Someone is taking notice. But why the stubbornness in others?

21 replies
Suddenly emails are appearing in my box that are EASY to read. Wow! For several months I have been appealing for fonts to be larger on web sites and in emails as people with vision impairment, such as older folk, those suffering from cataracts, and anyone with other sight problems cannot read most emails. They certainly struggle with web sites where the font size is minuscule.

In my case I spend hours on the Internet and sometimes my eyes are so sore I have to stay away for days sometimes. It is a refreshing sight to see emails where the sender is making an effort and the font is not only big but bold. Good on you for doing that, whoever is. Now for the rest of you.

Lately I find many sites are just impossible even when the zoom tool is used. Some sections of sites will not zoom in and sometimes the menus for navigation are almost the same color as their background and so tiny that even with a magnifying glass they cannot be read. That's where the guesswork and frustration comes in and many just click off such sites.

If people want their sites read they should be making them user friendly not covert with impossible colors, fonts that blend in with the background, and jammed up as though every fraction of the web page is costing them a fortune.

There is a trend to using this formula but where did it come from? Why are most sites restricted to a few inches across the page and yet can run on to eternity down it? When will everyone take notice of the benefit in having their sites, emails, blogs and articles read by everyone, not just a select few who might have superman like vision or better?

Norma
#email content #font size #notice #stubbornness #taking #web page problem #web site design #web site traffic
  • Profile picture of the author Craig Fenton
    Hi Norma:

    It would be interesting to poll the fine Warriors and ask what font and size do they use for their email, Word Documents, and websites as a general rule.

    In the book industry they always liked 12 font Times New Roman.

    Have a great weekend!
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  • Profile picture of the author dclozen
    Actually If you're using internet explorer. You can increase the size of the web display as much as 400%. by clicking on the bottom right of your screen.
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  • Profile picture of the author George Wright
    Hi Norma,

    You are right as far as I'm concerned. I know a while back there were "accepted standards." I don't know who set them. LOL but the thought was a rather small font for emails.

    I personally like larger font. I haven't seen it much myself. I think I'll increase my email's font size a bit and see what happens. I couldn't hurt.

    George Wright
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    "The first chapter sells the book; the last chapter sells the next book." Mickey Spillane
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    • Profile picture of the author Norma Holt
      Originally Posted by George Wright View Post

      Hi Norma,

      You are right as far as I'm concerned. I know a while back there were "accepted standards." I don't know who set them. LOL but the thought was a rather small font for emails.

      I personally like larger font. I haven't seen it much myself. I think I'll increase my email's font size a bit and see what happens. I couldn't hurt.

      George Wright
      George, I see this hit the right spot with you. No it won't hurt. I recently received emails from a warrior who wrote right across the page in the smallest font and his emails were impossible to read. I sent him an email to explain this and he replied that he just did not realize that people could not read his messages.

      Emails should be only a third of the page across if even that. I try to keep them down to a quarter the width because the eyes can easily follow the type down the page instead of having the lines merge with one another.

      Originally Posted by dclozen

      Actually If you're using internet explorer. You can increase the size of the web display as much as 400%. by clicking on the bottom right of your screen.
      There is a reason I don't use IE and prefer Firefox. It has to do with viruses, etc. The zoom does magnify the pages but as I explained not everything is enlarged. Usually the important bits, such as the navigation links, stay as they are.

      Norma
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      • Profile picture of the author RedMatrix
        Originally Posted by Norma Holt View Post

        There is a reason I don't use IE and prefer Firefox. It has to do with viruses, etc. The zoom does magnify the pages but as I explained not everything is enlarged. Usually the important bits, such as the navigation links, stay as they are.

        Norma
        Norma, with Windows Vista, no matter if you're using IE or Firefox, if you zoom in on a website, everything gets bigger, even the static images! Vista enlarges them on the fly. Sure, they may look a *little* distorted and blurry, but it's kick butt!
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        • Profile picture of the author Norma Holt
          Originally Posted by RedMatrix View Post

          Norma, with Windows Vista, no matter if you're using IE or Firefox, if you zoom in on a website, everything gets bigger, even the static images! Vista enlarges them on the fly. Sure, they may look a *little* distorted and blurry, but it's kick butt!
          Yes, I use Vista and am aware of the enlarging tricks. However, I think most of you have missed the point. I am computer savvy and know how to magnify, zoom in, etc. But there are millions of readers out there with old computers and systems who cannot do such adjustment and millions more who do not know how to magnify their pages.

          If you are selling something online isn't it better to get to your market in the best way possible. If you were running a retail shop would you have it up several flights of stairs, have dimly lit displays, and hit them in the eye with psychedelic colors? Or would you have it easily accessible, nicely displayed, attractive colors and great lighting?

          Norma
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  • Profile picture of the author George Wright
    Norma,

    Guilty as charged. That's the type of emails I've been sending out.

    Strange, I like big font and I send little font. I must have a screw loose.

    George Wright
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    "The first chapter sells the book; the last chapter sells the next book." Mickey Spillane
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  • Profile picture of the author BizBoost
    Norma, you make a very fine point. Now, for a reality check...

    That is not the sort of thing that gets taught to wanna-be internet marketers. They are mainly schooled in academic concepts like "conversion rates" so that if, for example, "people who can't read small fonts" isn't quantifiable for them in a way that suggests they can improve their conversion rates, then they won't get up off their keisters to do anything about it...

    BECAUUUUUUSEEE.....

    Newton's first law of motion says:
    An object at rest tends to stay at rest and an object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.
    And no one's really training people to think outside the box these days. Though they do pay it a lot of lip service, they do so only to appear "forward-thinking" but, in reality, very few ever actually DO anything outside the box and, the truth is, people with the kinds of challenge you just described don't matter to their bottom-line mindsets.

    By all means, express yourself and please continue to try and wake people up from their small-font, conversion-oriented dream-state, but, right now, the way I described it is pretty darn close to the way that it is... plus or minus a few grey hairs.

    Best wishes,
    Eric
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    • Profile picture of the author pooja87
      Hi friend

      It would be interesting to poll the fine Warriors and ask what font and size do they use for their email, Word Documents, and websites as a general rule.
      In the book industry they always liked 11 font Times New Roman.
      Have a great weekend!


      pooja

      thanks
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  • Profile picture of the author howudoin
    It would be interesting to poll the fine Warriors and ask what font and size do they use for their email, Word Documents, and websites as a general rule.

    In the book industry they always liked 12 font Times New Roman.
    As far putting content on internet is concerned, sans serif fonts such as Arial, Verdana and Tahoma are better visually. You can see the sales letter of any of the Gurus and they go with this. Even many people use these in putting their WSO's.
    Although, many Noobs still continue to go along with using the serif fonts, which are more stressful on eyes especially with the glare of a computer screen.

    With sarif fonts such as Times New Roman, they are more difficult to read.

    Bhupinder
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Grossman
    You should use a browser that zooms the whole page, not just the font size, like Opera. You'll never have to deal with a website whose fonts won't enlarge again.
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  • Profile picture of the author Diana Lane
    I'm the opposite - I can read telephone directory-sized text with ease, but if someone threw said telephone directory at me I probably wouldn't see it coming Large text gives me a headache, and I do all my coding and writing in Notepad with the font set to Verdana size 8. I know from comments about the size of my handwriting that not everyone is like this, so I try to make sure that everything I put before the eyeballs of the world is a bit bigger.

    I can't believe I'm the only one who'd find it a problem if the internet suddenly went large overnight, though - there must be others out there.
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    • Profile picture of the author Norma Holt
      Originally Posted by Diana Lane View Post

      I'm the opposite - I can read telephone directory-sized text with ease, but if someone threw said telephone directory at me I probably wouldn't see it coming Large text gives me a headache, and I do all my coding and writing in Notepad with the font set to Verdana size 8. I know from comments about the size of my handwriting that not everyone is like this, so I try to make sure that everything I put before the eyeballs of the world is a bit bigger.

      I can't believe I'm the only one who'd find it a problem if the internet suddenly went large overnight, though - there must be others out there.
      Diana, your site is good. I can zoom it and it is very clear, well done and nicely formatted. No problems there. The colors are also great. It is not with these type of sites that I have a dispute. Right now I can't recall any that are difficult as I quickly flick off them never to return.

      The sites that are into good marketing, e.g. eBay, are well designed, easy to read and zoomable for the sight impaired. Personally my eye sight is good for my age and I only need glasses to read close up. I can view the screen without them. Another very good to read site is the Warriors forum. Here there are no problems now that we have the new format.

      It stands to reason that not everyone thinks this way and variety is inevitable. But if one were to think of how people read their site we might have a lot more user friendly browsing than we do now.

      God bless

      Norma
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      • Profile picture of the author tremayne
        Norma:

        Thank you for raising this subject!

        I am 75 and have "reasonable" eyesight but I am online 16 hours a day, seven days a week, and that alone is a strain on the eyes.

        I use 12pt for emails and for my site because I recognize there are a lot of other people like me who cannot see small squiggles. In fact, when I am writing text for my site I usually write in 12pt at 200% magnification and apply a green background that I later remove. Much kinder to the eyes.

        I have long seen your point as an important one and wonder if I have achieved easy reading with my site. (I'm looking to find out if you see any negatives at Lunch with Gaffer - Home.)

        I have recently switched to Tahoma as a typeface. Although a sans serif type, I personally find it a little clearer than Times and either the type or the line spacing seems a fraction larger. For me, it is easier to read so I have adopted it for all of my material.

        Congrats for your post. Let's see if we can start an online movement!

        Sydney
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  • Profile picture of the author Adaptive
    Norma, I agree with you about the importance of very readable and inviting web design.

    However, the subject line reminded me of some recent spam emails that keep coming and coming. I expected the next line would be about a Canadian pharmacy!

    Regards,
    Allen
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  • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
    Originally Posted by Norma Holt View Post

    Suddenly emails are appearing in my box that are EASY to read. Wow! For several months I have been appealing for fonts to be larger on web sites and in emails as people with vision impairment, such as older folk, those suffering from cataracts, and anyone with other sight problems cannot read most emails. They certainly struggle with web sites where the font size is minuscule.

    In my case I spend hours on the Internet and sometimes my eyes are so sore I have to stay away for days sometimes. It is a refreshing sight to see emails where the sender is making an effort and the font is not only big but bold. Good on you for doing that, whoever is. Now for the rest of you.

    Lately I find many sites are just impossible even when the zoom tool is used. Some sections of sites will not zoom in and sometimes the menus for navigation are almost the same color as their background and so tiny that even with a magnifying glass they cannot be read. That's where the guesswork and frustration comes in and many just click off such sites.

    If people want their sites read they should be making them user friendly not covert with impossible colors, fonts that blend in with the background, and jammed up as though every fraction of the web page is costing them a fortune.

    There is a trend to using this formula but where did it come from? Why are most sites restricted to a few inches across the page and yet can run on to eternity down it? When will everyone take notice of the benefit in having their sites, emails, blogs and articles read by everyone, not just a select few who might have superman like vision or better?

    Norma
    Norma:

    Being that I wear bifocals myself, may I offer a suggestion?

    In Internet Explorer (it's also in other browsers, but this is the on I use), in the lower right hand corner is an adjustment of magnification you can do yourself. It opens a drop down menu, and you can magnify the page past 100% to the preferred magification you desire.

    Now you can read the emails, no matter what size the text comes in just by adjusting it yourself. Try it and see.
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  • Profile picture of the author ChristianM
    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/1499 - that allows page-wide zoom if ff2.0 and i thought ff3 had it built in.
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  • Profile picture of the author jamesviago
    i use arial 11 point.
    occassional 10 point for asides, sidebars or indented incidentals.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dan Grossman
    It's a poor analogy to compare the font size of "most e-mails" to a retail shop that seems to purposely make it hard for people to shop. It's more like dinging every mall in the country for not printing all price tags in extra large fonts for a small minority with vision problems.

    If you know you have trouble reading the average font size, then that person should become aware of the options available for making that size readable.

    I dare you to find a computer old enough it can't run Opera, which has had full page zooming for longer than any of the other browsers. It's also ahead of Firefox, IE and Safari in web standards support. It's also fast and compact enough that Opera Mini provides a full, desktop-like browsing experience on mobile phones, including full page zoom support so you can read a page even on that tiny screen.

    System requirements: Pentium II class system with 64 MB of RAM and at least 50 MB of free disk space. Windows 95 or later.
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    • Profile picture of the author Norma Holt
      Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post

      It's a poor analogy to compare the font size of "most e-mails" to a retail shop that seems to purposely make it hard for people to shop. It's more like dinging every mall in the country for not printing all price tags in extra large fonts for a small minority with vision problems.

      If you know you have trouble reading the average font size, then that person should become aware of the options available for making that size readable.

      I dare you to find a computer old enough it can't run Opera, which has had full page zooming for longer than any of the other browsers. It's also ahead of Firefox, IE and Safari in web standards support. It's also fast and compact enough that Opera Mini provides a full, desktop-like browsing experience on mobile phones, including full page zoom support so you can read a page even on that tiny screen.

      System requirements: Pentium II class system with 64 MB of RAM and at least 50 MB of free disk space. Windows 95 or later.
      You missed the point. Web sites are like retail shops for anyone selling stuff online. Emails are another issue. Whether old computers can run the right browsers or not is not what I said. Its a fact that people new to the Internet may not and probably are not familiar with all the options available let alone the different type of browsers etc.

      Norma
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