Is the Drip Fed "Product Launch Formula" Idea Too Slow for You?

36 replies
This is not specific to the PLF product, but more the concept of spacing out 3 videos in the week prior to a launch to build excitement.

I was thinking of using this for an upcoming product, but my personal tastes may be getting in the way.

Personally, after the first video I generally lose interest and never make it through remaining videos on later days and forget to buy during the artificially short buying period. This isn't because the first video is bad - if there was a Buy Button I may whip out my card - but after a couple days I now have other things on my mind and other things demanding my time.

But I am also the type of person that will read a book in one sitting, even if it means staying up all night; when "24" was showing we would not watch an episode very 7 days but instead recorded each episode and then had a weekend marathon to watch it all at once.

For you, does the "drip fed" marketing approach work to build interest and make you more interested in buying a product?

.
#drip #fed #idea #product launch formula #slow
  • Profile picture of the author kencalhn
    great question; I've split tested both variants extensively, and at least for internal launches unless you're planning on an evergreen launch model (squeeze page for drip 1 video, etc ), for regular launches I've found single videos work just fine.

    if it's a big coordinated jv launch with launch partners and affiliates then it may be best to use a multi-video approach for repeat exposure from all the jv partners; for internal launches though I've done great with single-video (plus webinar preview) type model, fwiw

    I'll do a) site with preview video, b) announce preview webinar they can attend and announce launch c) post replay of webinar video on site d) followup emails for launch; all within 2 week timeframes, for dozens of launches, usually I do 8-15 launches a year, internally. i'd make a lot more money if i did coordinated jv launches w/drip videos; for internal launches though multi video is too much, at least for my audiences.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119557].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author footbag_man
    For my launches this is what I do:

    • 1 email 5 days before launch
    • 1 email the day before launch
    • 1 email the day of the launch
    • 1 email 2 days after the launch

    Its been working for me.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119578].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TyreeSEO
    Rather than mailing I'll go out and hit up my homies personally.

    I feel like a face to face connection leaves a better impression and helps me snag more sales. I've had no problem getting 100% of my 3 customers to buy my product this way.

    It's effective and it works.
    Signature
    "If you don’t want beef, milk the cow, cowboy."
    -
    Lil Wayne
    (My name is Tyreese, not Tyree)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119704].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author theory expert
      Banned
      [DELETED]
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119728].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author TyreeSEO
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119731].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author shane_k
          Originally Posted by TyreeSEO View Post

          I was talking about real life products. If I know that any of my customers live close by I'll go door to door and speak with them. It's like a hard sale, but it works.
          Yes that can work, but remember you are on an Internet Marketing Forum that deals with people selling, marketing, and promoting products to people who live all over the world.

          So your advice in this context is not helpful.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119760].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author TyreeSEO
            Originally Posted by shane_k View Post

            Yes that can work, but remember you are on an Internet Marketing Forum that deals with people selling, marketing, and promoting products to people who live all over the world.

            So your advice in this context is not helpful.
            If your online business isn't making any hustle on the offline world then it ain't a business.

            I think you need to respect the fact that I informed him the true power of meeting face to face. Would you tell your mother happy birthday in an e-mail? No, you'd do it face to face. A birthday is just as important as a sale, so I do it face to face and it works.
            Signature
            "If you don’t want beef, milk the cow, cowboy."
            -
            Lil Wayne
            (My name is Tyreese, not Tyree)
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119772].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119744].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author shane_k
          Originally Posted by GuruJu View Post

          I think you don't understand who Tyreese is. His products are very expensive and he has a fantastic sales pitch. You should respect him and not ridicule him.

          Obviously this doesn't work everyone, but he's just sharing his process. Don't be a schmuck, use some saykhel.

          Even if he does has a product that is very expensive at some point it will become inefficient to meet your customers face to face.

          What happens when he has a 100 customers? a 1,000? 10,000?

          PS what is saykhel? (curious)
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119766].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
            Originally Posted by shane_k View Post

            Even if he does has a product that is very expensive at some point it will become inefficient to meet your customers face to face.

            What happens when he has a 100 customers? a 1,000? 10,000?

            PS what is saykhel? (curious)
            Saykhel is common sense.

            This is an internet marketing forum, but you can utilize offline marketing to push your online marketing services.
            Signature

            'As Confucius say,' but under the sky, under the heavens there is but one family.

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119776].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author shane_k
    Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post


    For you, does the "drip fed" marketing approach work to build interest and make you more interested in buying a product?
    I think if you have something like

    Day 01: video review of product
    Day 03: pdf review of product
    Day 6: Podcast review of product

    Then that can get repetitive and boring.

    But if your first video is just enough to peak interest.

    Like something simple where you just say, "something new is coming" and that's it.

    That will peak my interest to keep an eye out.

    If you do that then your next video/pdf/webinar (whatever) better give me a bit more information but not enough to completely let me know what it is.

    what I find great for a second intro is to talk about the specific problems/challenges that we are going to solve (but still not say what the product is)

    Then I would do the launch.

    In the second one where you could talk abou the problems you could even "reveal" a couple of tips that they can try or test out.

    I think a part of the reason people might do multiple steps is your whole list might not open the first email, some will but others won't, and then hopefully those that didn't open the first email will open the second one, or the third one, etc.

    So I think a part of doing the multiple step launch is to catch those who might have fallen through the cracks, and at the same time building up interest and desire.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119792].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author TyreeSEO
      [DELETED]
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119794].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
        Banned
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119949].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author TyreeSEO
          [DELETED]
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119963].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
          [DELETED]
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119985].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
            Banned
            [DELETED]
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120001].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
              [DELETED]
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120015].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
                Banned
                [DELETED]
                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120044].message }}
                • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
                  [DELETED]
                  {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120076].message }}
                  • Profile picture of the author theory expert
                    Banned
                    [DELETED]
                    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120142].message }}
                    • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
                      Originally Posted by theory expert View Post

                      You not only agreed you pretty much vouched for his business acumen.

                      (or what ever guru joe said), can understand how this is applicable to what the OP asked. It sounds more like a self interest post to me.
                      That's because it works. It doesn't have to be one person doing it all. If you've built up staff or know how to contract workers, it can also help when building up hype and interest for a product launch, which is especially helpful for expensive products and services.

                      For example, trade shows, which can really help with a product launch, involve direct face-to-face communication. Building rapport in this way is much more effective.

                      If you have the opportunity to utilize face-to-face, either personally, through networking and with clients, then it is a tried and true recipe for success.

                      And just to be clear, in my culture we have a phrase, yiddisher kop. From this, guruju was the name ascribed to me for my work with the community's youth.
                      Judd is my name, Ju is an abbreviation.

                      You can calm down with the ad hominem attacks now. If you are prejudiced, try to exercise restraint.
                      Signature

                      'As Confucius say,' but under the sky, under the heavens there is but one family.

                      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120163].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author shane_k
      Originally Posted by TyreeSEO View Post


      Would you tell your mother happy birthday in an e-mail? No, you'd do it face to face. A birthday is just as important as a sale, so I do it face to face and it works.

      Well, since I live across the country from her, I tell her on the phone and on facebook. lol

      Look, I do understand what you are saying about meeting face to face and I am not saying that doesn't work.

      But what happens when you have 1,000 customers and you want to do a product launch?

      What happens when you have 10,000 or 100,000 customers and you want to launch a product?

      I respect your question, however it shows lack of understanding that the OP might be trying to launch to a list of 1,000 or more people and it is inefficient for him to meet face to face with each person on his list.

      Even if it was only 100 people on his list, it could still be inefficient for him to meet with that many people.

      Even with you believing what you believe, you still have to understand that at some point you can only meet face to face with so many people each day until your business (online or offline) starts to suffer.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119854].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author entry
      Originally Posted by shane_k View Post

      I think if you have something like

      Day 01: video review of product
      Day 03: pdf review of product
      Day 6: Podcast review of product

      Then that can get repetitive and boring.
      Re: Is the Drip Fed "Product Launch Formula" Idea Too Slow for You?

      This is a common spacing from product launches and videos.
      Signature
      I Have to say a Massive...THANK YOU to every Warrior who has helped me, and thanks to every warrior who helps me in the future...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7124188].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author bwh1
    Interesting to see the conversation about OP's question.

    Please leave it to what the thread was meant for guy's.

    Our product launch funnel had 3 videos spaces out over 1 week and a half.

    We had quit a few complains from people so changed it to a direct access where on each video was a link to the following.

    Important to know is that we had 90% organic traffic for a "free training" keyword, so guess that's why they complained to wait days for each video.

    We will relaunch our product this November for the 2012 version and like to improve the ROI for our affiliates a lot, so your topic is spot on to see how we should go with this.

    G.
    Signature

    Affiliates Wanted! Make anywhere from 42,- to $72 in commissions. Simply Recommend the Best QuickBooks Pro Video Course available at Clickbank.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7119896].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author theory expert
    Banned
    Guys are all the clients local, or, are your clients global? If they are global which is the intent of the thread then even if face to face won't work for a drip fed launch! Unless you plan on flying in to meet all your customers and that is an expensive endeavor to say the least.

    Even if you are surveying, or, testing a new product, and, you wanted to meet the customers door to door it would only be a sample size test prior to a larger regional/international launch. If you don't agree then lets respectfully agree to disagree, and, let the OP have his thread back.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120197].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
      Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

      This is not specific to the PLF product, but more the concept of spacing out 3 videos in the week prior to a launch to build excitement.

      I was thinking of using this for an upcoming product, but my personal tastes may be getting in the way.

      Personally, after the first video I generally lose interest

      For you, does the "drip fed" marketing approach work to build interest and make you more interested in buying a product?

      .
      Originally Posted by theory expert View Post

      Guys are all the clients local, or, are your clients global? If they are global which is the intent of the thread then even if face to face won't work for a drip fed launch! Unless you plan on flying in to meet all your customers and that is an expensive endeavor to say the least.
      Like I said, you can place your staff at trade shows if you have a suitable product. The OP clearly states that drip feeding doesn't appeal to him, and an alternative was suggested. It isn't the only alternative, and I'd like to discuss others, but you clearly want to press the point.

      As a one-man operation I can appreciate why you couldn't understand this working, but with a budget you can hire people.
      Signature

      'As Confucius say,' but under the sky, under the heavens there is but one family.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120220].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Nightengale
      kindsvater,

      You raise a good question.

      I totally get why you'd get bored/lose interest after the first video. That often happens to me too.

      However, it's important to remember: you are not your clients/customers. Experts drip feed their content on purpose to build excitement and anticipation. There are a number of reasons for this. Here are just three:

      1. If you labor in oblivion over a product, then just drop it out on a sales page with no pre-launch promotion of any kind, you'll hear just crickets. It's kind of like the old question "If a tree falls in the woods where no one can hear it, does it actually make a sound?"

      Bottom line, it just doesn't matter.

      2. It's important to make an event of your launch, teasing people about what's coming next. People are funny. We all want what we can't have -- even if just for a while.

      Any good business person knows that a product or service usually has to be explained so that the true value can be explained. Given a long-form sales letter, people often DON'T get the value (they rarely read a sales page word for word) and the sale is lost.

      If you drop your glorious product on a long sales page, people are just going to scroll to the bottom to see what the price is and make a decision to buy or not buy based almost solely on price. It's the kiss of death.

      3. These types of launches also build excitement and social proof. People are perverse. If everyone else wants it, we want it too -- usually just BECAUSE everyone else wants it!

      If a product is just dropped unceremoniously on a sales page, the only way to know if we're in good company when making a buying decision is via testimonials. Testimonials are still included in these drip-fed launches, but this type of launch structure is MUCH more powerful.

      Most of the time, I'm like you: I get bored and lose interest quickly, ESPECIALLY if the information is spaced too far apart or if it drags on FOREVER. The product and timing either have to be just right (I really need/want that particular product at that time) and/or I need to already know/trust/admire the expert.

      I finally bought PLF last year. I'd watched Jeff Walker for a long time but had never bought. I finally was in a place where I really needed to launch something officially and here came Jeff with the newest version of PLF.

      I was pre-sold and by the time we got to the "open cart" date, I was dying to buy. My only question was "What's the price and can I do payments?"

      The reason I "put up" with it was because it was Jeff. Not only is Jeff THE product launch expert, I like his style. His sincerity shines through and I LOVE that!

      I was NOT disappointed.

      I'm currently watching Dan Kennedy's launch of "Lead Generation Machine." I've studied Dan since I was 19 and love his stuff. LGM is something I could really use in my new business right now. I already know it will focus on direct mail, which is a nice complement to my online marketing. And I've been wanting to add direct mail for a while now.

      I'm already salivating over it. I have just two questions: 1.) How much is it and can I do payments? 2.) How is it different from Magnetic Marketing (which I already have)?

      While you want to take your own tastes into account, always be testing to see what works. As Dan says, YOUR opinion doesn't count. Dollars are the only votes that count.

      If you don't like long, drawn out launches, start with a shorter launch. As you release each video, make previous videos available at the same time.

      (Frankly, KNOWING I'd want to buy LGM and knowing I'd be impatient waiting for each video, I deliberately didn't pay much attention until just two nights ago when I watched all 3 videos (of 4) at once. Now I'm waiting impatiently for the 4th "buy here" video.)

      Start with something you're comfortable with, then tweak it and test it, letting the numbers tell you what to do next. But it's a foolish mistake to avoid doing something just because you don't like it. You're leaving a LOT of money on the table. Business is just business. It's just mechanics. So do what makes you the money.

      You're not being asked to rob children.

      Michelle
      Signature
      "You can't market here. This is a marketing discussion forum!"
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120344].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author TyreeSEO
        Originally Posted by Nightengale View Post

        Any good business person knows that a product or service usually has to be explained so that the true value can be explained. Given a long-form sales letter, people often DON'T get the value (they rarely read a sales page word for word) and the sale is lost.

        If you drop your glorious product on a long sales page, people are just going to scroll to the bottom to see what the price is and make a decision to buy or not buy based almost solely on price. It's the kiss of death.
        Fantastic point Michelle.

        That face to face connection that you can make (even in pre launch it can be a video! Let them see your face with YOU talking!)

        If you let sales page turn into one of those main stream long scrolling type pages then you're in for some trouble.

        Make that connection with your buyer, show them that you're there for them!
        Signature
        "If you don’t want beef, milk the cow, cowboy."
        -
        Lil Wayne
        (My name is Tyreese, not Tyree)
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120383].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120275].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author theory expert
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120342].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Horny Devil
      Banned
      [DELETED]
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120363].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author theory expert
        Banned
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120404].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Nightengale
          [DELETED]
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120515].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author TyreeSEO
            [DELETED]
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120539].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author GuruJu
    Drip feeding a launch plays into the Transtheoretical Model, which is to persuade your audience step by step.

    First of all, they are ignorant of the products existence.
    Secondly: Contemplation: You've made them aware and they begin to think about using it.
    By Stage 3 you're at Preparation: They are thinking about buying from you, but need more information about benefits. Ensure that the benefits apply to at least 1 of these 8 primary human needs:
    1) Survival, enjoyment of life, life extension.
    2) Enjoyment of food and beverages.
    3) Freedom from fear, pain, and danger.
    4) Sexual companionship.
    5) Comfortable living conditions.
    6) To be superior, winning, keeping up with the Jones.
    7) Care and protection of loved ones.
    8) Social approval.

    The final stage is purchasing.

    The Fear Factor helps the sale along (only 10 copies available), as well as Ego Morphing, which is where the person identifies the product as something that will improve them, or the way they are perceived, and the Means-End Chain, which involves future pacing. Allow the customer to see themselves using it and being successful in the future.

    There are more, but this should help.
    Signature

    'As Confucius say,' but under the sky, under the heavens there is but one family.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120396].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ken Strong
    Stick to the thread topic. Any more arguing and people will be getting forum vacations.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120606].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120861].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author shane_k
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      I think a week is probably too short a time frame for most products - on a larger scale, look at Apple, Microsoft, even books and movies, for example. I've noticed in IM that I don't often see a lot of that kind of pre-promotion, months before the product release.

      I'm far more apt to already have made a decision to buy something as far as a year or so in advance...usually waiting for the "Leaks" and other info to be released and constantly scrounging around the net for more details.
      It is interesting when you think about it, how apple is so good at keeping the interest alive and building over such a long period of time.

      And if you think about it, it certainly goes against the whole idea that you see in some marketing books about how people's attention spans are getting shorter and shorter, and shorter.


      The key is to focus on getting others talking about it socially, more so than anything else...
      And this could be a part of what email marketing is missing is that interactivity not just between you and your customer, but between your customers themselves.

      I know for me, I am a big film fan, and when I see a trailer me and all my film friends will talk about over and over again, I guess building excitement between us, and selling each other on the reasons why we should go and see the movie.

      I am definately going to think more about this for my business and look at how I am doing things, and how can I improve the interactivity between my customers themselves, and how to help get them talking about my products between them, exciting andn selling each other.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120919].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      Mike,
      Unless there's some real, tangible limit on sales that needs to be imposed, I don't think the scarcity routine is necessary - I can't remember the last time I saw non-IM company's doing this.
      Apple does it all the time with new iPhone releases. Not quite as in-your-face, but there are always worries about demand seriously exceeding initial supply. For a lot of Mac fanboys, that matters. Having the latest and greatest is a big deal for some of them, and getting it the first day is a "Sign to the Faithful" that they're among the Cool Kids.

      I recall a similar situation with the Kindle Fire. Anything labeled "limited edition" is an example, too. And "Sale, this weekend only!"

      It happens offline a lot. We just don't usually look at it the same way, because it's so common it's accepted.


      Paul
      Signature
      .
      Stop by Paul's Pub - my little hangout on Facebook.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7120936].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
        Banned
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7121072].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          Mike,
          Actually, I would have just replaced it with the same model I had, but wanted to check out the Fire for my kids to use as a tablet.
          Completely different products. I've got two Kindles (the original and the keyboard model with Whispernet connectivity), plus the Fire. The Fire is a nice intro to tablets, and it's great for reading in a dark room. The display is sweet, which makes video on it enjoyable. But for reading in normal light... I'll stick with the e-ink models.

          One real advantage for kids: The Fire is sturdier than most tablets.
          I don't disagree with this bit about the fanboys, but I don't count supply/demand issues as the same as "IM Style" scarcity, i.e.; "Only 500 will be sold and then the offer is closed forever".
          That's true. They do that last part differently: Constant model upgrades, and a planned system of cultural obsolescence. The ultimate commercial "tribe."

          Useful lessons in each approach, I think.
          While I could be wrong, I've often wondered just how much money has been left on the table by having those one day only launches in IM.
          Good question. Interestingly, one of the key principles in PLF is the momentum a launch builds. Jeff uses it, with regular upgrades and re-releases of his system. For him, limited classes make sense, because of the personal time involved. For people selling straight digital, with no coaching or other personal time components, it's just dumb. Unless the product won't live up to regular market discussion, of course.

          A lot of his students use the momentum concept really well. They take that buzz and build on it, using press releases, glowing testimonials, and success stories to sell more product, get more affiliates, and finance more rapid growth. Just like more traditional businesses.

          That's part of the advantage of the sequential launch. The buzz doesn't just die when the cart closes. And, if you're using a rolling launch strategy, it can keep building.


          Paul
          Signature
          .
          Stop by Paul's Pub - my little hangout on Facebook.

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7121104].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

            Unless there's some real, tangible limit on sales that needs to be imposed, I don't think the scarcity routine is necessary - I can't remember the last time I saw non-IM company's doing this.
            Paul beat me to my main point, so I'll just add this...

            About the closest thing I could think of to the IM 'only selling 500' model is the offers from companies like Franklin Mint or the outfits that make those collectible dolls. They're being offered as collectibles where a large number in circulation would make the items less valuable.

            The IM equivalent would be resale rights, master resale rights and PLR products. The more copies available, the lower the perceived value.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7122834].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

    This is not specific to the PLF product, but more the concept of spacing out 3 videos in the week prior to a launch to build excitement.

    I was thinking of using this for an upcoming product, but my personal tastes may be getting in the way.

    Personally, after the first video I generally lose interest and never make it through remaining videos on later days and forget to buy during the artificially short buying period. This isn't because the first video is bad - if there was a Buy Button I may whip out my card - but after a couple days I now have other things on my mind and other things demanding my time.

    But I am also the type of person that will read a book in one sitting, even if it means staying up all night; when "24" was showing we would not watch an episode very 7 days but instead recorded each episode and then had a weekend marathon to watch it all at once.

    For you, does the "drip fed" marketing approach work to build interest and make you more interested in buying a product?

    .
    I'm with you on this one when it comes to watching 2 or 3 videos before launch date. Especially if the first video is hype and my perception is that the next videos will also be hype. The only way I might buy on launch date is if I marked it on my calendar with an alert or if I happen to read an email that the offer is ready for purchase.

    Heres the thing though.. affiliates! Established affiliates know their own customer's buying preferences better than the product owner and if I was the product owner.. I would let the affiliates promote it to their customer base in the best way that works best for them.

    One thing a top affiliae taught me a long time ago about long pre-launches is the difference in ROI can be significant. Example is an eBook of mine that I was going to sell for $49.95. The affiliate offered to create a two week pre-launch, with those damn videos, and sell for $97.00. In all honesty, my reply was I did not think the Ebook was worth $97. Long story short.. I went with it and sales were better than I expected and feedback was excellent.

    Then the tables turned. 14 months later I revised the eBook owed to significant changes in the subject matter. Essentially, the first eBook was out-dated and would not "work" without the newest eBook. Same product launch method, and in week 1, the response was very poor compared to the first launch.

    Knowing to be prepared for a shift (thanks to Warriors) I redirected to a different sales method and it made all of the difference. Video under the Headline and this time sales copy under the video. Potential customers had both options: Video and Text. End result was immediate increase of new subs which resulted in excellent ROI.

    So, I do both now, but give affiliates all of the options since they know their customers buying preferences better than me.

    Jeffery 100% :-)

    P.S. I probably should have read the whole thread since I didn't have to watch any videos
    Signature

    Entrepreneurs starting out and small businesses without giant staffs and budgets.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7133995].message }}
  • There's an important factor that needs to be taken into consideration: social buzz, which sustains the market attention.

    In a Jeff Walker's type of launches, you rely on many affiliates mailing out for you as the launch process moves further on. That means that, as the launch draws near to the end, there's a "social buzz" within the niche/community because everybody is mailing, blogging, forum'ing and all in all pumping up the bubble. Finally, as the cart opens, there's a burst of sales coming through.

    Maybe, just maybe, if you don't have that social buzz sustaining your audience's attention high all the way through the launch, you might want to shorten down the launch to make sure attention doesn't fizzle out along the way.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7134083].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author gpwilson
    We are living in the era of advanced technology. At least we know that which product are popular and which are not. The product which got popularity have something valuable for their customers. This is why we all are run for quality and good products. To me, what it is important is to just satisfy our needs. So the real question is that how do we satisfy our needs. Answer of this question is, there are lots of door open now in this vast internet world.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7134194].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jeff Walker
    Well I've got a few opinions on this topic...

    Now I would be the last person to tell you that you should use a product launch sequence for every promotion. I certainly don't.

    But with regards to:

    Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

    Personally, after the first video I generally lose interest and never make it through remaining videos on later days and forget to buy during the artificially short buying period. This isn't because the first video is bad - if there was a Buy Button I may whip out my card - but after a couple days I now have other things on my mind and other things demanding my time.
    In my experience, one of the absolute most important lessons in marketing is that "you are not your target market"... just because you think/feel/act one way doesn't mean your prospect does the same.

    In fact, I can almost guarantee you are not like your prospect... for a whole variety of reasons. There are exceptions to this rule, but they're pretty rare. And making the assumption that your prospects are going to think/act/feel will get you in trouble.

    Creating a sequence (like I do/teach with product launches) is almost always more effective than a stand alone promotion.

    For most markets... on a simple sales per lead basis, there isn't much that approaches the effectiveness of a well-executed product launch sequence.


    - Jeff
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7134291].message }}
    • Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post

      Creating a sequence (like I do/teach with product launches) is almost always more effective than a stand alone promotion.
      We all agree in that, but the discussion the OP raises is not whether to do a sequence or not. The discussion is whether to artificially hold back the offer all the way to sequence post #7 (for example) instead of letting people order from sequence post #1, and post #2, and post #3, etc.

      To sum it up: does "anticipation and buzz-generation" overcome the distraction and potential "focus drop" over the course of a launch?
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7134455].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Jeff Walker
        Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

        We all agree in that, but the discussion the OP raises is not whether to do a sequence or not. The discussion is whether to artificially hold back the offer all the way to sequence post #7 (for example) instead of letting people order from sequence post #1, and post #2, and post #3, etc.
        Hmmm... I didn't see that question raised by the OP.

        And as far as "artificially hold back the offer" - well, I don't understand that phrase. If you're offering something for sale, then you have the right to make any type of sales presentation you want... and present the offer when you want. And, of course, the prospect has the right to engate or walk away to whatever extent they want. I'm not sure how the timing of the offer could be "artificial".


        To sum it up: does "anticipation and buzz-generation" overcome the distraction and potential "focus drop" over the course of a launch?
        Well that will depend on the offer and the prospect universe.

        In my experience, for *most* of "our" types of products... a launch sequence is going to crush a promotion that asks for the order immediately.


        - Jeff
        Signature
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7135550].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author matchoo77
          Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post


          In my experience, for *most* of "our" types of products... a launch sequence is going to crush a promotion that asks for the order immediately.


          - Jeff

          Yes! Well put Jeff. I think we can get so technical with all of these buzz words like "launch" that we forget the basic truth that people are not ready to buy our stuff right away. They need to be "warmed up" before they are ready to buy, and that is exactly what Jeff does with the way he puts out free content before he offers his stuff for sale.
          Signature

          Join Microcapmillionaires Affiliate Program (new tools!):http://members.microcapmillionaires....273-affiliates

          Attention Stock Investing/Trading, Forex & Binary Options Marketers: PM me or send email to microcapmillionaires [at] gmail if you'd like to join my new Mastermind Group, where you can rub elbows with million dollar marketers and grow your business quickly!

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7135721].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kencalhn
    one thing that would be helpful to get split test data for is launch success for

    a) how videos /content drip is best (is it always the standard 4-video series, or is 2 vs 3 or other variables, better, by market/price point etc)
    b) internal vs jv launch; significant differences in what converts best when doing different types of launches
    c) video variables (length/content of videos to tell the story forward, sequence variables of problem/agitate/solve/testimonial/you can do it too/transformation/call to action themes etc)

    i test constantly; it would be good to see what others have found though, for $400-$1997 price point launches, internal vs jv
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7135783].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jeff Walker
      Ken,

      Great questions...

      Some of those things are difficult to test, especially during JV launches. The place were testing is easiest and cleanest is when you start doing Evergreen launches.

      Internal Launches are generally more compressed than JV Launches, simply because you need to give JVs time to get their promotions out.

      It's impossible to generalize on video length, because it depends on the quality of the copy/script and the quality of the delivery. Some people can deliver a compelling 40-minute video, but most cannot. Some topics are complex enough to call for long videos, some aren't. It's like the old saying about copy - it can never be too long, it can only be too boring.

      You've been doing video in your business forever, so you've probably already got a good idea about how long you can go and still be engaging...

      Number of videos... varies by the launch, but I defer to old-school storytelling and the three act play. Three acts... three prelaunch videos.


      - Jeff
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7136781].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author WarrenPeterson
        Originally Posted by Jeff Walker View Post

        ...

        Number of videos... varies by the launch, but I defer to old-school storytelling and the three act play. Three acts... three prelaunch videos.
        I'm prepping my own launch right now, and what you said above is one heck of a gold nugget! That just connected so many dots with me on so many levels... THANK YOU! -Warren
        Signature
        Do you really want to build a real business?
        Then you need this: 21 Days To Business Success
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7152372].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kencalhn
    Jeff,

    Thanks so much; as always I learn valuable insights from you. Good points on time compression on internals vs jvs w/blast schedules. I am in the process of transforming prior internals into evergreens, so they become passive automated income generators (squeeze page on front with 3-vid drip content/autoresponder chain a la Yanik oil wells), and will finally be doing more w/affiliates/jvs.

    And thanks for the tip on 3-video launch, I'll do that with my current one that I'm launching this upcoming week; I had planned on a single-vid but will do three videos for that one this time; makes sense to do more audience involvement/capture objections/hot buttons by reading vid1 comments, address those in faq/testimonial vid 3, and cta vid 3 etc.

    I've done exhaustive competitive analysis of trading industry launches; specifically the plf style ones, so thanks (indirectly) for all I've learned from you, by studying those. I've always aced internal launches in the trading biz since '99, but totally missed the boat on jvs/affiliates/evergreens.

    And from what I gathered from a comment you made in your latest plf relaunch, there's a huge revenue difference potential in internal-only vs jv launches. Corey R and Derek told me years ago I need to do more w/aff marketing, problem is in the trading biz there's a lot of shenanigans, the "marketers vs credible authorities" often don't overlap, so I've been reluctant to do plf style launches w/others in my industry (which has cost me many millions in lost revenue potential; I'm well aware of). But I'm going to expand launch style marketing significantly within my industry w/many colleagues, I've been testing a lot this year, rolling out soon.

    Thanks for all you've done, Jeff - I've significantly improved my sales and internal launch process over the last few years based on what I've observed from learning your processes by watching others do it. My biggest IM win: learning how to use plf style launches for internal product launches. My biggest IM epic fail, lol: not trusting people in the trading industry, so not doing much aff/jv focused marketing (which is, I'm belatedly realizing, 13 years into my im career, where 90% of the money is).

    You've made a big difference in a lot of our lives; so thanks -- it helps everyone, in our mission to 'get the word out' and genuinely help our customers, with more engaging launch sequences. Your contributions are of strategic, significant impact to the IM landscape, like Dan's are for marketing. And you seem like a cool guy, too, so that's a plus. off to have an adult beverage myself now, lol.

    playing guitar and trading in colorado springs,

    - ken
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7144308].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jeff Walker
      Ken,

      Thanks for your kind words... it's been a long and wild ride in this business. I really love the IM community, and it's been crazy to watch it grow up.

      It's sorta weird... but the reason I keep pushing and working to evolve PLF and make a bigger impact is because I love helping entrepreneurs. I just love seeing people build businesses and create freedom in their lives... and create positive impact in the world. The reality is that I don't really have to work anymore - I've kept a very simple lifestyle, and I've made a bunch of money over the last 16 years. The thing that keeps getting me out of bed is making an impact.

      In any case, you might be interested to know that Corey was literally the first person to hire me to run a launch... I talked to him on the phone and we sealed the deal just about 36 hours before his tragic accident. I've never really made that public out of respect to him and his legacy.

      I wouldn't consider it a fail to not have done JV launches... we all make choices in our business. There's lots of PLF Owners who never use JVs or affiliates. JV Launches are the place where you can REALLY scale up... but they're also a lot more complicated than Internal launches. Lots more moving pieces. And your life gets more complicated as well - all of a sudden you have a lot of JV relationships to manage.

      As you might know, I started in the trading world... and was in that market from '96 until 2005. Like you, I never did JVs - I had a partner in that business that didn't want to use affiliates. I will say that the JV environment in that niche has become pretty evolved.


      - Jeff
      Signature
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7150728].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author midiwhale
    @kindsvater

    a lot of great points in this thread.

    Back to the original question to do a launch sequence or not.

    Naturally there is no "one size fits all" answer.
    But the way @kindsvater used the word "drip fed marketing" I get the feeling you are looking at it from a different perspective.
    A proper launch sequence is not about peace meal teasing.

    If your clients are so impatient to buy, that they can't wait 3 days between videos, then these are probably a "handful" of pre-prepared clients who already
    1) know you and trust you
    2) understand your offer/product and what it will do for them
    3) are enabled to buy and the price/terms isn't an issue.

    One thought - You could have a subtle early bird list on day 1, so they can show they are ready to buy. But any pre-selling would spoil the "event", so IMHO that seems wrong.

    It's also about behaving congruently!
    So if you say one can't buy until launch day, that should be true. If they are ready to buy, that is great :-) and they don't have to watch the launch content sequence, to learn more, if they don't want to, but they'd still have to wait to buy, IMHO. But the launch sequence should teach them something of value anyway, else your content just sucks.

    Your list is obviously hyper stoked, or your product alchemaic :-)

    In my world, the lists (jv or internal) are usually not so ready.
    1) They don't know they want it yet (maybe the concept, but your particular variant?)
    2) they may not know, like or trust you enough, or your skills/success in this variant.
    3) they may not be in buying mode, and need "proof" that it is a wise investment

    A launch sequence should
    1) build/re-build relationship
    2) educate the audience
    3) excite the audience and focus their attention on your offer, and not the other 10 coming every day.

    Should you do a launch sequence?
    It depends on the above, and I'm assuming your product is well over $97.

    Although Buchard/Kern did a sequence on a $6 (?) book but that was also about getting sales momentum for a launch day, for another reason (NYTBS charts) and/or maybe it lead to a secondary offer, where you needed to be way more prepared to leap.

    I didn't even buy the book, actually because the launch sequence was too thin!

    As mentioned, in many cases a one time sales letter (without prior brand) is not enough to convert enough leads. If it is, then great, but it's probably a "simple offer" at an easy price point. aka more of an impulse buy.

    The bigger question is launch burn out of event marketing.
    And while there are many glibb answers about how to make a re-launch an "event", the biggest thing is ideally it will be to a NEW crowd, so it doesn't matter.

    Using a launch sequence to the existing client base, many of whom own v1, (assuming they don't get a free upgrade) is IMHO trickier.

    But in many ways is the secondary side benefit of a "proper" launch sequence - because it is about "content" and ideally this will be v2 (updated) content, so it will help existing customers and non-owners list too.

    But a proper launch sequence will build relationship and trust.
    Something I can't remember a single sales letter ever doing (?)

    And then the shock of a re-launch is minimal.
    Of course many businesses move on in their own product evolution anyway, after 12 months.

    Anyway my personal strategy is not to do re-launches.
    Nor is it to keep changing products - lol.

    I aim to fresh launch the new evolution, vs an update or plan mark 2.
    Not sure if I am making that clear.

    I am negotiating a launch as we speak and once it has happened, I can give you a more concrete example of how I evolutionised the product (and the marketing), instead of re-launched it.

    Needless to say it will have (an educational) launch sequence.

    As to the original question, you can not do it the wrong way round :-)
    You can be patient and do a launch sequence first and see your actual results.

    After a month you can then do a traditional FLAT launch (ideally to a fresh list) and compare the results.

    You can't sell it normally (FLAT) then do a launch sequence a month later - as it will be OLD news :-) unless of course you have a really good product evolution reason to do so.

    Bottom line, try a launch sequence once, and see how you go ;-)

    Peter
    Signature

    EARN $497 affiliate commissions per sale from December 4th. (EPC $41.43)
    http://www.launchframing.com?q=wf
    Plus see my own launch November 16th.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7152187].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author kencalhn
      Great points, Jeff... that really comes through, by the way, which is a key to success, is you are authentic, in wanting to help....you genuinely try and help people. A former co-worker at Ford Motor recommended a great book called "leadership jazz" to me, which talked about authenticity, and it stayed with me as a core value, and something I recognize and respect in others, like yourself.

      Thanks for the story about Corey, I always love hearing things about him, I'm still quite sad about the loss; I keep meaning to post a video tribute on my memorial site for him but can't get through the take without getting emotional, he really had that much of an impact on me. That's neat that you'd been working/talking with him as well. Always a bright, energetic guy, he was always in my thoughts, constantly, as I grew my biz back in 99 on, eg "what would Corey do?" was my personal thought-to-myself throughout site design work and the rest of it. Speaking at his anaheim seminar, meeting with him in his hotel suite, he was like an eagle, very sharp and focused and bright. I miss him. That's great that you'd been working with him; he was a dynamo; would've been great to see what could've been with you two working together.

      Yeah it's been a crazy, wild wonderful ride. IM has been like Alice, or Oz.

      And that's great about the "impact" value of PLF, like Tony R, seeking as a core goal to empower/have an impact/contribution goals are always a key driver for why we do what we do.. ultimately, it's about really helping people, leaving a legacy and the rest of it, which you're doing.

      just did my internal launch today started a few hrs ago (3 vid approach and pushed out date, for more time for building story/anticipation w/prelaunch vids)... thanks again for the insights, and for all you do. You're one of the few people worth learning from in this industry. If all IMers were to just study Dan K and yourself, (and the copywriters, like Fortin, Carlton, Makepeace), and Eben and Brendan, they'd be a lot better off than shiny object syndrome chasing stuff as they do.

      right re trading jv niche evolution; i know the sophistication/split testing/infusion sequences/loops/fully aware of all the behind the scenes stuff (I have sources); will be launching similar biz model for colleagues soon, will be interesting to see revenue/impact/relaunch cycles/etc. Like Schefren/Abraham would say, goal is to get to working On the biz instead of In it, always a challenge for the solo entrepreneur, the automation/leverage changes to make.

      Thanks, for making a strategic, significant impact. PLF + Dan K marketing are the strongest combination of success factors in the industry.


      to contributing massively,

      -k
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[7152241].message }}

Trending Topics