team teaching you old methods that just piss people off. There are a lot better ways to work the network marketing business that does not piss people off or make you look like a scam artist.

      Re's
      Rob

      Hey, to each their own. Glad you was able to find success with it.

      How did your approach differ from the MLM norm?
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      • Profile picture of the author Rob Whisonant
        Originally Posted by MarketingMinded View Post

        Hey, to each their own. Glad you was able to find success with it.

        How did your approach differ from the MLM norm?
        Well I could write a book on it but in a nutshell...

        I don't do meetings, I don't do sales presentations. I don't hound my friends. What I do is...

        Let people (friends included) know what I do for a living. The same way you let people know what job you do. I let people see me using the products. If someone asks about a product I tell them a little about it and how to get it. I don't pressure them.

        I plant seeds... People that are interested ask questions. Usually a few weeks to months after they find out through regular conversation what I do. You let people come to you when they decided they are interested. You don't ram it down their throat. A person may have no interest at all in the business side of things. Then later down the road when a big bill comes up and he or she starts thinking about how to earn a side income they think back... Hmmmm I need to find out a little more about what Rob does. I'll give him a call.

        Just like if you have a friend that is a plumber. He let you know he was a plumber some time in the past. When you need a plumber you call him. Same with other professions. It's all about networking. Not high pressure selling.

        Big key is to have products people are honestly interested in and want to actually use.

        Re's
        Rob Whisonant
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    • Profile picture of the author mazero
      Yeah, I agree 100%
      Like any other business model. You have to put in high volumes of hours to build momentum.
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  • Profile picture of the author stanigator
    MLM is not my thing. You'll only make good sums of money individually if you joined early (i.e. near the top of the food chain). If you joined early, the company is likely getting started, which is usually a tougher sell for its associates. I'm not completely sure how the business model works. Basically, each associates would spread the product transactions to a few customers, who may become associates themselves and further the process. A fraction of the flush-over profit earned from all the customers and associates buying the products (somewhat resembles a pyramid structure) pays their commissions.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rob Whisonant
      Originally Posted by stanigator View Post

      MLM is not my thing. You'll only make good sums of money individually if you joined early (i.e. near the top of the food chain).
      This is actually just a myth and not really sure where people come up with that idea. For this to happen an extremely large market segment would have to me in the MLM. This just does not happen. Only a small percentage of the population are in a network marketing business. And a large portion of people that are in network marketing are in it for the discount on the products only.

      Re's
      Rob Whisonant
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  • Profile picture of the author Sarah Harris
    There are some really interesting marketing and business plans out there. If you can find the MLM that is right for you it is very easy actually to make a lot of money. Take a closer look at some of these marketing plans ...some of them are brilliant...the problem is many of the most brilliant have poor management, or poor products. When you find that income opportunity ...that the numbers add up ... the products (yes plural) are great and there is opportunity for growth due to customer sales rather than all affiliate based you have a winner.

    You just have to make sure that you are selling something that is needed or wanted by many people. The problem is that many people don't look at it as a niche market and they think they have to con their family and friends. If you join something that requires you to sponsor people as an affiliate to earn then you are in a questionable program.

    I am in a couple right now and they are based on me marketing to customers and provide a benefit to those customers. I use all of the information I have learned doing traditional IM over the last 10 years and do very well.

    You can also develop another income from things you learn doing MLM or Network Marketing.

    I do live on the beach in the Caribbean now and the difference is I work with people. I train people that want to get involved and it is about quality not quantity. You can make much more with just a few well trained, affiliates than with many you just get in so that you have numbers...that is what most people don't get.
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    • Profile picture of the author MarketingMinded
      Originally Posted by Sarah Harris View Post

      There are some really interesting marketing and business plans out there. If you can find the MLM that is right for you it is very easy actually to make a lot of money. Take a closer look at some of these marketing plans ...some of them are brilliant...the problem is many of the most brilliant have poor management, or poor products. When you find that income opportunity ...that the numbers add up ... the products (yes plural) are great and there is opportunity for growth due to customer sales rather than all affiliate based you have a winner.

      You just have to make sure that you are selling something that is needed or wanted by many people. The problem is that many people don't look at it as a niche market and they think they have to con their family and friends. If you join something that requires you to sponsor people as an affiliate to earn then you are in a questionable program.

      I am in a couple right now and they are based on me marketing to customers and provide a benefit to those customers. I use all of the information I have learned doing traditional IM over the last 10 years and do very well.

      You can also develop another income from things you learn doing MLM or Network Marketing.

      I do live on the beach in the Caribbean now and the difference is I work with people. I train people that want to get involved and it is about quality not quantity. You can make much more with just a few well trained, affiliates than with many you just get in so that you have numbers...that is what most people don't get.
      I totally respect your position and stance on MLM.

      Glad you found success with it!
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  • Profile picture of the author paul nicholls
    i joined some mlm programs a few years ago when first started out

    personally i think mlm is a complete waste of time and a very unethical business model but that is just my opinion

    having your own product that you sell instead is much more of a business rather than just get people to pay you to join your downline

    paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    I stopped being involved in mlm years ago when the company I was involved with went out of business. Boy, did I get screwed. Another company before that, changed the commission structure and screwed me out of the thousands of dollars. To have a somewhat balanced view here, the company did give me some funds for my assets (my downline). But in the end I still got bent over and <too graphic to detail here>.

    Even with those bad experiences, I'm not going to bad mouth the industry as a whole. Anyone who broad brushes an entire industry based on what they hear or read from other people aren't really giving an informed opinion or even if it didn't work out for them (there could be many reasons behind mlm failures). There are bad apples in all industries. There are a lot of Warriors who do very well with networking marketing companies but they don't talk about it in this forum because they realize they'd be wasting their breath on people who don't really know how the industry works.

    After those experiences, I swore that I would never let my income or financial fate be decided by any single organization again. Since then I've created my own products and have affiliates market them for me (among others things). I'm no longer at the whims of the policies and procedures of an mlm organization who can change them at any moment. I now control my own commission structure, I get to make the rules.

    Mlm can be a good thing if you do your research and if the company isn't being run by morons. Though you definitely want to have more than one income stream coming in if you choose to go that route. Personally, I'd rather go with option B (product creation).

    RoD
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  • Profile picture of the author jkgultimate
    I first started with USANA which was getting too expensive. You have to buy a $150 USD product a month to maintain your status as a distributor. Than I look on ebay and people are selling them for $80 USD. I contacted them about their pricing policy which bans people for selling their products under wholesale. That didn't do anything about it so I got out of it. I only take some of their health products because they are geniunly good, but the business sucks.

    Now I joined a silver coins company and I have been apart of them for only a month so far, but instead of buying a health product that you crap out everyday, now I am investing in silver which in my opinion is a good thing considering silver is going up in value lately.

    Like people said earlier, if you like the product in this case its an investment, then go for it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Grace
    In my opinion, it's all marketing. MLM, IM, they like to pretend the other doesn't exist. There's almost a line drawn in the sand.

    But to me they're one of they same... you're selling stuff. That's it.

    Thing about MLM is there's a lot of potential for residual. Personally I do both, but here are my personal guidelines for MLM...

    First off, they all have the "Best" pay plan so I pay no attention to that. I choose based on products I like and that I want regardless of if I can make money. If you get in for just money you'll fail more often than not.

    I'm in three companies now and I love the products. In fact two of them I've never actively promoted just because I like them a lot but have had no time to do so.

    I also pick a company that offers real value. I don't want to buy overpriced stuff that I can get at Costco for half the price on any given day.

    So, when newbie coaching clients ask me what's a good way to make money, I do offer MLM as one possibility. Mainly because the product is in place, the money is there, and if you deal with the right people you have an instant positive community support structure... something you don't find in a typical IM product.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vasilev
    Originally Posted by MarketingMinded View Post

    Are you a part of a MLM network? If so, why did you join?

    Are you or someone you know making a killing doing MLM?

    What are some of the best MLM networks you've seen/experienced?

    I'm amazed at how many people are still apart of MLM networks. The concept makes sense but the products are usually lackluster and individuals are sometimes overly aggressive or manipulative in their approach.

    It also reminds me of having a regular 9-5 job.
    The problem is people don't get this business model. It works great, if done right... it has always been

    What helps people not understanding it, is that almost everybody involved in a MLM, constantly talks about millions and billions and shit like that...
    so people get a wrong idea about it.

    Another bad thing is that most people join and start implementing the "fake it till you make it" thing and look like idiots, jumping around fake showing off and things like that... these guys don't really know marketing, so they chase people around acting weird, which makes a bad impression.

    These things ( and some more not worth mentioning ) give people the wrong idea about MLM, but don't make it bad business at all, it only shows few know how to use this model.

    Let me now clear it out what Network Marketing/ MLM is:

    This is a business model based on building a net of distributors sell for you.

    It takes skills, money( less than almost any other business, but still- you need money ) and a LOT of work to grow.

    And when I say skills, I mean business skills ( leadership, marketing skills, persistence, investing and more).

    The company and its products are important too, very few companies are worth joining.

    It is really funny when I see people expressing their emotions saying bad things about this business model... it shows right away that they don't understand how business in general works.

    So to sum up:

    Awesome business model, but definitely not for everybody.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ruzza
    Many years ago I had a go at Amways and ACN. Out of the two I found ACN was the most viable as there is always a decent market for the products they had to offer.

    I think the most valuable thing I received out of these MLM's was going to all the seminars and getting motivated by all the speakers (whether is was bs or not) to break out of the standard 9-5 dead and job type mold and aim higher in life.

    I still sometimes attend the seminars for this exact reason gives great motivation but im sure you could make good money from MLM just takes a tremendous amount of effort to build at the start.

    -Ryan
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Moffatt
    I love pretending I'm an Egyptian Pharaoh atop of a large pyramid and having everyone below me build my empire. Just kidding. On a serious note, I may film a video similar to what I just described just for sh*ts and giggles.

    I recently joined a MLM (I'm sure y'all have heard of it 8554 times) and I have to say it's pretty damn fantastic. I love the product and the commissions are freaking stellar! Win win in my book!

    So far this week MLM = Make Lotta Money!
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    • Profile picture of the author Rob Whisonant
      Originally Posted by Jason Moffatt View Post

      I love pretending I'm an Egyptian Pharaoh atop of a large pyramid and having everyone below me build my empire. Just kidding.
      Now that's a picture!

      Now anyone in any business or job can pretend the same thing since all businesses are structured like a pyramid. It's just up to you where you place yourself within the pyramid structure. Personally I always choose as high up as possible.

      Regular business
      You got the boss at top.
      Then you have the executives.
      Then the managers.
      Then the workers.

      Now if you are 100% self-employed...
      You at the top.
      Anyone you sub work out to is next.
      Your hosting company, autoresponder company, your electric company are here.

      All the same structure that run all business. A pyramid. Without this structure you would not have a business. You would have a commune of some sort.

      Re's
      Rob Whisonant
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    • Profile picture of the author Vasilev
      [QUOTE=Jason Moffatt;6981091]

      I recently joined a MLM (I'm sure y'all have heard of it 8554 times) and I have to say it's pretty damn fantastic. I love the product and the commissions are freaking stellar! Win win in my book!

      [QUOTE]

      I hear you... been in since the beginning. It is a money maker.

      February though, people were talking weird about it in here. I guess some just can't get rid of their ego's.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
    Anyone who understands the power of leverage in business
    will have the good sense to at least look at MLM. There isn't
    a better vehicle to produce leveraged residual income anywhere.

    PERIOD.
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    If you knew what I know you'd be doing what I do...
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
      Originally Posted by Tsnyder View Post

      Anyone who understands the power of leverage in business
      will have the good sense to at least look at MLM. There isn't
      a better vehicle to produce leveraged residual income anywhere.

      PERIOD.
      Anyone who understands business, understands that ownership and control are necessary for maximizing profits. You don't own an MLM business (it is NEVER your business), you can only be involved in it.

      Some people don't want to own a business, and there's nothing wrong with that. Just as some people aren't cut out for MLM, some aren't cut out for full ownership. To each their own.

      I just don't want people to fall for the lie that they own their business if it's MLM.

      All the best,
      Michael
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      "Ich bin en fuego!"
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      • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
        Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

        Anyone who understands business, understands that ownership and control are necessary for maximizing profits. You don't own an MLM business (it is NEVER your business), you can only be involved in it.

        Some people don't want to own a business, and there's nothing wrong with that. Just as some people aren't cut out for MLM, some aren't cut out for full ownership. To each their own.

        I just don't want people to fall for the lie that they own their business if it's MLM.

        All the best,
        Michael
        Repeating something over and over doesn't make it true.

        If I don't own anything how is it that I sold my business
        with another MLM several years ago for a whole lot of money?

        And the supplier (the company) approved. Before anyone jumps
        up and asks why the company would need to approve if you own
        the business they are a party to the agreement to distribute their
        products.

        Whenever someone tells my I don't understand business if I think
        that being a successful MLMer is owning something I usually just
        shake my head, smile to myself, and chuckle just a little.

        What every MLMer owns is a marketing business... no different than
        anyone struggling in IM to create and market their own product.

        We're just smart enough to contract with someone to do all the
        boring stuff for us so we can concentrate on marketing and building
        the business. If one supplier goes out of business or fails to perform
        as we wish there are plenty more. It's our marketing business... we
        choose to market for whomever we like.

        We have contract rights the same as anyone else in business. Our rights
        can not be arbitrarily abrogated. We have legal recourse. We are not
        employees.

        In any case... call it whatever helps you through the night but the fact
        is if you're relying solely on your own efforts to create, produce and market
        a product you are the one who operates more like a job than a business.
        Congratulations! You own a job that will likely never pay you a dime of profit.

        Good luck with that paradigm! When you want to learn something about
        leverage, let me know... always happy to help!
        Signature
        If you knew what I know you'd be doing what I do...
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        • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
          Originally Posted by Tsnyder View Post

          Repeating something over and over doesn't make it true.
          The repetition doesn't make it true, the truth makes it true. So, repeating something over and over doesn't make it untrue either. (Just sayin')

          If I don't own anything how is it that I sold my business
          with another MLM several years ago for a whole lot of money?
          That's a fair question. What exactly did you sell? Did you sell the MLM? Or did you sell your organization? Or...?

          And the supplier (the company) approved. Before anyone jumps
          up and asks why the company would need to approve if you own
          the business they are a party to the agreement to distribute their
          products.
          If you fully own the business, then would you need to get approval from anyone? Perhaps there are aspects of the business that you own, but the only way to truly and fully own an MLM is to be the person who created it (or purchased it from the creator).

          Whenever someone tells my I don't understand business if I think
          that being a successful MLMer is owning something I usually just
          shake my head, smile to myself, and chuckle just a little.
          No need to chuckle at me. I know you have an excellent grasp of business. You don't fully own the MLM, but as mentioned, there may be portions of what you do that you do own.

          What every MLMer owns is a marketing business... no different than anyone struggling in IM to create and market their own product.
          I don't completely agree, but will give you the benefit of the doubt. How many MLMers understand that? How many are led to believe that?

          We're just smart enough to contract with someone to do all the
          boring stuff for us so we can concentrate on marketing and building
          the business.
          Repeating something over and over doesn't make it true.

          If one supplier goes out of business or fails to perform as we wish there are plenty more. It's our marketing business... we
          choose to market for whomever we like.
          I'm not sure if you are referring to the MLM you are currently using, or to your personal "marketing business".

          We have contract rights the same as anyone else in business. Our rights can not be arbitrarily abrogated. We have legal recourse. We are not employees.
          If the MLM goes belly-up, then you need to find a new MLM. To me, that sounds very similar to losing a job.

          In any case... call it whatever helps you through the night but the fact is if you're relying solely on your own efforts to create, produce and market a product you are the one who operates more like a job than a business.
          That has not been my experience. Of course the key word is 'solely'.

          Congratulations! You own a job that will likely never pay you a dime of profit.
          Again, that has not been my experience.

          Good luck with that paradigm! When you want to learn something about leverage, let me know... always happy to help!
          I know you are, and I always appreciate your patience with me.

          I was actually wondering if you were going to bring up leverage, because I didn't talk about it in my response at all.

          The funny thing is that I'm trying to be more understanding in my comments regarding MLM. For example, in my first post, I wasn't only referring to people "selling the dream" but also to those who willingly buy it without doing any form of due diligence. While I wouldn't recommend MLM to people, I would feel 100% comfortable pointing them in your direction if they insisted on learning more.

          One other thing, most of these threads use the term 'MLM' as if it refers to a single business, and that all MLMs are either good or bad. There are honest and less-honest traditional businesses, and the same is true when it comes to MLM.

          All the best,
          Michael
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          "Ich bin en fuego!"
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          • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

            What exactly did you sell? Did you sell the MLM? Or did you sell your organization? Or...?
            I have a friend who sold for over $900,000 (at the age of 25, having started it when she was 18) the distributorship from which she'd been earning about $30,000 per month, Michael.

            You wouldn't have convinced her that she "didn't own her business". And plenty of serious, successful, business professionals thought it was worth large 6-figure sums, at the time she sold it. I don't think you'd have convinced them, either.

            What do you think such purchasers of MLM distributorships are really buying, if MLM distributors "don't own their own business"?

            The "distributorship" such people sell is their own business in exactly the same sense that my websites, subscriber-lists and articles are "my own business".

            Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

            If you fully own the business, then would you need to get approval from anyone?
            For exactly the same reason an affiliate marketer might, under some circumstances, in selling his business: the manufacturer of the products has to be willing to do business with, and be represented by, the new owner. This is usually a formality. Pointing out that someone's consent is needed simply isn't the comparative criticism of MLM that you're trying to make out, here.
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            • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              I have a friend who sold for over $900,000 (at the age of 25, having started it when she was 18) the distributorship from which she'd been earning about $30,000 per month, Michael.

              You wouldn't have convinced her that she "didn't own her business". And plenty of serious, successful, business professionals thought it was worth large 6-figure sums, at the time she sold it. I don't think you'd have convinced them, either.

              What do you think such purchasers of MLM distributorships are really buying, if MLM distributors "don't own their own business"?

              The "distributorship" such people sell is their own business in exactly the same sense that my websites, subscriber-lists and articles are "my own business".



              For exactly the same reason an affiliate marketer might, under some circumstances, in selling his business: the manufacturer of the products has to be willing to do business with, and be represented by, the new owner. This is usually a formality. Pointing out that someone's consent is needed simply isn't the comparative criticism of MLM that you're trying to make out, here.
              I have no idea, and that's what I'm trying to find out.

              I still don't understand what exactly is being sold.

              Also, you are mistaken when it comes to my motives. I'm just trying to understand, and going out of my way to not criticize (though I may not be doing as well on that as I think).

              All the best,
              Michael
              Signature

              "Ich bin en fuego!"
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              • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                Banned
                Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

                I still don't understand what exactly is being sold.
                I can't really add much to my comment above: the "distributorship" such people sell is their own business in the same sense that my websites, subscriber-lists and articles are "my own business".

                If I become an affiliate for some bestselling ClickBank product and build up a niche site and a list and feed 100 messages into an autoresponder series and develop traffic sources, and derive steady/increasing monthly income from it, and then sell that business in its entirety to someone else, who then derives that steady monthly income from ClickBank instead of my receiving it, by virtue of owning it, you understand what's being sold, don't you?

                What's being sold is the assets of the work already done and the right to the future long-term income (albeit paid by a third party) accruing from them.

                It's more or less the same thing, isn't it?

                The point I'm making is that in one case you wouldn't be telling me "I don't really own the business" but in the other, it seems, you are?

                Correct me if I'm wrong, but on the previous page you adduced it as a problem of MLM that you don't really own your distributorship. I don't understand why. They're real businesses. People buy and sell them. Ok, you need someone's consent (in each case - you'd need ClickBank to accept you as an affiliate, just like you need the MLM company to accept you as a distributor). And you're dependent on the survival of the manufacturer and product(s) in each case, too. But in what sense do you feel you "own" one and "don't own" the other? In what sense is it harder to understand what's being sold in one case than in the other?
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    • Profile picture of the author Thomas Michal
      Originally Posted by Tsnyder View Post

      Anyone who understands the power of leverage in business
      Will know these are called employees and distribution outlets.
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  • Profile picture of the author vajra123
    Multi-level-marketing is the process in which every member in this circle have to sale the the products of that company .This is totally based on link to one another member in this circle.
    I have also joined MLM in "Wow we" that is based in America and is doing business since last 5 years.
    I am not totally satisfy with that type of marketing because in this marketing you totally depend on the other person in below to you in your circle. We can say that it is tough level marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author milliondream
    I think MLM business is suitable for someone that has persuative skill and like to take care of his/her team.
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    • Profile picture of the author cainbrian
      I believe MLM is the Slavery Model...lol

      Honestly, if you put in 18-hour days... Have a mental shift take place... Learn how to successfully market your business... Get initial results to build a story that influences more results... Out-produce your team so they produce... Simplify the selling process for your team while still encouraging creativity... Have a Funded proposal that works and helps offset your advertising cost because of the low initial commissions... Build relationships... Offer outside training that gets others to promote you... Be on the phone all day... Pitch the promised land to those who have already failed or beat your head against the wall shifting the perspective of other in regards to working a job... All for a $12 check for the first 6 months until you reach the point in the 2 get 2 gets 2 where it hits an exponential curve... btw did we forget attrition? lol

      Not saying MLM is completely bad, just let's be honest here. The average person is not willing to go through this process and commit. I understand not pre-judging, but the issue I have is when you are looking someone in the eyes knowing that they are not a targeted prospect and telling them they can live the dream if they just get started and go to a weekly hotel meeting. That's BS in my opinion. I have the utmost respect for the super small percentage that actually go out and produce like crazy to hit the top ranks - they deserve every bit of that success!

      I believe you are better off using affiliate programs to generate your initial results from home and start building a list, and then create your own products so that you can earn higher commissions, brand you for the long-term, and begin outsourcing to scale up. It's about preaching results, not theory.
      Signature

      Thank you for connecting with me, I really appreciate everytime you respond or have a conversation with me. (hint: I'm an introvert, lol) --- http://attractivesponsor.com

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      • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
        Originally Posted by cainbrian View Post

        I believe MLM is the Slavery Model...lol

        Honestly, if you put in 18-hour days... Have a mental shift take place... Learn how to successfully market your business... Get initial results to build a story that influences more results... Out-produce your team so they produce... Simplify the selling process for your team while still encouraging creativity... Have a Funded proposal that works and helps offset your advertising cost because of the low initial commissions... Build relationships... Offer outside training that gets others to promote you... Be on the phone all day... Pitch the promised land to those who have already failed or beat your head against the wall shifting the perspective of other in regards to working a job... All for a $12 check for the first 6 months until you reach the point in the 2 get 2 gets 2 where it hits an exponential curve... btw did we forget attrition? lol

        Not saying MLM is completely bad, just let's be honest here. The average person is not willing to go through this process and commit. I understand not pre-judging, but the issue I have is when you are looking someone in the eyes knowing that they are not a targeted prospect and telling them they can live the dream if they just get started and go to a weekly hotel meeting. That's BS in my opinion. I have the utmost respect for the super small percentage that actually go out and produce like crazy to hit the top ranks - they deserve every bit of that success!

        I believe you are better off using affiliate programs to generate your initial results from home and start building a list, and then create your own products so that you can earn higher commissions, brand you for the long-term, and begin outsourcing to scale up. It's about preaching results, not theory.
        Let's be honest here... what you described bears no
        resemblance to how mlm is built successfully.
        Signature
        If you knew what I know you'd be doing what I do...
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  • Profile picture of the author JBanis
    I don't try and get too hung up on the negative feelings that the word MLM brings. For me it's more about this: what actual valuable product does the company offer? Is there a real way to make money for example, without needing this whole team? etc. If the answer is 'yes', then I would also be happy promoting the company.

    I've just joined a company that looks very good in my opinion, and they're just started up. Actually, these guys are from IM world, but again, the product is already very good, so I was happy to join. It's going live in a week or so.

    Also, if the MLM company solely relies on these nonsense motivational groups and networking, and there is no way this works online, then I also don't like it.

    Final point: of course, commissions need to be superb
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  • Profile picture of the author ShutupAndEarn
    I am doing some MLM and am having great success with it. This is the first time I have ever done it and I found out about it here on WF. It is relatively easy I am just promoting it through the web and have gotten a couple retail stores in on it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mitja Drame
    I joined one very promising, really great Network Marketing company this year. The reason why is that I want to grow on my personal level and remove fears.

    I want to meet great people, learn by their experience and because I can start with very little investment. But I invested more, so I can work better. It's great to learn something new, how to make great presentations, improve sales skills which I can use online as well, build a great team inside of organization and many more.

    It's nice to be in society of great and infuential people. The support is great, and everyone helps you to build better business. You're not on your own.

    Also there are lots of seminars, online and offline. These are my reasons. And to join MLM, you should look at 3 important things. A product that really works, great company behind it and a great support.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterkailo
    MLM is only great if you have built up a nice reputation otherwise you're just like the people who are at the very bottom making $0
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  • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
    On the subject of company approval...

    I also once owned a new car dealership... when I sold it
    the buyer was required to get approval from the manufacturer.

    Do car dealers not own their businesses?
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    If you knew what I know you'd be doing what I do...
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  • Profile picture of the author Tsnyder
    On the subject of not owning the MLM business...

    Of course I do not own the company whose products
    and services I distribute. How does that equate to not
    owning a business at all?

    Do businesses engage in mutual transactions for profit with
    other businesses every day in this world or has commerce ceased
    to exist?

    As you know, I am a distributor for SOC. That business is owned
    by Kody Bateman, and others. My business is Darn Good Marketing.
    Darn Good Marketing contracts with SOC to perform certain functions
    in exchange for various types of compensation. Kody B does not own
    my business any more than I own his. He does not employ me... I do
    not employ him. Darn Good Marketing existed long before I contracted
    with SOC and will exist long after my SOC affiliation ends... if it ever does.

    In addition to the business mentioned above that I sold I also have a long
    standing contract with another MLM company that has been paying me since
    the early 90s.

    I do own a business.
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    If you knew what I know you'd be doing what I do...
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