When Should I Move On To Another Niche?

by techbx
23 replies
Should I wait until I get consistent sales with one website/niche or should I be working simultaneously on different websites?

What's your take?
#move #niche
  • Profile picture of the author WalterWhite
    The best thing you can do in my opinion is to "Build one house" and then move to another project.

    Working on many projects at once will not get you anywhere...

    Concentrate on ONLY one niche and stick with it until you get it up and running on autopilot and then move on...

    But that is just my opinion...

    Anyway...

    Best Regards and Good luck !!
    W.W.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Irvine
    I agree with Walter on this one.
    When I first started out I was trying to build 2-3 web 2.0 pages a day, this eventually fried my brain and I just about gave up.

    Focus on one site/method until you are monetizing it well, even to the point of near full automation.

    Then (and only then) move onto a new niche

    Best of luck to you!
    Paul.
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  • Profile picture of the author dadhere
    Well, yes, but I build and then promote for about 3 days. Then build again. maybe you're doing that already but I thought I would mention it.
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    • Profile picture of the author techbx
      Actually, I've been stuck on the same site for about 3 weeks now. I'm building a list with it but I want to make sure I can monetize that list before I move on. So far I've had some success but nothing extraordinary.

      I just want to know if I'm taking the right approach or if I'm spending too much time on one one site.
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      • Originally Posted by techbx View Post

        Actually, I've been stuck on the same site for about 3 weeks now. I'm building a list with it but I want to make sure I can monetize that list before I move on. So far I've had some success but nothing extraordinary.

        I just want to know if I'm taking the right approach or if I'm spending too much time on one one site.
        Start sending GOOD FREE CONTENT and offers to your list.
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        • Profile picture of the author Michael Shook
          If your niche is big enough there is no reason why you have to move on at all, unless you just want to do that. Willie has the best post in this thread about that idea and if you select a market which is broad enough in the first place, you never really have to leave that market and you can set up lots of related sites in specific niches if you want to.

          No reason why if your market was, for instance, dogs or even something more specific like dog health, that you would ever need to move on to anything else unless you really just wanted to for adding variety in your life.
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  • Profile picture of the author stockpost
    Basically when you think you reached a saturation point where you can not make any more money on that niche or if you are spending too much time, that you feel your time is better used on some other niche.
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  • Profile picture of the author Willie Crawford
    I would take things all the way through to profitability, and with
    a steady flow of traffic, before moving on to another niche. Having
    a dozen incomplete sites (not earning money) is practically worthless.

    Once a site is profitable, I'd actually build more sites in that niche
    rather than moving to another niche most of the time, although I
    appreciate the need to diversify.

    Willie
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  • Profile picture of the author techbx
    I think my problem is that I never feel like I've done enough marketing. I'm trying to squeeze as much PPC, article marketing and organic SEO visitors to the website.

    I fear that if I move on, or even just multitask, I'll be keeping myself from finding the secret sauce that I need to get consistent traffic and buyers. Does anyone else ever feel that way with a new site?
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  • Profile picture of the author ilee
    My advice is to ALWAYS find a niche that you're interested in. Personally I think it's much better staying in the same niche because after a while, you will be an expert in the niche instead of just a bogus one
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  • Profile picture of the author IMSince2003
    If your model is building niche sites, then this is what I've done profitably for over 8 years:

    1) Research a niche that has potential. Do the keyword research THOROUGHLY.
    2) Create a list with both HIGH and LOW competition keywords.
    3) Write 30 articles based on that list.
    4) Create the blog with WP and create a customized header, make it nice, but not too professional.
    5) Install a plugin that automatically submits each new post to the major social bookmarking sites (look at onlywire for example).
    6) Publish the first article. Make it at least 1,000 words. Make it sticky and make sure you have LSI keywords present. Go bookmark the site.
    7) Wait for Google to index the site.
    8) Once indexed, publish the next 9 articles at one every 2-3 days.
    9) Publish the rest at 2 per week.
    10) Go do it again for the next niche.
    11) In 2 months, see which sites are gaining traction and start improving those.
    12) Monetize the winners.

    There you are in a nutshell. In a year from now, you should be making at least $1,000/month with Adsense alone. You're welcome
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Sell complimentary products/services to existing customers.

    Most times you dont need to build more sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author Royalking
    First build one site and get it ranked on first page and make sure it stays there. Then if sales are not coming in try to split test different titles or pre selling strategies, only then start with the second one with a lesson learned from the first site. Just replicate what best worked for the first site.
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  • Profile picture of the author jbsmith
    Depends - often the way I move into a niche that I really want to capture but where I do not yet have a footprint or 100% visibility is to setup multiple websites targeted specifically at sub-niches.

    In some cases I've done this with multiple pages on a single site with each page focused on a specific sub-niche, in other cases I have created completely different sites - result is the same, you soon get a pretty good sense of which sub-niches are pulling and which are not.

    Once I've had a few thousand visits to the sites/pages, I make a conclusion on the top 1-2 sub-niches/positioning methods for that market.

    I've recently done this in two brand new niches and it worked wonders...within 2-weeks I had a very clear picture of where the demand and money was.

    Jeff

    Originally Posted by techbx View Post

    Should I wait until I get consistent sales with one website/niche or should I be working simultaneously on different websites?

    What's your take?
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  • Profile picture of the author Larry Leggett
    Why people changes his or her business? When they are unable to make any sort of profit from a business, they move to another business. Here also, if you are not successful in a niche, you should move to another.
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  • Profile picture of the author JoeyXoto
    You definitely Need to maximise one till you are happily earning consistent daily earnings. If you're not smashing one niche, how do you expect to do 2 at the same time.

    1 at a time mate, then whem you are making good money, begin to outsource things for other niche websites.

    Hope that helps.

    Joey
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  • Profile picture of the author Marcus Rockey
    find the niche you are interested in, good at and have a love for.

    Once you've done this I strongly recommend that you stick with that niche until it is fulfilling your vision.

    Put it this way...

    You want to build an email list, products, affiliates, JV's etc. By remaining in the same niche you go grow much quicker. When you want to start up a new product in your established niche you already have a list to promote to, affiliates that will promote it for you and JV's that will drive you all the way.

    This make perfect sense right.

    Why move on unless you have squeeze every bit of juice. You would only move to make more money but I don't believe you will make more money...

    Marcus Rockey
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  • Profile picture of the author rockong
    You shouldn't just leave your first niche site untouched when you move onto your next niche website project. In order to keep up with Google, it would be wise to constantly pump in content. You'll see more traffic and hopefully higher revenue too if you do so. Def fill up your portfolio of websites, but it would be smart to stay within one niche so you can master it, collect a bunch of opt-ins, and really dominate

    Best of luck!
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      I'm going to give you a slightly different angle to consider...

      Sometimes, with a single site, you reach a point where you either need a break or you just need to let something play out. For example, if you're an Amazon associate, they update the sales and traffic numbers every 24 hours. Checking stats more often than that is not fruitful. For another example, if you know that submitting content to a site takes a day or two, worrying about it doesn't make it faster.

      So I like to have two projects going, and alternate between them.

      As for moving on to another niche, it depends somewhat on how you define "niche". Since someone mentioned dogs, let's use that. If your first site is about Labrador Retrievers, your second site could be about Yorkies. You probably wouldn't want to move to something totally different, like weight loss or making money. Staying within a particular market offers the chance for leverage.
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      • Profile picture of the author techbx
        Staying in the same niche makes a lot of sense to me. That way you can market other products to the same list. I think I'm having a eureka moment.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        So I like to have two projects going, and alternate between them.
        This.

        Exactly.

        Not only for the good and valid reasons John mentions, but in other ways, too: I've always found that two is a very good number, myself. Especially when it's two niches within the same market.

        I'm insecure enough to worry that "one" can be a disaster because I can screw something up completely and fail miserably at any one of the 19(?) different things you have to do to start earning real money from a niche site, or because the niche can suddenly expire the day before I try to earn money from it, or whatever else can go wrong. And I feel a lot safer working on two projects. It would be really unlucky for both to turn out badly.

        But certainly not more than two, because in the early stages you're putting in the most work and bringing in the least money, and you certainly don't want that applying to too many parts of your business at the same time.
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        • Profile picture of the author Marcus Rockey
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          This.

          Exactly.

          Not only for the good and valid reasons John mentions, but in other ways, too: I've always found that two is a very good number, myself. Especially when it's two niches within the same market.

          I'm insecure enough to worry that "one" can be a disaster because I can screw something up completely and fail miserably at any one of the 19(?) different things you have to do to start earning real money from a niche site, or because the niche can suddenly expire the day before I try to earn money from it, or whatever else can go wrong. And I feel a lot safer working on two projects. It would be really unlucky for both to turn out badly.

          But certainly not more than two, because in the early stages you're putting in the most work and bringing in the least money, and you certainly don't want that applying to too many parts of your business at the same time.

          This is good advice and I will only add that I started three offline businesses two of which fell flat on their faces. When I reflected as to why the main reason seemed to be that I hadn't understood my prospects needs affectively. I thought I had a great business and I loved it but my prospects didn't.

          It's my belief that if you fully grasp what your readers want and start "in their minds" then marketing, content, retention etc become far easier. No guarantees of success but the odd's are stacked in your favour.

          Marcus Rockey
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Gray
    "If you try to hold 2 or more birds in your hand for same time, you will lose the hold from first one."

    concentrate one niche at a time. focus on every point which can lead to success. once you succeed, can go for another niche.

    this will make things easier to handle.
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