22 replies
There's an artist on Fiverr offering to draw graphics. I asked if I bought a picture from them if I would be allowed to use it on my Kindle book. They said that was fine as long as I give them credit. I haven't actually released any Kindle books yet, but I'm working on my first fiction book. First off, is there a place in the Kindle format to give an image credit? Secondly, do most people on Fiverr make requests like this one?
#fiverr #question
  • Profile picture of the author blillard
    I wouldn't too much work with anyone who does not offer FULL rights to any design that I pay for. Typically you are supposed to be the full owner of the design once paid for and sent to you. My suggestions would be to keep looking for a designer who gives those rights.

    It seems this seller is looking for more sale but you're not obligated to do such thing being your paying for a service rendered.
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  • Profile picture of the author betterwtveter
    I used to promote services quite a bit on fiverr and about 25% of my customers wanted to customize their order, which is cool with me. I don't know how to solve the kindle issue anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author icoachu
    Actually, if you read Fiverr's terms, the moment they sell you work, all rights go to you. It is a work for hire website. Unless your provider got a special deal with Fiverr, all work he produces is work for hire. You can resell it, lease it, license it out, whatever -- you own it.
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  • Profile picture of the author arrrrgon
    Thanks for the replies guys. Her work looks really good, but I don't want to deal with any hassles, so I'll probably go with someone else.
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  • Profile picture of the author caseter
    Sounds like the seller is trying to get a bit more out of the deal than is reasonable. Another example of people taking advantage of honest people.


    Casey
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  • Profile picture of the author SamuelCarter
    Hey,

    I know it can be quite lengthy but always read the small print. You would assume you pay for a service and the end product is solely yours. However when it comes to receiving royalty etc who wouldn't want more $. So when entering into a contract etc, make sure the terms are clear and you retain a copy.

    However in future, if a designer is being somewhat difficult, find another, not worth the hassle.
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  • Profile picture of the author Naim717
    I agree with icoachu and if anything an extra $5 would probably give you the rights if they didn't ask or credit.
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  • Profile picture of the author EasyMoneyDre
    You can just disregard that - fiverr's tos gives you all the rights, and it's not like he's actually going to check something for just a $5 order.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tony Martinez
    To those saying that all rights to delivered work automatically go to the buyer, you need to read Fiverr's TOS a little more closely:

    "Ownership and limitations: unless clearly stated otherwise in the Gig description text, when the work is delivered, the buyer is granted all intellectual property rights, including but not limited to, copyrights for the work delivered from the seller and the seller waives any and all moral rights therein."

    Sellers are free to retain some rights...and come on, at $5 per work, is it really unreasonable for them to do so? On the flip side, though, to enforce such rights would likely be a hassle.
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    • Profile picture of the author arrrrgon
      Originally Posted by Tony Martinez View Post


      Sellers are free to retain some rights...and come on, at $5 per work, is it really unreasonable for them to do so? On the flip side, though, to enforce such rights would likely be a hassle.
      If their products are that good they should sell them somewhere else for more money shouldn't they?
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      • Profile picture of the author Tony Martinez
        Originally Posted by arrrrgon View Post

        If their products are that good they should sell them somewhere else for more money shouldn't they?
        A desire to retain some rights isn't necessarily a quality concern...I mean, if the seller just wants a simple credit line, then that's for s/he to get his/her name out there, I suppose. I'm not sure. I'm not much into design work, and so I can't comment too well on rights. My point with my prior post is, make sure to read the TOS completely, because assuming stuff, or just applying bits and pieces, can create hassles or other trouble.

        Now, to answer your question: Definitely, sellers should sell somewhere else besides Fiverr. However, Fiverr can be a decent source of traffic (and building some recognition), and so, I can understand why people bother selling gigs on there... Heck, I run a few of my own gigs on there. However, I would never get into any creative work on there, such as logos, graphics, web design, etc...unless someone can churn out stellar work in minutes, there's little to no way it could be a profitable use of time, at least in my opinion. That's why I stick with gigs I can either automate or complete within minutes.
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    • Profile picture of the author icoachu
      Originally Posted by Tony Martinez View Post

      To those saying that all rights to delivered work automatically go to the buyer, you need to read Fiverr's TOS a little more closely:

      "Ownership and limitations: unless clearly stated otherwise in the Gig description text, when the work is delivered, the buyer is granted all intellectual property rights, including but not limited to, copyrights for the work delivered from the seller and the seller waives any and all moral rights therein."

      Sellers are free to retain some rights...and come on, at $5 per work, is it really unreasonable for them to do so? On the flip side, though, to enforce such rights would likely be a hassle.
      Exactly. Just getting a lawyer to fill out a template C & D will run the service provider a couple of C notes.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Birch
      Originally Posted by Tony Martinez View Post

      To those saying that all rights to delivered work automatically go to the buyer, you need to read Fiverr's TOS a little more closely:

      "Ownership and limitations: unless clearly stated otherwise in the Gig description text, when the work is delivered, the buyer is granted all intellectual property rights, including but not limited to, copyrights for the work delivered from the seller and the seller waives any and all moral rights therein."

      Sellers are free to retain some rights...and come on, at $5 per work, is it really unreasonable for them to do so? On the flip side, though, to enforce such rights would likely be a hassle.
      Yup - where would you start explaining this to some Fiverrs where English is at least their 4th or higher language?
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  • Profile picture of the author Faisal66
    people make a way lot of funny requests than yours...lol
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  • Profile picture of the author Sean Mckee
    Seems a little strange..I'd find someone else.
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  • Profile picture of the author figgity
    Originally Posted by arrrrgon View Post

    There's an artist on Fiverr offering to draw graphics. I asked if I bought a picture from them if I would be allowed to use it on my Kindle book. They said that was fine as long as I give them credit. I haven't actually released any Kindle books yet, but I'm working on my first fiction book. First off, is there a place in the Kindle format to give an image credit? Secondly, do most people on Fiverr make requests like this one?
    I'm sorta SMDH at this thread. People get credit for commissioned artwork all the time. A designed book cover fall into that category. It's not an unreasonable request, especially since you are only payng $5 and the guy is prob. geting $3.80 after fees.
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  • Profile picture of the author BrianDouglas
    Originally Posted by arrrrgon View Post

    There's an artist on Fiverr offering to draw graphics. I asked if I bought a picture from them if I would be allowed to use it on my Kindle book. They said that was fine as long as I give them credit. I haven't actually released any Kindle books yet, but I'm working on my first fiction book. First off, is there a place in the Kindle format to give an image credit? Secondly, do most people on Fiverr make requests like this one?
    When you commission a work, it belongs to you. When you pay someone to do something for you, especially on fiverr, credit is NOT necessary because the work was commissioned.

    If you want to credit them for the graphics and thank them in that way, that's great. But he can't tell you "no, not unless you credit me". It is best to credit a person, but if they were paid one-off, it is not necessary.
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