clickbank n00bie question

17 replies
Ok,

So I'm new to promoting clickbank products, and was thinking I would do that. How do you determine what is a 'good' product to promote? I remember someone saying that 'gravity' was one such indicator -- but what "number"? Like a gravity of 5? 15? 50? 500? I understand the higher the better, but what would be the bare minimum? As well, what information should I pay attention to in the other fields?

Thanks!

Johnathan
#clickbank #n00bie #question
  • Profile picture of the author Jassim
    Well, Clickbank is all about number game. You can pick good product to promote by visiting the site cbengine.com & the best gravity is above 100 for any product.

    The other things you need to know is $/sale and total $/sale. The place you can find very good resources about clickbank is clickbank itself.
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    • Profile picture of the author dumbledoor
      Originally Posted by Jassim View Post

      Well, Clickbank is all about number game. You can pick good product to promote by visiting the site cbengine.com & the best gravity is above 100 for any product.
      I'd say a gravity score of 30 is good enough to show that it converts. At 100, it means that there are approximately 100 unique affiliates who've made a sale in the last 2 weeks from the product (roughly, the formula for the computation of gravity score is not disclosed). This could mean a lot of competition for a noobie. But if you know what you're doing, and you actually have a list, etc, you'd want the gravity to be as high as possible. Because you know you'd have no problem getting traffic.
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      • Profile picture of the author frannetz
        This must be a very friendly forum, with the replies you all gave to this thread, I'v got a new insight on marketing affiliate product via click bank.
        KEEP IT UP!
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  • Profile picture of the author tgrpublishing
    Visit cb-analytics.com for insight into a product's performance. You can see historical trends which gives a good indication of how well it's selling.
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  • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
    In my opinion, and from previous experience,

    Gravity is NOT something you can base your decision on.

    Gravity is simply the number of affiliates who have made sale or more in the previous 8 weeks... <-- not exactly massive support for the quality of a product.

    Find a product that fully caters to the needs of your target niche. I never look at Gravity when thinking about a new promotion.

    Peace

    Jay
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    Bare Murkage.........

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  • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
    Originally Posted by ProductCreator View Post

    - is this a total amateur who has no idea how to make a long format sales page? OR
    - is this someone who does understand what it takes to convert a prospect into a buyer?
    The sales page isn't something I would ever base my decision on either...

    A crappy product could have had a smokin' hot copywriter do the sales page, that doesn't mean you are going to have happy customers..

    Peace

    Jay
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    Bare Murkage.........

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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      :sigh:

      Maybe this is why so many people have crap results with affiliate marketing.

      Gravity - This is the false priestess of product greatness. Everybody thinks
      just because a product has a high gravity means it's a great product. All it
      means is a bunch of sheep have jumped on this thing like a tick on a dog and
      are milking it for everything it has.

      And the worst part is, out of a gravity of say 300, there might be 5 affiliates
      who have made more than a couple of sales in that 90 day period. Even
      just 1 sale by an affiliate raised that gravity by 1.

      Gravity is something you have to take with a grain of salt. Yes, it's
      important, but only to see if a sales page converts or not and even then,
      it can be misleading. A new product could be kick ass but because it's new
      nobody is promoting it yet. So there is no gravity.

      Dangerous game to play, deciding to promote a product based on this
      number. With a high gravity, you could be beating your head against a
      stone wall trying to make a sale.

      I was selling 20 ebooks a month of Magic Of Making Up until the gravity
      went out of control. Now, I stopped selling it, even though it's still a
      great product. I'm just sick of banging heads with 300 other affiliates.

      Sales Page - Have fun with this. Do you really know what a good sales
      page is? Unless you know the conversion stats, or are an expert copywriter
      there is no way you can tell how good that sales page is performing. And
      if it is one of those drop dead killer sales pages, it doesn't say beans about
      the product. No way in hell will I promote a crap product no matter how
      well it converts, which is why I always get the product first.

      Crappy sales page? I mean you're really sure it is? Make a deal with the
      product creator to put up your own page. Tell him it'll make him a lot more
      sales than what he has now. If he has a low gravity, he'll probably give
      you the okay.

      Point is, never make your decision based on how slick tongued the
      copywriter is.

      Commission - You won't want to knock yourself out for peanuts.
      Everybody has their breaking point. Me? I won't promote a product unless
      it pays me at least $25 per sale. Otherwise it's not worth my time. With
      so many merchants paying 75% commission, why bust my butt for 50% of
      a $19.95 ebook?

      Okay, there's more, but this should get you started.
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    • Profile picture of the author Chris Lockwood
      Originally Posted by JayXtreme View Post

      The sales page isn't something I would ever base my decision on either...

      A crappy product could have had a smokin' hot copywriter do the sales page, that doesn't mean you are going to have happy customers..
      I know you're looking for quality products, but don't you consider the sales page, too? If the sales page sucks, it won't convert well, unless you can convince people to ignore its suckiness.

      I really don't get why people pay any attention to gravity- did anyone read what was already said about it above?

      Let's say I had a product that converted at 20% and sold 100 copies a day through my own advertising for 2 cents a click on Adwords, but no affiliates were promoting it yet. It would have gravity of zero- does this sound like a product you should avoid promoting?

      Or consider product B, which converts at .01% but has a gravity of 200, because 200 affiliates made 1 sale each, then gave up because they lost their shirts on that terrible conversion? I guess you would blindly jump on this one, since you think high gravity = good.
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      • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
        Originally Posted by Chris Lockwood View Post

        I know you're looking for quality products, but don't you consider the sales page, too? If the sales page sucks, it won't convert well, unless you can convince people to ignore its suckiness.
        Yes... I always take it into consideration.. it is a part of the whole decision making process...

        But I would never base my decision on the sales page... and if I really like the product with crappy copy, I can create my own and bypass the merchant sales page

        Peace

        Jay
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnathan
    Hmm...

    Thanks so far for the responses... Really, really, quite good, that I wouldn't have otherwise considered...!
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  • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
    The $/sale can be misleading too. Many vendors have multiple products they sell through one Clickbank account. The $/sale is an aggregate from all products in one account. So, if you see a $/sale of $20 and the product in the Marketplace you are looking at sells for $77, you cannot assume that there is a high return rate. The vendor may be selling a $27 product through that account as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author davesh
    i have a concerns about clickbank refund policy !!!

    i made a purchase of one guru product... but after trying it was not worth my bucks spent on it so i asked for refund from clickbank 3 times through there link of csinquiry.html asking them to refund my bucks but inspite of repeated request I have had received no response no refund money back !!!

    Any idea where to contact this guys for refunds ?
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  • Profile picture of the author dsmpublishing
    The gravity subject is very interesting just imagine that someone has had affiliate sales through someone with a large list and that is there only sales and then people have complained about that product. To me gravity isnt everything as a big seller could have had 50 affiliates working for him where as a newbie may only have 2.

    To me its always down to the quality of the product if the product is good the sales are there to be had.
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  • Profile picture of the author warpri
    If you're serious about clickbank, choose affiliate products from a subject what you're familiar with.
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  • Profile picture of the author alonpy
    Thank you, I know I'm not the one that post this, but I learnd a lot from this post.
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  • Profile picture of the author Davion Wong
    This is how gravity works. When an affiliate makes 1 sale, it adds 1 point to the gravity. And that is the maximum an affiliate can add, no matter how many products he sells. In other words, if the gravity is 50, it means that 50 affiliates have sold 50 products in the most simplistic way of explanation.

    However, bear in mind that this gravity score attributed by the affiliate will actually diminish over a 8 week period at a factor of 0.96 per day. In other words, within 8 weeks, the sale registered will drop to 0.1.

    So a high gravity simply means that many affiliates have successfully sold at least 1 product, it does not tell you if they are making many repeated sales. It could be that there is so much buzz around the product that 1000 affiliates are promoting and only 50 are making sales and gives the gravity of 50. Is that a good figure? I would say not.

    As for another product with a gravity of 5, it could mean that 5 affiliates have made at least 1 sale or made 10 sales, which ever the case is, the gravity is still 5.

    So in terms of sales volumes, you really cannot tell. And it is not conclusive that a high gravity product is of higher quality. What it suggests is that there are many affiliates promoting it and they have made at least 1 sale.
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