What to respond with when they ask how much?

16 replies
Hi,

I've been doing pretty successful selling my text marketing service to my local area and as well as outside states.

One thing I keep coming across is that they respond with how much or whats the cost to me.

I try to avoid on just telling them my price because then I never hear from them again.

What are some things you guys are saying to them to close this deal because obviously I have intrigued their interest and now I feel like they are checking out competitors.
#respond
  • Profile picture of the author ilee
    tell them whatever price you're happy to do the work for... unless you're desperate to make the sale.
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    • Profile picture of the author Fleki
      I tell them that I can get a solution for them for as little as $100 and as much as $2000, it just depends on how good they want it to work/look. I tell them I can send them samples of everything from $100 to $2000. Then I talk to them for a few more seconds and then I ask them if they want me to send more of those examples around $100-$400 or $500-$1000, or more.

      Works for me.
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  • Profile picture of the author bumkeun
    I only have one set price and I'm not desperate. I tell them the price and I don't hear back is what I don't want to happen anymore.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
    Banned
    Here's a book you should read (not an affiliate link):

    Zig Ziglar's Secrets of Closing the Sale: Zig...Zig Ziglar's Secrets of Closing the Sale: Zig...

    Some great lessons in that book, and I've personally used the advice to close a lot more sales recently. He tells you exactly how to handle someone who says "that's too expensive..."
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  • Profile picture of the author bumkeun
    Thanks! I will look into that book. My service is not expensive but there are many other services like it.

    What I am hearing from them is what is the cost to me. I respond. No answer after that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
      Banned
      Originally Posted by bumkeun View Post

      Thanks! I will look into that book. My service is not expensive but there are many other services like it.

      What I am hearing from them is what is the cost to me. I respond. No answer after that.
      So what you're saying is that they're not asking about the price you're charging them, but what the actual cost is to you compared to that price? This is your problem I think (although without being inside the situation I can't say for sure).

      They're realizing that the actual cost of completing action X is $Y; but it only costs you $Z to actually do it. With that insider information they can go troll the market and find someone who is willing to work for a smaller profit margin. You're giving your potential clients the ability to undercut you without ever talking to a competing provider, if that makes sense.
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  • Profile picture of the author bumkeun
    No, I mean they're asking what their cost is. I would never tell them what MY cost is.

    I tell them what the service cost. And POOF! They vanish.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
      Banned
      Originally Posted by bumkeun View Post

      No, I mean they're asking what their cost is. I would never tell them what MY cost is.

      I tell them what the service cost. And POOF! They vanish.
      Well, you need to do a better job of proving that the up front cost now benefits them in the long term. The book I linked to covers that. You want to prove to them that not getting your service now is going to cost them more in the long term than the relatively small sacrifice they make now. I've been utilizing this technique, as the price of my articles is usually what hangs people up. Craft a strong enough argument and you're golden.

      Tl;DR: The customer should be the winner in every transaction. If they're not, you aren't doing it right and you're definitely not pitching it right.
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Grace
    It's none of their business what it costs you to provide the service. When I come across people that nickel and dime everything to death, my reaction usually is I don't want them as a client. Because they will continue to make your life miserable.

    I like to work with folks that see the true value of what I can do for them. A good case is recently I had my carpets done. I could have hired one of the many "Do your whole house for $99" guys, but I know they suck. I use a guy that charges me $550, and it's worth every penny.

    So for fun I showed him an app I could make for his business, and he bought it no questions asked, because he knows real value and service.

    The point is I don't care if you're online or offline or both like me. Cheap customers cause a million headaches, but high end clients value everything you do and treat you right (Of course provided you treat them right and provide tremendous value.)

    It's so funny how some people will buy a $20 product and then gripe, moan, threaten, and bitch to no end. But my 14k coaching clients are the best people in the world to work with! Fire you crappy clients and go for the good ones.
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  • Profile picture of the author theory expert
    Banned
    hey you should address this question where the guys do what you do all day. Go here:Offline Marketing Discussions
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    So I'll bet you tell them all about the bells and whistles about what you do. They act excited and then...

    Poof!

    "What's your price?"

    The steps are in the wrong order. Fortunately, you can change them.

    Enjoy:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ml#post6298956

    Bonus:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/offline-...ml#post5727652
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  • Profile picture of the author Randall Magwood
    Look them firm in the eye with a straight poker face without flinching or studdering and state your price. Don't beat around the bush with it... or simply give them a few marketing options that they can choose from, and include the price tag for each of the marketing options that are presented to them.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterme
    You need to bypass the price for a bit. You can't hide it, because that sends the wrong signal. So you need to acknowledge their request but then brush it aside until later, after you've built some value and desire. "I'll be happy to go over pricing with you. Can I ask you a few questions first to make sure I understand what you have in mind so I can give you an accurate quote?" or "Oh, that depends on several options, so let me ask you..."

    Asking questions keeps you in control of the conversation too.

    Are you trying to make the sale on the phone or are you looking to make appointments?
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    "Best book on answering objections I have seen... it's for photographers but it has brilliant techniques you can use in any business." - Claude Whitacre. When They Say That, You Say This (Amazon Kindle)
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  • Profile picture of the author George Wright
    Unless things have drastically changed, and I know they haven't, when they ask "How Much," you shut up and start writing the order.

    George Wright
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    "The first chapter sells the book; the last chapter sells the next book." Mickey Spillane
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