Is this lame to you? Celebrities using ghostwriters on Twitter

90 replies
I read this article at http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/27/te...r.html?_r=1&hp

It's about celebrities using ghostwriters to Twit for them.

Why take something as personal as Twitter--and make it impersonal?

I mean--140 characters--does that really need to be outsourced?

I understand that celebs have very busy lives, but, this is ridiculous. It takes less than 30 seconds to type:

"I'm walking to the bathroom... I hope this goes well."

What do you think?
#celebrities #ghostwriters #lame #twitter
  • Profile picture of the author dsmpublishing
    I totally agree and most of them dont do this but i am sure there are a few that do and those that are known for it dont get as much attention on twitter so it works against them in the end.
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  • Profile picture of the author madison_avenue
    A lot of them can't type. Most of them have probably not even heard of Twitter, their public relations staff set everything up for them.
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  • Profile picture of the author EndGame
    I believe some marketers are doing this already.

    I can see why it might not seem great for the followers and fans, but hey, some celebs just might not like the internet, or technology. At the same time, their pr company probably understands the benefit of having a profile on all these upcoming social media networks and the like.

    It doesn't surprise or upset me.

    There are some cool celebs who seem happy to do their own tweets, such as stephen fry.
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    • Profile picture of the author Eric Lorence
      Or maybe just "Fiddy" and Britney have no clue how to use a computer?...
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      • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
        Originally Posted by Eric Lorence View Post

        Or maybe just "Fiddy" and Britney have no clue how to use a computer?...
        Or how to type a simple 'Twit' from their cell phone...
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        • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
          I would say it makes a mockery of the concept of Twitter - but then again, most 'celebs' don't actually write their best selling books either.

          It's just normal marketing - as soon as a demand for anything appears, there will be a boatload of people jumping onboard to try and get their piece of it.

          Trying to build relationships by proxy so that you can influence those people at the time when you need them is blatently manipulative - but I suppose this is the price of technology - people stop doing things in person because it's easier to do it digitally.

          Plenty of companies are much less effect because their employees use email when a 1-1 chat would do, or a telephone call.

          I've seen several companies start HR dispute resolutions only to find out it was all just a misunderstanding between the people involved.

          The further away you get from personal communication, the less you communicate - I'd vote for someone I'd met in person over any Internet based politician (as long as they were worth voting for, but that's a different issue )

          Andy
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          • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
            Andy,

            I agree with everything you said.

            One of the coolest things about Twitter is that it's the most personal form of social networking online--next to Facebook--in my opinion. Mainly, because you actually feel like you are in direct contact with the people that follow you and vice versa.

            I understand outsourcing... I understand leveraging... I understand business & marketing. But sometimes I feel like the human element is much 'too far' removed.

            How busy are you when you can't spend 20-30 seconds to type a message to people that are actually interested in you?

            What's next? Are they going to start outsourcing autographs too?
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            • Profile picture of the author Black Hat Cat
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              Originally Posted by marcanthony View Post

              Andy,


              What's next? Are they going to start outsourcing autographs too?
              Been doing it for years, in some capacity. You don't think they actually sign all those items that go out to their fans, do you?

              As for outsourcing Tweets, maybe the ones who do it recognize the lameness of Twitter, and have better things to do with their lives than sit behind a keyword telling people they're going to the bathroom. I know I do, and I'm not even a celebrity.
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              • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
                Originally Posted by blackhatcat View Post

                You don't think they actually sign all those items that go out to their fans, do you?
                I have no idea what they do behind closed doors. I hope that they don't need other people to forge their signatures.

                As for outsourcing Tweets, maybe the ones who do it recognize the lameness of Twitter, and have better things to do with their lives than sit behind a keyword telling people they're going to the bathroom.
                It's possible--but Twitter couldn't be entirely lame to them if they felt the need to pay someone else to do it for them.
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          • Profile picture of the author TimGross
            Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

            it makes a mockery of the concept of Twitter
            Heh, that struck me as funny, as if Twitter were some high-minded noble venture or philanthropic enterprise...

            For the highly successful whose fans want to feel connected with them which in turn may increase their branding somewhat, Twitter is a low-return marketing avenue, case closed.

            Time spent Twittering is time not spent doing something else. If a celebrity doesn't truly enjoy doing it, it's an enormous waste of their time.

            The solution as with every other low-return marketing issue: Outsource.
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    • Profile picture of the author blogonator
      i guess Twitter is taking the world by storm..right?
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  • Profile picture of the author billbarrett
    Outsourcing Twitting, hahaha. It is really a ridiculous. It makes sense only if this ghostwriting is a part of a large scale branding campaign that involves tens and hundreds accounts and has the goal to make some buzz...
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  • Profile picture of the author travlinguy
    Could be the only alternative for folks with only one or two functioning brain cells.
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    • Profile picture of the author Art Turner
      Originally Posted by travlinguy View Post

      Could be the only alternative for folks with only one or two functioning brain cells.
      That's where the word "stupid" got in here.

      They're outsourcing business operations, how is that apples and oranges?
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      • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
        Originally Posted by Art Turner View Post

        They're outsourcing business operations, how is that apples and oranges?
        Because Ebooks and Articles don't compare to 140 character micro-blogging.

        I agree, many people use Twitter for business--that's cool. Outsourcing business operations is fine with me--even better for the outsourcee.

        But Twitter? It takes 30 seconds to send a message from your phone.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dana_W
    Funny thing - several press release clients have now hired me to manage their Twitter accounts for them. This includes creating and uploading their Twitter background - well, okay, I outsource that to Ryan Leisure - and handpicking who they should follow and following a few hundred people a day to build up their Twitter followers. And in a couple of cases, I do their Tweeting for them too.
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  • Profile picture of the author meisters
    I'm agree with all of you. For article with 140 words you need ghostwriters? Hmm....maybe those celebs in the past at elementary school actually their never working their homework by him/herself. That celebs only know "money will solve all their problem"
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  • Profile picture of the author Dana_W
    Not everyone is good at socializing. Some people want the power of Twitter to promote brand awareness and drive traffic - and they lack either the time or the ability to utilize it properly.
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    • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
      Originally Posted by Dana_W View Post

      Not everyone is good at socializing. Some people want the power of Twitter to promote brand awareness and drive traffic - and they lack either the time or the ability to utilize it properly.
      Well you would say that wouldn't you
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  • Profile picture of the author Adaptive
    I'll need to have my people come up with a witty reply they can post here about that sad fiasco.

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  • Profile picture of the author Art Turner
    Yeah, I also hear people are using ghostwriters for their articles and ebooks. What's up with that? Are they too stupid to write their own?
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    • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
      Originally Posted by Art Turner View Post

      Yeah, I also hear people are using ghostwriters for their articles and ebooks. What's up with that? Are they too stupid to write their own?
      Apples and Oranges...

      But either way, I don't think it's an issue of stupidity at all... not quite sure how that word ended up here.
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  • Profile picture of the author jayden.fellze
    I think they are not the real celebs.. they are those fans who playing like their idols.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    Who cares. I unfollowed a bunch of them because of the wretched stupidity. Ashton Kutcher & Demi being at the top of the list.
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    • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      Who cares. I unfollowed a bunch of them because of the wretched stupidity. Ashton Kutcher & Demi being at the top of the list.
      That's pretty funny!
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        A news anchor on one of the cable networks said last week that he was surprised to learn he had thousands of followers on Twitter.

        Interesting - he doesn't have a twitter account and never did.

        Twitter is not personal - just gives that impression. Truth is, on Twitter and other social sites you don't usually know who you are talking to....only who they say they are.

        kay
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        • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
          Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

          Twitter is not personal - just gives that impression. Truth is, on Twitter and other social sites you don't usually know who you are talking to....only who they say they are.

          kay
          This is a good point. Realistically, it's not that personal--but I don't think that is the general perception.

          But then again, I only follow people that I know personally.

          Until I read the article--I hadn't even considered that anyone would even think to outsource Tweets... It seems so easy to me.

          I mean... there isn't much thought that needs to go into a Tweet
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          • Profile picture of the author jmidas
            Is this lame? Not at all. Let's see: most of us agree that twitter is worth the effort to assist in our marketing/branding. Right? I think we can all agree that it is not the be all and end all, but it helps.

            Also, let's see: the physical act of posting a tweet is about a $5 per hour job, right?

            Now, making a movie, TV show or recording is probably worth a little more than 5 bucks an hour to these people, right?

            SO, why wouldn't someone worth millions pay someone the 5 bucks an hour to outsource the task? Forget for a minute that is twitter posts being outsourced. It is simply a task being outsourced that further promotes the celebrity brand.

            I outsource writing, programming, etc., as do many successful people on this forum. So, why is this any different? Are you holding a celebrity to a different standard than a marketer when all they really are is marketers? All they are doing is marketing themselves. In fact, I find it more "lame" that there are celebs not doing this.

            Now, all this said, this does not suggest that some of these celebs actually have a brain or even could find "twitter" if you spotted them "twitt". But, at least they have a smart advisor somewhere.
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            • Profile picture of the author ExRat
              Hi,

              I think it's great. As 'ordinary' people become aware of this, it might just jolt them out of their brainwashed state and they may start believing in themselves rather than fawning over every word of the outsourced BS spewed out by their idols' marketing & PR department.

              But then again, that would require them to actually switch their brain on, so there's not much chance of that...for a brief moment, I experienced a vague sensation of hope...
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              • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
                Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

                Hi,

                I think it's great. As 'ordinary' people become aware of this, it might just jolt them out of their brainwashed state and they may start believing in themselves rather than fawning over every word of the outsourced BS spewed out by their idols' marketing & PR department.
                I think it's great in a, "tough love" kind of way as well. Unfortunately, I don't think that the lesson is well received.

                On another note:

                What I'm realizing is that everyone has a different interpretation of how Twitter is 'supposed' to be used--obviously, Twitter can be used however it's users wants to use it.

                However, I can't let go of the fact that it's so easy to do--that it's unnecessary to outsource it--whether one uses it for business, pleasure or both.

                I can't imagine how anyone could be that busy, considering that I have extremely busy friends that find the time to Tweet. But then again, everyone prioritizes according to their way.
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          • Profile picture of the author richdirtygirl
            Originally Posted by marcanthony View Post

            I mean... there isn't much thought that needs to go into a Tweet
            Mmmmmmmmm cute thing... are you sure??

            It is not only the tweet you send... you can even use some third parties and broadcast throughout the day...

            The power of twitter is in the conversations.

            Ask Queen Dana if you don't believe me... she is an expert.

            When you send a tweet, the dance starts... someone will answer and you will have to squeeze thoughts, feelings, images and spice in 140 chars...

            And as the friends' pool grows, you will have people talking to you about the most diversified and wildest subjects (oh well... that happens to me at least LOL ), 24 hs a day...

            What do you think that will happen to a celebrity that only broadcasts and doesn't answer to any conversation over time?

            Yep! the ticket to ByeBye Land... Not answering means direct rejection... that is a powerful deal breaker.

            RDG :p
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  • Profile picture of the author paulwaltz
    I don't read celeb Twitters, but it's not a hard thing to do, and it only takes at most 5 minutes to put something up. You'd think it would be something that they WANT to do. :|
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  • Profile picture of the author Jackie Tulos
    It is all about marketing today. There are some celebrities writing on twitter for real. One that I follow is Wil Wheaton, twitter.com/wilw. He has made 1000's of post and is very funny.
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  • Profile picture of the author jmandile
    i can see why they would want to outsource it (i mean if you are a busy celeb you dont want to be bothered with twitter) but you still want the benefit of building a stronger bond with your fans.

    --jermy
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      I wonder how many of the celebrities (and others) outsourcing Twitter even realize they have accounts...

      I just read a great article in Sports Illustrated about how many famous athletes go broke because they turn everything over to a financial adviser.

      I would imagine a lot of celebrities are the same way, turning their careers over to a manager that may or may not know what they are doing.

      I don't understand the need to know all the details of these stars' lives. When I see them on TV playing themselves, most of them are pretty boring.

      As far as imposters go, there was a semi-famous cartoon back when public access to the real Internet was cranking up. It showed two canines looking at a web page. The caption read, "On the Internet, no one knows you're a dog."
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  • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
    Dana and Aritra,

    My hat goes off to each of you.

    While I understand the importance of Twitter-- on one hand -- in terms of branding/marketing. Another part of me wonders why something so simple needs to be outsourced.

    Honestly, I do think it's ridiculous, but that's just the way I see it. But, if people really need someone else to Tweet for them--whatever the reason may be--then that's what they should do.
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    • Profile picture of the author eholmlund
      Originally Posted by marcanthony View Post

      While I understand the importance of Twitter-- on one hand -- in terms of branding/marketing. Another part of me wonders why something so simple needs to be outsourced.

      Honestly, I do think it's ridiculous, but that's just the way I see it. But, if people really need someone else to Tweet for them--whatever the reason may be--then that's what they should do.
      While it may be "simple" and quick, it still takes time.

      What if your time was worth $10k/hour? If you spent 5 minutes a day tweeting, that's 35 minutes a week... $5800 of your time; a job that could be outsourced for probably $100/wk.

      I don't tweet because even though it would only take me 5 mins a day, I'd be thinking about it in the back of my mind for the rest of the day. So I'd be interested in a ghost tweeter...

      My only question is where do these celebrities find ghostwriters that they trust to represent themselves in an entertaining way?
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  • Profile picture of the author Aritra Basu
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    • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
      Originally Posted by Aritra Basu View Post

      See the point there?

      Well... here's the thing--If a brand is what's being represented--I kind of understand why a company would outsource Twitter updates. However, If I'm under the impression that I'm following and individual, I'd like to think that their Tweets were actually coming from them--even if they represent their own brand(which they do)

      But that's just me...

      In my case, I don't follow random people... just people that I've known or have met.
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  • Profile picture of the author esr
    They gotta keep their names out there, I guess. It's all about PR.
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  • Profile picture of the author madison_avenue
    Most celebrities are really "brands", some with dozens of flunkies working for them. The bigger the name the bigger the "brand" and the more distant they get from "ordinary people". They may do a spot of charity work but they get treated with due deference while doing this which allows them to maintain their distance. Most don't have the time or the inclination to interface about trivia with their often clingy "fans" and why should they?

    If you are an actor, you want to act. Why would you want to waste time chatting about trivia with your "fans"? Just because you have seen someone on the telly does not mean you know them that's just an image they're projecting.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Guerrero
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    Well sometimes they (the celebs) don't know every detail of the PR campaigns.

    I have two friends who are very well known. One a writer and the other an athlete and you would not believe the amount of stuff they have to agree to just to get a book published.

    My writer friend told me that he was at a book signing and a fan and Myspace Friend talked to him like they knew each other. My friend said that he has never been on Myspace and was pissed when he found out that the PR company through the publisher had this set up for him.

    Yes I think he can handle 140 characters.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dana_W
    I used to ghostwrite ebooks for internet marketing gurus who put their name on the ebooks I wrote. (No, I can't say who!) Is ghostwriting on Twitter any worse?
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    • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
      Originally Posted by Dana_W View Post

      I used to ghostwrite ebooks for internet marketing gurus who put their name on the ebooks I wrote. (No, I can't say who!) Is ghostwriting on Twitter any worse?
      It's not a matter of whether it's worse or not. If there are people that need someone else to socialize for them--that's there prerogative--regardless of my personal opinion of it.

      Frankly, I don't think that it's a fair comparison. A ghostwritten ebook vs. a ghostwritten 'Tweet'--just isn't comparable. But, there are a lot of intelligent people on this forum that--I'm pretty sure--could come up with a descent argument against me on that.

      Overall, I think that it's a bit ridiculous that anyone would need another person to type a few short sentences for them. But, I understand why someone would do it.

      I've never worked for anyone else in my entire adult life. I've had a few different business--some worked... some didn't work. Regardless of whether or not any business of mine was a success--I've always used a business model that included outsourcing--and it's many forms.

      When I first got started on the Internet--outsourcing consisted of having other people write articles, press releases, etc...

      One thing that I never consider outsourcing was Social Networking. I mean... it's actually fun to me. I like Twitter and Facebook. Neither site distracts me to the point that it becomes detrimental to my productivity.

      Of course, when money enters the picture--many things change. That's when sites like Twitter and Facebook really take the form of a viable marketing tool. And people use it accordingly...

      But there are plenty of people out there that use Twitter casually--and make tons of money--without having someone else manage their account for them. And, regardless of what anyone says--we all should be able to admit that typing 140 character micro-blogs 4 or 5 times a day--is not a hard thing to do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nathan Hangen
    Lance Armstrong is the perfect example of authenticity on Twitter.

    Kawasaki is a perfect example of a Fraud.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    How about the Milwaukee Buck's basketball player getting busted for sending tweets at halftime in the locker room.

    He was sending out live tweets while the coach was talking.
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    • Profile picture of the author pavondunbar
      Marcanthony:

      Celebs using ghostwriters on Twitter doesn't really bother me...

      I agree with you, sir...

      Twitter is a personal platform and celebs hiring ghostwriters to "tweet" for them does make it impersonal...

      But they do have busy lives...

      Take Barack Obama, for example...

      Barack Obama has a Twitter profile with over 200,000 followers...

      How could he solve national and global problems if he's "tweeting" on Twitter....

      I can see it now...

      CONGRESSMAN: Mr. President, we need you to look over this bill about the stimulus package you proposed to Congress.

      OBAMA: Just throw it on my desk. I'm on Twitter right now. I'll look at it later...

      (on Twitter)

      BarackObama just rec'd stimulus pkg on my desk. Will look at it later since I'm addicted to this Twitter thing.

      (Hits Update button)

      BarackObama is angry because it's raining in DC and I had plans to take my daughters out to the zoo.

      (Hits Update button)

      3 hours later...

      CONGRESSMAN: Mr. President, the Senate wants to know what you think about the stimulus package revisions we proposed?

      OBAMA: Dammit! Didn't I tell your ass I'll look at it later! I'm busy! Get out of here!

      BarackObama dam this congressman is bothering me about this stimulus pkg. Should I look at it now or later?

      (Hits Update button)

      BarackObama it seems like the rain is going away. Maybe I should take my kids to the zoo...

      (Hits Update button)

      LOL...

      See my point?

      Twitter is kinda, well...

      Addicting...

      Have a good weekend, Mr. Anthony.

      Pavon
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      • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
        Originally Posted by pavondunbar View Post

        See my point?
        Pavon
        I kind of see your point. I would say that the President of the U.S. is a bit exceptional though.

        But let's use that example...

        Barack Obama has been seen on TV attending--post presidency--ball room dances, he's appeared on late night television shows... hell, he even has time to make predictions on who he thinks will win the NCAA tournament.

        And, if I see him on the basketball court, shooting jumpers, one more time--I'm almost certain his next move will be to enter the NBA draft.

        These are all things that I would consider to be distractions, that certainly redirect his focus from 'global problems'

        If he eliminated--just one--of his many frivolous actions--I'm pretty sure that even he would have the time to send a Tweet.

        I guess that, part of me feels that no one is that busy. But, like I said before--everyone has the right to use Twitter however they want.

        Me--using words like lame and ridiculous to illustrate my opinions towards Twitter ghostwriting--is nothing more than my language of choice.

        I don't really think that there is anything wrong with anyone that wants to use Twitter 'their way.'

        I just sometimes wish--for the sake of humanity--that everything didn't always have to be transformed in to 'something else'
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    • Profile picture of the author Cat0889
      what is a ghostwriter?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      I don't worry about the celebs. I could care less about Spears or whomever. This just shows what a great tool twitter is for branding and publicity that their PR folks want them on Twitter. Most celebs don't answer their own fan letters so I don't see why it's so shocking that they would have a PR agency handle their twitter account. But the fact they're on Twitter demonstrates the power of twitter for our own businesses.

      I don't see a difference between celebs using a PR firm to tweet or sign their "autograph" on a picture. Or in the old days "answering" fan letters. They're using Twitter to brand themselves and be relevant with the new technology that their fans are using not to tweet their lives. That's why I don't follow celebs since in reality you're probably just following a PR intern.
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Marc,

      I was about to write what hesaidblissfully said -

      At least in some cases, it may be that someone deemed it smarter to have a ghostwriter tweet than risk the celeb saying something embarrassing/offensive/stupid, etc. Especially online where every comment is recorded for posterity.
      If a celeb puts a foot wrong, it will be spread across the world within minutes. Do you think David Beckham's PR department are going to allow him to be in control of his PR for anything but the absolute essentials (EG live television interview - although he will have important answers written on the back of his hand anyway, by someone who can write ). One slip up could cost billions over time in lost contracts etc.

      Plus they trade on the fact that most of the fans will believe that it really IS him who is communicating with them - which is the main reason why they use twitter and similar - it's faceless, not live and therefore can be carefully scripted. Plus, once they appear, their presence spreads virally.

      Barack Obama has been seen on TV attending--post presidency--ball room dances, he's appeared on late night television shows... hell, he even has time to make predictions on who he thinks will win the NCAA tournament.
      ...and his every move and word will be carefully scripted by the PR people who work for the people who invested those billions to get him there in the first place.

      They wouldn't want him pulling his own strings and making gaffs about the olympics would they?

      I just sometimes wish--for the sake of humanity--that everything didn't always have to be transformed in to 'something else'
      I have no doubt that the ventriloquists who are pulling his strings feel that their policies ARE in the best interests of humanity, although that would relate to the whole, or the 'chosen', as opposed to each expendable individual.
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      • Profile picture of the author Nathan Hangen
        Well the great thing about Twitter is that you don't have to follow them. I think its funny that these people don't get it. People on Twitter (most of them) aren't stupid and aren't there to hear the step by step diaries of celebrities. I can hardly think of any celebrities I would follow. I'm not there for that kind of information. That being said, I think they are giving up their chance to be unique.

        Hiring people to ghost twitter for you is a joke. If you can't figure it out or don't want to do it, then don't. Anything less than authenticity get a giant #FAIL in my book.
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        • Profile picture of the author ExRat
          Hi Nathan,

          Anything less than authenticity get a giant #FAIL in my book.
          But that's the point - to fail in your book, you first have to recognise their lack of authenticity.

          I think its funny that these people don't get it
          They would probably answer that by asking you to compare bottom line

          People on Twitter (most of them) aren't stupid and aren't there to hear the step by step diaries of celebrities
          ...and I think the bottom line comparison would probably answer that one too...

          Just saying.
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        • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
          Originally Posted by Nathan Hangen View Post

          Well the great thing about Twitter is that you don't have to follow them. I think its funny that these people don't get it. People on Twitter (most of them) aren't stupid and aren't there to hear the step by step diaries of celebrities. I can hardly think of any celebrities I would follow. I'm not there for that kind of information. That being said, I think they are giving up their chance to be unique.
          I agree...

          Hiring people to ghost twitter for you is a joke. If you can't figure it out or don't want to do it, then don't. Anything less than authenticity get a giant #FAIL in my book.
          I agree more...
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          • Profile picture of the author ExRat
            Hi Marc,

            No one can be me--better than me
            That's my point - with respect, you're not a celebrity.

            If you were, you'd know that 'me' is not required - no matter how good you are at it. All that is required is for you to play the part of 'me' that has been designed for you.

            The promoters don't want the real 'me' because the buying public don't either. They want unbelievable perfection to fawn over in order to justify their own feelings of inadequacy.

            And this is why most celebrities also have the same feelings of inadequacy, because they cannot match up to the role models that they play. Hence, multiple and continual personal crisis, breakdowns and hissy fits.
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    • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
      Doesn't surprise me in the least. Most of those types wouldn't know how to wipe their ass if it wasn't for the personal assistants.

      Case in point: What bubblehead would call personal security if a maid found their boyfriend face down on the bed in the middle of the day? Mary-Kate Olsen did exactly that when a maid found Heath Ledger's body the day he died.

      With that kind of dazzling display of personal judgment, no wonder they have assistants for almost everything.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy LaPointe
    Most people will never know, it's all about image, branding and building a following. Nothing wrong with it. It's part of being in Hollywood.
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  • Profile picture of the author Trader54
    And the biggest twit of them all ....

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    • Profile picture of the author Hesaidblissfully
      Celebrities often have their public persona managed by other people. What parties to attend, who to be seen with, what to say in interviews. Is having a ghostwriter tweet for you any more fake than having your PR people tell you what to tweet about?

      At least in some cases, it may be that someone deemed it smarter to have a ghostwriter tweet than risk the celeb saying something embarrassing/offensive/stupid, etc. Especially online where every comment is recorded for posterity. Or maybe they just had better things to do with their time. I'm sure if they could outsource public appearances, they'd do that to.

      Having said all that, I do still think it's lame.
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    • Profile picture of the author MeTellYou
      Originally Posted by Trader54 View Post

      And the biggest twit of them all ....

      YouTube - Rick Sanchez Pretending To Twitter

      Goodness... tha's so fake! I hate it when people do that (I don't want to be negative thoug

      Sebastian
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  • Profile picture of the author Bev Clement
    And it isn't only celebrities who outsource, even some members here do the same thing.

    I know there are a number of packages around which offer to manage your twitter campaign, get you more followers and then tweet for you so that you can earn the highest possible income from twitter.
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Bev,

      And it isn't only celebrities who outsource, even some members here do the same thing.
      Yeh, but they're 'celebrity' IMers - in the 'small pond' sense...

      PS Could you sign this ebook for my kids please?
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  • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
    I haven't been on Twitter for weeks... I have 3 people doin' my tweets


    lolol... if Guy Kawasaki wants to have someone tweetin' for him... w00t for him.. who really cares?
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  • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
    Roger,

    All of your points are crystal clear--as usual. My problem is being too much of a wishful thinker. My fingers are always crossed in hopes that the Pinocchio's of the world will realize that being made of wood is not their destiny. But maybe it really is...

    Anyhow, I'm all for outsourcing--but, I'm also in favor of using some of my own talent as well. No one can be me--better than me. But, maybe I'm being over-dramatic... maybe the people that are willing to outsource "Tweet's"--this isn't that much of an issue.

    I just can't get over the fact that typing 140 characters, or less, has become so time consuming that an individual would need someone else to do it for them.

    And, the stubborn, more controversial side of me rejects the inkling that outsourcing Tweet's--is a smart business decision.

    Soon... people will hire other people to have fun for them.
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  • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
    Roger,

    Points well taken...
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  • When I was a boy, I sent a Valentine to a young, female TV star. I got an 8 X 10 glossy B&W of her (okay, it was a daguerreotype). Guess what? She probably didn't sign it herself.

    Should I have asked for my Valentine back?

    "Do what you do best, outsource the rest."

    The real problem with Twitter is the demands that OTHERS make about how and when you Twit. Double entendre intended.
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  • Profile picture of the author Simon74
    I am not surprised, with celebrity everything it's possible!
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    Not all celebrities are so by choice.

    Plenty of athletes, writers, artists of all types that are in it for their craft but it's the public that puts that status on them.

    They didn't choose to have a bunch of crazy knucklheads stalking them day and night.

    So I remember a thread here about using your own identity and people here thought it would be wise for Internet marketers who are only known here on a forum to conceal their identity from loonies so how much more so if you are stalked by idiots with cameras all damn day.

    I would want someone writing my fans too just in case I slipped up and said something real that they could use to track me down.

    If fans and admirers don't want to follow around "real" people but would rather follow people they see on t.v. then why would you want to give them anything real?

    Give them what they want.

    Gee, don't we chant that crap all night here. Give them what they want. They the fans, obviously don't want it real.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nathan Hangen
      Originally Posted by Matthew Maiden View Post


      Give them what they want.

      Gee, don't we chant that crap all night here. Give them what they want. They the fans, obviously don't want it real.

      And that, in my opinion, is entirely the problem. Why are we obsessed with celebrities in the first place?

      I just don't get it I suppose. I'm not into following celebs, but I appreciate the ones that are real about it. Shaq, Lance, etc. I'm guessing people follow celebs because it makes them feel closer...finding out that they aren't really there in the first place screams "giant lie" to me. Maybe the fans don't care...I don't know.

      I do know that alltop.com isn't that great anyway

      @ExRat...I'd like to see these bottom lines show monetization by Twitter. The truth is that celebs aren't using it to monetize. Build hype...maybe, but I don't think comparing bottom lines makes any difference. So what, they've got 40k followers...do they reply to their audience? I doubt it. That's what makes the rest of the people on Twitter more important...at least in my book. It is all about people connecting with people.

      Sure, you can make money and build businesses and brands, but that is secondary in my opinion.

      I just read a study that most Twitterers are something like 30+ years old. How many of you fine adults follow celebs and hang on their every word?
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  • Profile picture of the author madison_avenue
    Does Michael Jackson Tweet?
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Hesaidblissfully View Post

      At least in some cases, it may be that someone deemed it smarter to have a ghostwriter tweet than risk the celeb saying something embarrassing/offensive/stupid, etc. Especially online where every comment is recorded for posterity.
      If you listen to many celebrities when they do slip the leash, you realize that these people are not the sharpest knives in the drawer. Take someone with the right look and an intense desire for adoration, pile money on that person, and surround them with people whose job it is to wipe the ass and then kiss it, and you get something dumber than a deaf-mute at a ventriloquist convention.

      If this is your meal ticket, do you really want them exposed to the paying public?

      Originally Posted by Vince Runza Online View Post

      The real problem with Twitter is the demands that OTHERS make about how and when you Twit. Double entendre intended.
      Hey, Vince, you reminded me of the time our state fair had a booth with a former Playmate signing 8x10s. Mine said "Love and kisses, you sexy thing". You mean that twenty-something bombshell really didn't have the hots for a nerdy 13-year old? Damn... :confused:

      As for the demands of others, I found this...

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  • Profile picture of the author MeTellYou
    the reason why they are actually doing This is because if they do not want to to worry about it. it is much easier for them to outsource it, and not have to think about it ever again. Not lame if you ask me!
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    • Profile picture of the author Nathan Hangen
      Haha, that Twitter Whore video was great...I'm sure there are people that use Twitter like that too.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kay King
        People on Twitter (most of them) aren't stupid and aren't there to hear the step by step diaries of celebrities.
        We tend to look at Twitter as a marketing tool - a traffic tool - a business tool.

        In reality, I expect many who participate on Twitter are those who want to feel a "connection" to an authority or a celebrity. A while back I was surprised when I heard some friends (who are not in any way connected with working online) discussing the celebs they "follow" as if they have a personal relationship because they are allowed to be followers.

        They totally believe their tweets are being answered by that famous person - and they are happy thinking that. I'm not going to burst their bubble. There will always be more followers than leaders.

        kay
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        I'm going to work on being less condescending
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  • Profile picture of the author cclou
    Not lame to me. If I'm following a celeb, it's because I'm interested in their work. If they use Twitter solely as a promotional tool, that's fine. I follow 74 people, and a lot of them are "celebs". I like it because I stay updated on people I like, and they control what info to share. It does make me feel "closer" to these people, but I don't harbor any delusions that I'm their friend.

    Truthfully I joined Twitter to follow one of my favorite celebrities.@feliciaday. I then added @wilw (Wil Wheaton), @stephenfry (is anyone not following Stephen Fry?), @davekellett (I read his comic, Sheldon, daily), and more. I doubt any of them are ghosts.

    I wouldn't say I'm obsessed with celebs. I don't read gossip magazines. My stars aren't all that famous. But in general their tweets are more interesting than the internet marketers I follow. I mean, I would never have seen the Youtube video "Kittens! Inspired by Kittens!" if @feliciaday hadn't posted a link to it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dana_W
    For me - I love networking and socializing so going on Twitter and Linkedin and Facebook and interacting, is one of the fun parts of my day.

    But people outsource the stuff that they need done, that they are not good at or that they don't enjoy - I outsource web design and wordpress coding.

    As for celebrities hiring Twitter ghostwriters - call me a cynic but I don't really believe that ANY part of most celebrity's personas are real. They are a Hollywood creation, an idealized version of the celebrity. The interviews they give, the clothes they wear, the airbrushed pictures that are taken of them, their "autobiographies" - they are ALL stage managed behind the scenes. I don't see Twitter ghostwriting as any different.
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  • Profile picture of the author TommySC
    Of course its lame... but these folks don't have time to do it all themselves.
    Tons of magazine article are ghost written for celebs all the time. This is really no different.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nathan Hangen
      Originally Posted by TommySC View Post

      Of course its lame... but these folks don't have time to do it all themselves.
      Tons of magazine article are ghost written for celebs all the time. This is really no different.
      How does a celebrity have any less time than you or I, who actually have to work for a living?
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      • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
        Originally Posted by Nathan Hangen View Post

        How does a celebrity have any less time than you or I
        I was thinking the same thing. Like mentioned above, Shaq and Lance Armstrong Twitter for themselves--are they not busy celebrities?
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        • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
          I had to stop paying the ghostwriter who handles my Warrior Forum posts because she raised her price to $40 a post.

          I was going to sack her anyway before she raised her price because she got me involved in lots of arguments and even flamed people.

          Martin
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          • Profile picture of the author ExRat
            Hi Nathan,

            How does a celebrity have any less time than you or I, who actually have to work for a living?
            I don't get the confusion here about celebrities and how the system works. Most people in the public eye (celebrities) are -

            a) employees (or self employed but with contracts that exercise a huge amount of control over everything they say, do, eat etc)

            b) second in income to a whole group of people above them, who will always be wealthier and more profitable than them. EG - the celebrity only has one main product - themselves - their employers may have a portfolio of clients and will earn more than any of them because they are on a higher percentage, and often pay them up front fees in order to own the residuals.

            Another example - nowadays many of the most popular celebrities are arriving from obscurity through reality TV. As time goes by, the employers of these celebrities are continually refining the contracts they offer the new recruits to give more up front cash, in order to dazzle them with the carrot and blind them to the long term potential that they will get them to sign away from the start.

            You don't have to see it to believe it - it makes perfect business sense. The celebrities are not business people and the business people who sign them up know this. They get it all signed up and sealed while they are at the point where the employer can still make, or more importantly break them - when they are still desperate for fame.

            This process goes so deep that football clubs are scouting for young kids - under the guise of talent-scouting, when in fact their main interest is giving the parents a small but appealing carrot to get these kids signed up to a pre-contract that says that if they become good, they will be grandfathered into a certain club.

            The competition is fierce enough that legal battles are fought out in court by the different clubs over the methods they have used to gazzump each other for the rights to some unknown 6 year old.

            My point - it is in the interest of the employers through the life of the celebrity to portray an image that the celebrity is the one calling the shots - not only does this enhance their image, it also encourages others to seek fame.

            But as business people and marketers we should know that it is the person in the position of real power, the one who already has the wealth and power, and creates the contracts - who really has the power, who isn't having their strings pulled, who isn't a slave to someone elses rules and timetable, who will always be more wealthier and powerful than the celebs that they employ.

            Celebrities probably work harder and have less time than anyone and if you believe different then you are missing the big picture and seeing things through the eyes of the consumer.

            Of course there comes a time when they have finished their early contracts, have amassed their own wealth and can renegotiate using business people they employ so that things work on their terms. But quite often, their short-term fame has expired by this time and they end up doing TV adverts for budget supermarkets, or embarrassing themselves in some other way in housewifey 'hello' type magazines etc while desperately trying to create some buzz to gain the fame they have lost.

            In my opinion celebrities are some of the unluckiest people in the world. The world is full of unknown people going about their day-to-day business living in terraced houses in suburbia, who, in comparison, are living like kings - and I am forever grateful, and proud, to be one of them.

            For example - I am allowed to post whatever I want, whenever I want, without having it looked over or ghostwritten by PR people - on twitter, here, or anywhere else. And I can make as much money as I like without having to give a larger cut than my own share to anyone else.

            What price freedom? Celebrities (in general) have signed away anything and everything - their time, their name, their privacy, their lives - everything. I pity them.
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            • Profile picture of the author Jason Moffatt
              I have a couple friends that tweet for celebrities, and really not sure how I feel about it. Don't really care to be brutally honest. It is as it is.

              I won't reveal names of said celebs as I don't wanna "blow their cover".

              In the end, these celebs just view Twitter as another avenue to spread their fame and messages. And Twitter is really "hip" right now so of course many of these folks want to be on there, even if they don't fully understand how to use it.

              Quite a few marketers I know are using outsourcers to Tweet as well. Others just set up some type of RSS feed that dish out content.

              I think the worst part of the whole argument is telling other people how they should be using the tool. To each his own. We all can unfollow with a click of a button.
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          • Profile picture of the author Dana_W
            Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

            I had to stop paying the ghostwriter who handles my Warrior Forum posts because she raised her price to $40 a post.

            I was going to sack her anyway before she raised her price because she got me involved in lots of arguments and even flamed people.

            Martin
            Hey! $40 per Warrior Forum post was a BARGAIN! I should have tripled my prices! Ooops...er....I mean....

            The preceding post was ghostwritten. No hamsters were harmed in the making of this post. Results not typical. Reading this may affect your ability to operate heavy machinery.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tom E
    That's very lame indeed. It takes seconds to text a message a day to your followers. When you hire people to do it, eventually your followers will catch on, and ultimately, you end up losing valuable promotion.
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  • Profile picture of the author morwanneg
    Ridiculous but thanks to these celebrities ghostwriters have jobs. So hard to find a job nowadays.
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  • Profile picture of the author marcanthony
    Originally Posted by Jason Moffatt View Post

    I think the worst part of the whole argument is telling other people how they should be using the tool.
    Who told anyone how they should be using it? I didn't see that anywhere.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lambert Klein
    Why do they use them to write books? I guess if they have trouble putting thoughts into words and if the Ghostwriter is relaying their thoughts and feelings accuratly, then maybe that's ok.

    I know I was shocked when I first discovered this. Hey I was shocked about many things though throughout my life. Some you could used to, some not.
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  • Profile picture of the author James Schramko
    Many IM'ers already do it. I know several who have ghost written titter accounts.

    There is also a lot of automation happening. I know this for fact because their twitter accounts post new tweets every few minutes when they are up on stage talking to me live.......about how to keep it 'real'

    Of course celebs get it ghost written.
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