How important is grammar... REALLY?

138 replies
Aye Warriors

I was just thinking about this because I have seen people call out other people over grammar in their blog post, article etc.

Do you really pay attention to grammar? I know it's important in a professional market, however - I get the best results when I just talk like I'm talking to a best friend.

I don't mind bad grammar, because some people understand better on a different level, and most people know what you're trying to say either way.

The only thing I have a problem with is when someone uses bad spelling.

What do you think, is grammar really a big deal in your eyes?

Do you think it makes you look less professional as a marketer?
#grammar #important
  • Profile picture of the author Vorsiedious
    grammar i can tolerate. but missing words and periods drive me nuts. it happens though.
    Signature

    My blogs: Funny Jokes • Blogger Guide • Video Game Blog

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088052].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author jkibbles
      Originally Posted by Vorsiedious View Post

      grammar i can tolerate. but missing words and periods drive me nuts. it happens though.
      ^^This. Poor grammar I can tolerate, since it sometimes makes the writer seem more of a real person. Blatant mistakes in spelling and punctuation drive me up the wall, and I've actually closed web pages for serious spelling errors. There's really no excuse for spelling mistakes anymore, since every browser and editor has a spell check function built into it.

      Another pet peeve is misuse of pronouns. You're instead of your, it's instead of its, that sort of thing. I don't know why, but those irritate me more than anything else.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088067].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
        Originally Posted by jkibbles View Post

        Another pet peeve is misuse of pronouns. You're instead of your, it's instead of its, that sort of thing. I don't know why, but those irritate me more than anything else.
        This is poor grammar. LOL
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088098].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author jkibbles
          Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post

          This is poor grammar. LOL
          Nice one
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088120].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Heimdallr
          Grammar makes information clearer, that's its purpose. Lack of it devalues the potential value in anything written; as confusion or misinterpretation will result in lost time and or refunds.

          Grammar is intuitively learnt as a child, so it is recognisable even if they can't define it. So, it's the first point of trust in any written communication.

          Also, I've noticed as pointed out above that the most common mistakes are:
          Your/You're
          Advices (no such word)/Advice (proper plural form)
          Informations (no such word)/ Information (Collective Noun and therefore no plural needed)
          ...spellings/ spelling
          etc. ...
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088217].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author TerranceCharles
        Originally Posted by jkibbles View Post

        ^^This. Poor grammar I can tolerate, since it sometimes makes the writer seem more of a real person. Blatant mistakes in spelling and punctuation drive me up the wall, and I've actually closed web pages for serious spelling errors. There's really no excuse for spelling mistakes anymore, since every browser and editor has a spell check function built into it.

        Another pet peeve is misuse of pronouns. You're instead of your, it's instead of its, that sort of thing. I don't know why, but those irritate me more than anything else.
        Good point, one thing that stood out to me is when you said. "Poor grammar I can tolerate, since it sometimes makes the writer seem more of a real person." I think so also, it shows personality. I have closed websites completely because of bad spelling though
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088119].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author garveyonweb
        Originally Posted by jkibbles View Post

        Poor grammar I can tolerate, since it sometimes makes the writer seem more of a real person. Blatant mistakes in spelling and punctuation drive me up the wall, and I've actually closed web pages for serious spelling errors. There's really no excuse for spelling mistakes anymore, since every browser and editor has a spell check function built into it.

        Another pet peeve is misuse of pronouns. You're instead of your, it's instead of its, that sort of thing. I don't know why, but those irritate me more than anything else.

        Ditto this, however I'm prone to the odd typo (or spelling mistakes) myself. So hands up.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289533].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Like it or not, you are prejudged by your grammar, vocabulary, and even your writing style. Unfortunately, this is a harsh reality. Not understanding these nuances of marketing can be costly in sales.

          I market in 68 niches, which include culturally diverse ethnic arenas as well as some in the Spanish language. In my experience, you can not connect effectively with your target market unless you communicate in their "language", which does include these expectations of grammar, vocabulary, and style.

          Being able to relate to your target audience encompases an awareness of how these elements interact in the process of engagement. Making a successful connection with a reader is largely emotional, a subtlety enhanced by the synergistic effects of relevant content, cultural awareness, grammar, word choice, and style. Significant deficiencies in one or more of these areas can result in disengagement, ie low conversion rates or loss of sales.
          Signature
          “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289600].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

    Aye Warriors
    Do you think it makes you look less professional as a marketer?
    Yeah, of course it makes you look less professional. I like to write the way I talk as well. And even if I talk like a street thug, I still feel the need to put it across as best I can.

    Someone told me this long ago. There are three ways to communicate:

    Good
    Neutral
    Bad

    Always strive for good or neutral. You're not going to piss off your target audience by getting it right. But you will alienate some (meaning they won't buy) if you get it wrong. So always get it right or neutral.

    Most people, and this isn't directed at you because grammar doesn't appear to be any kind of problem for you, who defend sh*tty grammar are people who couldn't get it right if their lives depended on it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088082].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author apkkadam
    Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

    Aye Warriors

    I was just thinking about this because I have seen people call out other people over grammar in their blog post, article etc.

    Do you really pay attention to grammar? I know it's important in a professional market, however - I get the best results when I just talk like I'm talking to a best friend.

    I don't mind bad grammar, because some people understand better on a different level, and most people know what you're trying to say either way.

    The only thing I have a problem with is when someone uses bad spelling.

    What do you think, is grammar really a big deal in your eyes?

    Do you think it makes you look less professional as a marketer?
    It really depends who you ask. Personally, I am particular about grammar and spellings. It shows that people really do care about what they say and how they say it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088090].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author webpeon
      Poor grammar in small doses is fine. Making mistakes and being authentic will sell over being perfect on most occasions. Large amounts can get annoying.

      Spelling mistakes are unforgivable.
      Signature
      Web 2 Mobile
      The Future of The Web
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088135].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author funkynassau
    I do indeed think bad grammar and bad spelling are big negatives. I was a magazine editor for over 16 years and considered myself the Grammar Police for our publication. Grammar and spelling were pounded into our heads in public school and as a result I am quite good at both. To me, if you can't spell properly you need to get a dictionary. If your grammar is that bad, perhaps you need some lessons in correct usage. It turns me right off to see poorly written and edited articles and text. It looks like the person doesn't care and I would not likely buy their product as a result.
    Signature

    ChipFixx custom mixed auto touchup paint kits.
    http://www.chipfixx.ca

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088109].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author apkkadam
      Originally Posted by funkynassau View Post

      I do indeed think bad grammar and bad spelling are big negatives. I was a magazine editor for over 16 years and considered myself the Grammar Police for our publication. Grammar and spelling were pounded into our heads in public school and as a result I am quite good at both. To me, if you can't spell properly you need to get a dictionary. If your grammar is that bad, perhaps you need some lessons in correct usage. It turns me right off to see poorly written and edited articles and text. It looks like the person doesn't care and I would not likely buy their product as a result.
      I completely agree with you. Great post. I personally feel people tend to buy stuff from you if you look the part (i.e. a professional).
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088379].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author thatkeywordguy
    It's all about YOU'RE vs. YOUR

    which, though i have a college degree, i didn't know the difference until i was 30
    Signature

    Get Keyword Reseacher at CleverGizmos.com.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088158].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TerranceCharles
      Originally Posted by thatkeywordguy View Post

      It's all about YOU'RE vs. YOUR

      which, though i have a college degree, i didn't know the difference until i was 30
      I do have to admit myself. I didn't know the importance of your and you're until about 1 year ago and I'm 27 - so we're in the same boat...LOL
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088191].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author cashp0wer
        I think grammar is very important in blogs
        Signature
        My Internet Marketing Blog - Warts And All!
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088201].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

        I do have to admit myself. I didn't know the importance of your and you're until about 1 year ago and I'm 27 - so we're in the same boat...LOL

        I'm 57 and I won't know the difference until I'm sixty.

        A slight aside. Google looks at poor spelling and poor grammar as a sign of spinning content, and penalizes you for it. I tend to type as fast as I can read. Sometimes I don't look before I post.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093421].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author muzzy4u2
        Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

        I do have to admit myself. I didn't know the importance of your and you're until about 1 year ago and I'm 27 - so we're in the same boat...LOL
        I didnt know about it untill now and I am 28 lol
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7109657].message }}
      • Grammer I can tolerate but spelling mistakes annoy the hell out of me.













        Signature

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7111029].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author TheArticlePros
          [DELETED]
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7111101].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author xparte
            Originally Posted by JaRyCu View Post

            Just reading down this page, and just looking at the people on this page who think proper grammar is important, check out what I found:



            No capitalization of the first word in the statement, the first word of the third sentence, and the third sentence is ever so slightly nonsensical.



            ...says the person who didn't put a period at the end of the sentence.



            I "hat" bad grammar too, Bev.



            It also helps to put spaces in between sentences.



            D-E-F-I-N-I-T-E-L-Y (It seems to be a new phenomenon over the last 5-6 years where people can't spell this word. 10 years ago I don't think I ever saw anyone misspell it.)



            Run-on sentences are also not attractive.



            Amen. That's what the preview button is for.



            G-R-A-M-M-A-R

            They annoy me as well, GSRR.

            Here's a tip for everyone: If you're using IE or Firefox, download Ginger. It's a free tool and it will check your spelling AND grammar as you type. It's not perfect, but it has a learning database so that it gets better the longer you use it.

            If you're using Chrome, Google built in a spell checker that underlines everything that's spelled incorrectly in a red squiggly line. That really helps you not to make easy mistakes.

            -- j
            +1 about Ginger. Some things are easy to fix.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7111490].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MarketingMonk
    Terrance, I think proper use of grammar and correct spellings go a long way in helping you. Agreed that some people will overlook such things but why take a chance?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088177].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author XenG
    Grammar is valuable. This isn't even a question, really. At times, people find credibility in the way contents are constructed/written. How can you win your readers' trust when you can't even write with the appropriate grammar? Think about it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088232].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author AndyT
    I've heard that small grammar and spelling mistakes can hurt conversions on sales pages to an amazing degree. But I've also heard that ugly and/or amateurish ads and landers can convert better than professional ones.

    Ultimately, I imagine it depends on your market, and you won't know for sure until you test.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088234].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SangGuna
    For me,grammar is not an important thing,as long as u not losing your meaning or in other word people know what u talking about..
    Signature
    Work HARD n SMART...^_^
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088277].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Akibahoward
    Try this idea on for size......there is a lot of discussion here about how "I" don't mind it, and how "it doesnt' bother ME that much".

    I learned an important lesson many years ago while here in the forum (early days). Stop thinking about you and your process. If you are an Internet Marketer, or are trying to BE one, you do the following things;

    You do NOT buy online like the general public.
    You do NOT notice the same mundane things that others do.
    You do NOT offer the same level of INTOLERANCE outsiders to because you know what it takes just to get a site up and going.

    I agree, I don't often take that into consideration, depending on the offer, the page, and the frequency. But that is ME. I'm an Internet Marketer.

    You and I cannot...I REPEAT CANNOT think about WHAT WE DO, we must detach ourselves and think as a REAL, OUTSIDE, NON INTERNET MARKETING consumer.

    And I must tell you, in my honest opinion, people OUTSIDE of IM'ing (and as displayed here, even some INSIDE) really are turned off by a deluge of grammatical errors. It's WORTH it to check and double check your work before giving it to the world. As Monk said above, 'why take the chance'....

    Thank you TC for this discussion!

    Akiba
    Signature

    Joining the Amazon Affiliate Family....!

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088322].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author jkibbles
      Originally Posted by Akibahoward View Post

      Try this idea on for size......there is a lot of discussion here about how "I" don't mind it, and how "it doesnt' bother ME that much".

      I learned an important lesson many years ago while here in the forum (early days). Stop thinking about you and your process. If you are an Internet Marketer, or are trying to BE one, you do the following things;

      You do NOT buy online like the general public.
      You do NOT notice the same mundane things that others do.
      You do NOT offer the same level of INTOLERANCE outsiders to because you know what it takes just to get a site up and going.

      I agree, I don't often take that into consideration, depending on the offer, the page, and the frequency. But that is ME. I'm an Internet Marketer.

      You and I cannot...I REPEAT CANNOT think about WHAT WE DO, we must detach ourselves and think as a REAL, OUTSIDE, NON INTERNET MARKETING consumer.

      And I must tell you, in my honest opinion, people OUTSIDE of IM'ing (and as displayed here, even some INSIDE) really are turned off by a deluge of grammatical errors. It's WORTH it to check and double check your work before giving it to the world. As Monk said above, 'why take the chance'....

      Thank you TC for this discussion!

      Akiba
      Great post, AkibaHoward. Thank you for reminding us that we write for the masses, not for fellow marketers. Considering the state of education in the United States, we could probably spend about half of our writing time pursuing other endeavors and still write convincing copy.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088337].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author apkkadam
      Originally Posted by Akibahoward View Post

      Try this idea on for size......there is a lot of discussion here about how "I" don't mind it, and how "it doesnt' bother ME that much".

      I learned an important lesson many years ago while here in the forum (early days). Stop thinking about you and your process. If you are an Internet Marketer, or are trying to BE one, you do the following things;

      You do NOT buy online like the general public.
      You do NOT notice the same mundane things that others do.
      You do NOT offer the same level of INTOLERANCE outsiders to because you know what it takes just to get a site up and going.

      I agree, I don't often take that into consideration, depending on the offer, the page, and the frequency. But that is ME. I'm an Internet Marketer.

      You and I cannot...I REPEAT CANNOT think about WHAT WE DO, we must detach ourselves and think as a REAL, OUTSIDE, NON INTERNET MARKETING consumer.

      And I must tell you, in my honest opinion, people OUTSIDE of IM'ing (and as displayed here, even some INSIDE) really are turned off by a deluge of grammatical errors. It's WORTH it to check and double check your work before giving it to the world. As Monk said above, 'why take the chance'....

      Thank you TC for this discussion!

      Akiba
      Well said Akiba!!
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088384].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TerranceCharles
      Originally Posted by Akibahoward View Post

      Try this idea on for size......there is a lot of discussion here about how "I" don't mind it, and how "it doesnt' bother ME that much".

      I learned an important lesson many years ago while here in the forum (early days). Stop thinking about you and your process. If you are an Internet Marketer, or are trying to BE one, you do the following things;

      You do NOT buy online like the general public.
      You do NOT notice the same mundane things that others do.
      You do NOT offer the same level of INTOLERANCE outsiders to because you know what it takes just to get a site up and going.

      I agree, I don't often take that into consideration, depending on the offer, the page, and the frequency. But that is ME. I'm an Internet Marketer.

      You and I cannot...I REPEAT CANNOT think about WHAT WE DO, we must detach ourselves and think as a REAL, OUTSIDE, NON INTERNET MARKETING consumer.

      And I must tell you, in my honest opinion, people OUTSIDE of IM'ing (and as displayed here, even some INSIDE) really are turned off by a deluge of grammatical errors. It's WORTH it to check and double check your work before giving it to the world. As Monk said above, 'why take the chance'....

      Thank you TC for this discussion!

      Akiba
      Akiba, Great post I see where you're coming from on this one. We tend to sometimes think about the marketer first instead of people outside of IM.

      Although, most of the people that do buy our products and services are business owners and marketers I can see why people outside of IM would have a problem with grammar.

      Whenever I read a sales page with ok grammar, or some slang, I don't necessarily mind it. I like when people talk to me as if we were sitting across from each other at the bar just chillin
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088757].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author shane_k
        Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post


        Whenever I read a sales page with ok grammar, or some slang, I don't necessarily mind it.
        If someone is looking at your sales page and is focusing on your grammer instead of your message, then you have already lost the sale, and you are definately doing something wrong.

        And if your ad copy is good, and you are getting people excited, and eliciting emotions in them, getting them to want to buy, then they won't be paying any attention to your grammer.

        For me personally, I make a lot of grammer mistakes, and I probably already have, or will in this post, but it is because I write to people the way I speak, and partly because I didn't really pay attention like I should have in English class, lol.

        I was worried about it at first, and I hired someone to go over my grammer, but after split testing my sales copy and their sales copy the difference in conversion was so small that it didn't warrent paying someone a monthly fee for something that didn't make much difference overall.

        But this is my experiene in my niche, with my customers. Yours or someone else's might be different, so I would suggest to split test your results.

        The only other thing that I want to add, is that there is a difference between the way we were taught to write in English class, following those rules, and writing for persuasion and sales.

        It's just like when you are speaking. There is a difference in how you are supposed to speak and how you speak when you are trying to persuade or sell to someone
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088917].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Fredbou
        Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

        Akiba, Great post I see where you're coming from on this one. We tend to sometimes think about the marketer first instead of people outside of IM.
        This happens a lot with IM and with Web sites in general. we always need to step back and take stock of how our material, Web site, etc. appears to others. Often we think it sounds alright, or looks good, etc. but it really pays to get someone else to assess your work.
        Signature

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089147].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jaggyjay
    I'd say it matters somewhat... at least when your trying to market "artikels"

    OP here: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ease-stop.html
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088410].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jborjaperez
    IMO,

    If your providing articles as a service, Yes. Or offering advice to people, the grammar might matter so you seem to have more authority in the given niche.

    If I'm writing on my blog for my self enjoyment and showing my progress as I grow, I think I'd like to be more personal with my readers.

    I've also read a few things online about sometimes it's the spelling mistakes that actually increase E-mail CTR's and get more attention. Example: Crazy - > Krazy. But then again, I'm assuming this is a premeditated tweak.

    I guess it depends on who you're writing to.

    That's just my two cents.

    -Jared
    Signature

    In my signature.. It's not a secret method.. It's a lifestyle.. It's Day 1, Follow Me From The Bottom UP!

    I Write Articles Too! PM ME!

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088416].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author seasoned
    Knows who what bad grammer was? Might none some cared not! Wrotten gramer bad no difference not make! Though confusing can it be! Don't not agreed you?

    Yeah, Akibahoward is 100% right. If you stray too much from accepted grammar, or the norm of the target market, you WILL lose customers! That is true of ANY language!

    Steve
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088475].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author RPaige
    I would try to speak as appropriately as possible for the particular audience you are trying to reach. Spelling mistakes and missing words are probably two of the biggest mistakes I notice immediately. To be honest, when I see several of those types of mistakes on one site, I assume it is unprofessional and move on.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088478].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author peteJ
    Personally, having good grammar is absolutely essential to me. I don't mind a few mistakes here and there, but if someone has a lot it really makes them look unprofessional. When someone looks unprofessional I tend to trust them less, and therefore are less likely to buy from them.
    Signature

    Full Service Web Development and Small Business Marketing - Total Web Connections

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088538].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author clever7
    Bad grammar can negatively influence your image for many reasons. It has no meaning if you want to merely be friendly and approach your audience.

    You can use casual expressions and speak with confidence, without making mistakes.

    You have to be a good writer if you want to be respected by your readers. They like rules and guarantees. They like to feel that they can trust you because you are professional.







    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088814].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author WarrenPeterson
    Bad spelling usually annoys me right away. I type too fast myself, and make plenty of mistakes - however with spell-check, I see no reason why those should ever get through to a live post or page.

    For grammar errors, I'm more forgiving. This is partially because I personally misuse the comma and dashes (and I know I do, it is intentional). I tend to use them to slow down the reader, to force pauses, manage the pacing of the reader, etc... not because it is always proper placement.


    A few years back I had read a piece where it had been written that an intentional typo now and then in a blog post was good. The theory was that the typo brought people out and that they commented; in other words the intentional typo increased comments and participation.

    I looked just now and was not able to find the specific link that I was looking for, but there are a handful of interesting threads on intentional typos.

    Any thoughts from you all about that idea - intentional typos?
    Signature
    Do you really want to build a real business?
    Then you need this: 21 Days To Business Success
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088851].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TerranceCharles
      Originally Posted by WarrenPeterson View Post

      Bad spelling usually annoys me right away. I type too fast myself, and make plenty of mistakes - however with spell-check, I see no reason why those should ever get through to a live post or page.

      For grammar errors, I'm more forgiving. This is partially because I personally misuse the comma and dashes (and I know I do, it is intentional). I tend to use them to slow down the reader, to force pauses, manage the pacing of the reader, etc... not because it is always proper placement.


      A few years back I had read a piece where it had been written that an intentional typo now and then in a blog post was good. The theory was that the typo brought people out and that they commented; in other words the intentional typo increased comments and participation.

      I looked just now and was not able to find the specific link that I was looking for, but there are a handful of interesting threads on intentional typos.

      Any thoughts from you all about that idea - intentional typos?
      That's another GOOD point Warren, it can be used for different readers as you mentioned to slow down the reader, to force a pause and get them to take action. I myself use these methods to and I haven't gotten any complaints about it.

      And, to answer your question... I have read something about purposely misspelling words to cause a reaction. I haven't did that on purpose, but one time I misspelled two words in a blog post and had about 3 comments letting me know, so I can say it does work to increase your readers engagement...LOL But I don't think that's the type of attention I would want.

      BUT, you can make some good money finding misspelled domain names and get more traffic
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089219].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Martin Avis
        When I learned about copywriting (I may not be all that good at it, but I did work in advertising with some of the best for 25 years) I was told that one of the secrets of successful copywriters is to avoid creating inadvertent 'attention diverters'.

        The purpose of good sales copy - and I believe the same can be said for a good article or blog post - is to craft it in such a way that the reader slides through without having their focus shifted.

        Attention diverters are those accidental words, phrases or grammatical mistakes that make the readers' mind wander off the subject. When you are trying to sell something, whether that something is a product from a sales page, a concept in an article or an idea in a blog post your biggest enemy is that the reader starts to think about something else. Boredom is the biggest culprit but glaring spelling mistakes and uncomfortable grammar are both capable of making the reader think about something you hadn't intended.

        A spelling mistake or a split infinitive might not be the end of the world, but it can be the end of your direct link to the readers' mind. In other words, the difference between getting the response you desire and hearing the door slam shut.

        That's not to say that your grammar has to conform to some highfalutin 'Queen's English' standard. Far from it as consistently writing like an Oxford Don can jar with regular people just as quickly as writing sloppily can. Conversational English is generally good enough. If you can read it out loud and not sound like either a plum-mouthed professor or a street urchin you are usually good to go! Consistency is the key - pick a style that will sound natural to the majority of your audience and stick to it.

        If you have the choice and the ability, eliminating as many attention diverters from whatever you write will have a marked effect on how many people read to the end and act in the way you hope.
        Signature
        Martin Avis publishes Kickstart Newsletter - Subscribe free at http://kickstartnewsletter.com
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089478].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author lhavro
        Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

        That's another GOOD point Warren, it can be used for different readers as you mentioned to slow down the reader, to force a pause and get them to take action. I myself use these methods to and I haven't gotten any complaints about it.

        And, to answer your question... I have read something about purposely misspelling words to cause a reaction. I haven't did that on purpose, but one time I misspelled two words in a blog post and had about 3 comments letting me know, so I can say it does work to increase your readers engagement...LOL But I don't think that's the type of attention I would want.

        BUT, you can make some good money finding misspelled domain names and get more traffic
        Another grammatical error, "I haven't did that on purpose" should be "I haven't DONE that on purpose".

        Free lesson from an immigrant.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289337].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7088858].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author xparte
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      Although I own an EFL (English as a Foreign Language) school and teach English, it bothers me that others are generally quick to point out mistakes, whether in grammar or spelling, or even overall use of the language.

      I've yet to meet a native speaker of English who was consistently perfect in his or her writing. Professional writers, for example, are backed up by editors and their material is scrutinized over and over.

      The litmus test for me is simply whether or not the person writing has communicated his or her thoughts adequately. It doesn't matter if they're a native speaker or not...what matters is the ability to communicate.

      We live in a world today where English seems to be the de facto standard language for the Internet. As a result, there are millions of non-native speakers who struggle to adapt to it.

      Aside from sales letters and other writing that merits having an editor review it, most casual writing, such as blogs and forum posts should be met with more tolerance.

      Writing is a surprisingly difficult way to communicate in any language, with relatively few being genuinely expert at it. That said, while we should all strive to do it well, as readers, I think tolerance is far more important than criticism.
      Of course, tolerance is important--to you and me. Unfortunately, tolerance is not nearly as important to our target audience. As a non-native speaker, I know I will never be able to speak or write English as naturally as native speakers (hell, those articles alone are often killing me 'cause my language doesn't have them), but I agree with Akiba: bad grammar does take points off your credibility. Sucks, but it is just a given...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089011].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author goindeep
        Aghhh.... *SIGHS*

        Look...

        Listen to Yoda you must.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089046].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
        Banned
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089074].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author xparte
          Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

          It is...but just an FYI - I am a native speaker of English. Born, raised and educated in the US. ...
          Sorry, "Drunken Greek" threw me off. No offense.
          I hope you're right and I'm wrong. For my own sake.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089108].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
            Banned
            [DELETED]
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089143].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author xparte
              Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

              No offense taken...most folks don't know that about me.

              My point is that non-native speakers tend to assume that all native speakers are perfect - they're not...by a long shot.

              Just think about it in terms of your own native language - is everyone perfect? I'm guessing not...
              Of course, not, but then again, as you yourself said: "...non-native speakers are held to a much higher standard than native speakers."

              That's the point! When a native speaker makes a mistake in grammar, they do it with confidence, and it shows. When I make a mistake, I usually mess up an article or a preposition, or even worth--a sentence structure because I'm subconsciously trying to build it the way it's done in my language. That gives me away instantly.

              On the other hand, I don't do "normal" mistakes like "there" instead of "they're" (well, when I do it's not a mistake, it's a typo), and I always use a spell-checker even in forums because this is so easy, there is no excuse not to. But the downside is that the errors I make are such that a native speaker won't, and that can't be a good thing when you target, say, the US market.
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7108631].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Black Hat Cat
          Banned
          Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

          As Shane_K said, if someone is focusing on your grammar, you've already lost the sale.
          If your grammar is so bad they can't help but notice, then you've most likely lost that sale as well.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093621].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Akibahoward
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      Although I own an EFL (English as a Foreign Language) school and teach English, it bothers me that others are generally quick to point out mistakes, whether in grammar or spelling, or even overall use of the language.

      I've yet to meet a native speaker of English who was consistently perfect in his or her writing. Professional writers, for example, are backed up by editors and their material is scrutinized over and over.

      The litmus test for me is simply whether or not the person writing has communicated his or her thoughts adequately. It doesn't matter if they're a native speaker or not...what matters is the ability to communicate.

      We live in a world today where English seems to be the de facto standard language for the Internet. As a result, there are millions of non-native speakers who struggle to adapt to it.

      Aside from sales letters and other writing that merits having an editor review it, most casual writing, such as blogs and forum posts should be met with more tolerance.

      Writing is a surprisingly difficult way to communicate in any language, with relatively few being genuinely expert at it. That said, while we should all strive to do it well, as readers, I think tolerance is far more important than criticism.
      Respectfully, I disagree. I think you have two issues here. You're right that there may need to be a new consideration for the Non native speakers, but the idea that I should 'let down the walls' to accomodate those that don't, I am sorry, I can't.

      There MUST be at least a standard. This is criticism, this is business. And, like it or not, in business, you must follow some basics. Grammar, spelling and more are some of those standards that HAVE to be uphelp.

      To tell you the truth, many (if not most) of the non native speakers I know, work HARDER than most native speakers to 'get it right'.

      I am just saying here, I accept SOME errors, that is natural, and even the 'natural language' concept makes sense, but I, when speaking, TO PROFESSIONALS, don't use broken english. That's just with my 'homies'.....(I'm black...It's ok..lol)

      Seriously, broken english, which I think is a good part of what you are referring to, is not the biggest issue. If I see that someone is TRYING, that will keep me there a bit. But if it's just lazy and horribly put together, they have lost me.

      Just a thought...

      A
      Signature

      Joining the Amazon Affiliate Family....!

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7091701].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author lhavro
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      Although I own an EFL (English as a Foreign Language) school and teach English, it bothers me that others are generally quick to point out mistakes, whether in grammar or spelling, or even overall use of the language.

      I've yet to meet a native speaker of English who was consistently perfect in his or her writing. Professional writers, for example, are backed up by editors and their material is scrutinized over and over.

      The litmus test for me is simply whether or not the person writing has communicated his or her thoughts adequately. It doesn't matter if they're a native speaker or not...what matters is the ability to communicate.

      We live in a world today where English seems to be the de facto standard language for the Internet. As a result, there are millions of non-native speakers who struggle to adapt to it.

      Aside from sales letters and other writing that merits having an editor review it, most casual writing, such as blogs and forum posts should be met with more tolerance.

      Writing is a surprisingly difficult way to communicate in any language, with relatively few being genuinely expert at it. That said, while we should all strive to do it well, as readers, I think tolerance is far more important than criticism.
      I'm so glad that you took "my" side and spoke up for me. It's my chance to speak for myself to these ignorant "adults" so call "native Americans - proud and highly mighty.
      I don't care if I misspell, grammatically incorrect,.....ect. I'm proud that I've learned and able to communicate with English speaks. Have you tried to learn something to communicate with people outside of your comfort zone?

      I'm Chinese and French and English is my 3rd language. I came to America when I was 21 years old. Spent 4 years serving in the USA Army, speaking very limited English (no one ever complained) and got out of the Army with the highest award ever given to an enlisted woman.

      I went on to earn a BA and a MBA degrees from Roosevelt University in Chicago, and became a CPA. For over 10 years I felt discriminated by people I worked with, people like some of you who insisted that everyone should be like you or else. I am always very good with numbers, analysis but very little patient for spelling (I hardly check my writing except when I need to publish it), so when you can't tolerate my grammar, spelling or even the way I write and speak with an accent, should I also call you stupid for not able to read a "financial balance sheet"? And those who can't even do simple math when they calculator is not on sight?

      I'm an American and have been living in the USA for 20 years. I love America but I'm also global. I suggest you open your narrow mind and try to learn the world outside of your alley, street, city or state, and see if you can see a broader reality.

      If you think this is America and all the people should be like you - my gosh, you must be living in the 18th century.
      WOW! It sure feels good to give a piece of my mind.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289277].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by lhavro View Post

        (I hardly check my writing except when I need to publish it), so when you can't tolerate my grammar, spelling or even the way I write and speak with an accent, should I also call you stupid for not able to read a "financial balance sheet"?
        That depends on whether we're trying to make a living by using/creating a financial balance sheet, doesn't it?

        It's context-dependent, isn't it?

        I admire your academic and other achievements, but the reality is that if you're trying to make a living by attracting English-speaking traffic to a web page full of English text, being a qualified CPA and supremely gifted at interpreting or compiling a financial balance sheet is going to be of rather limited value to you. In that context, your income will depend on your grammar, though, for sure, whether you like it or not.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289357].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Elamros
    I think grammar is important. Although some of us make mistakes once in a while, it's fine as long as your compositions are still understandable. I consider that tolerable, especially if English is not the first language.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089075].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MyNiches
    Grammar is not, that important! at all?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089113].message }}
  • Firstly, as you say, there is no excuse for misspellings. It just give the impression that the site owner doesn't have much pride or care in what he/she's doing or offering.

    On the other hand, I feel that grammar depends on the target audience. In some instances you might use slang, local phrases etc and maybe not have the grammar 100% correct, but in other markets you would expect the grammar to be perfect, e.g legal advice, medical advice. This does not mean that you need to be writing in the manner or at the level of the 'small print' found on legal documents, just that the content is grammatically correct.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089124].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author MyNiches
    I think the important of grammar really depends on the writing itself.

    Good writing with so-so grammar will get you much further than bad writing with great grammar.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089128].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author O0o0O
    Bad spelling and grammar tends to result in poor sales and lower conversions. So, yes, it is extremely important.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089165].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TerranceCharles
    @Fredbou, Well said, always have someone else look over your work. I have did this in the past with some friends, non marketers and they've told me things that dramatically increased my conversion rate. It's funny to see when they say something like, your headline is bright red and big and underlined.... WHY? Lol... Thanks
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089196].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author lhavro
      Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

      @Fredbou, Well said, always have someone else look over your work. I have did this in the past with some friends, non marketers and they've told me things that dramatically increased my conversion rate. It's funny to see when they say something like, your headline is bright red and big and underlined.... WHY? Lol... Thanks
      Hey, just caught some mistakes and one it's a grammatical error....."I have did this in the past with some friends", it should be "I have DONE this in the past with some friends".
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289325].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Sarevok
    Some expert copywriters make bad grammar on purpose.



    Food four thoght
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089202].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jacob Padget
    I can understand that, for people who struggle with grammer, it is easy to descend into a lazy attitude of it not really being important. But, of course, it is important. Yes - people may understand you, either way, but that isn't the point. People want to buy products and/or services from what they perceive to be intelligent people. This includes either being competent at using the English language, themselves, or being willing to find someone to represent them who is. I can usually understand what a toddler is saying to me. But, that doesn't mean that I want to trust them with anything to do with my business.

    It may seem petty, but ultimately, it isn't. When you're advertising, people who read your advertisements do not have much to go on to decide who they want to choose to handle whatever area of business it may be. One simple way of comparing and contrasting between providers is to look at how they have presented their product in words: in fact, this is often the only way. If someone seems more intelligent, literate, knowledgeable or experienced through what they write, then, when looking through dozens of advertisements, websites, etc., one is going to favour them over others.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089216].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author prem khaira
    Banned
    Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

    Aye Warriors

    I was just thinking about this because I have seen people call out other people over grammar in their blog post, article etc.

    I've seen quite a few on a weekly basis and some of these people are downright rude. Now that's more unprofessional than little grammar mistakes...oh yea!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089497].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Martin Avis
      Originally Posted by prem khaira View Post

      I've seen quite a few on a weekly basis and some of these people are downright rude. Now that's more unprofessional than little grammar mistakes...oh yea!
      In general the people who point out mistakes are trying to help, but their reward is often to be accused of being at best mean and at worst linguistic fascists.
      Signature
      Martin Avis publishes Kickstart Newsletter - Subscribe free at http://kickstartnewsletter.com
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089513].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        There's a difference between "perfect grammar" and "colloquial grammar".

        Mistakes cost reader attention, and ultimately sales.

        There's a little bit of subjectivity involved, though, in defining what's a "mistake".

        I sometimes start sentences in my articles and on my websites with the word "and", or "but", neither of which I normally allowed when editing for traditional print-media publishers. And you can debate as much as you like whether or not that's a "mistake". Meanwhile, I'll continue to do it.

        But not knowing the difference between "their", "they're" and "there" is a clearcut mistake, and inexcusable. Avoiding obvious grammatical mistakes has certainly never cost anyone any sales. Some marketers like to imagine that just because they don't care about this, their customers don't either. But they're just trying to fool themselves.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089687].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author prem khaira
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Martin.Avis View Post

        In general the people who point out mistakes are trying to help, but their reward is often to be accused of being at best mean and at worst linguistic fascists.
        Dear fellow warrior, i'm not saying that it's wrong to correct someone...Everyone should be corrected at times BUT...

        There is a proper way to do it which is the polite way and then there's the unnecessary, rude call out.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7091923].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Bernd Sauereisen
        I am also under the opinion that grammar is important. Small mistakes can be overlooked though because, unless you take the time to proof read, there will likely be some kind of mistake.

        Grammar is even more important when selling a product. Sloppy writing and grammar does make the product look like cheap and rushed.

        That's my opinion.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092112].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author got2know
        English was one of my worse subjects at school. Year later I started a work's newsletter, and although popular it was a massive eye opener as to just how little I knew about grammar, spelling and the construction of a well written sentence.

        Some years after that, I started to write some kids stories. Again another massive lesson in punctuation and grammatical tense.

        I'm 46 now and still make many, many silly mistakes. Thank god for spell checkers and those who are willing to help with proof reading.

        Of course, there will always be those with the ability to better understand and practice the proper use of grammar and punctuation than others which is a good thing especially if they are helpful souls.

        My pet hate is text speech in forums. If someone was to make a spelling mistake, I would probably not notice anyway as long as I got the gist of the word.

        Is it important? I would say the more well written the better the read.

        Bill
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110693].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Ellrose
        I don`t think that grammar has to be perfect but a little attention is nice.
        When I get an email written like a text message,you know, when someone writes like a crackhead talks,I usually just delete and move on.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7290245].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JabMonkey
    It doesn't bother me when someone else uses bad grammar or typos, but I'm rather hard on myself sometimes. I'll edit my own reply if I spot anything overly amiss.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089539].message }}
  • Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

    Do you think it makes you look less professional as a marketer?
    Of course if makes you look less professional.

    If you cannot be arsed to proof you texts, how do I know as a customer that you can be arsed to confirm the quality of your product/service?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089582].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Deepak Media
    Casual writing like talking to a friend is OK but doesn't mean it should lack grammar.

    "Hey friend, let talks about some important stuff now. I haved some good experience of this topic"

    I am not joking, I have seen such english floating around on the web.
    Signature
    Digital Marketing Author | Speaker | Consultant

    Read my Blog: DigitalDeepak.com

    @ Bangalore, India.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089640].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Chri5123
    grammer is well important that and spelling as well if you want 2 be suceesfuk in the IM
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089843].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Christian Chan
    i doesnt pay attention to grammer.

    Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

    Aye Warriors

    I was just thinking about this because I have seen people call out other people over grammar in their blog post, article etc.

    Do you really pay attention to grammar? I know it's important in a professional market, however - I get the best results when I just talk like I'm talking to a best friend.

    I don't mind bad grammar, because some people understand better on a different level, and most people know what you're trying to say either way.

    The only thing I have a problem with is when someone uses bad spelling.

    What do you think, is grammar really a big deal in your eyes?

    Do you think it makes you look less professional as a marketer?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7089875].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author OmarNegron
    As long as you are able to get your point across in a stylish way then that truly is what counts but when it comes to missing words, using the wrong word (than instead of then, to instead of too lol) and of course the missing periods and the run on sentences.

    It can be pretty frustrating for the reader since they won't be fully captivated by the article and instead will be distracted by the many mistakes it has.

    -Will
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7090069].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TimothyTorrents
    As long as the sentences flow properly and make sense it does not bother me.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7090121].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Troy_Phillips
    Why do you ask Ms Wombat?
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7090128].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Evans
      There's not many people who would tolerate bad grammar in a hard copy book so it should be no different for articles and reports.

      General forum posts are less important.

      Daniel
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7090140].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author smallpond
    There's a massive difference between writers that have mastered the conversational style, and writers that say "I wrote it like someone talking, on purpose" in an attempt to excuse their awful copy.

    For the record, the conversational style is typified by short sentences, impactful one-sentence paragraphs and other such devices; not by grammatically incorrect rambling.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7090437].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by WarrenPeterson View Post

      For grammar errors, I'm more forgiving. This is partially because I personally misuse the comma and dashes (and I know I do, it is intentional). I tend to use them to slow down the reader, to force pauses, manage the pacing of the reader, etc... not because it is always proper placement.
      Grammar was invented to make communication easier. Not to torture grammar school kids. If breaking the rules facilitates communications, I say screw the rules. But know when and why you are breaking them.

      On the other hand, proper grammar often does aid communication. As Martin pointed out, you want the reader's attention to flow from idea to idea. Some errors create sentences that make readers pause and go "huh?". Not what you want.

      If you'll notice, I don't use perfect grammar myself. I dangle participles, use sentence fragments, and so on. But unless I'm having a particularly obtuse day, I usually get my message across.


      Originally Posted by WarrenPeterson View Post

      A few years back I had read a piece where it had been written that an intentional typo now and then in a blog post was good. The theory was that the typo brought people out and that they commented; in other words the intentional typo increased comments and participation.

      I looked just now and was not able to find the specific link that I was looking for, but there are a handful of interesting threads on intentional typos.

      Any thoughts from you all about that idea - intentional typos?
      If your intention is to stoke the "Mrs. Wombats" of the online world to call you out on mistakes, rather than discuss or comment on your ideas, this might work.

      I see it as one of the distractions I try to avoid...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7090953].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Karry
    My theory is good grammar and punctuation never lost anyone a sale.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7091183].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Raydal
    Grammar is important. It's the rule of the language.
    Without it, meaning would be lost.

    I've found that people who contact me about some
    grammatical mistake in my sales letter seldom buy.

    Did they not buy because of the bad grammar? I may
    be biased, but I doubt it. Some people are more
    easily distracted than others. And we need these
    people. They make great editors, surgeons, accountants
    and engineers, but seldom great sales people.

    So if someone points out to you the mistakes on your
    site, it's the joy of helping you that motivates them
    rather than being your customer.

    If your site was perfect, these people would
    say, "Wow! Well written" and pass on to find some
    mistakes on another site.

    Yet, if you appear "too clean" you can seem disconnected.
    Not only in politics but selling too.

    -Ray Edwards
    Signature
    The most powerful and concentrated copywriting training online today bar none! Autoresponder Writing Email SECRETS
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7091286].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author peter_act
      Originally Posted by Raydal View Post

      So if someone points out to you the mistakes on your
      site, it's the joy of helping you that motivates them
      rather than being your customer.

      -Ray Edwards
      Absolutely correct Ray.

      Believe it or not, I have converted three WSOs to Word, corrected the spelling mistakes and bad grammar, sometimes completely re-writing whole paragraphs.

      I have then re-converted it back to PDF, and sent both the Word and PDF versions back to the seller.

      Why did I do all this? As you say, it's the joy of one Warrior helping another, with no thought of financial gain.
      Signature

      Cheap websites for small businesses: Affordable mobile websites
      Get a free autoresponder here: Money Making Opportunities

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093687].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author wyatt2011
    I would never point anything out to anyone but I am also very judgemental. If I'm talking to someone like I am to you, then grammar doesn't matter to me, but if I am making a purchase I want to see perfection because it tells me that you are all about business. And that you took the time to use a spell checker and checked your grammar. I see tons of wso errors and it drives me nuts and makes me rethink making a purchase. It might be wrong, but it does.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7091994].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author maggie2
    From my perspective grammar is really important and so is spelling. To me, if you don't care enoough to get those right I'm not sure I would be willing to follow any advice you might give.
    Signature

    Marg

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092411].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by maggie2 View Post

      From my perspective grammar is really important and so is spelling. To me, if you don't care enoough to get those right I'm not sure I would be willing to follow any advice you might give.
      That's fair eno(o)ugh.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092636].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author faisalmaximus
    Conversion depends on good spelling, grammar etc. So, it is important to use proper grammar as long as you are at IM- this is my thinking.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092421].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Billy Levin
    I'm not really too bothered about seeing grammar errors, but when people get "your" and "you're" mixed up, that drives me crazy.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092624].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author koolphoto
    Petty is important to some people.


    Posted from Warrior Forum Reader for Android
    Signature

    My name is Ken Katz and I am a Web Designer and Photographer. My motto: "If you really want to do something, you'll find a way. If you don't, you'll find an excuse." -Jim Rohn

    Celebrity Portrait Photgapher - My Photography Portfolio.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092652].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author myob
      If you wish to be taken seriously your writing should be prefossional, and grammar is a major reflection upon which readers consider you by.
      Signature
      “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092765].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author ResultsDriven
    It depends on how savvy your market is; it may actually be beneficial to use poor language in certain situations. Many urban markets and websites (like worldstarhiphop.com) actually see higher conversion rates when, essentially, poor grammar is used.

    Don't forget that poor grammar and bad spelling can leads to a higher click through rate though.
    Signature
    CHECK OUT THE WORLD'S LARGEST NICHE WEBSITE PACKAGE


    "Talk is cheap, results aren't."
    Results Driven IM
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092772].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author hyderkhan
    Grammar matters.

    If you want to be successful online, you need to utilize proper grammar in everything that you write.

    If you want to establish your credibility in the eyes of your audience, you need to ensure that your grammar is impeccable.

    If you want to develop customer loyalty, grammar matters.

    If you want to increase your sales conversion rates, grammar matters.

    If you want to reduce your website's bounce rate, grammar matters.

    If you want people to actually READ to the end of your article or to the end of your email, without clicking on the back button (or delete button if an email), then you need to ensure that your use of grammar is flawless.

    And I would have to surmise that grammar matters (or will someday matter, if not already today) to Google. Someday Google will come out with some new update where they will devalue sites with "poor grammar". Who knows!?
    Signature
    Looking To Help A Fellow Warrior Out.

    Need a Wordpress website built? I know Wordpress, MySQL, PHP, and even GIMP, and can help you build your website.

    I'm looking to JV with anyone with a drive to succeed. Send me a PM.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092785].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jill Carpenter
      Originally Posted by seasoned View Post

      Knows who what bad grammer was? Might none some cared not! Wrotten gramer bad no difference not make! Though confusing can it be! Don't not agreed you?
      Originally Posted by Andrei Rotariu View Post

      Aghhh.... *SIGHS*

      Look...

      Listen to Yoda you must.
      Yes! I heard Yoda too when reading that.

      I love when people talk about their marketing add.

      Is it advertising?

      Or do they just have marketing ADD?
      Signature

      "May I have ten thousand marbles, please?"

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092859].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Steven Cavan
    Spelling mistakes happen all the time. I am definitely guilty here.

    However, it drives me insane when I notice my own copy with bad grammar and spelling. Bad spelling loses credibility to a lot of people. I try my hardest to keep my writing as clean as possible.

    Most people will relate your style of writing to a certain level of education. You certainly don't want people going around calling you a dodo bird. Take the time to review articles and posts.
    Signature
    Viral Marketing-Tips, Tricks and Strategies By Steven Cavan
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7092971].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SamuelCarter
    Grammar is important. It can certainly effect your spam score if you are sending out emails to your subscribers. The last thing you want is your emails ending up in the junk mail. So spend the time and make sure all appears correct and professional.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093397].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by ResultsDriven View Post

      It depends on how savvy your market is; it may actually be beneficial to use poor language in certain situations. Many urban markets and websites (like worldstarhiphop.com) actually see higher conversion rates when, essentially, poor grammar is used.

      Don't forget that poor grammar and bad spelling can leads to a higher click through rate though.
      There's a big, big difference between deliberately breaking the rules for a reason you can articulate and the kind of gibberish some people put out.

      Try that 'wannabe rap star' language pitching a 7-figure software or consulting contract to a Fortune 100 CEO and see how far you get.

      I see some of the hip hop stars outside of that environment on TV, and most of them sound like your average yuppie in the 'burbs.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093442].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DrFresh
    As far as sales copy or misspelled words in sales videos, I kind of think ugh... it gives it less credibility IMO...

    but just general blogging I say who cares unless you're trying to get the visitor to trust you and click through to check out the product. Spelling & grammar can affect how people see you so if you're trying to convince your visitors of something I'd be as proper as possible is what I'm trying to say...

    yayayaya!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093431].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KyleG1461
    Getting simple things wrong makes you look like a moron. Do you want to look like a moron in front of your prospects/clients/customers/competitors/mom/etc?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093559].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author GeoFan
    Offline, in person, your appearance and speech makes a personal statement about who you are.

    Online, your personal image comes across in the way you write. It's important to take the time to clarify what it is you want to say, and put it in writing properly.

    People will judge your worth by how you write.
    Signature
    Free SEO Report, good for one site, one keyphrase, one time use ... Don't pay for SEO services, get a Free SEO Report, try before you buy! After your initial free report, the cost is very reasonable. A brief proposal and recommendations will be included with your free report. IF this is against the WarriorForum TOS, I will delete it. Please, just let me know... PM me.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093571].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author malcsimm
    Hi mate

    Martin Avis has a point that you should not go too far: but as a fellow Brit I do feel peeved when a fellow marketer goes for:

    "there ok to do that", instead of "they're", or

    "its ok to do that" instead of "it's".

    But then who are we to judge the acceptable level of grammar?

    It does more often seem to be Americans who make these errors: (Whoops - racey) but then America has it more right than the Brits as far as "ization" goes, for example, which is better than our (UK) preferred " isation", the pundits tell me.

    One thing I do know is that the more I use a computer, the more often I have to check spellings. I'm just not as good at spelling as I used to be pre-computer.

    Malc
    Signature

    You WILL banish # Procrastination, # Email bloat, # Wasting time, # Wasting money
    Getting Things Done PLUS Evernote turned my life around - read here how I do it
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093615].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author textbroker
    Of course spelling and grammar are important!
    As someone else mentioned, most folks who say that it isn't important are making excuses for their mistakes.

    We hear the line of "That's how I express myself" all the time. You can have a close, friendly tone that's still grammatically correct. You can even use slang, idioms and contractions. But when you rely on formatting or extraneous punctuation to slow your readers down, you're taking a major risk, one that Martin.Avis mentioned - getting your reader off track.

    BIG Mike asks for tolerance, and sure, we can all ignore the errors. But we're writing for customers and leads. Why give them any reason not to trust us? Take a look at this article, and you'll be spell-checking your product descriptions. BBC News - Spelling mistakes 'cost millions' in lost online sales
    Signature
    http://www.textbroker.com
    Custom Content Creation
    Starting at 1.2 cents per word
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093633].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Tayman
      Just depends on what you are doing.

      If you are trying to attract a high level crowd, grammar/spelling etc. is "important".

      Your time is better spent maximizing revenue and not worrying about the Grammar Police. Hire an English major looking for extra cash on fivver or oDesk to review your work if it's that important to you.

      Be yourself. Many people who point out grammatical errors are looking for a reason to tear you down for one reason or another anyway... F*&# them. I'd rather absorb solid information with grammatical errors from someone who is accomplishing the goals I've set for myself than read a bunch of garbage from someone who is grammatically correct.

      I've learned quite a few "golden nuggets" from people with extremely hard to understand accents and poor English. That's all that matters.

      Some of the most successful internet "marketers" are from China and Russia.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093698].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    Originally Posted by TerranceCharles View Post

    Do you really pay attention to grammar?
    If you do not know the difference between you're and your, I have a very difficult time trusting you to know very much of anything.

    Consider this sentence:

    "There is a way to put $108,458 in your pocket by tomorrow."

    Now compare this one:

    "They're is a way to put $108458 in you're pocket by tomorrow."

    Or this one:

    "their is a way 2 put $1084,58 in ur pocket by 2morrow"

    All three are legible and understandable, and the words are the same, but which of the products are you more likely to buy?
    Signature
    "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093717].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Imperfect grammar is not that bothersome as long as I can still tell what the writer/speaker is trying to communicate.

    I find downright bad grammar to be quite bothersome and even problematic.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093720].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author nipsyr
    Of course both are important!

    I would like to know the reasoning behind those who say it isn't important.

    I think what bothers me the most is the influx of text speak. People seriously think two is 2 and your is ur.

    Usually, the person is also unable to put a coherent sentence together and communicate clearly. I believe the day you can no longer communicate clearly except with your group of buffoons using text speak, you are done in life unless you realize what you are doing is not correct and seek out help to learn the correct way.

    To those of you who have a first language other than English, are the young people also butchering your language with text speak?

    People do often get very angry when it is pointed out. They have every excuse in the book for why they can't communicate properly. I think it is just laziness and they don't care.

    There are plenty of sites online to learn and brush up on spelling and grammar.

    I also don't like broken English. I have seen power point presentations and white papers written in broken English. There really is no excuse for that. Find someone who is a fluent speaker to look over the paper and correct it before publishing.

    When you are on a mobile or casually writing, I can overlook more lapses than writing and grammar presented in a professional setting.

    I have found the older I get, the worse my spelling is.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7093914].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author xparte
      Originally Posted by nipsyr View Post

      Of course both are important!

      I would like to know the reasoning behind those who say it isn't important.

      I think what bothers me the most is the influx of text speak. People seriously think two is 2 and your is ur.

      Usually, the person is also unable to put a coherent sentence together and communicate clearly. I believe the day you can no longer communicate clearly except with your group of buffoons using text speak, you are done in life unless you realize what you are doing is not correct and seek out help to learn the correct way.

      To those of you who have a first language other than English, are the young people also butchering your language with text speak?

      People do often get very angry when it is pointed out. They have every excuse in the book for why they can't communicate properly. I think it is just laziness and they don't care.

      There are plenty of sites online to learn and brush up on spelling and grammar.

      I also don't like broken English. I have seen power point presentations and white papers written in broken English. There really is no excuse for that. Find someone who is a fluent speaker to look over the paper and correct it before publishing.

      When you are on a mobile or casually writing, I can overlook more lapses than writing and grammar presented in a professional setting.

      I have found the older I get, the worse my spelling is.
      Yes, but they do it because they think it's cute.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7108647].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Joshua Rigley
    Banned
    Personally I strongly dislike it when I see someone make a basic mistake, such as misspelling "you're". Whenever I read a salesletter or an infoproduct that I've paid for that has typos in it, it comes across as lazy and unprofessional in my eyes.

    If a person can't be bothered to hire a proofreader to ensure there are no jarring mistakes in their copy, I can see no reason why I should be bothered to buy their product.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7108484].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Simon Ashari
    Haters gonna hate (as they say).

    Way too many grammar nazis out there. I am pretty keen on my spelling and grammar when making blog posts (but not forum posts... just saying). All I do is correct something when it gets pointed out (either by me or someone else).

    Simply thank them for pointing it out, nothing more.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7108644].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author peter_act
      Originally Posted by Simon Ashari View Post


      Way too many grammar nazis out there. .
      Isn't it a maxim that when someone introduces Hitler or the Nazis into any debate, they have already conceded the argument?
      Signature

      Cheap websites for small businesses: Affordable mobile websites
      Get a free autoresponder here: Money Making Opportunities

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7114679].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author superwelshman
        Originally Posted by peter_act View Post

        Isn't it a maxim that when someone introduces Hitler or the Nazis into any debate, they have already conceded the argument?
        I am going to use that. It is the same as the line: "Why spend all this money on defence when we could be spending it on hospitals?"

        I would say that in written language, it is vitally important. It helps with portraying a professional image of yourself or your organisation. Reading a poorly written CV or website is annoying. In speaking, I would suggest that it is not so important because the focus should be more on fluency. It is better to have rhythm in your language than lots of pauses all the time.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7238277].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author dillon5
    I believe that grammar does matter maybe that's due to the fact I am still in school, but either way that's how I feel. I can't at all claim that I am good at it myself, but the teachers and people make sure we know how to spot the mistakes. I couldn't say that because of grammar issues I wouldn't buy your product but I would notice it.
    Hope that helps
    Signature
    *******Christmas is just around the corner!******
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7108658].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author fitnesslover1
    I find poor grammar to sound very unprofessional and unintelligent
    Signature

    Visit www.myphenomfitness.com for nutrition and fitness topics including the safety of tap water consumption, the hormonal response to exercise, and and other health articles.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7109671].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author locke815
      Originally Posted by fitnesslover1 View Post

      I find poor grammar to sound very unprofessional and unintelligent
      Indeed it is. Do you like your readers to read poor grammar material?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7290841].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author davidfrankk
    As long as it doesn't confuse the reader with the meaning of the sentence, I have no problem with poor grammar.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7109866].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Beverley Boorer
    Nooo!! I hat bad grammar, it sucks. And it makes the peson look like they didn't get past third class. Not so bad on a forum, but what impression does it give potential clients or visitors? Not so bad socially but not for business pleeeeeeeeeeese.
    Just for the record I also hate bad spelling and punctuation. It can make the meaning unclear and even change the meaning if you put a comma in the wrong place.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110261].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Berkinb
    I guess it kind of depends on the subject you are writing about and the target audience.

    If the posts are educational/scientific/professional in nature, I believe it matters a lot. There is really no way to sound professional with bad grammar.

    On the other hand, if your blog/site is kind of casual, talking about personal stuff (experiences, emotions, etc.), I don't think that it matters as much.

    Personally, I get irritated if I see more than a couple mistakes; but the first lesson I have learned in business is what "I" think is irrelevant when it comes to sales and results. What's important is the reaction of the target audience.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110284].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author bhushan@rancor
    Grammar is the backbone here.I think it makes our Information clear and makes difference between right and wrong meaning.
    Signature
    Interactive Bees Pvt Ltd best known for Quality Web Development Solutions and Online Marketing Services.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110387].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author fatcitygirl
    I think this is a duh! It's super important. Bad grammar makes you look stupid and unprofessional. Common mistakes like your and you're, its and it's, etc. are easy to fix and make a HUGE difference in blog posts, ad copy and anywhere else you post something. Bad grammar only hurts YOU and your sales.
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110544].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Affiguy
    with poor grammar on business communication / in promotion creatives you run the risk of putting yourself in an unprofessional light. Though some intentional mistakes can play some key trigger part in ads for instance. So, you'd definately better know grammar rules and could boast a rich vocabulary so that you would be able to play with it!
    Signature
    Affiliate's Recurring Commission: Up to 70%, $110 average sale rate + rebills! Both housewives and top managers highly convert. Join In Now!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110753].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author muzzy4u2
    Grammar is really important especially if you are writing or re-writing articles as the main purpose of the article is to attract/engage the user and if grammar and sentence formation is not proper it doesn't look nice.

    therefore if you are writing a article on your own then its always better to prove read it twice before posting it online.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110775].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CyborgX
    Well it depends on the context, if I'm just chatting with a friend online or in a forum I really don't care if they have grammar slip ups, the same for arguing, I'm not the type of person who replies with those annoying comments "Oh your opinion doesn't matter because your grammar sucks" or whatever. On the internet I don't mind if someones grammar isn't perfect but I do feel there is a limit, if some people have such poor grammar that it becomes hard to read... that is where I draw the line (unless they're doing it as a joke). I do believe however that people should at least try on internet forums though, even if it's not perfect they should at least put some effort in. The only place grammar matters to me is real life scenarios, I'd hate to receive a letter from my bank with poor grammar, I'd probably move banks xD if I apply to a job at a company I may not have heard of before and they call me in for an interview by a letter or something and it's poor grammar, I probably wouldn't turn up lol they're clearly not very professional.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7110981].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Joseph Robinson
    Banned
    How I felt opening this thread:

    Dead Dove Do Not Eat - YouTube
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7111196].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sarah23
    my own grammar is terrible, not good enough..
    Signature
    "Gathering correct information and taking actions will boom your business.
    Never be afraid of failures and success will follow you"

    By My Unsung Guru and Mentor
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7111519].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author rfuture2009
    I personally do not have a problem with grammar errors, who really writes properly?


    not many people, less critical, more helpful
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7111553].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author RedShifted
      Originally Posted by rfuture2009 View Post

      I personally do not have a problem with grammar errors, who really writes properly?


      not many people, less critical, more helpful
      People with a college education maybe?
      People who actually want to be successful in life?
      People who care about things like credibility and professionalism?

      I definitely don't think anyone writes perfectly, but "properly" is a whole different ballgame. The least you should do is try your best.

      Why? Because if you come on this forum asking questions, while typing like a 5 year old, you're going to reduce the quality of the advice you get. You attract in this world precisely what you are sending out. The second I see repetitive spelling errors, no periods, or no caplocks, I'm GONE like the wind.

      So seriously. If you want to attract money, its all about quality and value. The least you can do is try incorporating some quality in your writing.

      ps. Me telling you to capitalize your letters *IS* me being "helpful". Its the most fundamental, easiest thing you can do, but you don't do it. So WHY ON EARTH would someone want to help you in other ways, if you can't even nail the fundamentals down?

      Thats my real issue with this. Make mistakes by accident. But If you're too lazy to press caplocks, and add periods to your sentences, then I'm too lazy to help you. Lets be real. Learn English first, then learn marketing second. Common sense doesn't get much more common than that.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7111659].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Beverley Boorer
    Having mistakes of any kind in your writing should be avoided if possible. Often the simply addition - or omission - of a comma will change the intended meaning to almost the opposite. Take, for instance, the simple sentence: Eats, shoots and leaves -something a gunman might do in a movie. Remove the comma and you get: Eats shoots and leaves - something a koala is likely to do.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7238305].message }}
    • {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7238475].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author TheArticlePros
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7238552].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Dryberry
          Originally Posted by JaRyCu View Post

          Dude that had me laughing out loud. I posted it to my FB wall and then was immediately presented with this from Lamebook:



          -- j
          I always like this one as well:
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7238578].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Matida
    Anyone can make spelling mistakes, but bad grammar in sales letters is very annoying in my opinion. Whenever I read a sales letter with bad grammar I will never buy the product, because it doesn't give me faith in the seller.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7238420].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author laurencewins
    I can't speak for others but as a writer and proofreader I can't stand bad grammar, punctuation or spelling. To me it is a sign that the person doesn't care enough about their customers to make sure it's right in every respect.

    If I showed you some of the material I have to fix, you would definitely agree with me. Ironically enough, it is often the people with the worst spelling and grammar that claim they have no mistakes.

    If I find errors in a person's website, I send them an email with a few errors included and then offer to fix everything (for a fee of course.) Sometimes they take me up on it and sometimes they don't but I feel at least I have made them aware of the problem.

    I think everyone is entitled to do what they please...but the bottom line is that you have to do what's best for the customer, not just what's best for you.

    If I am thinking about buying an ebook or something else online and I see bad grammar or spelling, I usually don't buy it unless it is just so good that I must have it which is a rare occurrence.
    Signature

    Cheers, Laurence. Writer/Editor/Proofreader.
    Website / Blog for more info.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289419].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author nunyad
    I think there is and never will be a concrete answer to the question here. Like so many other topics, it depends on quite a few factors. Obviously there needs to be a lowest common denominator type of grammar that doesn't dip into vague meanings and confusing pronouns and whatnot -- but with that said, this is the internet.

    The beauty of language is its fluidity. You can create new meanings even on accident, so as long as everything isn't blatantly spelled poorly or written in a cave man type staccato tone that reads like a wet piece of cardboard.

    Obviously grammar is good. But too much attention to these things can also alienate an audience. Perfect is another form of fiction that cannot be achieved imo. So get it reasonably close and enjoy the ride.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7289693].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Inspired, Inc.
    articles and blogs, need not to be really PERFECT... for as long as they make sense and readable, I'm cool with it...
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7290330].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author onlineblogger2
    I think grammar is important for all bloggers. But I also do many grammar mistakes in my blog. But I try to improve my English knowledge. :-( But it is not a easy task for me as English is not my mother language.
    Signature
    ALL Best Posts | The Best Internet Marketing Guides
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7290568].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jeremykim2011
    In the past, ungrammatical sentences were my pet peeves. (Actually, they still are.) I don't re-visit blogs and sites that are poorly written, have a lot of misspelled words, and have ungrammatical sentences that get in the way of communication. But over time, when I was keen on keyword research, I found out that some of the most-searched keywords don't follow the strict rules of grammar / mechanics. For instance, "womens bucket bags" instead of "women's bucket bags." Because of that, I created articles and Squidoo lenses using these supposedly "wrong" or "misspelled" words and phrases.

    To answer your question, though, I still pay attention to grammar even though I make some of them (deliberately or not). When I blog, I have some friends critique my articles and they're particular about grammar, sentence construction, and the overall flow of the articles. So I make it a point to review and proofread my articles at least twice before posting them.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7290639].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author sunray
    I think there is a HUGE difference if the person using incorrect spelling and grammar is a native speaker or not. If he is not, and still able to communicate in another language, although with some occasional mistakes here and there, he is obviously an educated person who has spent years on getting to the given level.

    But, on the other hand, if he/she is not able to write his/her own language pretty much flawlessly and in good style... well.. this also shows something about this person doesn't it? Lazy, unintelligent, reckless, arrogant... what else?
    Signature

    Use these laws and make the Law of Attraction work
    QuantumMindSuccess Learn how to live a happy, healthy and abundant life.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7290746].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Bruce Wedding
    There's a content writer on my Facebook. She's always promoting her services. Twice in the past month in Facebook promotions, she's misspelled "losing" as "loosing". Do you think I'd ever hire or recommend her? Not in your wildest dreams.

    WTF can't people spell "losing" anyway?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7290753].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Silas Hart
    I haven't read the other posts in this thread, but there is really two forms of bad grammar. The kind of bad grammar most of the internet and myself use. Then there is the kind that goes like "What you want? Buy my eBook. Make rich cause am guru." where there is a sense of laziness.

    I'm a little judgmental and a little educated and my past and current success in what I do has instilled an ego. I prefer to buy and listen to people who I know are smarter than me. Unfortunately I stereotype non-English speakers who don't have a full grasp of the English language as not really holding their understanding of something else to a higher standard. I realized this the other day when hanging out with one of my new friends from Burma (Myanmar) who although he had really good English speaking abilities for being in the U.S. for such a small amount of time, asked me about the similarities and differences of "Can and Can't, and Can and Can not." I then spoke in Chinese to him which I don't do often because I sound like a mentally slow when I speak it to someone who can speak Mandarin better than I can. I was reminded that American English and Mandarin Chinese are both really hard languages to learn.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7291119].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
    1. Fix the banner. Right now the guy looks stretched out.
    2. Take the info on the side bar and put it underneath where you say "free phone consultation."
    3. Everything should be properly centered.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7291140].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jon Patrick
    Very important. If you are trying to come off as professional, proper grammar and punctuation are a must. Misspelled words are completely uncalled for since spellchecker is pretty much standard nowadays. If you are trying to sell something or sound like an authority on a subject, you need to make sure everything is grammatically correct.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7291154].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author tomcam
    Good writing is terribly important to me. Good grammar is terribly important to me. That said-it's the offer that matters, and the value your product delivers. Regular people simply don't care about errors in grammar unless the writing is so bad they cannot use the product. Jason Fladlien's stuff used to be riddled with errors, but that never stopped him. His stuff is worth every dime (and now seems to be adequately copyedited).
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7291206].message }}

Trending Topics