How long before you scrap a niche site?

by ckbank
24 replies
How much time do you allow yourself before you decide your niche site isn't going anywhere?
#long #niche #scrap #site
  • Profile picture of the author MilkerFocus
    You should ask How can I let my site grow up faster.

    Marcus
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    • Profile picture of the author ckbank
      Originally Posted by MilkerFocus View Post

      You should ask How can I let my site grow up faster.

      Marcus
      Your answer is fun and all Marcus, but if every single niche site that was established succeeded, most of us on this forum would be rich.
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      • Profile picture of the author PerformanceMan
        Originally Posted by ckbank View Post

        Your answer is fun and all Marcus, but if every single niche site that was established succeeded, most of us on this forum would be rich.
        Use PPC and tweak the website. Set reasonable numbers for conversions. If the site repeatedly fails to earn, it's time to move on. This can be done in days or weeks, not months.
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    • Profile picture of the author garveyonweb
      Originally Posted by MilkerFocus View Post

      You should ask How can I let my site grow up faster.

      Marcus
      I agree with this sentiment. May bring a different outcome. Good research and keyword selection will reduce most failures before they start. IMHO.
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  • Profile picture of the author TheArticlePros
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeannie Crabtree
      I agree with JaRyCu. You will have the domain name for a year, so leave it on the internet and decide when it is time to renew it.

      Some sites can take a while before you are ranked. Just keep getting a few links to it each month after you have it all set up.

      Get some traffic through other sources besides the search engines, that way it starts paying for itself. Article distribution and social such as twitter or facebook come to mind.


      Originally Posted by JaRyCu View Post

      I'd give it 6 months. The first month should be spent setting up the site and making sure that your content is the highest quality it can be and 100% unique, then starting a backlinking campaign.

      That campaign should start slowly (it's a new site after all!) with a few links per day. Don't use spun content, don't use bad backlinks, and don't SENuke your site to death.

      Depending on the competition and PR of the pages, it could take a month, two months, or even 6-12 months before you're ranked. If you're not seeing progress after 6 months, though, it might be time to throw in the towel. You'll still own the domain for 6 more months, so it might come back and surprise you.

      -- j
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      • Profile picture of the author TheArticlePros
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        • Profile picture of the author Jeannie Crabtree
          @JaRyCu

          The article marketing can take a little time to create momentum. Why not start now? That way you can cover your loses while your sites are not ranking in the top searches and making sales. Plus, it is more backlinks and some traffic from real people.


          Originally Posted by JaRyCu View Post

          Bingo. I had 6 sites die in the recent Google updated this past weekend. I broke off my backlinking campaign on them, and now I'm just going to let them sit for a month or so and see if they recover.

          If they do, I'll backlink them some more.

          If they don't, I've already made up my mind to start an article marketing campaign for each one and see what happens with them. One of them may lend itself to PPC/CPA as well, so I'll go that route too.

          -- j
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          • Profile picture of the author TheArticlePros
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            • Profile picture of the author Jeannie Crabtree
              Yup, I am starting to see the reset on a couple of my sites that were affected all ready. It is silly to dump them at the first sign of trouble. I do continue to get a few links and book marks though.

              Nice that you know somebody that might know something about it...


              Originally Posted by JaRyCu View Post

              One big reason: I have it on good faith from a former employee of a certain search engine that I know very well that this little shake-up may reset in a few weeks, and some of the "losers" may return to their former status. I don't want to start an entirely new strategy until I see if his conjecture's correct.

              -- j
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  • Profile picture of the author retsced
    Originally Posted by ckbank View Post

    How much time do you allow yourself before you decide your niche site isn't going anywhere?
    How much time are you willing to spend on a strategy that simply isn't working?
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  • Profile picture of the author Adie
    Originally Posted by ckbank View Post

    How much time do you allow yourself before you decide your niche site isn't going anywhere?
    I had 12 niche sites and 8 were running great until EMD hit them. I just scrapped 8 and only 4 are running fine now. Started an authority site last week with a totally different approach and so far it is ranking fast. Not EMD and content are not less than 1000 words with loads of photos and videos....

    Those sites I scrapped were more than a year old and some are 2 years.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lotus Plaza
    6-8 months.
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    • Profile picture of the author fin
      I don't think you should ever abandon it, personally.

      If you planned it carefully you will know other people are making money in the niche. That means it's you that's doing something wrong. That's a good thing. It means you have to find out why it's not working and change it.

      If you just move to the next niche you're taking your problems with you and never getting any better at solving puzzles.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    Originally Posted by ckbank View Post

    How much time do you allow yourself before you decide your niche site isn't going anywhere?
    This is not easy to answer because it really depends on two things:

    1. How much market research you put into it before you launched your niche websites.

    2. How much time and money you're willing to invest to find a winning marketing funnel to make it profitable.

    For example, one of the my first websites was in the dating niche. I sent PPC traffic to an opt-in form which I changed about 50 times because I wanted to maximize my conversions. So during my first month I lost $800 buckaroos.

    My sales page sucked my left eyebrow, so I kepted testing out different titles and must have changed the first 3 paragraphs about a dozen times. My second month I lost over a grand. It was painful. But each time I made a sale I was using a tracking program back then that allowed me to see which keyword was making me the most money.

    I started out with a couple thousand keywords and after all this testing I found out that it was a handful of keywords that were making me money. So I got rid of all the keywords that were NOT converting and boom, I started making money to the tune a few hundred dollars a month.

    If I had given up during the 2nd month I would have never made it to that 3rd month of profitabillity. And this is one of the main reasons why people fail. They don't invest enough time to educate themselves so they know how to test their campaigns and then they're not willing to put in enough time and money to test them out.

    So how much time before you scrape your site? That's really up to you.

    RoD
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    I get bored with projects if I'm not seeing any results within 6 months, so I tend to drop them. At least by the time the domain renewal comes around ... it's toast if a site isn't doing anything.
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  • Profile picture of the author wolfmmiii
    Originally Posted by ckbank View Post

    How much time do you allow yourself before you decide your niche site isn't going anywhere?
    My primary model is review sites. Once I have 50 product reviews published, I judge the traffic and conversions. If the site is productive and worth the effort, I'll continue building it out. Otherwise, I save the content and let it drop.
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  • Profile picture of the author michaelthomas
    I would never scrap it just forget about and hopefully it builds up a bit of page rank and possible sell some guest posts and let others pay you to do the site for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Spencer Jones
    I had dozens of niche adsense sites from 2006-07 onwards. I kept renewing those sites every year without any results. Finally it took many years for me to realize that these sites are taking away my precious time and taking me nowhere. This year I intentionally left many domains to expire and am now entirely focused on my one blog which I always wanted to focus on. I am getting more results than I used to get since 2006.

    Lesson, keep your eyes fixed on one thing and you'll get faster and better results...

    Dr.Spencer Jones
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  • Profile picture of the author O0o0O
    It really depends on how competitive your niche is. Let's suppose you're working on an ultra competitive keyword for about 8 months, and it's slowly moving up page two. Once the sites get to page 1, then to spot 3, then 2, then 1, your income doubles and triples. So if you're in a competitive niche, and you have a solid strategy, then it's definitely worth the time and investment.
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  • Profile picture of the author seobro
    Sell them and make some money. They can bring in a pretty penny. Also, they have use as content sites for link building, but people will need a high PR to pay you. People also want a track record so do use GA to track your traffic and sales, as this will increase your final selling price.
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  • Profile picture of the author dejoliet31
    I tend to set a 6-8 month time limit for initial profit. If nothing substantial is happening, I put the site(s) up for sale, unless I have other uses for the domain. For existing sites that lose their standing, I don't have a hard and fast rule. Sometimes, I let them hang on for a year. In other cases, I feel I have "milked the cow" and should let them die when the domain comes up for renewal.

    Increasingly, I am getting rid of EMDs in favor of domains that are more suitable for authority sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author samjaynz
    If I'm driving traffic with PPC, forum marketing, blog commenting etc, then I'll give it a few months.

    If I'm relying on SEO traffic, then I won't want to wait much more than six months to see results (either good opt-in figures or cold hard cash in my bank account)
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    I've been giving them 1 year. If they pay for their domain, or almost do, then I will keep them.
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  • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
    Originally Posted by ckbank View Post

    How much time do you allow yourself before you decide your niche site isn't going anywhere?
    For a niche site you should be getting it to rank fairly quickly (assuming you're targeting niches with low-med competition).

    Once I have a niche site ranking, if it doesn't cover its own costs (hosting, content, links), then I scrap it and move on.

    You've got to know when to cut your losses.
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  • Profile picture of the author nav123
    'Till you know when enough is enough'
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    • Profile picture of the author webjedi
      Originally Posted by fin View Post

      I don't think you should ever abandon it, personally.

      If you planned it carefully you will know other people are making money in the niche. That means it's you that's doing something wrong. That's a good thing. It means you have to find out why it's not working and change it.

      If you just move to the next niche you're taking your problems with you and never getting any better at solving puzzles.
      Yup and your will just have another niche site that doesn't work.

      Originally Posted by Adie View Post

      Started an authority site last week with a totally different approach and so far it is ranking fast. Not EMD and content are not less than 1000 words with loads of photos and videos
      Thinking of going this route (adding an authority to my niches).

      Originally Posted by JaRyCu View Post

      Bingo. I had 6 sites die in the recent Google updated this past weekend. I broke off my backlinking campaign on them, and now I'm just going to let them sit for a month or so and see if they recover.
      They won't. Panda proper is a one year penalty I took a Panda 6 month penalty last year. Penguins are 90 day penalty.. EMD might be longer who know on that one I will check.

      Originally Posted by Spencer Jones View Post

      This year I intentionally left many domains to expire and am now entirely focused on my one blog which I always wanted to focus on. I am getting more results than I used to get since 2006.
      Beautiful !

      Originally Posted by JaRyCu View Post

      One big reason: I have it on good faith from a former employee of a certain search engine that I know very well that this little shake-up may reset in a few weeks, and some of the "losers" may return to their former status.
      Bullshit and hearsay, bah humbug. There is no 'reset', the good sites will return, the crappy EMDs are gone, that is what is intended to happen.

      Originally Posted by Michael55555 View Post

      I've been giving them 1 year. If they pay for their domain, or almost do, then I will keep them.
      Bingo.They are already made and effort has been poured into them.

      Originally Posted by nav123 View Post

      'Till you know when enough is enough'
      Bingo again.

      I let some weird one's slide because I am progressing in the field and I want bigger results, so little .15 cent CPC sites go away in favor of $27.00 CPC. Same effort as far as I can tell, just better KWs.

      Now I am working on my first sales funnel where the real fun is.


      tl;dr: Keep the sites!
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