How to do email marketing without spamming

25 replies
Hey all :-)

I have a problem and I was hoping you guys can offer solutions

I have a gig on fiverr, and after doing this gig quite successfully for about a year I suddenly realized that I have lots of returning customers and most of them are from a specific micro niche.
They use my service to promote their own business which is usually the same business - just in a different location.
So I started researching this micro niche and it seems like it's not that micro after all...
I found hundreds of businesses offering this service and all of them are potential big customers (regular customers) for my gig.
My gig is like a complementary service to the service their business offers...

Ok - so now I got a list of a few hundreds of email addresses of businesses in that niche and I want to offer my service to those businesses.

How do I do that without being a spammer?

I don't believe that any of these businesses will get upset if I send them an email about my service - this is not the issue.
The issue is technical.
How do I do it?

Send an email to myself using gmail and bcc a few hundreds of email addresses? Will my email even reach its destination like that?


Any help would be much appreciated...

:-)
#email #marketing #spamming
  • Profile picture of the author JabMonkey
    A few hundred emails isn't a lot really. You should be able to manually send each of them a unique email. It's also not spamming to use their website contact form if you have access to that info.
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  • Profile picture of the author tonyt3000
    Well something you can do is manually send them to a squeese page offering your service when you get them all on a list them you can contact them without problems
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  • Profile picture of the author sirtiman
    Use autoresponder with double opt-in for your gig buyers.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    If you are offering a service, the slow pace of sending individual emails manually might actually help you. What would you do if you sent out three hundred emails all at once, and more of them took you up on it than you could handle?

    That has been the downfall of many service providers who decide to 'go big' and offer a WSO. They sell the heck out of their offer and then find they've bitten off more than they can chew. Many of them never recover, business-wise, from the failure.

    That said, if contact information is publicly available, there is no law against sending them an exploratory email. You would not be spamming.
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  • Profile picture of the author gpwilson
    I think that you should not think like this way. My suggestion is if you are confident about your product then you do not need to worry about that. You can send the email directly. Just make sure that only the right person would get your mail.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by gpwilson View Post

      I think that you should not think like this way. My suggestion is if you are confident about your product then you do not need to worry about that. You can send the email directly. Just make sure that only the right person would get your mail.
      If the product is something like a digital download or something, I'd tend to agree with you. But the OP is offering a service which, unless they correct me, they sell and perform themselves. Which has physical limits in how much of that service can be delivered in a given amount of time. Confidence has nothing to do with it.
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  • Profile picture of the author AndrewStark
    When you deliver the gig just make sure that you put a signature line at the bottom of your work that goes to your main site where if the buyer is interested they can join your list.

    It's the same as putting your business card in the stuff that you on ebay, and a great way to allow these buyers to get in touch without breaking the fiverr rules of taking business away from their site.

    Also if you do use the "Contact Us" form on the website it's more cold calling than spamming, so just remember to only take on as much business as you can handle.
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  • Profile picture of the author mmmyway
    Thank you all for all the tips and insights!
    Some of the stuff here was very helpful to me!

    I think I need to clarify a few things because some of the replies here led me to believe I didn't explain my situation right...

    First of all - I'm not looking for more customers on fiverr.
    I want to get customers for the same gig - outside fiverr...

    Now, the customers I'm looking for are people who have a business in a very specific niche and they are not looking for the service I'm offering.
    They are not aware of its existence actually...

    So anything that has to do with SEO or video marketing can't really help me because nobody is looking for the service I'm offering.

    I'm also not looking for potential customers - I already have a list of a few hundreds of them (emails) and it's very easy to find more.

    It's the same is if I was offering a service that pizza restaurants could benefit a lot from.
    The problem would not be to get hundreds of pizza restaurant's emails - it's very easy to just google "pizza restaurant" and go over the results one by one and collect their email addresses.

    I also am not looking for ways to get pizza restaurant's owners to my website or squeeze page because non of them are searching for gigs related to pizza...

    I have to offer my service directly to the owners and tell them how some of their competitors are successfully using my service and convince them to try it out.
    I can even offer the first gig for free :-)
    That's why I think this has to be done with email marketing. I'm not a big believer in email marketing but I don't really see how I can reach such a specific niche audience that are not really looking for anything related to my gig at all.

    The only question is how to email them all with the biggest chance of most of them actually READING the email...The contents of the email is also not what I'm worried about at the moment.
    It's the getting as many of them to actually read my message that's bothering me.
    I have this feeling that if I simply contact each one of them directly via email - 90% of them will not even read the email because either it will be filtered as spam automatically or they will manually delete it before reading...

    Thank you all for all your help!
    I heard that some of the email marketers out there use services that send a newsletter for them - does this method have any advantage over simply sending the email to myself thru gmail and putting lets say 200 addresses I collected as BCC?
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by mmmyway View Post

      The only question is how to email them all with the biggest chance of most of them actually READING the email...The contents of the email is also not what I'm worried about at the moment.
      It's the getting as many of them to actually read my message that's bothering me.
      I have this feeling that if I simply contact each one of them directly via email - 90% of them will not even read the email because either it will be filtered as spam automatically or they will manually delete it before reading...

      Thank you all for all your help!
      Everything depends on first catching attention and then generating curiosity. The point of your opening email isn't to sell your service, it's to get a response. You want them to respond, that's it.

      So how do you do that?

      Catching attention boils down to your from: address and your subject line. The only response you want is an open.

      Don't use spammy tricks like "You have a payment waiting" or "security problem found" or even "is this your naked picture?"...

      Ask for their feedback. Ask them to fill out a survey, inquiring about the problem your gig solves (start the 'creating awareness' process). You may have to test several subject lines before you hit a winner.

      Once they open the email, your opening has one job - get them to keep reading.

      It's all basic copywriting. If you get stuck, start a thread in the copywriting forum section. There are some heavy hitters in there who will answer you.

      Originally Posted by mmmyway View Post

      I heard that some of the email marketers out there use services that send a newsletter for them - does this method have any advantage over simply sending the email to myself thru gmail and putting lets say 200 addresses I collected as BCC?
      When I get an email addressed to someone else, I assume it's one of two things - spam or some lame chain letter. Either way, your guess at 10% opens would be pretty optimistic, imo.
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    • Profile picture of the author Peter Roesler
      I would use a program like campaigner this will solve any issues of spamming. The key to email is your subject. Make it pop, make it so they will have to open it. Get $50 Free is a good tagline to open it up. then when they open it just have your cost marketed up $50 more in the email and strike through it. Make it exclusive, only the first 5 people to reply get this discount - etc. does that help?
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Peter Roesler View Post

        The key to email is your subject.
        I can't agree with you there, Peter. The key to email is who it's from.

        Whether your subscribers open your emails depends primarily on the relationships you've built with them.

        If marketers are dependent on catchy subject-lines to get their subscribers to open their email, then they've gone wrong at an earlier stage than that - often the expectation-setting stage.

        All clarified in this thread: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6123982

        Originally Posted by Peter Roesler View Post

        Get $50 Free is a good tagline to open it up.
        I hope you mean it sarcastically or inronically, but I have a nasty feeling you may just mean it seriously?!

        "Get $50 Free" is an appallingly bad tagline to use. It's dishonest, ridiculous, deceptive, laughable and probably contrary to the TOS of every autoresponder company there is.

        If you use subject-lines like that, not only will people (rightly) unsubscribe, but any decent, ethical autoresponder company will also (rightly) drop you like a stone. :p
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        • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          I can't agree with you there, Peter. The key to email is who it's from.

          Whether your subscribers open your emails depends primarily on the relationships you've built with them.

          If marketers are dependent on catchy subject-lines to get their subscribers to open their email, then they've gone wrong at an earlier stage than that - often the expectation-setting stage.

          All clarified in this thread: http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...ml#post6123982
          Alexa, you know you're usually my girl on things like this, but this time I think you missed something. Read the original post. The OP is trying to start the relationship by making contacts with people whom she might interest in her service. There is no relationship - yet. Nor is the contact a "subscriber" - yet.

          In other words, her situation is rather more like an author looking for new outlets to syndicate articles to, rather than the later list member relationship.

          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          I hope you mean it sarcastically or inronically, but I have a nasty feeling you may just mean it seriously?!

          "Get $50 Free" is an appallingly bad tagline to use. It's dishonest, ridiculous, deceptive, laughable and probably contrary to the TOS of every autoresponder company there is.

          If you use subject-lines like that, not only will people (rightly) unsubscribe, but any decent, ethical autoresponder company will (rightly) drop you like a stone. :p
          See, we're back on the same page...

          I get emails with headlines like that every day, including Sunday, and they all have one thing in common - if I don't recognize the sender, it gets a quick trip to the spam folder - unopened.
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          • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
            Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

            See, we're back on the same page...
            Phew.

            For a brief moment there I thought you were going to say the "Get $50 Free" subject line was a good idea.
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            • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
              Originally Posted by Richard Van View Post

              Phew.

              For a brief moment there I thought you were going to say the "Get $50 Free" subject line was a good idea.
              Richard, I can't drink enough to do that and still type...
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  • Profile picture of the author mmmyway
    BTW - technically there is a limit to how many gigs I can do per day but I'm basically covered... I can take by myself about 5x more work than I got now and I have a skilled and experienced freelancer that covers for me if I'm too occupied with other things that I do - so I guess in time of need he'll be glad to work full time...
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  • Profile picture of the author footbag_man
    Personally what I do is give at least 1 free good quality email per week and 1 promo email MAX per month.

    The more quality you give the better.

    The subscriber is thinking "if this person gives this away for free then what is he going to give me when I pay money for it?"
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  • Profile picture of the author mmmyway
    what do you people think about mailchimp? should I use it?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by mmmyway View Post

      what do you people think about mailchimp? should I use it?
      I wouldn't, personally.

      If you're even thinking about it, at least read all their terms of service very carefully indeed, and be aware that large numbers of Warriors have built up lists there, only to lose their accounts.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by mmmyway View Post

        it's going to be a short message with a very good looking example and a free 1st gig.
        The question is:

        1) How do I get as many of them to actually read the message?
        Write about the freebie in the title?
        2) How can I know that my message will reach the right person and not just a careless secretary?
        1) A curiosity play might be your best bet. Ask a question that they'll open the email to find out the answer. For example, if you have permission to use a similar business's name, you could ask "What does Acme Widgets know that you don't?"

        I wouldn't mention the freebie in the title, as you earlier said this was a service the prospect isn't aware of, and therefor isn't aware they need.

        2) You can't. The same way you can't know that a postal mail will reach the person it's addressed to rather than a screener. I do believe email has a better shot at getting directly to the person it's addressed to, though. Using a 'contact me' form on a website, as was suggested above, is more likely to get forwarded to someone assigned to handle form submissions. Just my opinion...
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  • The key is to offer them some value when you contact them.

    Do a free analysis for them, offer them a free report, something like that.

    People will not care if you send them an unsolicited message as long as it's packed with free value that they'll actually find useful.
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  • Profile picture of the author CashExpert
    I have tried contacting people this way before and it did not work. I actually sent a personalized email to everyone but the response was quite low.

    Maybe 2 out of 100 people got back to me.I think you should put up a website for your services and and run a paid advert to get traffic targeting the Niche you want to sell to.
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    • Profile picture of the author Richard Van
      Originally Posted by CashExpert View Post

      I have tried contacting people this way before and it did not work for me. I actually sent a personalized email to everyone but the response was quite low.

      Maybe 2 out of 100 people got back to me.
      I hope you don't mind me adding the bold part to your post.

      I have and still do contact people this way with a lot of success. I don't believe it's the method that is to blame, rather the content of the letter you send them...and of course, that the letter gets in front of the right person.
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      • Profile picture of the author mmmyway
        Originally Posted by Richard Van View Post

        I hope you don't mind me adding the bold part to your post.

        I have and still do contact people this way with a lot of success. I don't believe it's the method that is to blame, rather the content of the letter you send them...and of course, that the letter gets in front of the right person.
        it's going to be a short message with a very good looking example and a free 1st gig.
        The question is:

        1) How do I get as many of them to actually read the message?
        Write about the freebie in the title?
        2) How can I know that my message will reach the right person and not just a careless secretary?
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  • Profile picture of the author 300SMG
    Individual email is the way to go. It will give a much more personal touch.

    I will say this, and it might just be me. Anytime I see any type of web service offer from a gmail, yahoo mail or hotmail account it usually goes straight to trash. I think your subject line needs to be more of an inquiry type rather than a service offer.

    From what I'm reading, it seems what you offer will compliment their business. Let them know how and save the sales pitch/call to action until the end.

    However you decide to go about it, all the best.
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  • Profile picture of the author therichb
    Researching if the list is really good to approach for & the system used is the two things which are of relevance...

    The present email marketing systems do take care of subscriber information secrecy, so doing email marketing should be done with utmost care...
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